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Colonial Pipeline

Crockett

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Enbridge has denied that the pipeline, known as Line 5, is at any risk of spilling, saying that while the line does go underwater through the Straights of Mackinac, the line runs through a tunnel beneath the lakebed, reports The Guardian.
Witchmer has no clue on how to assess risk.

The risk of the existing pipeline having a “major spill” (need to close it)
The risk of building a new replacement pipeline. (need to stop it)
The risk of the beer virus.
The risk of losing a few freshwater clams, against the risk of dam system failure (Tittabawassee River)

There are other motives at work than simple common sense.
 

Crockett

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Bags, Buckets, Tubs? How stupid do you have to be?
I wonder how successful she was getting that heavy tub into the trunk of the car.

The stupidity of people just blows my mind.
 

hammerhead

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Bags, Buckets, Tubs? How stupid do you have to be?
I wonder how successful she was getting that heavy tub into the trunk of the car.

The stupidity of people just blows my mind.
Surely you had seen this, Crockett.

 

^updated^

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DarkSide, Blamed for Gas Pipeline Attack, Says It Is Shutting Down​

The hacking group, which the F.B.I. has said was responsible for the ransomware attack, said it had received “pressure” from the U.S.

By Michael Schwirtz and Nicole Perlroth
Published May 14, 2021Updated May 15, 2021, 11:29 a.m. ET
The criminal hacking group DarkSide, which the F.B.I. has blamed for carrying out a ransomware attack that crippled fuel delivery across the Southeastern United States this week, has announced that it is shutting down because of unspecified “pressure” from the United States.
In a statement written in Russian and provided to The New York Times on Friday by the cybersecurity firm Intel 471, DarkSide said it had lost access to the public-facing portion of its online system, including its blog and payment server, as well as funds that it said had been withdrawn to an unknown account. It said the group’s main web page and other public-facing resources would go offline within 48 hours.
“Due to the pressure from the U.S., the affiliate program is closed,” the statement said, referring to intermediary hackers, the so-called affiliates, it works with to break into corporate computer systems. “Stay safe and good luck.”
What that pressure may have been is unclear, but on Thursday, President Biden said the United States would not rule out a retaliatory strike against DarkSide that would “disrupt their ability to operate.” The White House spokeswoman, Jen Psaki, said the administration was waiting for recommendations from U.S. Cyber Command, but government officials on Friday declined to comment further about whether any action had been taken.
Cybersecurity analysts cautioned that the DarkSide statement could be a ruse, allowing its members to regroup and deflect the negative attention caused by the attack. The group’s announcement was reported earlier by The Wall Street Journal.
The crisis began when Colonial Pipeline, the operator of one of the nation’s largest fuel pipelines, announced on May 7 that it had been hit with a ransomware attack, in which criminal groups lock up computer systems and hold data hostage until the victim pays a ransom. In response, the company protectively shut down its pipeline, which delivers nearly half of the jet fuel and gasoline used on the Atlantic Coast, disrupting air travel and causing drivers to descend on gas stations in a surge of panic buying.

To free up its computer systems, Colonial Pipeline paid the extortionists about 75 Bitcoin, or nearly $5 million, according to people briefed on the transaction. The decision allowed the company to get gas flowing again, but may have complicated the Biden administration’s efforts to stave off new attacks.
In a statement on Friday, a Colonial spokeswoman said, “There is an ongoing investigation, and we’re not commenting on the ransom.”
Elliptic, a computer security company specializing in cryptocurrency, said on Friday that it had identified the Bitcoin wallet used by DarkSide to collect the Colonial Pipeline ransom payment. In a statement, Elliptic said Colonial Pipeline sent the ransom payment to DarkSide last Saturday.
Since the DarkSide account was opened in March, Elliptic said, it had received $17.5 million from 21 Bitcoin wallets, indicating the number of ransoms it had collected just this spring. Cybersecurity analysts assess that the group has been active since at least August, and has most likely used a number of different Bitcoin wallets to receive ransoms.
But on Thursday, someone withdrew roughly 113.5 Bitcoin, or $5.6 million, from DarkSide’s Bitcoin wallet and moved it into an unknown user’s account, according to TRM Labs, a San Francisco blockchain intelligence company. The sum amounted to Colonial’s 75 Bitcoin ransom plus that of a German company, Brenntag, which also opted to pay its digital extortionists, TRM Labs said.
To whom that other account belongs is yet another plot twist in the hacking episode.
“It’s hard to speculate,” Esteban Castaño, a co-founder of TRM Labs, said in an interview Friday. He noted that whoever moved DarkSide’s winnings would have had access to the group’s private key to its Bitcoin wallet.
“The question is where were those private keys stored?” Mr. Castaño said. “Were they on some server that someone else got ahold of? Or did DarkSide initiate the transfer themselves?”
The intense scrutiny that followed the Colonial Pipeline attack has clearly unsettled ransomware groups. This week, the operators behind two major Russian-language ransomware platforms, REvil and Avaddon, announced strict new rules governing the use of their products, including bans on targeting government-affiliated entities, hospitals or educational institutions.
The administrator of XSS, a popular Russian-language cybercrime forum, announced an immediate ban on all ransomware activity on the forum, citing, among other things, the bad press associated with the industry. In a statement posted in the forum, the administrator called the attention a “critical mass of harm, nonsense, hype and noise,” saying even the spokesman for President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia had weighed in on the Colonial Pipe attack. (The spokesman, Dmitri S. Peskov, denied that the Kremlin had been involved in the attack on the pipeline.)
“The word ransom has become associated with a whole series of unpleasant things — geopolitics, blackmail, government cyberattacks,” the XSS administrator wrote. “This word has become dangerous and toxic.”
Even if DarkSide has shut down, the threat from ransomware has not passed. Cybercriminal networks often disband, regroup and rebrand themselves in an effort to throw off law enforcement, cybersecurity experts say.
“It’s likely that these ransomware operators are trying to retreat from the spotlight more than suddenly discovering the error of their ways,” said Mark Arena, Intel 471’s chief executive. “A number of the operators will most likely continue to operate in their own close-knit groups, resurfacing under different aliases and ransomware names.”
Indeed, DarkSide gave no indication that its members were getting out of the ransomware business or even letting victims currently infected with the group’s malware off the hook. In its statement, DarkSide said it would hand over its decryption tools to affiliates, giving these intermediaries, who were responsible for infecting computer systems with the group’s malicious software, the ability to negotiate ransoms with victims directly.
“You will be given decryption tools for all the companies that haven’t paid yet,” the statement read. “After that, you will be free to communicate with them wherever you want in any way you want.”
Julian Barnes contributed reporting.

Michael Schwirtz is an investigative reporter based at the United Nations. Previously he covered the countries of the former Soviet Union from the Moscow bureau and reported for the Metro Desk on policing and brutality and corruption in the prison system.

 

EO 11110

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they can run w/out the internet/electronics on the pipeline

worst case = have to strap the tanks and operate the pumps and valves manually. routine stuff that's done every day in the business
 

^updated^

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They didn't shut down because they couldn't run gas thru the pipeline, they shut down because their computer systems were locked up and they had no way to keep records of who got what. They need those records for billing purposes.
 
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DarkSide, Blamed for Gas Pipeline Attack, Says It Is Shutting Down​

The hacking group, which the F.B.I. has said was responsible for the ransomware attack, said it had received “pressure” from the U.S.

By Michael Schwirtz and Nicole Perlroth
Published May 14, 2021Updated May 15, 2021, 11:29 a.m. ET
The criminal hacking group DarkSide, which the F.B.I. has blamed for carrying out a ransomware attack that crippled fuel delivery across the Southeastern United States this week, has announced that it is shutting down because of unspecified “pressure” from the United States.
In a statement written in Russian and provided to The New York Times on Friday by the cybersecurity firm Intel 471, DarkSide said it had lost access to the public-facing portion of its online system, including its blog and payment server, as well as funds that it said had been withdrawn to an unknown account. It said the group’s main web page and other public-facing resources would go offline within 48 hours.
“Due to the pressure from the U.S., the affiliate program is closed,” the statement said, referring to intermediary hackers, the so-called affiliates, it works with to break into corporate computer systems. “Stay safe and good luck.”
What that pressure may have been is unclear, but on Thursday, President Biden said the United States would not rule out a retaliatory strike against DarkSide that would “disrupt their ability to operate.” The White House spokeswoman, Jen Psaki, said the administration was waiting for recommendations from U.S. Cyber Command, but government officials on Friday declined to comment further about whether any action had been taken.
Cybersecurity analysts cautioned that the DarkSide statement could be a ruse, allowing its members to regroup and deflect the negative attention caused by the attack. The group’s announcement was reported earlier by The Wall Street Journal.
The crisis began when Colonial Pipeline, the operator of one of the nation’s largest fuel pipelines, announced on May 7 that it had been hit with a ransomware attack, in which criminal groups lock up computer systems and hold data hostage until the victim pays a ransom. In response, the company protectively shut down its pipeline, which delivers nearly half of the jet fuel and gasoline used on the Atlantic Coast, disrupting air travel and causing drivers to descend on gas stations in a surge of panic buying.

To free up its computer systems, Colonial Pipeline paid the extortionists about 75 Bitcoin, or nearly $5 million, according to people briefed on the transaction. The decision allowed the company to get gas flowing again, but may have complicated the Biden administration’s efforts to stave off new attacks.
In a statement on Friday, a Colonial spokeswoman said, “There is an ongoing investigation, and we’re not commenting on the ransom.”
Elliptic, a computer security company specializing in cryptocurrency, said on Friday that it had identified the Bitcoin wallet used by DarkSide to collect the Colonial Pipeline ransom payment. In a statement, Elliptic said Colonial Pipeline sent the ransom payment to DarkSide last Saturday.
Since the DarkSide account was opened in March, Elliptic said, it had received $17.5 million from 21 Bitcoin wallets, indicating the number of ransoms it had collected just this spring. Cybersecurity analysts assess that the group has been active since at least August, and has most likely used a number of different Bitcoin wallets to receive ransoms.
But on Thursday, someone withdrew roughly 113.5 Bitcoin, or $5.6 million, from DarkSide’s Bitcoin wallet and moved it into an unknown user’s account, according to TRM Labs, a San Francisco blockchain intelligence company. The sum amounted to Colonial’s 75 Bitcoin ransom plus that of a German company, Brenntag, which also opted to pay its digital extortionists, TRM Labs said.
To whom that other account belongs is yet another plot twist in the hacking episode.
“It’s hard to speculate,” Esteban Castaño, a co-founder of TRM Labs, said in an interview Friday. He noted that whoever moved DarkSide’s winnings would have had access to the group’s private key to its Bitcoin wallet.
“The question is where were those private keys stored?” Mr. Castaño said. “Were they on some server that someone else got ahold of? Or did DarkSide initiate the transfer themselves?”
The intense scrutiny that followed the Colonial Pipeline attack has clearly unsettled ransomware groups. This week, the operators behind two major Russian-language ransomware platforms, REvil and Avaddon, announced strict new rules governing the use of their products, including bans on targeting government-affiliated entities, hospitals or educational institutions.
The administrator of XSS, a popular Russian-language cybercrime forum, announced an immediate ban on all ransomware activity on the forum, citing, among other things, the bad press associated with the industry. In a statement posted in the forum, the administrator called the attention a “critical mass of harm, nonsense, hype and noise,” saying even the spokesman for President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia had weighed in on the Colonial Pipe attack. (The spokesman, Dmitri S. Peskov, denied that the Kremlin had been involved in the attack on the pipeline.)
“The word ransom has become associated with a whole series of unpleasant things — geopolitics, blackmail, government cyberattacks,” the XSS administrator wrote. “This word has become dangerous and toxic.”
Even if DarkSide has shut down, the threat from ransomware has not passed. Cybercriminal networks often disband, regroup and rebrand themselves in an effort to throw off law enforcement, cybersecurity experts say.
“It’s likely that these ransomware operators are trying to retreat from the spotlight more than suddenly discovering the error of their ways,” said Mark Arena, Intel 471’s chief executive. “A number of the operators will most likely continue to operate in their own close-knit groups, resurfacing under different aliases and ransomware names.”
Indeed, DarkSide gave no indication that its members were getting out of the ransomware business or even letting victims currently infected with the group’s malware off the hook. In its statement, DarkSide said it would hand over its decryption tools to affiliates, giving these intermediaries, who were responsible for infecting computer systems with the group’s malicious software, the ability to negotiate ransoms with victims directly.
“You will be given decryption tools for all the companies that haven’t paid yet,” the statement read. “After that, you will be free to communicate with them wherever you want in any way you want.”
Julian Barnes contributed reporting.

Michael Schwirtz is an investigative reporter based at the United Nations. Previously he covered the countries of the former Soviet Union from the Moscow bureau and reported for the Metro Desk on policing and brutality and corruption in the prison system.


A hacking group decides to shut down because they're pressured by the U.S. government.

I call B.S. They were already outside the law. Or were they?
 

Casey Jones

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A hacking group decides to shut down because they're pressured by the U.S. government.

I call B.S. They were already outside the law. Or were they?
Front for the CIA.

And the CIA is being Transformed into a front for BLM/DNC.
 

AurumAg

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Nailed it!
They didn't shut down because they couldn't run gas thru the pipeline, they shut down because their computer systems were locked up and they had no way to keep records of who got what. They need those records for billing purposes.
No billing capability = not being able to pay their own bills.
 

EO 11110

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They didn't shut down because they couldn't run gas thru the pipeline, they shut down because their computer systems were locked up and they had no way to keep records of who got what. They need those records for billing purposes.

that's what the scores of inspection companies are for - strap the tanks, catch samples, do the calcs on the transfers

the parties involved in the transaction use the inspector's numbers for billing - the electric stuff is reference only

the practice of transferring with 3rd party inspectors is commonplace in the biz

they easily could've kept operating at somewhat reduced flow rates -- only limited by manpower to turn valves and strap tanks
 
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Rusty Shackelford

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Is there really any value to having your systems all tied to the internet? Engineers are always pushing my utility to update our structure and automate everything and have it accessible by tons of remote features...I am only 46, but I tell them to piss off (politely) and that i am more than comfortable with my 6 guys being hands on and responding in person. None of our operations are online and hackable at this point...even if the power grid was compromised, I have a 400 kw generator topped off with 30 days of full load diesel. I like the piece of mind
 

EO 11110

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Is there really any value to having your systems all tied to the internet? Engineers are always pushing my utility to update our structure and automate everything and have it accessible by tons of remote features...I am only 46, but I tell them to piss off (politely) and that i am more than comfortable with my 6 guys being hands on and responding in person. None of our operations are online and hackable at this point...even if the power grid was compromised, I have a 400 kw generator topped off with 30 days of full load diesel. I like the piece of mind

the value (for them) is their ability to sit on their azz and bird dog the operators
 

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Cybersecurity tycoon Natalya Kaspersky claims CIA hackers could be behind US Colonial Pipeline attack blamed on Russian group​

14 May, 2021

Cybersecurity tycoon Natalya Kaspersky claims CIA hackers could be behind US Colonial Pipeline attack blamed on Russian group

Holding tanks are seen in an aerial photograph at Colonial Pipeline's Charlotte Tank Farm in Charlotte, North Carolina, U.S. May 10, 2021. © REUTERS / Drone Base

A cyberattack that crippled fuel supplies on the East Coast of the US and sent gas prices soaring could have been an inside job conducted by American spooks, rather than foreign hackers, a prominent Russian IT expert has claimed.

After a massive systems failure caused the Colonial Pipeline to shut down, Natalya Kaspersky, the co-founder and former CEO of security software firm Kaspersky Lab, who is now the president of cybersecurity company InfoWatch and one of Russia’s wealthiest women, made the explosive suggestions in an interview with RIA Novosti on Friday. She alleges that the US’ top foreign intelligence agency, the CIA, has a crack team of digital warriors who are able to masquerade as overseas hacking groups.

According to her, the group, known as UMBRAGE, is adept at hiding its online footprints. The existence of the team first came to light in a series of documents published by WikiLeaks in 2017 and subsequently picked up by American media. At the time, USA Today said that the shadowy operatives “may have been cataloguing hacking methods from outside hackers, including in Russia, that would have allowed the agency to mask their identity by employing the method during espionage.”

On Thursday, President Joe Biden announced that the devastating blow to America’s infrastructure had been dealt from abroad. “We do not believe the Russian government was involved in this attack, but we do have strong reason to believe that the criminals who did the attack are living in Russia, that’s where it came from,” he said.

However, Kaspersky pointed to the list “of the countries under whose hacker groups this UMBRAGE is disguised – Russia, North Korea, China, Iran.” She claimed that “therefore, it cannot be said with certainty that the attack was carried out by a hacker group from Russia, and that it was not a provocation made themselves from there, or from some other country,” she said.

The day before, the operators of the Colonial Pipeline said that service had resumed, and that “we can now report that we have restarted our entire pipeline system and that product delivery has commenced to all markets we serve.” However, they added, it could take several days before gas supply issues were fully resolved.

 

Casey Jones

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This is the kind of incendiary rhetoric, the kind of streams of accusations, that LAUNCH WARS.

Remember the Maine! The Spanish blew it up, in Havana Bay!

Except they didn't. But the Hearst newspapers and the government, kept repeating the accusation; and a needless, pointless war came of it.

Now we have the Dementia-Sufferer in Chief out there, repeating what's put on cue cards, written by the ones who actually did the sabotage, with intent to somehow stop oil usage.

What you have is stupid, feeble, and insane, all coming together to bring us nuclear Armageddon.
 

brosil

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When I took the cybersecurity training for the power company, they made it plain that any attempt to hook the power distribution intranet to the internet, hook up an external device or enter unauthorized code would result in immediate dismissal, loss of all benefits to include pension and criminal prosecution. It looks like the boobs at Colonial didn't get that message.
 

ABC123

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Colonial Pipeline BTC payment to hackers largely reclaimed. The state of trustless transactions. LOL. Once the coins leave your wallet you can't recover them. Allegedly. Maybe just the big guys can, minus 10% for the bigger guy..



Crypto

DOJ says ‘millions of dollars of bitcoin’ reclaimed from ransom paid to Colonial Pipeline hackers

Published: June 7, 2021 at 4:13 p.m. ET

By Mark DeCambre

"The Justice Department, in conjunction with other federal authorities, on Monday said that the majority of the ransomware Colonial Pipeline Co. paid to hackers last month has been recaptured.
During a news conference, Deputy Attorney General Lisa Monaco said federal investigators seized 64 bitcoin, valued at roughly $2.3 million, that were allegedly the proceeds from the ransom attack against Colonial Pipeline.
Colonial CEO Joseph Blount told The Wall Street Journal last month that he authorized the ransom payment of $4.4 million, because the company was unsure how badly the cyberattack had breached its systems, and how long it would take to bring the pipeline back."

https://www.marketwatch.com/story/doj-says-millions-of-dollars-of-bitcoin-reclaimed-from-ransom-paid-to-colonial-pipeline-hackers-11623096838?mod=home-page
 

ABC123

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1623119972791.png

twitter.com/cbs_herridge/status/1401995492368781313?s=21
 

Casey Jones

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We suspected this might be an inside, Deep State, job.

This would support that. Perhaps a rogue movement...but I can't see recovery of bitcoin unless the perps or potential perps are already known and already there is access to their computers and network history.
 

Usury

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Is there really any value to having your systems all tied to the internet? Engineers are always pushing my utility to update our structure and automate everything and have it accessible by tons of remote features...I am only 46, but I tell them to piss off (politely) and that i am more than comfortable with my 6 guys being hands on and responding in person. None of our operations are online and hackable at this point...even if the power grid was compromised, I have a 400 kw generator topped off with 30 days of full load diesel. I like the piece of mind

yeah i got a notice my utility co wants to install smart meters. Greeeeat
 

Casey Jones

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yeah i got a notice my utility co wants to install smart meters. Greeeeat
I just went through that.

Installed the GD things on Friday. Friday night the power took a schitt.

No internet to get their emergency number...which is just as well, because they had a "temporary" local emergency number...because of, you guessed it, Wu Flu.

So I waited. And my food warmed. And I couldn't cook. By midafternoon Saturday, I gave up waiting and dug out my inverter. Not the nice, neat package that Honda sells - this is something you wire to your truck battery. 1500 watts. Of course, when doing something like this, anything that can go wrong, will, so it took me three hours to get the appropriate bolts loose on the battery.

Wired up, stick in the throttle to keep the engine going at 1800 rpm, and I had my refrigerator running.

And still no crews, until Monday morning. My neighbors were sick of hearing my car running in the parking lot; but they had power and I didn't.

We're really in Clown World.
 

Buck

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I just went through that.

Installed the GD things on Friday. Friday night the power took a schitt.

No internet to get their emergency number...which is just as well, because they had a "temporary" local emergency number...because of, you guessed it, Wu Flu.

So I waited. And my food warmed. And I couldn't cook. By midafternoon Saturday, I gave up waiting and dug out my inverter. Not the nice, neat package that Honda sells - this is something you wire to your truck battery. 1500 watts. Of course, when doing something like this, anything that can go wrong, will, so it took me three hours to get the appropriate bolts loose on the battery.

Wired up, stick in the throttle to keep the engine going at 1800 rpm, and I had my refrigerator running.

And still no crews, until Monday morning. My neighbors were sick of hearing my car running in the parking lot; but they had power and I didn't.

We're really in Clown World.
sorry to hear you had to go through with that but for some reason, i find i'm a bit inspired by your desire to succeed and ability to do so

that really means nothing...but i do sense some pride in a completed task

:2 thumbs up:

weird...i felt something
 

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My neighbors were sick of hearing my car running in the parking lot; but they had power and I didn't.
All your neighbors had to do was run an extension cord to your house and they would have had peace and quiet...
 

Buck

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All your neighbors had to do was run an extension cord to your house and they would have had peace and quiet...
i once rented a place to stay, month to month, one day, i noticed, they ran an extension cord from my unit to another unit...

i even had cable TV coming from another unit, different from the one the extension cord was running to...

that wasn't my idea, Utilities Included is what it stated, and they were correct (i later found out by the mailman, it wasn't an actual / official mailing address tacked up on the fence, either)
 

WillA2

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Colonial Pipeline BTC payment to hackers largely reclaimed. The state of trustless transactions. LOL. Once the coins leave your wallet you can't recover them. Allegedly. Maybe just the big guys can, minus 10% for the bigger guy..



Crypto

DOJ says ‘millions of dollars of bitcoin’ reclaimed from ransom paid to Colonial Pipeline hackers

Published: June 7, 2021 at 4:13 p.m. ET

By Mark DeCambre

"The Justice Department, in conjunction with other federal authorities, on Monday said that the majority of the ransomware Colonial Pipeline Co. paid to hackers last month has been recaptured.
During a news conference, Deputy Attorney General Lisa Monaco said federal investigators seized 64 bitcoin, valued at roughly $2.3 million, that were allegedly the proceeds from the ransom attack against Colonial Pipeline.
Colonial CEO Joseph Blount told The Wall Street Journal last month that he authorized the ransom payment of $4.4 million, because the company was unsure how badly the cyberattack had breached its systems, and how long it would take to bring the pipeline back."

https://www.marketwatch.com/story/doj-says-millions-of-dollars-of-bitcoin-reclaimed-from-ransom-paid-to-colonial-pipeline-hackers-11623096838?mod=home-page

Now how is that supposed to possible?

Perhaps one of the chit coin users here could help me out. I need some splannin'.