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Cool items and whatever.

pitw

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I ain't gonna get shot for screwing up another thread[again], so here is one for all the cool stuff we collect/own/found or whatever.
IMG_1942_zps5eb1ce25.jpg


D-FENZ showed the coolest of all steam whistles that started this by the by.
Someone asked about the pressures on steam whistles and I don't know the whole range by any means. Old steam engines that I actually have a license to run had operating pressures from 150-250 PSI. A power generating boiler I worked on[worked for free to gather steam time to aquire my ticket] had operating pressures over 1,000 PSI and when them SOB's blew the safety valve it screemed so you would want to run off the edge of the building some 300 ft up.[Hated that one]. I'm absolutely positive there will be someone on this board with the knowledge to say the operating pressures.


Build your own
http://www.giangrandi.ch/mechanics/steamwhistle/steamwhistle.shtml

Wikipedia on whistles.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steam_whistle
 

pitw

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I've had this item for a spell and don't really know what it is or does for sure. It locks together right tight but won't hold much. It has the knobs on the end that could be hooked to something but the little tits that lock it together wouldn't hold a super amount of pulling force. Who knows?

together and locked.
IMG_1948_zpsbf332c05.jpg

Apart
IMG_1946_zpsdaf4be87.jpg

end with numbers
IMG_1945_zps1a95e79b.jpg

Inside end[kinda/sorta]
IMG_1947_zps68591d43.jpg
 

pitw

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You guys are doing such a bang up job, I figured I'd add another.
The thing beside the thing with the coyote burned on it, please.
IMG_2473.jpg

IMG_2474.jpg

IMG_2475.jpg

IMG_2476.jpg
 

<SLV>

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That looks like a small version of the vise-mounted bead roller I used to use when I was building aluminum bodied cars.
 

pitw

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That looks like a small version of the vise-mounted bead roller I used to use when I was building aluminum bodied cars.

For making mini vans?
 

newmisty

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Only thing this resembles to my limited eye is a "stair point gauge "for laying out stringers etc.
IMG_1948_zpsbf332c05.jpg


f0f384f9-0b9e-40fd-9954-8b40a2fe1d96_400.jpg
 

pitw

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I searched what you had quoted and found nothing I could see like it.
 

mtnman

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Here's just a little bit of what's piled up around here over the years. Blow it up and look around. You'll see a hand full of whistles hanging on the right side of the photo. Those big things with the flywheels are farm engines sometimes known as Hit and Miss engines, each one is at least 100 years old and they all run just fine. The name plates are from all sorts of machinery. Top shelf has more farm engines, they are all vertical as opposed to the bottom shelf which are horizontal. There's also a couple of steam engines up there. the big one is for my next steamboat. I'll post more later.

007.jpg
 

<SLV>

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I restored a similar forge blower as the one in the top right of the pictures.

_DSC0513.jpg
 

pitw

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mtnman, them is some fine built shelves to hold the load. I could spend hours standing there looking and days if someone was to be there and explain each piece. Some real nice one lungers there for a fact. I've sold a few vertical engines cause they are fair rare around here.
SLV, the forge looks great and will still be usable if necessary.
 

<SLV>

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SLV, the forge looks great and will still be usable if necessary.

I picked up a Peter Wright anvil locally for $100, and I've got 100 pounds of coal in my shop. I'm planning on putting it to use. :)
 

pitw

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Got a pic of the anvil[top and bottom], them suckers sell for $5/lb in good shape up here.
 

mtnman

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A good Peter Wright brings $5 a pound everywhere!
 

pitw

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<SLV>

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I got lucky. I was able to get it cheap because someone had welded a plate to the top of it. I cut the top off, and the work surface was in good enough shape. I don't know why someone welded to the top of it.

Here is a picture of it with the plate still on it (as well as a heel dolly welded off to the side -- I took that off, too).

_DSC0875.jpg

Here is another anvil I found. I've never seen another one like it. It weighs 117 pounds and has a square hole through the middle. It has four sides that each have a different radius. I'm guessing it is for working sheet metal. One thing is for sure, it is quality forged steel -- it rings like a bell. (I didn't even pay the full $65 for it -- got it for $50.) There are no marks saying who made it.

_DSC0871.jpg

_DSC0869.jpg
 

mtnman

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NICE! That square anvil, I'd say you're correct. The tin smith had all shapes and sizes. Here's another Tin knockers anvil, it's patented 1989 and used for making crimped ends on stove pipes. Old tools are another one of my passions. The Peter Wright, what are the three numbers on the side?

002.jpg
 

pitw

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I can see this is gonna be fun now. That is a fine anvil above the coolest one so far. Man I've bent a bunch of pipe and could only wish for something like that to bash my fingers on.
 

smooth

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Hey mtnman, does that old Fairbank Morse hit and miss run?

Here's just a little bit of what's piled up around here over the years. Blow it up and look around. You'll see a hand full of whistles hanging on the right side of the photo. Those big things with the flywheels are farm engines sometimes known as Hit and Miss engines, each one is at least 100 years old and they all run just fine. The name plates are from all sorts of machinery. Top shelf has more farm engines, they are all vertical as opposed to the bottom shelf which are horizontal. There's also a couple of steam engines up there. the big one is for my next steamboat. I'll post more later.

View attachment 69487
 

mtnman

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Fairbanks Morse type H, somewhat rare model. The ignition is on the left side as opposed to all the other engines with them on the right. Yes she runs just fine with a low tension coil and battery. It's all there and original except the muffler, I have since picked up the correct muffler, just haven't installed it yet. About the shelving, It's a pallet rack, strong as heck!
 

pitw

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Got this one from my fathers shop. I've left meat on that SOB for as years and Searcher could use it to keep in shape by just carrying it around everyday for a few hours.
IMG_0815.jpg


One batch of beating units
IMG_0811.jpg


I'm waiting to see a few of mtnman's cool old tools.
 

mtnman

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Here's some more anvil pictures. The first one is my collection of "advertising and miniature anvils", the second picture is of a "Civil War Broken" anvil. During the War of Northern Aggression, when troops came into an area they would send out scouting parties. They looked for food, animals and contraband. Anvils were contraband. Whenever an anvil was found, they would beat the "horn" with a 20lb sledge hammer, breaking off the horn. This was done to prevent the anvil from being used to make horse shoes. Without horse shoes your Cavalry don't move.

009.jpg

011.jpg
 
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mtnman

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Opps! Posting from the bible belt. I see that word many times a day on Baptist churches.
 

<SLV>

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NICE! That square anvil, I'd say you're correct. The tin smith had all shapes and sizes. Here's another Tin knockers anvil, it's patented 1989 and used for making crimped ends on stove pipes. Old tools are another one of my passions. The Peter Wright, what are the three numbers on the side?

0 3 21 = 105 pounds.
 

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mtnman

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Can you explain how the number system works? Please.

The English used the stone weight system. First number is multiples of 112 pounds, second is multiples of 28, third is remaining pounds.
 

pitw

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The English used the stone weight system. First number is multiples of 112 pounds, second is multiples of 28, third is remaining pounds.

I'm gonna enjoy your knowledge.:idea:
 

argentos

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The English used the stone weight system. First number is multiples of 112 pounds, second is multiples of 28, third is remaining pounds.

The Avoirdupois System for weights came to England after the Normans and the Brits took it to the North American Colonies.

capture.jpg

Much more at Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avoirdupois
 

D-FENZ

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I have always wanted a real windmill on the acreage and finally found part of one a couple of years ago, a 6' Aermotor mill and the stub tower at a farm auction. The stub tower is the short section of metal the mill is mounted to, and is designed to be bolted to a metal tower. The mechanics of the head were a mess and nearly worn out so I had to rebuild it including re-pouring the babbitt in all of the bearings. I ended up building the tower out of wood. This has got to be the only 3 legged wooden tower in the country- with good reason. It is a JOB with all of the compound miters and mortised joints to get triangles converted to squares on every joint.

To make the whole thing useful was another wrangle since the working head is nearly impossible to convert to rotary motion without major structural change. I opted for connecting a pneumatic cylinder to aerate my pond. The springs shown in the photo with the mechanism were needed to pull the rod back since the mill heads were only designed to lift/pull- not push. The springs retract the cylinder with only a small assist from the weight of the long wooden rod/pole from the head. Plumbed in with 4 check valves, it aerates the pond on both the push and pull of the cylinder. The only maintenance required is a squirt of oil every couple of months to lubricate the cylinder in each of the air inlets which are just air tool mufflers. Not shown is a cycle counter that I hooked up only because I had one. To date it has cycled some 8 million times with the only wear being the rubber rod wiper pulled out of the cylinder- I think it froze to the rod one time after a freezing rain and just pulled out. It doesn't seem to leak air or affect the function.

While I was building it, I also set it up to keep my shop air compressor tank filled, using an interchangeable, smaller 1/2" diameter cylinder. I don't use that setup anymore because the thing was constantly blowing the relief valve on my pressure tank. I just don't use enough of the air. Maybe if I get bored sometime I will plumb it up to a monster tank plumbed up to my monster steam whistle so it randomly blows depending on how windy it is. What would the neighbors- or anyone sharing my zip-code think?

I don't know if anyone thinks this is a cool item but it's certainly a whatever...

IMG_4420[2].jpgIMG_4421[2].jpgIMG_4422[1].jpgIMG_4426[1].jpg
 

pitw

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Definitely cool.
 

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1.jpg

Anyone ever come up with what this is yet? Looked around on line and can't come close.
 

pitw

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I've had it on my table for a month and took it to a couple coffee shops with no luck. Did have a guy offer me money for it but I told him only silver could shake it loose. He obviously wasn't a stacker.LOL
 

mtnman

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D-Fenz That's just TOOO COOOL!
 

southfork

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You could probably be on that American pickers show, Id bet they would love to get some of your oldies.

Here's just a little bit of what's piled up around here over the years. Blow it up and look around. You'll see a hand full of whistles hanging on the right side of the photo. Those big things with the flywheels are farm engines sometimes known as Hit and Miss engines, each one is at least 100 years old and they all run just fine. The name plates are from all sorts of machinery. Top shelf has more farm engines, they are all vertical as opposed to the bottom shelf which are horizontal. There's also a couple of steam engines up there. the big one is for my next steamboat. I'll post more later.

View attachment 69487