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Dealing With Doctors

TAEZZAR

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#2
Yes, there are dangers in medicine/pharmaceuticals.
It's very simple, know what you &/or your children are taking. Know the benefits AND the dangers.
The medical industry is important, even with it's short comings.
Several of us here at GIM2 have had serious surgeries that have given us a rejuvenated quality of life.
Medicine is no different than, contractors, automobiles or whatever. Know & understand your options, the good, the bad & the ugly !

Do your homework, your survival is up to you.
 

arminius

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Truth is that modern medicine is very good at trauma, basically war medicine. The rest of modern medical practice is mostly not about health, but about profit.

most physicians are about treating patients as vested interest, not human beings...
 

michael59

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#5
IDK, I would rather deal with pedro than with doktarie. sorry if that doktarie reference triggered anyone into some sibilance of nostalgia.

idk, half way through the vid I thunk a thought but the thought flew.....darn, hate it when that happens.
 

Buck

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#6
I watched a nurse attempt to over medicate my wife with a triple dose of insulin, during a short hospital stay that had nothing to do with her diabetes

My wife, being an ex-nurse, she questioned what she was being given (thank god it wasn't me, i'd be dead by now), and my wife stated that it was waaaayyyy too much. My wife asked her why would she try to kill her...
and the nurse kinda said a, oh, o.k., and quietly left the room.

We did complain, but were never given a follow-up, so, the nurse probably still has her job and because it didn't happen, we had a tough time getting anyone at the hospital to give two shites about the situation.

Humans are incompetent at the least, irresponsible at some of the more critical moments in our lives

the medical industry is one of the few industries where death happens everyday and the lack of professionalism often times goes unnoticed by the hospital adminstration and they aren't interested in any litigation so, to blow off all complaints is really quite easy and happens all the time

mostly the responsibility, or lack there-of, oftentimes ends up in the hole in the ground with the victim
 

Son of Gloin

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#7
I watched a nurse attempt to over medicate my wife with a triple dose of insulin, during a short hospital stay that had nothing to do with her diabetes

My wife, being an ex-nurse, she questioned what she was being given (thank god it wasn't me, i'd be dead by now), and my wife stated that it was waaaayyyy too much. My wife asked her why would she try to kill her...
and the nurse kinda said a, oh, o.k., and quietly left the room.

We did complain, but were never given a follow-up, so, the nurse probably still has her job and because it didn't happen, we had a tough time getting anyone at the hospital to give two shites about the situation.

Humans are incompetent at the least, irresponsible at some of the more critical moments in our lives

the medical industry is one of the few industries where death happens everyday and the lack of professionalism often times goes unnoticed by the hospital adminstration and they aren't interested in any litigation so, to blow off all complaints is really quite easy and happens all the time

mostly the responsibility, or lack there-of, oftentimes ends up in the hole in the ground with the victim
If they had killed her, they would have done their best to cover it up.
 

spinalcracker

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My hip replacement surgery was done at the Bob Dole VA in Wichita about 11 years ago.

Opiates have a 50-50 chance of triggering a migraine.

So after surgery , I woke up with a killer migraine.

At that time I was injecting Imitrex so the nurse gave me a shot...

Long story short , I couldn’t shake the migraine and here comes the fecking nurse with another shot of Imitrex...

I thought I had already had 2 shots in less than 24 hours so I stopped the nurse.

She left the room and came back 5 minutes later and said I can’t have another shot for 24 hrs...

That 3rd injection would have blown my heart up.

Doctors are really good at fixing bones and cutting up bodies and putting them back together.

But they suck when it comes to good health and proper nutrition.
 

Irons

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What I fail to understand is why doctors don't tell people that processed food is poisonous to 99% of the population.
Toxic to some degree to all and deadly toxic to many. They warn about cigarettes, spray paint, smog etc etc.
Nowadays a person who is 200 pounds overweight will lecture a physically fit person about smoking. Seriously, WTF?

Makes no sense, except medicated land whales take a lot of drugs until they keel over. Cash cows?


. :don't know:
 

EO 11110

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#10
organ donors are in jeopardy every time they step foot in one of those places. neat that you can't sell your organs, but the black marketers, based in the middle east, can/do traffic in them every day
 

anywoundedduck

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#11
I am sick of doctors.
The stupid ass Primary, that I have now will not prescribe the insulin that I use, even though by using it I control my A1C and have been for years. He sent me to a specialist (Endo) who wants to give me $900 a month out of pocket insulin, when insulin I buy over the counter at Walmart costs me $75 a month.
Insists I take statins, even though my ldl is under control.
Statins about ruined my kidneys, and put me into stage 4 renal failure, and he knows it. I stopped taking them, and my kidney function immediately improved. I stay away from the bastard.
I am sick of doctors.
 

madhu

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#12
Yes iatrogenic injuries are common and it is expensive. The malpractice companies are forcing changes on the industry.
Even today deaths/ injuries this that happen at a surgical center are not mandated to be reportable events to government and private regulatory agencies. So hospital are held to a higher standard. We have inexperienced medical staff and nurses that are independently providing care to more patients than humanly possible because of budget cuts.
Not providing excuses but these are facts. Inexperienced /incompetent providers are cheaper to hire.

Hospitals don't hire employees directly anymore to avoid the liability. The hiring is by a third party agency which make money without adding any value.

Not all hospitals are equally good at doing all kinds of surgery. Some are excellent in heart, others in cancer care etc. you should not expect your community hospital in small town to give you Harvard Class acre for uncommon problems
 

Unca Walt

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#13
Truth is that modern medicine is very good at trauma, basically war medicine. The rest of modern medical practice is mostly not about health, but about profit.

most physicians are about treating patients as vested interest, not human beings...
Love ya, arminius, but that above is immensely ignorant and wrong.

I am going to assume you are unaware of the common "burnout" of physicians. They last only so long, then the strain of every hour of every day seeing people ill, torn open, in horrible condition, and nearly ALWAYS blaming the doctor -- wears them down to the point where they simply wear out.

That is why -- pay attention, bro -- doctors lead other professions in:

Divorce
Alcoholism
Drug addiction
Suicide

When MySonTheDoctor (always one word) was a little kid, we had a birthday party for him. He gave away all his presents to the kids there because "nobody was making any fuss for them". He went on, achieving a super-high GPA in Emory in a "Pre-Med" curriculum.

When he applied for Med School, he was asked what he had already done to demonstrate his sincerity in wanting to be a doctor. Since I was not a doctor (and therefore he was un-schooled in the strains the profession has on family and self), he was told to "do something" and come back in a year.

TINS

So... while he continued on with his education, he also spent a full year as an unpaid intern in the Atlanta hospital ER. So he was there for Cut 'n Shoot Night, crushed skulls, etc.

Went back a year later with affidavits and letters of recommendation, etc. Went into "college" again for ANOTHER four fucking years.

Graduated top of his class, so then he spent ANOTHER two fucking year in Residency. OK, a mere TEN FUCKING YEARS in learning, and he got a job. Didn't pay much (Sooo-prise! Betcha didn't know new physicians do not get paid much.) $60K

He continued with surpassing brilliance and became Board Certified. Only 60% of doctors even try, and only 60% of them achieve Board Certification. He even did house calls pro bono. <<--- Read that aloud, bro.

Now I want you to think about this: There were MANY times his mother and/or myself had to put him back together because of the incredible DAILY life/death decisions and work draining his soul. He would be shaking in tears because he could not save a baby whose mother did drugs.

There were people who screamed at him because he would tell the family that the guy who took fifty Tylenol had destroyed his liver and would die in about two days. They screamed at him to "DO SOMETHING!"

And when he couldn't... it was, of course, his fault. All he was, of course, was a greedy sumbitch who only prescribed fake medicines for Big Pharma. That is all. Just ask Arminius. He'll -- in his ignorance --- has already sworn to it.

He works -- scheduled -- 12-hour days on a 7-day schedule. Frequently never gets home for three or four days.

You still with me, Arminius?

He could not show up here for Christmas. You now know why that is, don't you. He was working, saving lives... easing deaths... listening to assholes that think doctors are rich scream at him for not saving the kid whose chest got run over by a garbage truck.

Scotty is 54. He is burnt out. He is NOT rich. If he had enough money, he would raise enough of those dinosaurs to live on in retirement.

Bottom line -- Are there rich doctors? Yeah, of course. Never as rich as any politician, and never with really "free time" (the Phone Call Can Come At Any Time) (And It Fucking DOES.)

Not like your profession, Arminius. No one demands you re-awaken their dead baby. No one calls you at 3AM, 4AM.

Got it now? At least a little bit?
 
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anywoundedduck

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Wow, Unca, that is a lot of shit they have to go through, before they even become my doctor, but by the time they get to me, they are worn out, and not worth a shit, evidently.
It is they're chosen profession, you know.
The previous 2 doctors before my current were OK, but quit because of Obamacare, mostly.
 

Unca Walt

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"It is they're chosen profession, you know."

Why, yes!!

I DO happen to know it is their chosen profession. Let me explain what that means:

They CHOSE knowing that they are going into something that is almost certainly going to cost them dearly (believe me, they are told and shown ad nauseam before being accepted).

They CHOSE knowing that there would be ten years (or more) of learning/earning their degree.

They CHOSE because nearly all of them were cut from the same golden cloth as my son. Re-read his birthday party. Multiply that with all the generous and giving things he did growing up. And he is a brilliant doctor.

My family has always chosen to serve. Mostly in the military. Not as dangerous as being a doctor, but I wasn't smart enough.
 

spinalcracker

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Damn.
I forgot about Uncle Walt's son.
Now I feel bad about lumping all doctors into one box.

My apologies Walt.

I am sure there are good doctors and bad ones . Just like cement finishers and machinists.

This makes me think about people who complain about the police.
Its been my experience that the people who complain about the police , well who do you think they call first when there is trouble?....(I am sure most GIMers would grab a firearm first but we ain't normal).........
 

Unca Walt

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Damn.
I forgot about Uncle Walt's son.
Now I feel bad about lumping all doctors into one box.

My apologies Walt.

I am sure there are good doctors and bad ones . Just like cement finishers and machinists.

This makes me think about people who complain about the police.
Its been my experience that the people who complain about the police , well who do you think they call first when there is trouble?....(I am sure most GIMers would grab a firearm first but we ain't normal).........
Not needed, brother. What you are seeing is what Scooter has shown me very clearly: The medical profession is aging. VERY quickly.

I gotta do it. Just gotta. I am gonna stand here flatfooted and say that those who claim doctors tend to suck... ARE CORRECT (to a rising degree)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Scooter and I were discussing this coming problem, and I came up with a good analogy. Pretend, Spinal, that you are a doctor
Luftwaffe pilot:

You are a pilot in the Luftwaffe. You are damn' good at your job. There is a bitchin' casualty rate all across the country in the Luftwaffe.

The number of pilots lost exceeds the number of pilots newly trained. The overall coverage the Luftwaffe can handle has become spotty.

As the numbers continue downward, the Luftwaffe pilots get burned out. Mentally exhausted. Physically weakened.

Replacements are not even half-trained -- but they do the same combat the veterans do.

The Luftwaffe perishes.
 

arminius

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most physicians are about treating patients as vested interest, not human beings...
As stated, obviously not all.

Love ya, arminius, but that above is immensely ignorant and wrong.
It is true to all my experience with the profession. And I have more than 30 years in the profession. Not that there aren't exceptions, and some, exceptional exceptions, but trust me, 4 tough years in med school, and 3 to 5 years internship and residency, then the money that comes with it, and most docs don't want to rock that income boat, and practice according to the pharmaceutical modern medicine lies that modern medicine leads them into.

I am going to assume you are unaware of the common "burnout" of physicians.

Not like your profession, Arminius. No one demands you re-awaken their dead baby. No one calls you at 3AM, 4AM.
You are wrong, I've been there, and found the profession as indoctrinated to the income, indoctrinated to the false pharmaceutical model of healing, indoctrinated to themselves as exceptional in dealing with patients, when most are pushing pharmaceuticals secondary to time restraints, and increased income.

Not all, but certainly most.

By the way, I have good friends who are lawyers, doesn't change about how I feel about the profession, most of the professionals have been indoctrinated into a false exceptionalism for the sake of income, and a reliance on creating and utilizing public policy for their income.

Got it now? At least a little bit?
I'm sure your son is exceptional, coming from your loins, from what I perceive about you from your writing. But MOST aren't.

This has nothing to do with individuals, as there are lots of exceptional individuals in medicine, everything to do with the majority population of physicians, how they're trained, indoctrinated and generally practice.

Have you got it now?
 
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Unca Walt

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Just like the Luftwaffe towards the end... The percentage of under-skilled pilots keeps increasing.

And the overall number: "Experten" and the rest combined -- keeps dropping.

Doctors are Luftwaffe pilots. 1:1
 

arminius

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People just get tired of unadulterated stupified greed. We need to come to a place and start to say enough. Or you can go and stupidify your kids with another series of vaccine treatments...

I feel the same way about law...

And writers, don't get me started.:secret:
 

madhu

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#22
But greed is just everywhere and it is rampant societal problem. I get it, doctors nurses teachers should be held to a higher standard than the society.

Sometimes it is true, if you rock the boat, you cannot get another job and true that, and providers are disciplined by administrators ruthlessly when they report anonymously to government regulatory agencies regarding safety issues. A few years ago a military physician blogged under the pseudonym of medical corpse and clearly he was correct in exposing safety issues. However he was given honorable discharge from the service. Think vioxx, deaths were known to pharma company for 2 years before SHTF. Think GM and their auto cruise technology that accelerates on auto pilot causing injuries.

The guilds or association of professional society ensure that the pharma agenda is clearly followed in order to keep up with board certification.
 

anywoundedduck

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#23
@Unca Walt
Not enough Unca Walt sons to go around.
Short of your son having a practice in Louisville, can you ask him, please, how I can find a doctor that is not constantly insisting I take Statins, or similar drugs, to lower my cholesterol. I am not going to take em because they hurt my kidneys and will put me into kidney failure. I tell my current doctor that, and he retorts that I should take the statins and see a kidney doctor. There is more reasons than that. I take insulin for type 2 diabetes and, for years, have controlled wmy A1C with it for $75 a month. He sends me to an Endo who wants me to take a insulin combo that end up costing me out of pocket $700 a month, and that is impossible for me. Instead of writing the prescription for the insulin, like I asked (insurance will cover it if I have a prescription) He wants to send me to another Endo.
I am at my wits end,
Finding a doc here in Louisville when you are on Medicare is very hard.
My wife still has med insurance through my former employer, AT&T,and is comparatively pretty good insurance, but even she is having a tough time finding a good doctor.

I really don't expect ,you or,your son to answer this impossible question, so I guess we can label the whole discussion as rhetorical.
 

Someone_else

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#24
Duck, can you reduce your carbs? How about bacon and eggs for breakfast? Pork chops and fried mushrooms for dinner? Baked or fried chicken? Or grilled chicken breasts? How about veggies steamed and served with butter, salt, and pepper? You might be impressed with how good you feel if you can give up the carbs.
 

arminius

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#25
http://foodmed.net/2018/07/swiss-re-type-2-diabetes-reversal-lchf/

SWISS RE: TYPE 2 DIABETES REALLY CAN BE REVERSED
POSTED IN DIABETES

by Marika


This is the first in a two-part series on a remarkable event that took place in Zürich, Switzerland, in June 2018. It is a review of a conference that will hopefully help to change conventional medical treatment for obesity and type 2 diabetes dramatically in the near future.

The venue augured well: the elegant buildings of the Swiss Re Institute’s Centre for Global Dialogue in Rüschlikon on the west shore of Lake Zürich.

Speakers came from top research institutions around the globe. They argued that mainstream medical treatment for type 2 diabetes just doesn’t work well. In effect, it keeps people fat, sick and dependent on drugs.

That was fighting talk from physicians and scientists from around the globe. Their alternative was just as groundbreaking: It gives people with type 2 diabetes hope that they can reverse their condition safely and effectively without resorting to drugs or surgery.

(This is a longer version of a report that first appeared in Business Day newspaper in South Africa.)

By Marika Sboros

You know something big is happening when the world’s second-largest reinsurer, Swiss Re, has its eye on the future of diabetes treatment. And when the reinsurer hosts a global four-day conference casting serious doubt on mainstream medical treatment for type 2 diabetes.

In other words, speakers said, conventional medicine keeps diabetic patients sick, fat and drug-dependent.

Messages emanating from the conference were groundbreaking – and optimistic. Speakers said that type 2 diabetes is not necessarily chronic, progressive and degenerative. It can be reversed, even put into remission.

Speakers also said that low-carbohydrate, high-fat (LCHF) diets are safe, effective methods of reversing. And that patients don’t always have to resort to drugs or invasive bariatric (stomach) surgery.

Also under the spotlight at the conference were official low-fat, high-carb dietary guidelines. Speakers targeted the guidelines as major contributors to global epidemics of obesity and type 2 diabetes (or “diabesity” as doctors now call the twin incidence). They also called for radical revision of the guidelines.

It doesn’t take a rocket nutrition scientist to work out what is in it for the company to drive dietary change. Nor is it difficult to identify the main driver in this case: Swiss Re’s global chief medical officer, South African Dr John Schoonbee.

The reason for the reinsurer’s interest in nutrition is simple, Schoonbee said: “If more people die, we pay out more. If fewer people die, we pay out less. So, we want to keep people living longer, healthier lives.”

The cost of disease

Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) now account for six of the top seven causes of death globally, he said. Obesity, prediabetes and diabetes are growing global epidemics strongly associated with heart disease, stroke, cancer and Alzheimer’s disease.

Diet is the key factor in obesity and diabetes. Fixing nutrition won’t just slow down these epidemics but can also reverse these conditions, Schoonbee said.

As a large global reinsurer in life and health, Swiss Re’s exposure to long-term mortality and morbidity is “significant”. Improving these will lead to “very significant financial benefit”. It will also create an advantage allowing it to win new business.

Click here to read: ‘Cure’ for type 2 diabetes? A doctor’s personal journey
The company’s vested financial interest “entirely aligns with (its vision of) making the world a healthier, more resilient place”, he said. Therefore, its research arm, the Swiss Re Institute, regularly engages with stakeholders. It does so by “sharing insights, tailored services and products to enable risk-focused decision making and smarter solutions to manage risk”.

Conference delegates included nutrition scientists, endocrinologists, cardiologists, epidemiologists, psychiatrists and a South African, UK-based plastic surgeon. And among top research institutions represented were Harvard and Tufts universities in the US, Cambridge University in the UK and Sydney University in Australia.

Miracle meeting

The first two days debated Food for Thought, Science and Politics of Nutrition. That was a collaboration between the Swiss Re Institute and The BMJ (formerly The British Medical Journal) to launch a series of articles under the same name. These were researched and written by nutrition experts and advised by Cambridge University and Tufts University.

BMJ editor-in-chief Dr Fiona Godlee opened by saying: “There is no miracle diet but there is a miracle meeting and this is it.”

The meeting was not exactly miraculous. However, it did bring together on one stage for the first time experts with divergent views on optimum nutrition to treat and prevent obesity and diabetes.

An echo chamber it wasn’t.

Speakers raised one of the biggest scandals and controversies in nutrition science. It is that the guidelines had no science backing them up when the US first launched them onto an unsuspecting public way back in 1977. The same applied when the UK followed in 1983 and the rest of the English-speaking world thereafter.

Among speakers who have done major research on this topic were US science journalist Nina Teicholz, author of The Big Fat Surprise and British public health researcher DrZoë Harcombe. Harcombe is author of, among others,The Obesity Epidemic, What Caused It? How can we stop it?

Plant v animal

Some speakers vigorously promoted plant-based diets as optimum to treat and reverse diabesity. Among them was Prof Walter Willett, professor of epidemiology and nutrition at Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health. Willett is also professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School.

UK professor of medicine and metabolism Roy Taylor sat somewhere in the middle. Taylor, of Newcastle University, has spent more than 40 years studying type 2 diabetes and best treatment methods.

He said that eating patterns vary in different populations and there’s no one-size-fits-all diet. He also said that LCHF diets are “reasonable” treatment for type 2 diabetes. That’s provided they are “not extreme”.

Taylor agreed that diabetes is reversible. However, one obstacle is doctors who are “highly trained in using drugs and hardly at all in nutrition”.

Flawed science

British consultant cardiologist Dr Aseem Malhotra, author of The Pioppi Diet, came down firmly on the side of animal foods. He said that the huge global burden of chronic disease shows that doctors and healthcare systems have failed patients.

Commercial interests have hijacked the best available clinical evidence. And the root cause of obesity and type 2 diabetes is “flawed science”, Malhotra said.

A two-day Redefining Diabetes, Putting a Chronic, Progressive Disease into Remission conference followed. It proved to be the real groundbreaker, not far from miraculous in its implications.

There was consensus that dietary guidelines have contributed to the global diabesity tide. There was also consensus that LCHF diets can stem it.

US physician Dr Sarah Hallberg is adjunct clinical assistant professor of medicine at Indiana University Medical School and medical director at Virta Health. Analysts have called Virta one of San Francisco’s “hottest startups”. The company recently announced that it had raised $45m funding, bringing the total equity funding to $75m to date.

Hallberg said that diabetes is a disease of elevated blood sugar and even the American Diabetes Association acknowledges that carbohydrate is the macronutrient that aggravates it. She also said that there is no one-size-fits-all approach.

Healthy people can tolerate plant-based diets, Hallberg said. However, once they enter the disease state or have metabolic issues, then the evidence shows that animal-based diets are healthier.

Patient choice

Hallberg welcomed financial institutions showing interest in nutrition. Healthcare and related costs for type 2 diabetes are staggering, she said. In the US, it costs well over $10,000 a year to treat diabetic patients and costs are growing.

Hallberg is lead author of a Virta peer-reviewed study recently published in Diabetes Review. Results are from the first 12 months of the five-year study investigating standard- of-care, low-fat and low-carb therapies.

Among key takeaways, she said, data show for the first time that reversal is possible in a large-scale trial and in more than just anecdote. Data also show high adherence to LCHF diets.

Doctors often cite adherence as a barrier to nutrition for effective type 2 diabetes reversal, Hallberg said. However, at the end of a study year, 83% of patients on LCHF were still actively engaged.

“That’s better adherence than with most medications,” she said. Hallberg attributed that to a study design allowing patients to self-select from three diet arms.

She said that patient choice “is key” in diabetes treatment.

Virta data show that LCHF can achieve improvements in cardiovascular disease risk factors at the same time as diabetes reversal, Hallberg said. The LCHF group showed a significant 40% decrease in inflammation, a key cardiovascular disease risk marker.

‘No-brainer’

Low-density lipoprotein (LDL, so-called “bad” cholesterol) went up by 10%. Other markers that are better risk indicators, such as LDL B and apolipoprotein (APO) B, did not change.

“We haven’t seen anyone (with type 2 diabetes) who doesn’t improve on LCHF,” Hallberg said. “LCHF makes many things better without making things worse. It’s a no-brainer,” she said.

Resistance to LCHF is because many doctors are still “scared of (saturated) fat”. The saturated fat debate is “over”. We are pretty much done with it and we now need to get that message across, Hallberg said.

Malhotra referred to a seminal article he wrote in the BMJ in 2013, titled Saturated fat is not the issue. In it, he said that it has become a “mantra” that people must eat less saturated fat because it causes heart disease. Scientific evidence shows that this advice has” paradoxically increased our cardiovascular risks”, Malhotra said. Therefore, it is time to retire the mantra.

He went on to target the UK government’s “obsession with levels of total cholesterol”. He said that this has “diverted our attention from the more egregious risk factor of atherogenic dyslipidaemia”. It has also led to the “overmedication of millions of people with statins”.

Treatment ‘a lottery’

UK diabetologist Dr David Cavan, who calls himself a recovering endocrinologist, described modern medical management of type 2 diabetes as “a lottery” and “scandalous”.

Cavan is author of Reverse Your Diabetes, The Step By Step Plan To Take Control Of Type 2 Diabetes.

In 2013, he became director of policy and programmes at the Brussels-based International Diabetes Federation, a global federation representing over 230 national diabetes associations. In 2017, he set up a Diabetes Reversal Programme in Bermuda, in association with Bermuda Diabetes.

“Bermuda is a diabetes factory,” Cavan said.

Its “diabetogenic” environment ticks all the boxes for increased risk of type 2 diabetes. These include a staple diet of starch (rice and peas), high intake of sugary soft drinks, easy availability of low-cost, junk food and the high cost of healthy foods.

Of 30 participants on his LCHF programme after the first 12 months, all but four lost weight and waist circumference. Eight stopped all diabetes medications and 11 reduced some diabetes medication.

Cavan said it is now clear that type 2 diabetes results from modern lifestyles. This has led to the evolution of a new management paradigm.

‘Unbiased debate’

He outlined the basic principles: type 2 diabetes is associated with insulin resistance or carbohydrate intolerance; it can be reversed and remission is the goal; carbohydrate restriction is vital; intermittent fasting, low-carb and ketogenic (very-LCHF) diets work.

Jeffrey Bohn, Swiss Re Institute director, said that the BMJ partnership reflects a focus on major research topics for the future of the insurance industry and wider society.

“Swiss Re Institute has established itself as a platform for unbiased debate. I was particularly pleased that the Food for Thought conference was live-streamed and viewed more than 5,700 times by people in 63 countries,” Bohn said.

Schoonbee said that Swiss Re is agnostic.

“We don’t endorse any one diet. We want to know what works and we accept it as long as it is evidence-based. In that way, we are truly unbiased.”

He ended with a rallying call: “Imagine if we could stop diabetes and obesity epidemics and change the trajectory for world health, and for policy makers.”
 

itsamess

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#27
oftentimes ends up in the hole in the ground with the victim
Hence the phrase Doctors bury their mistakes. Not all doctors are the same and thank God there are some like Unca's son but I have worked with many that are money hungry pure evil beings. Went to school with some that were brown noses who didn't know shit. Dad was doctor so... The medical research end is all about management. Doctors are human beings so they make mistakes, but I am talking about attitude. What is the average attention span of doctor when talking to their patients, oh yes 11 seconds. You are a vehicle to make money. They know best, you know shit. Worked with one Oncologist that woudl walk out of patients room telling them hey would lick this and after door closed would comment how that was a dead "potato". Today he is a distinguished chair at a medical school. Psyching someone up is one thing, allowing them to prepare for the end is another story. One last thing if you have a relative who might be or know an undertaker ask them what the see when former patients come in. If they are honest they will tell you about cooked organs or tissue from cancer therapy and more. We all need them at some point in our life just make sure you watch for signs of genuine interest.
 

anywoundedduck

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#28
I am now totally of the opinion that the average American would,live longer by staying away from doctors. The less you see them, the less chance they have of injecting you with tainted vaccines, or putting you on a drug regimen that will kill you, long before,the disease gets you.
I know that a minority of doctors are honest and caring, but most are just shills for the drug companies.
It used to be different, but now it is an obscene money making scam that is killing many, who die penniless, because of the cost of the treatment that killed them.
TRUE!
 

hammerhead

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#29
@Unca Walt
Not enough Unca Walt sons to go around.
Short of your son having a practice in Louisville, can you ask him, please, how I can find a doctor that is not constantly insisting I take Statins, or similar drugs, to lower my cholesterol. I am not going to take em because they hurt my kidneys and will put me into kidney failure. I tell my current doctor that, and he retorts that I should take the statins and see a kidney doctor. There is more reasons than that. I take insulin for type 2 diabetes and, for years, have controlled wmy A1C with it for $75 a month. He sends me to an Endo who wants me to take a insulin combo that end up costing me out of pocket $700 a month, and that is impossible for me. Instead of writing the prescription for the insulin, like I asked (insurance will cover it if I have a prescription) He wants to send me to another Endo.
I am at my wits end,
Finding a doc here in Louisville when you are on Medicare is very hard.
My wife still has med insurance through my former employer, AT&T,and is comparatively pretty good insurance, but even she is having a tough time finding a good doctor.

I really don't expect ,you or,your son to answer this impossible question, so I guess we can label the whole discussion as rhetorical.
Not sure what the nightlife is where you are, any. It was explained to me by a dentist I used, and don't get me started on those money grabbers although not this guy IMO, early graduates of probably any field want to be in the city where there is always action.
 

anywoundedduck

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#30
Duck, can you reduce your carbs? How about bacon and eggs for breakfast? Pork chops ther and fried mushrooms for dinner? Baked or fried chicken? Or grilled chicken breasts? How about veggiesreally steamed and served with butter, salt, and pepper? You might be impressed with how good you feel if you can give up the carbs.
Thanks for the advice. I love everything on your above menu, but there is one problem.
I can't give up bread.
Everything. else that's high carb, I can give up.
Bread? No.
Low carb bread? Yuk!
 

GOLDBRIX

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#31
Doctors are entering the same list Lawyers and Policemen are already on:
"Nobody Likes until You Actually Need One" List
 

Unca Walt

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#32
@Unca Walt
Not enough Unca Walt sons to go around.
Short of your son having a practice in Louisville, can you ask him, please, how I can find a doctor that is not constantly insisting I take Statins, or similar drugs, to lower my cholesterol. I am not going to take em because they hurt my kidneys and will put me into kidney failure. I tell my current doctor that, and he retorts that I should take the statins and see a kidney doctor. There is more reasons than that. I take insulin for type 2 diabetes and, for years, have controlled wmy A1C with it for $75 a month. He sends me to an Endo who wants me to take a insulin combo that end up costing me out of pocket $700 a month, and that is impossible for me. Instead of writing the prescription for the insulin, like I asked (insurance will cover it if I have a prescription) He wants to send me to another Endo.
I am at my wits end,
Finding a doc here in Louisville when you are on Medicare is very hard.
My wife still has med insurance through my former employer, AT&T,and is comparatively pretty good insurance, but even she is having a tough time finding a good doctor.

I really don't expect ,you or,your son to answer this impossible question, so I guess we can label the whole discussion as rhetorical.

Dang, Duckie... You are in a fargin pickle, no error. Scooter cannot prescribe for you, but he can pass on knowledge to me.

So... Unca Walt says: "Hey Duckie -- you have a good possibility of help!"

My darling bride of these last 60 years cannot take statins. They make her muscles hurt all over. But her cholesterol is in good shape.

HTF she doodat?

The solution is sumpin' called Zetia. <<== that's the brand name of Ezetimibe. This stuff is a lipid-lowering compound that selectively inhibits the intestinal absorption of cholesterol and related phytosterols. It must be coupled with good diet and exercise. It does NOT work on inhibiting your liver making that shit. It screws your small intestine into not absorbing the naughty stuff.

AND YOU ARE FUCKING PAYING TOO MUCH.

This next statement will probably make a couple of doctor/pharma haters absolutely shit their pants in disbelief, but Big Pharma (Merck) (HOLY SHITBALLS!!) will GIVE it to you FREE (if you qualify). <<-- And if you can't figger out how to do that, I can't help ya. :-)

Check with your "doctor" -- make him do a little work.

www.merckhelps.com/ZETIA
ZETIA
® (ezetimibe) 10 mg Tablets. This product qualifies for the Merck Patient Assistance Program.This private and confidential program provides product free of charge to eligible individuals, primarily the uninsured who, without our assistance, could not afford needed Merck medicines.

DYODD, bro.

But stay the hell away from statins if you take Zetia. They do not play well together.

I truly hope this helps, bro.

PS: Thanks for the nod to my brilliant son.

PPS: And one more thing for all doctor haters: try, willya? to give some of them a break. It takes about fifteen years of actually being a doctor to be pretty good at it. The pandemic problem is that the LUFTWAFFE no longer has enough of the veteran "pilots" due to the strains and burnouts.

Young doctors will do their best (and that would be replicated exactly in the LUFTWAFFE analogy where a Kraut pilot will only have ten hours in a Bf-109, and he goes up against a US pilot who had 600 hours before he even got over to the battlezone.)

So the Kraut may be trying, but he simply cannot match the guy with 60 times his experience.

This is a real thing, guys. And it is going to get progressively worse. I have no bumper-sticker solution. Neither did the Luftwaffe.
 
Last edited:

Someone_else

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#33
I can't give up bread.
I have been low carb for years, and there is no substitute for bread. No sandwich bread, no French bread, no dinner rolls, no pizza.

I can put a hamburger patty on a plate with cheese and a pickle, but it's not the same.
I can have a plate with pepperoni, sauce, cheese, and olives, but it's not a pizza.
A taco salad is okay, but it's just not the same without the shell.

I guess part of the experience is holding the food in the hand while eating it.

On the other hand, eating a steak with knife and fork is perfectly fine. I have no urge to hold it in my hand and chew off chunks.

Consider fried pork rinds as a snack. I have yet to find any other low carb crunchy snack.

Have some nuts, too. What do you like? Peanuts, sunflower seeds, almonds, cashews, brazil nuts? If you get the munchies, have a few and maybe in a few minutes the urge will go away.

A salad can be dull. Why not make it a chef's salad or seafood salad?

And speaking of seafood, salmon is not cheap, but it can sure be satisfying. If you get a salmon fillet with the skin, I suggest taking the skin off after cooking and toast the skin in a toaster oven until it is crispy.

There is no substitute for bread, but there are a lot of good foods that might take your mind off of its absence for a while.
 

Son of Gloin

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#34
I have been low carb for years, and there is no substitute for bread. No sandwich bread, no French bread, no dinner rolls, no pizza.

I can put a hamburger patty on a plate with cheese and a pickle, but it's not the same.
I can have a plate with pepperoni, sauce, cheese, and olives, but it's not a pizza.
A taco salad is okay, but it's just not the same without the shell.

I guess part of the experience is holding the food in the hand while eating it.

On the other hand, eating a steak with knife and fork is perfectly fine. I have no urge to hold it in my hand and chew off chunks.

Consider fried pork rinds as a snack. I have yet to find any other low carb crunchy snack.

Have some nuts, too. What do you like? Peanuts, sunflower seeds, almonds, cashews, brazil nuts? If you get the munchies, have a few and maybe in a few minutes the urge will go away.

A salad can be dull. Why not make it a chef's salad or seafood salad?

And speaking of seafood, salmon is not cheap, but it can sure be satisfying. If you get a salmon fillet with the skin, I suggest taking the skin off after cooking and toast the skin in a toaster oven until it is crispy.

There is no substitute for bread, but there are a lot of good foods that might take your mind off of its absence for a while.
There’s a lot of good advice in your post. I can live without bread and pasta, no problem. All bread and pasta is tasteless junk that sucks the moisture out of your mouth if you don’t soak it in sauces, butter or stick slabs of meat in it. Potato’s are my problem. I love them baked, mashed, fried, boiled, you name it, so I have to be careful with them. I just limit my consumption and frequency of use on them. EZPZ.
 

Unca Walt

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#35
Just saw this...

"...the medical industry is one of the few industries where death happens everyday and the lack of professionalism often times goes unnoticed by the hospital administration and they aren't interested in any litigation so, to blow off all complaints is really quite easy and happens all the time"

Here we have one side of a coin. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

My son has saved the lives of over a thousand people. He has patched up thousands more.

LET US COUNT THE NUMBER OF "THANK YOU FOR SAVING MY LIFE!" LETTERS OVER THIRTY YEARS:

=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
NONE YET.


MORAL OF THE STORY: This coin has TWO sides.
 

GOLDBRIX

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#36
There is no substitute for bread, but there are a lot of good foods that might take your mind off of its absence for a while.
You can make a small batch of muffin-like creations using ground Flak seed or Coconut flour.
Yep, It aint the same, and I need to get back on them after the holidays.
Pizza - I eat one piece with the crust. Three inch square cuts or if Pie Cut split one slice in half and eat it, scrapping the other half. ( I always do Light sauce too). The rest of my pizza the toppings are scrapped off onto a plate and I'll eat the toppings only.

My genetic make up I don't do "FAT FREE" or "LIGHT" Dressings or Salad Dressings with SUGAR listed in the ingredients. Alcohol Sugars are O.K but should be limited, Full Fat, Butter, E.V. Olive Oil are good.

I decided I'll start a thread for recipes for bread-like substitutes. I've got two I'll go post now so give me a minute or two.
 

utsteve

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#37
I have learned in this Lyme battle that the average US person fighting Lyme sees 26 doctors before finding one that can help them. Because of my dislike ( or substitute stronger words) of doctors, I only saw 1 before the Doctor that has helped me immensely on my 9 year fight. The first one would only use Pharmaceuticals antibiotics and nothing else. I went with a doctor that would use pharmaceuticals, herbal, vitamins, supplements food etc. Of course my wife and I each spent 7-8 weeks spending 60-70 hours educating ourselves before we even made an appointment with the first doctor. Have 2 daughters that are nurses and they sure wanted us to see Infectious disease doctor x or y. But by then we had learned how little the average doctor or specialist knows about Lyme and how much damage they can cause by trying to Practice on you.

Got to tell you, when you realize what sugars, dairy and grains do to your body it sure is easier not to eat them when they cause so much pain and inflammation. Bread is no problem to stay away from then.
 

Son of Gloin

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#39
There is an old saying, attributed to one of the ancient Greeks that goes, “Let your food be your medicine and your medicine be your food.” There are no wiser words ever uttered by a human being.
 

BarnacleBob

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#40
A Doctor can only be as good as his patient! If the patient wont follow doctors orders, it is immoral to blame the Doctor... My Cardiologist said that most of his patients wont follow his recommendations concerning diet, exercise, smoking & excessive alcohol use, etc... his only option for these patients is to treat them with pharma. Cant blame the Doc for that... Another complaint that can be heard from health care providers is that most patients cannot properly communicate with them. This makes a proper diagnosis a crap shoot.... ! Patient ignorance & lack of communication skills cant be blamed on the Doc.

Funny thing, informed patients that have performed due dilligence seem to have much better luck with timely treatments than the uninformed with low communications skills... Do ya think theres a connection???