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Drugs are killing so many people in West Virginia

Scorpio

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#1
Analysis | Drugs are killing so many people in West Virginia that the state can’t keep up with the funerals



The Washington Post
Christopher Ingraham 13 hrs ago



© David Ryder/Reuters A man injects himself with heroin using a needle obtained from the People's Harm Reduction Alliance, the nation's largest needle-exchange program, in Seattle.

Deaths in West Virginia have overwhelmed a state program providing burial assistance for needy families for at least the fifth year in a row, causing the program to be nearly out of money four months before the end of the fiscal year, according to the state's Department of Health and Human Resources (DHHR). Funeral directors in West Virginia say the state's drug overdose epidemic, the worst in the nation, is partly to blame.


West Virginia's indigent burial program, which budgets about $2 million a year for funeral financial assistance, had already been under pressure from the aging of the baby-boom generation. The program offers an average of $1,250 to help cover funeral expenses for families who can't otherwise afford them.

In the current fiscal year ending June 30, "1,508 burials have been submitted for payment through the Indigent Burial Program,” according to Allison Adler, a spokesman for state DHHR Secretary Bill Crouch. “There are funds remaining for 63 additional burials.”

The program has been around for decades, according to Adler, but only began running out of funds starting in 2013. In 2014, the program ran out of money in June. By 2015, the program's budget was depleted by March, similar to where it stands this year.

Adler didn't respond to a question on the role drug overdoses have played in the program running out of money. But funeral directors such as Robert C. Kimes of the West Virginia Funeral Directors Association blame skyrocketing overdose deaths for the current troubles. In 2015, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, West Virginia's drug overdose death rate stood at 41.5 cases per 100,000 residents, the highest rate in the country and nearly three times the national average. In 1999, the state's overdose fatality rate was below average.




©
Provided by WP Company LLC d/b/a The Washington Post

Nationally, drug overdose deaths accounted for fewer than two out of every 100 fatalities in 2015. But in West Virginia, overdoses claim more than three out of every 100 fatalities. And among certain demographic groups, the likelihood of overdose is much higher: roughly 8 percent of all fatalities among white men age 35 to 64, for instance, and over 28 percent of deaths among white males age 15 to 34.

The state's funeral directors are on the front lines of this trend. “When you get an overdose, typically it's going to be a younger individual who's not financially in a great position,” Kimes said. “I've heard from several funeral directors that the majority of [overdose deaths they deal with] are addressed via the indigent burial program.”

West Virginia is somewhat unique in providing a state-level program for indigent burials, Kimes said. The majority of states don't provide such services at the state level, and most of the ones that do limit them to recipients of Medicaid, SNAP or other social programs for the poor. In many states, funeral assistance is left to the discretion of individual counties or cities.

West Virginia expects a half-billion-dollar budget shortfall in the next fiscal year, making relief from the state unlikely. Social service agencies report being overwhelmed by the number of overdose and addiction cases. In the city of Huntington (population 49,000), for instance, authorities responded to 26 heroin overdose cases in one four-hour span last year.

A Charleston Gazette-Mail investigation last year found that between 2007 and 2012, as the state's drug overdose epidemic skyrocketed, drug wholesalers shipped over 780 million doses of opiate painkillers hydrocodone and oxycodone to the state, or roughly "433 pain pills for every man, woman and child in West Virginia.” Those two drugs killed more than 1,700 West Virginians during that time period, the investigation found.

“That's not the kind of business you want” as a funeral director, Kimes said. “You hate to see a young person's life thrown away.”


http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/an...ep-up-with-the-funerals/ar-AAnYKBM?li=BBnb7Kz
 

GOLDBRIX

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#2
Yeah. It bleed over into Eastern and Southeastern Kentucky too. Change the name of the State and cities ya got the KY problem to a tee.
 

latemetal

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#3
Time to bury in farm fields, just make sure its deep enough, have county inmates do it so they can see their future...
 

southfork

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© David Ryder/Reuters A man injects himself with heroin using a needle obtained from the People's Harm Reduction Alliance, the nation's largest needle-exchange program, in Seattle.

The Irony, drugs are illegal but they give free needles to them to shoot up with.
 

BackwardsEngineeer

I'll just take one of my Proton Energy Pills....
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#5
Johnson city and through the smokies as well..... Spoke with a gal hiring for national mall retail chain, she had typically 2 of every three applicants fail the drug screen. Described the problem as an epidemic from the companies perspective. My take.... they are cleaning out the hills setting them up as future places of refuge. By the time they are needed all that will be left will be old timers and burn outs.
 

Mujahideen

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#6
Doctors overprescribe, people get hooked to pills and then their prescription runs out... what ya gonna do then? Ban marijuana! lol

The pharmaceutical industry is nothing but a bunch of legal drug dealers.

“We found there was about a 25 percent lower rate of prescription painkiller overdose deaths on average after implementation of a medical marijuana law,” lead study author Dr. Marcus Bachhuber said.

http://drugabuse.com/legalizing-marijuana-decreases-fatal-opiate-overdoses/
States with access to legal marijuana have lower opiate deaths. That's a fact.

Let the bodies hit the floor until we change our policy.
 

Joe King

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#7
I know how to fix it!

All we gotta do is double down in the war on drugs. More cops more courts more jails and longer punishments will surely fix the problem, right? The People must conform or pay the price for making decisions we don't like that regard their personal lives.
...but seriously, this whole problem is the result of decades of govs knee-jerk reactions based on ignorance of the subject matter.
...and yet another example of our "leaders" working to defeat their Constitutionally imposed limitations on power. The Founders never intended for the gov to involve itself in such matters.
 

Goldhedge

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#8
The Irony, drugs are illegal but they give free needles to them to shoot up with.

It's really quite simple. Give them needles so they kill themselves sooner, because getting HepC takes so darn long!
 

Aurumag

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#10
It's really quite simple. Give them needles so they kill themselves sooner, because getting HepC takes so darn long!
I liked your post because death by OD is very likely the cheapest and most efficient solution.
 

southfork

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#11
In the current fiscal year ending June 30, "1,508 burials, So that being said 3k a year indigents doing themselves in, what Is the total then per year, how many can afford their own burials?
 

Alton

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#12
I liked your post because death by OD is very likely the cheapest and most efficient solution.
Yep! Inexpensive, relatively quick, relatively painless, no "blood on the hands", blame is shifted to doctors and BIG Pharma. Nearly a NWO politician's wet dream!
 

Mujahideen

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#13
Prescription drugs kill more people in the U.S. than any other drug, but heroin overdose deaths have exploded, leading the Drug Enforcement Administration to declare both as the most threatening drugs.

http://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/us_563bb0b8e4b0b24aee495d4e

Legal drug dealers.

If you get prescribed oxy, don't.
 

^updated^

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#14
Gee, I wonder what we've been doing in Afghanistan for 15 years? Hmmm... What could it be?

*U.S. "fighting" (more like guarding) in Afghanistan for 15 years.

*90% of the world's opium comes from the opium poppy fields of Afghanistan.

*Opium production in Afghanistan is at an all-time high, after having been eradicated by the Taliban between 1996-2001.

*Opioid abuse (illegal and legal -- heroin and prescription opioid s) is at epidemic levels across the U.S. Heroin -- once an expensive designer drug -- is now cheap and easily accessible.
 

ArkWv

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#15
It's a huge problem here and I know several who died. Two girls I worked with both in their mid 20's died. Their dealer was found dead last year sitting in his running car. To much heroin.
All I could think was "Karma MF'er".
One boy shot and killed his friend because he thought he was a monster trying to kill him.
Another beat his grandfather to death with a baseball bat for drug money.
I used to think it was cute to go to the town park and see a condom on the ground, some ole boy got lucky, not so cute now when I saw a needle.
 

gringott

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#16
Here around the Louisville area the ODs seem to be skyrocketing. Barely a day goes by that the local teevee news doesn't have pictures of OD cases in their autos. Seems the drug dealers are mixing Fentanyl in the heroin causing the problem. First we had the state flooded with prescription opiates, making the drug companies rich, then Jack Conway and crew "cracked down" on this, literally making it almost impossible for Joe Sixpack to get opiate medication without major hassle, many doctors simply refuse to prescribe them, sending the patients to "pain clinics" as they don't want the legal hassle. As predicted, this crackdown had the addicted seek out heroin as a substitute for the opiates they were getting via prescription. So jump in heroin use, followed by mixing in of Fentanyl, followed by jump in death by OD. All foreseeable.

Yes, Dorthy, big pharma is nothing more than a legal drug dealer. The damage they have done is tremendous.
 

anywoundedduck

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#17
The CIA is flooding the country with Afghanistan opiates. While our kids guard the poppy fields, production is up a thousand percent.
Hard to guard the border to prevent this, because the Opiates are flown in by Military transport. The money accumulated from the sale of opiates is laundered by our too big to fail banks.
Trump has a lot of draining to do. Many of our military and intelligence agencies are in on it. It needs to stop.
 

kiffertom

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#18
how many heroin addicts are there? there are 1.5 million chronic abusers! they use 25 to 50 mg/day. 1500,000 x .25=375000 grams/28grams/oz=13,392.85oz/16oz/pound=837.05 pounds per day.this is the low side. double it for the high side.