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Farm Tractor thread

pitw

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Sunday I got caught doing nothing by a landowner up North[I was watching geese in the am] and he said, "Seeing as you got nothing to do jump in I need you for a few hours". Soooo I ended up driving this


for 3.5 hours while he pounded a mile of fence posts. I ain't a JD fan by any means but will admit this is a damb fine tractor.
 

ttazzman

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@Pitw........need me to send you some green n yellow spray paint


of course i cant tell what it is but it appears to be a 6cyl and a 70s-80s rig ....so it is a heck of a tractor compared to what you have been posting earlier ....lotta torque n hp in that rig, lotta tractor....
 
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mtnman

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michael59

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Was watching some of the conversion videos and was wondering how come I always work alone.

Oh and for those who do things the odd way. In the video above that john deer one when you have purchased a tractor that is over 40 years old and find that the fuel lines have that solid crap in them take the fuel lines off and apply heat to melt that stuff. I was doing one and I had to even plug the tank and boil the fuel damm near with a propane torch. The fuel was so hot I could not keep my hand in it. so out comes fuel and goop and of course upon cooling a bit the goop stays in the bottom of the buckets. So did this three times and then hooked up and ran BUT, but I failed to leave the tractor running. AND, by golly that goop somehow solidified in the injector pump. Yep no fuel going to injectors now as it just bypasses and heads out the return line.

Oh the joys of working on old iron.

Edit: Only use the information in this post if you have to get a tractor out of the field and back to the shop as I have been running into this problem a bunch. I just cleaned a 152 or a MF135 and have a different way to accomplish a cleaning.
 
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Lt Dan

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Spent a couple or three hours yesterday replacing the water pump on my Ford 1710 tractor. Had to almost remove the radiator (loosen and lift) to get the fan blade to swing out of the housing on the radiator. No leaks now so good to go. Small tractor with a bucket loader, really useful around the place.

Today, may have a chance to use it pulling brush stumps from along the edge of the lower crop field. Sure easier than digging them out by hand with a mattock.
 

mtnman

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I just brought this home today. It has Ford 3000 tin but it's a Ford 3400 Industrial. Runs OK, stops OK and the tires are good. I'm going Monday to get a Front Loader attachment for it. Soon it will be my Front Loader, I'll need it this summer for moving sheet steel and angle iron. Big job coming this summer.
tractor 002.JPG
 

ttazzman

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I just brought this home today. It has Ford 3000 tin but it's a Ford 3400 Industrial. Runs OK, stops OK and the tires are good. I'm going Monday to get a Front Loader attachment for it. Soon it will be my Front Loader, I'll need it this summer for moving sheet steel and angle iron. Big job coming this summer. View attachment 80412

gas or diesel?...........think adding weight on the rear end.......and working your arms out ahead of time (no power steering).......but other than that you should love it......beats the hell outa the alternative

Edit: I was wrong on closer inspection it does have powersteering
:) :)
 

mtnman

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gas or diesel?...........think adding weight on the rear end.......and working your arms out ahead of time (no power steering).......but other than that you should love it......beats the hell outa the alternative

Edit: I was wrong on closer inspection it does have powersteering
:) :)
Gas, and yes it has power steering, dual cylinders. This tractor was built to have a loader, everything is heavy duty. I plan on hanging about 800lbs off the 3 point.
 

michael59

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4wd can get you in some tight spots and out but some of those spots are just too tight and you have to get another tractor. The good thing is that they sell wire rope in all sizes and length. signed from been there done that....

Annywhoo just thought I would pop in and fart. Seems those 4020's are about gummed up in the diesel tanks and the whole fuel delivery system by now. Just went through this....

Parked tractor-tractor decided it had wheels and tits.
found the evil crud in fuel lines
used propane torch to clear lines
tool side panels off and used bigger torch to heat fuel tank
drained tank
did the heat and drain 3 times.

put it all together fired it up and it ran....was/Was going to let it go till it ran out of fuel bunt no, NO sadly I shut it off and there by completely gummed up the injection pump when the diesel oil cooled. So I timed it up and pulled the pump. here is where it gets interesting......

cheep and despicable me only had so much brake clean that would cut this gum so I decided to soak the injection pump in gasoline.
I pulled it out and drained, shot it with air, shot it with brake clean and dunked it like I was dunking a witch.

I would say all in all I spent 4 hours soaking squirting and blowing...{get ur mind out of the gutter}... and then wall-A there it was gum-free with the fuel metering free and the governor springs and linkage all free...... yep just ready to be reinstalled.

Yep, that/this is the first time I have ever used gasoline to un-stick a diesel pump. yep three county fairs and a dog and pony show and I thought I had seen it all.

So My advise is: If your tractor is old fear not about it just not starting because the fuel shut off or governor is stuck due to waxy, gummy, fuel crap that alkey-hall and such cannot control; yes I tried fuel additives to cut this stuff.

What I am saying is when push comes to shove and that mechanic tells you he needs to pull that pump and send it off to be "REBUILT" that using gasoline and brake clean and air is a cheeper way.....I have a 3208 injection pump that has been being rebuilt for two months now....

Oh yeah word of advise.....DO NOT mix gasoline and diesel and and run the motor thinking you will clear it up that way unless you like changing pistons.
One more thing....I purged out about a good BIG sized coffee mug of crud out of the fuel tank and, and I had that fuel so hot I could not keep my hands in it when draining.
 

ttazzman

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Gas, and yes it has power steering, dual cylinders. This tractor was built to have a loader, everything is heavy duty. I plan on hanging about 800lbs off the 3 point.
I fluid filled my rear tires.........even with that my rear tires will bounce and lose traction with a 1k# round bale on the frount.......sometimes if i know i have a lot of heavy loader work to do i will put a bale spike on the 3pt or a heavy box blade (both weigh about 1k# ) on back....makes a world of difference...

my tractor is 4wd so rear traction loss really isnt a issue but safety is ....my little tractor i am talking bout is probably overall about 800# lighter than yours in stock form...
 

michael59

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And I broke my Roosa Master injection pump. Seems the advance screw gets stuck or gauled in. Shattered the hex on it. :( SAD looks like this one is going to the rebuild guys in a bucket. Also sad is I now get to pay $500 to $600 for the privilege of sending it there.

so, does any one know how to get the rear bumper bolts out of a XJ6 1980's style. Oh and I should warn you this Jag is not in the book. Just pm me if you have run across this before. Darn.....I guess it is house work today.....
 

michael59

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Well I had a little socket welded onto the advance screw so it could be pulled and found that the two rotor plungers were gooped in and stuck. :-( so my gasoline trick did not work in un-sticking them, worked on every thing else though. Also found that the delivery valve and its stop were missing, ha, who would have thought this thing could even run without those, but it did. Also, downn in the advance side of the pump there is a plunger with a ring. under this ring is a seal and this seal will expand by either using gas or the other brake clean I was using so I could not get it back together and broke the ring....so ordered those. All in all parts for the rebuild cost about $130.

compare that price along with my wages/time and total cost is going to be $300 tops which is better than $700 for a used or rebuilt pump. Believe me they are about the same. So the ole 4020 should be chugging along today... :-)
 

mtnman

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Well my little blue tractor is getting a some surgery. It started by the idea I'd slap a set of rings in her to up the compression a bit, well one thing leads to another... When she's back together she'll have: new clutch plate, pressure plate, throwout and pilot bearing, oil pump, water pump, valve job, distributor, front main seal, rear main seal and finally, knurl the pistons and new rings. I figure while she's this far down replace what might break.

tractor loader 001.JPG
tractor loader 002.JPG
tractor loader 003.JPG
 

Howdy

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knurl the pistons
A sleeve and piston set doesn't cost much. Your tractor must be one that doesn't have sleeves. Torn down as far as it is, seems I would go ahead and have it bored if it doesn't have sleeves. Then it should be GTG another 40 years.
 

mtnman

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A sleeve and piston set doesn't cost much. Your tractor must be one that doesn't have sleeves. Torn down as far as it is, seems I would go ahead and have it bored if it doesn't have sleeves. Then it should be GTG another 40 years.
She's already at .040 over and no sleeves. I only need her for another 20yrs...
 

ttazzman

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certainly a ridge reem and cylinder hone job is in order as a minimum..if your replacing rings...i would probably pull the rod caps and check journals and clearance with some plasti-gage
 

mtnman

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certainly a ridge reem and cylinder hone job is in order...if your replacing rings
Yes, that's a given. Otherwise the rings won't seal.
 

Howdy

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I have done several poor boy in frame overhauls consisting of honing cylinders and going back together with same size rings and journals and not miking anything, and sending the head out to grind valves. This can only be done on an engine that doesn't knock and makes sense when not equipped with sleeves. It is generally good for another 40K miles at least. Older industrial engines usually have very generous rod and main bearing surface volume and seldom need the crank turned.
The idea behind that kind of overhaul is that the investment, especially in labor is minimal. When I invest the labor to pull an engine out, it's difficult to justify not going 100% on it.
 

mtnman

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I have done several poor boy in frame overhauls consisting of honing cylinders and going back together with same size rings and journals and not miking anything, and sending the head out to grind valves. This can only be done on an engine that doesn't knock and makes sense when not equipped with sleeves. It is generally good for another 40K miles at least. Older industrial engines usually have very generous rod and main bearing surface volume and seldom need the crank turned.
The idea behind that kind of overhaul is that the investment, especially in labor is minimal. When I invest the labor to pull an engine out, it's difficult to justify not going 100% on it.
If this were a car or truck, I'd bore and sleeve the cylinders and turn the crank, but it's a tractor/loader that will be used maybe twice a week for an hour or so each time. It just doesn't justify the $1000 price tag for that job and parts. On this loader you have to remove the front axle to get the oilpan off. The oilpan is cast iron and part of the structure, made this way to handle the stress of the loader.
 

michael59

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As you know I have been working on an old 4020 which gelled up with crud in the injection pump. Many a time I thought I had this thing figured out and many a time I was left bamboozled and butt hurt.

So pump was sent in and came back and installed. No work. Yes fuel was pumped at the pump to injectors but no start, so figured pump was 180 off. So pulled pump and actually made it 180 off. So pulled pump again. Now here is something to pay attention to.

When .along sure motor is on top dead center lift valve cover and make sure the rockers on the number one cylinder are loose. This shows that the number on is actually on the detonation stroke.

So I lined up the tick marks in the sight port and a big fat NOTHING.
So I made sure the return line was abel to flow and it was free all the way to the tank. In fact it actually went into the tank about three to four inches. And, nothing in fact the pump quit pumping.

So procured a Holley Red electric fuel pump, bypassed the mechanical fuel pump and forced fuel into and through the rebuilt pump. Turned over and over, nothing. Got pissy and started shooting starting fluid into the stack. Locked up motor. Did this again with less start fluid, and puff poof, puff, poof.....And then the BIG belly gurggles in the tank. Seems that the fuel tank on a John Deer 4020 has the return line that goes way down into the tank and this was plugged with crud. As soon as that cleared the motor chuga-chugged to life.

Yay. I have fought this thing for months and I knew this thing should run, what I did not know was the length of the return line into the fuel tank as I only put 5 gallons of fresh fuel in the tank.

So there you have it my misery equates to your technical abilities now.
Oh yes, also remember this current diesel fuel is partly bio red and green as they are actually the same fuel and these old tractors gum up so use a biocide in your fuel.
 

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Diesel tanks sometimes get real cruddy. I would drop a small flashlite on a string and look carefully at the inside. You may have to take the tank off and steam clean it.
 

mtnman

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Well she's back together. Honed the cylinders, knurled the pistons, new rings, new bearings, lapped the valves, new clutch, rebuilt starter, rebuilt alternator, rebuilt carb, new distributor, new coil and plugs, new gaskets, rebuilt radiator, new hydraulic pump for the loader, new wiring, new solinoid, all fresh oils and coolant, new radiator hoses, lots of new bolts and more I can't remember. Next step is to attach the loader and pump. Picked up a pair of forklift forks at the scrapyard for cheap, building a frame to hold them. A couple of days and I'll be moving stuff around the yard!
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michael59

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Diesel tanks sometimes get real cruddy. I would drop a small flashlite on a string and look carefully at the inside. You may have to take the tank off and steam clean it.
Naw, it's as clean as a propane burner can make it. You see we knew this crud was there so I took the side panels off and burnt the paint off heating the fuel. I then took the fitting off the bottom and drained. By the third time the fuel was so hot I could not put my hands in it.

So hooked everything up and it ran. But after the fuel cooled it would not start next morning. It was then the conundrum began.

Oh and the crud that came out of that tank was astounding, lots of it, gooey solid tan crud. So we went looking and this crud is in every fuel tank there.
 

mtnman

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Naw, it's as clean as a propane burner can make it. You see we knew this crud was there so I took the side panels off and burnt the paint off heating the fuel. I then took the fitting off the bottom and drained. By the third time the fuel was so hot I could not put my hands in it.

So hooked everything up and it ran. But after the fuel cooled it would not start next morning. It was then the conundrum began.

Oh and the crud that came out of that tank was astounding, lots of it, gooey solid tan crud. So we went looking and this crud is in every fuel tank there.
It ran with hot fuel but not with cold fuel? Sounds like a cylinder compression problem to me...
 

michael59

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It ran with hot fuel but not with cold fuel? Sounds like a cylinder compression problem to me...
Oh no not a compression thing at all. It definitely was a fuel thing. Went this morning and rolled it over and let it run till I gathered up all the tools ad packed them inside. When a diesel engine locks up on ether you can bet that at least one cylinder has compression.
 

michael59

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Yep, could be my grand-pappy in one of those picks.

He told me when he was done feeding the thrasher he hopped firefights for three days. And when he had to walk, he walked.

And, on the road,trail, home he actually jumped over that guy who was laying in the road.

Imagine having something of value in your pocket that you would not let yourself sleep/rest because if you did then it might be taken from you.

Yeah, a season's worth of miseries? And, today it is expected?
 

coopersmith

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Hey there what is that float tool? A float to me is a planer/leveler for clean plowed ground for irrigation to flatten, so the water will flow a certain direction. You are obviously not leveling your hay ground?
 
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glockngold

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https://www.farmshow.com/a_article.php?aid=18899

Hayland "Float" Flattens Fields



The 350 Hayland Float will rid your land of mole hills, humps, and hollows, according to Westward Products Ltd. in Red Deer, Alta.
The implement was originally marketed as a rental unit to fertilizer dealers who were using it to apply fertilizer while also leveling out the land (a tank was added in front, and dribble tubes in the back).
"It became apparent there was a market for hay producers, so we added it to our product line," says Len Schultz, company representative.
Now the unit is used to level pastures, hay meadows, and other areas, and provides an economical way to prevent expensive repairs to haybines, discbines, balers and forage harvesters. It also helps to reduce livestock injuries.
The unit is made of tube steel. The tow hitch is self-leveling and hydraulically adjustable to raise or lower the amount of pressure applied to the ground, depending on conditions. The rear tubes on the wings and frame are loaded with steel punchings for added weight.
The 3,800-lb. rig incorporates two 1100 by 20 used military tires, and its wings lift hydraulically for transport. The working width is 35 feet.
The 350 Hayland Float sells for $12,625 (Can.).
 

pitw

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I used it to knock down mole and gopher hills. The hay land gets so rough from the critters that we used to break the hay up early just to get rid of the rough.
 

coopersmith

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I have never seen a tool like that in my life. I would have to say it would be useless round here.

We do alot of haying round here as well, baling trash mostly, for cow feed. be it failed milo, corn stalks, wheat straw, oat straw, maybe some crp grass if its allowed. We swath it high, rake a few days later and bale.

I can see where that ground conditioner would be good on alfalfa or grass plots, to save your sickle if your running low.

thanks for the info,
coopersmith
 

pitw

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Nope. I hoop up right at the wheel so it is a easy pull. Just me being stupid.
 

michael59

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And someone said "Let there be stupid" and I showed up.

Nice buggy design. Yep, I've been there. Actually had to have a 300 foot 3/4 swedged line handy and an extra tractor. Who sat in the other seat? Whom ever I could con for fifty bucks, and some times it was days.....got it done though.