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Farm Tractor thread

DodgebyDave

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#41
Those classic Ford tractors are tough to beat for getting done whatever.

You'll need a bulldozer, too.
 

Eat Beef

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#42
Did yours have that SelectOspeed transmission? Are they any better than hydrostatic?
4 forward 1 reverse with a hi/lo, so 8f/2r. Standard.

Mine was bought by my grandpa in 1969. We replaced the clutch in the mid 80s, and the steering column in the late 90s. It ran on 2 of 3 cylinders for a decade. The injector pump was going out. It's now down to 1 cylinder, and runs like a popping johnny, but I haven't gotten around to replacing the pump yet.



It also has 'armstrong' power steering (no power steering), which I prefer to Ford's abysmal attempts at adding power steering to tractors. I'm pretty sure Ford made their own 3 cylinder diesels at the time. Either way, they're great engines, much better than any gas tractor engines, including the 8/9/2ns.
 

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#43
It's now down to 1 cylinder, and runs like a popping johnny, but I haven't gotten around to replacing the pump yet.
That one cylinder is probably pretty scalded by now, carrying the entire load. Those are good tractors. The 8N's major advantage was production numbers. All the Ford tractors built after the 8N up to the late 70"s were probably better, but there are so many 8N's around and they're cheap and easy to maintain.

Henry Ford was a great American.
 

Eat Beef

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#44
I'm not running it on one. It's been shut down a while, I tried to get her running recently and found that the injector pump is down to one, but I won't be using it until I get it fixed.


I don't know why, but I love that old tractor. Whether bushhogging, digging post holes, raking hay, or any other of a million odd jobs, I've spent many a miserable hour on the old gal!
 

Eat Beef

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#45
Back to the original topic, check out "Ag Cranes". They are something like a front end loader for the 3pt hitch. They don't work well for digging/moving dirt, but are great for a million other chores that involve lifting.
 

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#46
Being Friday and noticing we're lacking some music for this thread (not that it needs it) - I found this inspirational. It's not for everyone had to share.
The metaphor if one follows is that of a workhorse (i.e. farm tractor) being that of the roots of bluegrass style of a modern metal rock song (i.e. large 4x4 truck on the road today) fused together with an overall expression of toughness.........enjoy.

 
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Argent Dragon

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#47
Back to the original topic, check out "Ag Cranes".
Found it (actually Ag-Kranes to be technical) >>
http://www.wikco.com/agkrn.html

*Although, this type of implement is for a much larger tractor than I plan on getting (70+hp) unless they have a smaller compact version I missed.
 

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#48
I don't know why, but I love that old tractor. Whether bushhogging, digging post holes, raking hay, or any other of a million odd jobs, I've spent many a miserable hour on the old gal!
Good thing it doesn't have power steering, bushhogging tends to rip everything out from under a tractor. That's what I liked about the 8N. The only thing that it had to get tore off was the exaust and I carried the tools to put it back on in the field.:D

I knew a guy in Lexington Texas that had one just like yours but with a loader. It was pretty ragged but he loved it.
 

Eat Beef

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#49
Ag Krane is the original,and all I know to call them, much like "Crescent Wrench" is used to describe all adjustable wrenches.

There are other manufacturers, who make smaller models. I've seen them on 35-40 horse tractors. The first one I saw/used was a big one on a 250 horse 4wd. It takes some time to get the hang of it, but the guy who owned that one could really make it talk. It also lifts almost straight up, I don't remember how high but you could use it as a scaffold that was close to twice as tall as a front end loader on a 120 horse.
 

ttazzman

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#50
Lot's of people get two tractors. One will have a front end loader. There always heavy stuff around a farm and they sure save the back and are worth it even if you seldom move dirt. If you have much steep terrain, 4WD is needed not so much just for traction but for safety. You can get up any hill with a running start on a 2WD tractor, but 4WD means 4WD braking (and slower speeds), which is better than anti-lock brakes. Working a loader with a 4WD tractor is much easier. So a tractor with a loader and 4WD and power steering is valuable....and usually expensive. Again, most 4WD tractors are later models and Japanese. The front axles tend to be weak.
If you don't have steep terrain, a loader and power steering would do.
Amen.........MFWD...4wd...very very rarely has anything to do with getting going traction like in a truck or car..........its about SAFTY...going down a hill that is rocky or slick at all with a trailer or a load etc in a STD tractor with STD 2wheel brakes and only the rear wheels providing torque braking is a disaster waiting to happen........i rarely ever need 4wd pulling a implement in the field.....but i Double Dog Dare you to put a big round bale on the frount loader n go down one of my hills with a 2wd it beats the heck outa a coney island thrill ride...side hill work is a major plus for 4wd also

90% of my tractors are 4wd....other than being more costly to buy....i have not had any maintence issues that required any major expense due to the 4wd

all my tractors are JD or Caterpillar...
 

DodgebyDave

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#51
For all of you farm hands out there fixing to attack the day and reshape the tundra (49* here this morning)

 
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Eat Beef

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#52
Amen.........MFWD...4wd...very very rarely has anything to do with getting going traction like in a truck or car..........its about SAFTY...going down a hill that is rocky or slick at all with a trailer or a load etc in a STD tractor with STD 2wheel brakes and only the rear wheels providing torque braking is a disaster waiting to happen........i rarely ever need 4wd pulling a implement in the field.....but i Double Dog Dare you to put a big round bale on the frount loader n go down one of my hills with a 2wd it beats the heck outa a coney island thrill ride...side hill work is a major plus for 4wd also

90% of my tractors are 4wd....other than being more costly to buy....i have not had any maintence issues that required any major expense due to the 4wd

all my tractors are JD or Caterpillar...

I'm right on the coast and it's flat as can be, the only place you hit a grade worth mentioning is a ditch/etc.

But I use my MFD all the time. My implements are sized to my tractor, and without the fronts pulling I get serious slippage with both my disks. I also frequently use the MFD when shredding. I don't run it that way, but if I hit a soft spot I'll kick it in to keep from getting stuck. I also use it a lot when pulling stuff, be it a huge log, stuck truck/tractor/etc.
 

ttazzman

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#53
I'm right on the coast and it's flat as can be, the only place you hit a grade worth mentioning is a ditch/etc.

But I use my MFD all the time. My implements are sized to my tractor, and without the fronts pulling I get serious slippage with both my disks. I also frequently use the MFD when shredding. I don't run it that way, but if I hit a soft spot I'll kick it in to keep from getting stuck. I also use it a lot when pulling stuff, be it a huge log, stuck truck/tractor/etc.
well hell if you put enough behind it you need all you can get...:cool05:.....my place is a river bottom land with 100' high hills on each side....i dont put enough on behind to need it in the bottoms...but those hills are a different story......

my best experience was a couple of winters ago....headed down a hill after a snow....was actually in 4wd doing ok....started slipping twards some trees....so i drop the frount loader to stop and kinda reset things....ooops ...had the frount loader bucket nose turned up ...down it went raised my frount wheels..now i had a big ole frount ski and rear wheels going down the hill...liked to craped my pants...till i got the loader edge turned down and stopped...shoulda got it on utube coulda made a fortune...:fisheye:
 

JustPassinThru

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#55
Saw those quick-attaches when I was working near a construction site. Remarkable improvement...how much of a blessing it would have been, years ago, to be able to quick-attach pallet forks...or a power brush...or a snowplow (saw that, also!)...

It's amazing the developments. Like those tracked rigs based on skid-steers...
 

Eat Beef

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#56
That brings up a great point.

A skid steer can do most stuff a front end loader on a tractor can do, but do it much more efficiently. I would much rather have a skid steer and a tractor without a loader than two tractors with loaders.

My Ford 3000 basically got mothballed once we got a skid steer. The only thing the tractor beats it on is speed and PTO work.
 

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#57
I rent skid steers about once a year. they are handy as hell. I can do a 180 degree turn on my mountain driveway instead of driving to the nearest switchback to turn around. I might get one of my own if I can find a good deal at an auction. Unlike most loaders, you can actually see what you're putting in the bucket.
Skid steers do have their problems and limitations, though. Side and rear visibity sucks. They are not anywhere near as service friendly and long lasting as regular tractors. Lots of hydraulic motors to fail, very complicated hydraulic system, problems of inaccessibility and rough ride.

A skid steer with 6000 hours is a lot more risky to buy than a tractor or backhoe with 6000 hours.

After experimenting with different sizes, I found that they need to be at least about 6000 pounds and 60 HP to do much good. If you run them at 2/3 throttle they operate a lot smoother. Most have foot controls for the bucket, but the Cats have everything in your hands which makes them real easy for anyone to learn.
 

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#58
Question : What is this for ?

00r0r_k01GCjr59OV_600x450.jpg
 

hoarder

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#59
That's a homemade box blade used for leveling, contouring and landscaping.
 

mcmurph

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#60
Tractor play.

Got the 8N out this weekend to split some wood at my parents. Sorry the vid quality is so bad.

 
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Argent Dragon

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#61
Tractor play.

Got the 8N out this weekend to split some wood at my parents. Sorry the vid quality is so bad.
Thanks for sharing - effective and sure beats the heck outta using an axe to split by hand. :thumbs_up:
 

goldie40

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#62
I have A Massey Ferguson Industrial 20 with a bucket and snow plow, also have a JD 3 Pt hitch single bottom plow for it. I'll post pictures when I figure out how again
 

ttazzman

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#63
Talking skidsteers......I own 2 gehls....my personal comments

if your going any distance at all a tractor is much faster and smoother riding
skidsteers are hard on tires
skidsteers are hard on turf
all hand controls on skidsteers are much more user friendly and better for close work than foot
skidsteers are king on power attachments..
skidsteers are great in tight places
skidsteers are all balenced differently many need counterweights to carry heavy buckets (also going up and down hills can be challanging)
skidsteers are helpless in mud
skidsteers will rattle your teeth turning on pavement
my favorite attachments are grapple bucket...and a breaker (will drive steel fence posts right through tree roots)

future plans are to sell off the skidsteers and go to a tracked skid loader
 

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#64
Talking skidsteers......I own 2 gehls....my personal comments

if your going any distance at all a tractor is much faster and smoother riding
skidsteers are hard on tires
skidsteers are hard on turf
all hand controls on skidsteers are much more user friendly and better for close work than foot
skidsteers are king on power attachments..
skidsteers are great in tight places
skidsteers are all balenced differently many need counterweights to carry heavy buckets (also going up and down hills can be challanging)
skidsteers are helpless in mud
skidsteers will rattle your teeth turning on pavement
my favorite attachments are grapple bucket...and a breaker (will drive steel fence posts right through tree roots)

future plans are to sell off the skidsteers and go to a tracked skid loader
I've heard the Gehl's are made in USA by a company in South Dakota, is this still true? The Gehl I rented had foot controlled bucket.
Seemed like a good simple machine.

I've heard that the tracked skid steers wear so fast that contractors must charge an extra $10 an hour just for track wear. They seem to love them in spite of it.
 

ttazzman

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#65
I've heard the Gehl's are made in USA by a company in South Dakota, is this still true? The Gehl I rented had foot controlled bucket.
Seemed like a good simple machine.

I've heard that the tracked skid steers wear so fast that contractors must charge an extra $10 an hour just for track wear. They seem to love them in spite of it.

to tell the truth i dont know....i bought mine through the Cat local dealer over 10yrs ago.....however one has a Perkins engine the other a Deutz engine....both mine have the T stick hand controls...very intuitive anyone can drive them...it has foot hydralic implement control....all we have ever had to do is fluid and tire maintenance...(someone mentioned that they are hard to maintain not true with my gehls the cab just tilts up out of the way for simple access)

the difference between a tracked skid and a tire'd one is night and day well worth the difference in production.....run a tire'd one much and you will find they are very helpless in soft footing conditions including loose gravel and they are so hard on tires tire wear and replacement is a issue also.....i even have a set of the airless tires but they suc also...turn on rocks much and tires get cut up bad..

a tracked one....is just short of a track loader with all the plus's of a regular skidsteer.....none of the soft footing problems...none of the balance problems...much more load capacity...etc.
 

Armed.peasant

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#66
to tell the truth i dont know....i bought mine through the Cat local dealer over 10yrs ago.....however one has a Perkins engine the other a Deutz engine....both mine have the T stick hand controls...very intuitive anyone can drive them...it has foot hydralic implement control....all we have ever had to do is fluid and tire maintenance...(someone mentioned that they are hard to maintain not true with my gehls the cab just tilts up out of the way for simple access)

the difference between a tracked skid and a tire'd one is night and day well worth the difference in production.....run a tire'd one much and you will find they are very helpless in soft footing conditions including loose gravel and they are so hard on tires tire wear and replacement is a issue also.....i even have a set of the airless tires but they suc also...turn on rocks much and tires get cut up bad..

a tracked one....is just short of a track loader with all the plus's of a regular skidsteer.....none of the soft footing problems...none of the balance problems...much more load capacity...etc.
Do the tracks on your skidsteer stop the pain in the neck teeter totter affect you often get on rough terrain when using a rubber tired skidsteer?
 

Armed.peasant

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#67
That brings up a great point.

A skid steer can do most stuff a front end loader on a tractor can do, but do it much more efficiently. I would much rather have a skid steer and a tractor without a loader than two tractors with loaders.

My Ford 3000 basically got mothballed once we got a skid steer. The only thing the tractor beats it on is speed and PTO work.
I often use my tractor and a Bobcat skidsteer as a team when moving dirt. The tractor can get traction and go places the Bobcat can not, but the Bobcat can move and handle 3 times the weight in the bucket. I will post pictures of a large dirt pile I am clearing now by using the tractor to shuttle the dirt down to a location in which I can scoop it up with the Bobcat and move dump it a couple hundred yards away.

They both have their place along with advantages and disadvantages.
 

ttazzman

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#68
Do the tracks on your skidsteer stop the pain in the neck teeter totter affect you often get on rough terrain when using a rubber tired skidsteer?
of the tracked skidsteers i have run there are two basic track systems......one is real solid and is very much like a dozer..they will teter toter on large rock n such but still better than a tire'd one ......the other system is suspended tracks and they are really really nice but more components to wear out and maintain but ride like being on a cloud


as for moving dirt over distance you need a bigger tractor and a ~1yd bucket or so but boy those compact tractors do a ton of work for their size

i really love equipment (when it works) can talk this stuff all day :cheerful:
 
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Eat Beef

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#69
I agree about both having advantages/disadvantages. I can't imagine pulling a disc with a skid steer. You could do it, but it would stink. But for augering post holes or driving posts, give me a skid steer any day. I think when we made the switch we were setting 9 or 10 corner posts per day, we had 12 set before lunch with the skid steer.

Most mfgs offer hand/foot, t handle, and joystick controls these days. Joysticks rock.

The tracked machines take mud a lot better than rubber tires, and they're WAY more comfortable. But they are SUPER expensive to run. We run steel tracks over rubber tires, and drive the machine across the marsh. Steel over rubber will out perform a tracked machine in mud any day, I've never stuck it. The only time we've had trouble is if the tracks are loose and you spin inside the tracks. Even at that, I worked it out with the bucket, and we're talking about in stuff that would have stuck a MFD tractor a couple of hundred yards ago.

BTW, I'm still on 3 of the original 4 tires from a late 90's machine, but we don't have any rocks and rarely run on concrete/pavement. They've looked like they were going to pop at any second for several years!
 

Eat Beef

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#70
as for moving dirt over distance you need a bigger tractor and a ~1yd bucket or so but boy those compact tractors do a ton of work for their size

i really love equipment (when it works) can talk this stuff all day :cheerful:

I have a big tractor with a big bucket, but if you need to move dirt more than a couple hundred feet you need a dump trailer.

It never ends!:biggrin:
 

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ttazzman

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I agree about both having advantages/disadvantages. I can't imagine pulling a disc with a skid steer. You could do it, but it would stink. But for augering post holes or driving posts, give me a skid steer any day. I think when we made the switch we were setting 9 or 10 corner posts per day, we had 12 set before lunch with the skid steer.

Most mfgs offer hand/foot, t handle, and joystick controls these days. Joysticks rock.

The tracked machines take mud a lot better than rubber tires, and they're WAY more comfortable. But they are SUPER expensive to run. We run steel tracks over rubber tires, and drive the machine across the marsh. Steel over rubber will out perform a tracked machine in mud any day, I've never stuck it. The only time we've had trouble is if the tracks are loose and you spin inside the tracks. Even at that, I worked it out with the bucket, and we're talking about in stuff that would have stuck a MFD tractor a couple of hundred yards ago.

BTW, I'm still on 3 of the original 4 tires from a late 90's machine, but we don't have any rocks and rarely run on concrete/pavement. They've looked like they were going to pop at any second for several years!
the problem we have around here with steel over the tire tracks is ...Rocks....etc getting caught inside the track and shredding a tire

lol.....and yeah it never ends.........dump truck...dump trailer...scraper...:party30:

since were talking this stuff i have found one of my handiest machines (non-pto) .....is my Cat backhoe 416c...moves dirt fast...cabed with heat/air...has a thumb on it(great brush machine)....and i rigged the skid steer breaker to go on it for driving fence posts in odd places etc.....the pick and carry capacity of the thumb is just amazing...sprout clearing day :banana:
 

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ttazzman

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#75
do you guys fluid fill the rear tires in those compacts? .......i did in my little JD 4500 it made worlds of difference in loader versitility?? its like having a 2 size bigger tractor....

FWIW ....i fill my own tires the cheapest thing i have found to use is low freeze point window washing fluid usually once or twice a year it goes on sale here for under a dollar a gallon
 

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#77
do you guys fluid fill the rear tires in those compacts? .......i did in my little JD 4500 it made worlds of difference in loader versitility?? its like having a 2 size bigger tractor....

FWIW ....i fill my own tires the cheapest thing i have found to use is low freeze point window washing fluid usually once or twice a year it goes on sale here for under a dollar a gallon
I just got mine last January, but have been meaning to fill the rears with fluid. With a full bucket load the rear tires want to skip a good bit. Also have a finish mower attachment that I use when I need the loader bucket as it adds quite a bit more weight than the scraper blade.
 

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#78
Ok, I've narrowed my search to these (3) three. Which one of these looks like the best deal and better suited for versatility of the land (5-acres).

Tractor 'A' - 1947 Ford 8N with 5-ft Field General shredder for $2500


Tractor 'B' - Ford 2600 (1976 ?) with shredder (5') and working gauges for $2900 :



Tractor 'C'
- Farmall 'M' with 3-pt. hitch conversion and 5-ft. shredder for $3000:




......or none-of-the above (post alternative below) ?
 

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#79
I believe the Ford 2600 was available in both gasoline and diesel. At that price it's probably gasoline. The tires look good on all of them, just watch out for dry rot cracks.
 

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#80
Ok, I've narrowed my search to these (3) three. Which one of these looks like the best deal and better suited for versatility of the land (5-acres).


......or none-of-the above (post alternative below) ?

Have you been to look at all three tractors? What all do you plan to do on your 5 acres? I know you mentioned maintaining a garden, all three would work for that. Just to be clear, the mowers pictured aren't good as a lawn mower. If you're looking to do lawn maintenance, you'd need a finishing mower.