• "Spreading the ideas of freedom loving people on matters regarding high finance, politics, constructionist Constitution, and mental masturbation of all types"

Farm Tractor thread

ttazzman

Midas Member
Midas Member
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Apr 2, 2010
Messages
5,450
Likes
5,574
Location
mid-usa
you must get a lot of moisture to work with .....if you dont use any mulching

+1 on the different methods in different areas.......its always good to ask...
 

pitw

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Jun 25, 2013
Messages
3,276
Likes
3,723
Location
Eastern Alberta.
Our annual rainfall is less than 12 inchs. We grow food to eat like potatoes, beans, turnips, peas, carrots[do real well], cucumbers, tomatoes and a few others. Our fruit is Raspberries, strawberrys and the worst grapes on the continent.
 

hoarder

Site Supporter
Site Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
11,870
Likes
12,673
Location
Montana
wow!!:afraid:..........where i am at annual precipitation is ~45in......its a wonder you can grow anything
A lot depends on elevation and how far North you are. Pictured is the view from my front door. We get 16" total annual precipitation.
Areas of Texas that get the same precipitation grow little more than cactus and maybe a few gnarly little Mesquite trees down in the draws.
 

Attachments

Argent Dragon

Site Support
Site Bus
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 29, 2010
Messages
8,267
Likes
2,974
Location
Lone Star State
I just looked up the annual rainfall and it's listed as 35 inches per year.
 

blue96

New Member
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
37
Likes
20
Location
Loving County, Texas
New Holland TC45d with a 16LA Front Loader. Works great for our small farm.
 

blue96

New Member
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
37
Likes
20
Location
Loving County, Texas
I just looked up the annual rainfall and it's listed as 35 inches per year.
Not sure of hoarder's location but all rainfall is not created equal. For example we get nearly the same rainfall as some people we know in Iowa but when looking inside the annual numbers they have nice consistent rainfall where we'll get 2-4 inches in a day or two and then nothing for a month or two.
 

Argent Dragon

Site Support
Site Bus
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 29, 2010
Messages
8,267
Likes
2,974
Location
Lone Star State
After doing some shoveling this past weekend, I came to the obvious conclusion that all here have been telling me..........I need an FEL ! :bear_blink:

That said, it's going take some financial creativity on my part to avoid debt and buy yet another old tractor so call me crazy. I investigated trying to get a loader attached to my MF-175 but it doesn't seem cost effective not to mention the labor involved in doing so. For those here that dig, how important is size and is there such a thing about buying too big a tractor ??

I've seen a few worn-out backhoe's and super old loader tractors but nothing I'd spend $$$ on to keep. However, I did run across this beast, a JD-4320 from 1972 being sold by a company in East Texas. After calling them, the guy I spoke with said if I buy it, he'll deliver it to my land free of charge.

Well, it this worth the dough or do I keep searching ?


http://www.tractorhouse.com/listingsdetail/detail.aspx?OHID=8335507
 

hoarder

Site Supporter
Site Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
11,870
Likes
12,673
Location
Montana
After doing some shoveling this past weekend, I came to the obvious conclusion that all here have been telling me..........I need an FEL ! :bear_blink:

That said, it's going take some financial creativity on my part to avoid debt and buy yet another old tractor so call me crazy. I investigated trying to get a loader attached to my MF-175 but it doesn't seem cost effective not to mention the labor involved in doing so. For those here that dig, how important is size and is there such a thing about buying too big a tractor ??

I've seen a few worn-out backhoe's and super old loader tractors but nothing I'd spend $$$ on to keep. However, I did run across this beast, a JD-4320 from 1972 being sold by a company in East Texas. After calling them, the guy I spoke with said if I buy it, he'll deliver it to my land free of charge.

Well, it this worth the dough or do I keep searching ?


http://www.tractorhouse.com/listingsdetail/detail.aspx?OHID=8335507
The front edge of the bucket on that tractor looks about 7 feet ahead of the front axle, which makes for very clumsy operation.
I've never used one, but have you considered a 3 point rear scoop? I imagine they're extremely slow and clumsy to use, but very cheap. They can be mounted in either direction.

Edit: John Deeres from the early seveties have a very good reputation.
 

Attachments

Argent Dragon

Site Support
Site Bus
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 29, 2010
Messages
8,267
Likes
2,974
Location
Lone Star State
I've never used one, but have you considered a 3 point rear scoop? I imagine they're extremely slow and clumsy to use, but very cheap. They can be mounted in either direction.
Yes, but like you, I've never used one so I question the effectiveness. However, the slowest method (and most sore) is to hand shovel. I can drag some dirt in my box blade to where I need it, but it's difficult for me to 'scoop & dump' without some kind of hydraulic top link like a backhoe. Not to mention, with the box blade I have to strategically place it so as not to alter the terrain that I want left alone. In the end, driving some 200 ft+ over bumps knocks some of the dirt out on the way with the bb.

There's guys in my area with used scoops in the $150-$200 range which is ultra cheap in comparison to buying another tractor, loader, etc.
 

hoarder

Site Supporter
Site Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
11,870
Likes
12,673
Location
Montana
To answer your earlier question, Bigger is usually better when it comes to tractor-loaders. 4x4 is useful, but power steering is almost mandatory. A bucketfull of dirt is damned heavy and the more strength and power up front the better.
The problem with Japanese 4x4 tractors is that the front axles are generally kinda light duty with a loader, so a 2WD older US made tractor like the JD you linked makes sense as long as it has power steering.
The scoop was just a suggestion to save your marriage, LOL. 3 tractors? If your wife is that easy to get along with, maybe you can aquire a large gun collection while you're at it. Niether will lose value.

:D

It doesn't cost much to try a used scoop.
 

Argent Dragon

Site Support
Site Bus
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 29, 2010
Messages
8,267
Likes
2,974
Location
Lone Star State
:D

It doesn't cost much to try a used scoop.
This seems to be the most logical for my situation. They were invented & marketed for a reason (like what if you don't have a FEL).
At least I could bridge the gap until something better comes along.
 

CiscoKid

They all look good through beer goggles...
Gold Chaser
Joined
Nov 30, 2010
Messages
2,632
Likes
2,371
Location
Between here and there
carpet
easy to put down and take up.....12' strips.....
is superior at.......retaining moisture.......and weed prevention
is free as scraps
works good to prevent melon ground contact rotting
potatoes will grow under it ....making for no digging harvesting
Yep. Got a pile of carpet remnants sitting in my basement just waiting for spring planting. Paid nothing for it. Never been walked on. We have more ground water than we know what to do with right now and, in fact, are currently getting 8 to 10 inches of global warming, we can get very dry here after June.
 

Argent Dragon

Site Support
Site Bus
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 29, 2010
Messages
8,267
Likes
2,974
Location
Lone Star State
Here's a JD 4020 coming up for auction this week in my area. Starting bid is $4500 with 1st bid to meet the reserve.
A large loader like this one alone runs $4k+ (if I were to add one to my MF) so in a sense the tractor is nearly free.

 

hoarder

Site Supporter
Site Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
11,870
Likes
12,673
Location
Montana
You generally get more bang for your buck at auctions than a dealer. Look it over carefully. If it bids up near dealer price, plan to drop out.
I like to start a diesel up cold in the winter to see how worn out it is. At bigger auctions I've been to, a crew goes out with starting fluid and jumper cables and starts everything early before they open for inspections, which makes them more of a gamble.
 

ttazzman

Midas Member
Midas Member
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Apr 2, 2010
Messages
5,450
Likes
5,574
Location
mid-usa
Around here Green paint is worth twice the price.....

as Hoarder said and i agree....those early 70s JDs were horses for sure...and you wont lose money on them unless you buy a huge lemon

both of the tractors you linked are "real" tractors.....lots of HP...lots of WEIGHT(weight sux to transport..great for a FEL)...made to work and pull.......not made to be nible.......think Big truck vs Sports car......i think all of those early 70s JDs had power steering so thats a non issue.......parts are very availible.....they use a lot of fuel......in my opinion a FEL with joystick controls is MUCH prefered to dual valves.......a FEL should be capable of raising the frount end of the tractor off the ground...

on JD tractors of that vintage i look for two issues...
#1 hydraulic issues.....is it slow or low power....if so avoid..
#2 transmission shifting issues....

problems in those two areas can be very expensive to repair on those models

those are ~10k # tractors with a FEL so they dont get home on a typical car hauler trailer FWIW
 

pitw

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Jun 25, 2013
Messages
3,276
Likes
3,723
Location
Eastern Alberta.
This seems to be the most logical for my situation. They were invented & marketed for a reason (like what if you don't have a FEL).
At least I could bridge the gap until something better comes along.
I have two[one is under a few feet of snow and I can't find a pic of it. They are awesome for leveling an area and with enough time[and area] you can dig a basement. They are the same thing as the horse drawn fresno basically.




 

Argent Dragon

Site Support
Site Bus
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 29, 2010
Messages
8,267
Likes
2,974
Location
Lone Star State
I have two[one is under a few feet of snow and I can't find a pic of it. They are awesome for leveling an area and with enough time[and area] you can dig a basement. They are the same thing as the horse drawn fresno basically.
Sounds like a poor man's backhoe without the 'teeth' and hydraulics. I'm just try to move dirt and trying to avoid lots of hand shoveling. Moving dirt takes lots of energy and is quite tiring as I'm finding out the hard way. Just to be clear, I'm not talking about hard dirt or clay..........this is fairly loose dirt that I'm digging out the side of a small pile (hill) from when the pond was dug years ago. I've ripped into it with my box blade and the dirt comes apart easily although it's got grass and weeds growing all over it. Underneath it's quite soft which is why I'm trying to move it to my garden plot so I can build-up terraced raised beds by adding more topsoil.
 

pitw

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Jun 25, 2013
Messages
3,276
Likes
3,723
Location
Eastern Alberta.
Sounds like a poor man's backhoe without the 'teeth' and hydraulics. I'm just try to move dirt and trying to avoid lots of hand shoveling. Moving dirt takes lots of energy and is quite tiring as I'm finding out the hard way. Just to be clear, I'm not talking about hard dirt or clay..........this is fairly loose dirt that I'm digging out the side of a small pile (hill) from when the pond was dug years ago. I've ripped into it with my box blade and the dirt comes apart easily although it's got grass and weeds growing all over it. Underneath it's quite soft which is why I'm trying to move it to my garden plot so I can build-up terraced raised beds by adding more topsoil.

It will work like a charm for you.
 

rockriver

Seeker
Seeker
Joined
May 2, 2013
Messages
354
Likes
217
scoop...
I've got one for my 40 hp jd and it works great.. can dig in hard stuff. for soft it would be awesome... and cheap. just check your tractors rear wheel clearance and lift arm length and clearance before buying...

one scoop on tractor would outwork a big bunch of folks with shovels and wheelbarrows!!

fel... I wanted the biggest bucket sold for my tractor... dealer was quick and firm that I didn't need the biggest and the biggest would hold more dirt than my tractor could handle. and "rockriver, you are going to overload that bucket. everyone does."
make sure you have p.s.
4x4 dramatically increases capability of fel. I don't have. front end is trying to dig, front tires just sitting there. if front tires could do some
pulling (and this is where all the weight will be at time of digging/loading) capability drastically increases.

old john deeres...
I had an old jd 50hp forgot the model.. I'm getting crs... anyhow... check country of mfg... mine was made in Germany!! awesome
sold real fast when I put it for sale. I think the model was same series as you are looking at... only sold it because I got a great deal on
nearly new tractor.. I may have made a mistake.
 

Argent Dragon

Site Support
Site Bus
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 29, 2010
Messages
8,267
Likes
2,974
Location
Lone Star State
one scoop on tractor would outwork a big bunch of folks with shovels and wheelbarrows!!
:woohoo: This is exactly what I'm trying to accomplish.............time to get a scoop ! :burnout:
 

Argent Dragon

Site Support
Site Bus
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 29, 2010
Messages
8,267
Likes
2,974
Location
Lone Star State
***UPDATE***

No scoop...........I'm going to Oklahoma to pickup my auction win :

IMG_0615.jpg :woohoo::woohoo:
 

Argent Dragon

Site Support
Site Bus
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 29, 2010
Messages
8,267
Likes
2,974
Location
Lone Star State
1973 IH Farmall 656 rated at 63hp with a weight of 6,641 lbs. Independent PTO 540/1000 rpm.
Final price of $4850.

Here's a pic of the 3-point (Cat I and II), with extra remotes :thumbs_up:

Garden 026.jpg
 

hoarder

Site Supporter
Site Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
11,870
Likes
12,673
Location
Montana
Gasoline or diesel engine? Is it the IH 6 cylinder with the hole clean through the block between #3 and #4 cylinder (for throttle linkage on some applications)?
 

pitw

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Jun 25, 2013
Messages
3,276
Likes
3,723
Location
Eastern Alberta.
Great buy if it runs. Good 3PTH and the remotes are priceless. Enjoy the heck out of 'er and let us know what was wrong with it.
 

ttazzman

Midas Member
Midas Member
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Apr 2, 2010
Messages
5,450
Likes
5,574
Location
mid-usa
you finally got a loader tractor :s1: and if it runs a fine one at that.......you will soon wonder how you did with out a loader...


I hope it runs good......those are fine tractors overall for what your doing....
 

Argent Dragon

Site Support
Site Bus
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 29, 2010
Messages
8,267
Likes
2,974
Location
Lone Star State
Gasoline or diesel engine? Is it the IH 6 cylinder with the hole clean through the block between #3 and #4 cylinder (for throttle linkage on some applications)?
It's GAS and a 'hog' at that with a 33-gallon tank but with only 5-acres I'm not moving around a lot. The dirt I'm relocating is no more than a 100-yds. to my food plots.

[TABLE="class: tdData3, width: 100%"]
[TR]
[TD="class: tfld"] [/TD]
[TD="class: tdat"]International Harvester C263
[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD="class: tfld"] [/TD]
[TD="class: tdat"]gasoline
[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD="class: tfld"] [/TD]
[TD="class: tdat"]6-cylinder
[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD="class: tfld"] [/TD]
[TD="class: tdat"]liquid-cooled
[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD="class: tfld"] [/TD]
[TD="class: tdat"]263 ci [4.3 L] [/TD]
[/TR]
[/TABLE]
 

JustPassinThru

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Joined
Dec 13, 2011
Messages
2,711
Likes
1,527
Location
a better place
It's GAS and a 'hog' at that with a 33-gallon tank but with only 5-acres I'm not moving around a lot. The dirt I'm relocating is no more than a 100-yds. to my food plots.

[TABLE="class: tdData3, width: 100%"]
[TR]
[TD="class: tfld"] [/TD]
[TD="class: tdat"]International Harvester C263
[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD="class: tfld"] [/TD]
[TD="class: tdat"]gasoline
[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD="class: tfld"] [/TD]
[TD="class: tdat"]6-cylinder
[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD="class: tfld"] [/TD]
[TD="class: tdat"]liquid-cooled
[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD="class: tfld"] [/TD]
[TD="class: tdat"]263 ci [4.3 L] [/TD]
[/TR]
[/TABLE]
You're better off with a gas engine if you're going to use it infrequently. A diesel's more efficient and sometimes longer-lived but it needs lots of care - and use.

A 263 six making only 63 horsepower? Well...it won't be overstressed. Flathead?

The six will be good for smooth, steady power. The Ford three-cylinders I'd worked with...contrary to their earlier flathead fours, the OHV threes were revvers. And they'd bog down when you got into grunt work.

Your six surely won't have any of that.
 

Argent Dragon

Site Support
Site Bus
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 29, 2010
Messages
8,267
Likes
2,974
Location
Lone Star State
I hope it runs good......those are fine tractors overall for what your doing....
If the dealer is good on his word, he stated that it's fully operational, runs good, and only needs cosmetics to look better.

I'm getting my farmer friend (who sold me my 1st and 2nd tractors) to help me go pick it up. He threw me for a loop when he offered to trade his newly rebuilt engine MF-135 for my MF-175. He needs the 175 for his hay operation and said the 135 would be more suitable for my garden. It's a gas version with a continental engine and I remember seeing it at his brothers with all the pistons out and the entire engine torn down to the block. Also, the headlights and all gauges work on the 135 where my 175 doesn't have working lights and only the temp & fuel gauges work. I'm on the 'fence' though and kinda like my Perkins diesel although I've yet to do any service work on it.
 

Argent Dragon

Site Support
Site Bus
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 29, 2010
Messages
8,267
Likes
2,974
Location
Lone Star State
A 263 six making only 63 horsepower? Well...it won't be overstressed. Flathead?

The six will be good for smooth, steady power. The Ford three-cylinders I'd worked with...contrary to their earlier flathead fours, the OHV threes were revvers. And they'd bog down when you got into grunt work.

Your six surely won't have any of that.
More SPECS:

[TABLE="class: tdData3, width: 100%"]
[TR]
[TD="class: tfld"]Bore/Stroke:[/TD]
[TD="class: tdat"]3.5625x4.39 inches [90 x 112 mm]
[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD="class: tfld"]Air cleaner:[/TD]
[TD="class: tdat"]dry
[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD="class: tfld"]Compression:[/TD]
[TD="class: tdat"]8.8:1
[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD="class: tfld"]Rated RPMs:[/TD]
[TD="class: tdat"]1800 (early)
[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD="class: tfld"] [/TD]
[TD="class: tdat"]2300 (late)
[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD="class: tfld"]Oil capacity:[/TD]
[TD="class: tdat"]9 qts [8.5 L]
[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD="class: tfld"]Coolant capacity:[/TD]
[TD="class: tdat"]21 qts [19.9 L] [/TD]
[/TR]
[/TABLE]
 

Argent Dragon

Site Support
Site Bus
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 29, 2010
Messages
8,267
Likes
2,974
Location
Lone Star State
The loader appears to be a factory install. It's an International 2000, checkout that nice curved brace on the bottom extending to the back.

Garden 022.jpg Garden 024.jpg
 

JustPassinThru

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Joined
Dec 13, 2011
Messages
2,711
Likes
1,527
Location
a better place
I'm getting my farmer friend (who sold me my 1st and 2nd tractors) to help me go pick it up. He threw me for a loop when he offered to trade his newly rebuilt engine MF-135 for my MF-175. He needs the 175 for his hay operation and said the 135 would be more suitable for my garden. It's a gas version with a continental engine and I remember seeing it at his brothers with all the pistons out and the entire engine torn down to the block. Also, the headlights and all gauges work on the 135 where my 175 doesn't have working lights and only the temp & fuel gauges work. I'm on the 'fence' though and kinda like my Perkins diesel although I've yet to do any service work on it.
I'd take him up on it.

You're getting into a new-to-you field and NEED knowledgeable friends. He's helped you; apparently one of those tractor sales was a mistake. Let him buy it back and take his smaller one.

If it doesn't work out, you can sell the 135 and buy another diesel. Think of all the fun you've had...more to be had and maybe even some profit in it.
 

DodgebyDave

Metal Messiah
Midas Member
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
11,086
Likes
12,173
Just Passing Thru: Horsepower sells cars, Torque plows fields. Ignore those horsepower numbers. look at the peak torque vs rpm, then match that to your work.
 

Argent Dragon

Site Support
Site Bus
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 29, 2010
Messages
8,267
Likes
2,974
Location
Lone Star State
I'd take him up on it.

You're getting into a new-to-you field and NEED knowledgeable friends. He's helped you; apparently one of those tractor sales was a mistake. Let him buy it back and take his smaller one.
He's offering a straight up trade. He sold me the 175 for only $3500 and said that if he puts the MF-135 up for sale he'd ask a minimum of $4k due to the engine rebuild and more popularity with the smaller tractors in my area. There's no losers and if he didn't need it for his hay operation he wouldn't be offering. As much as I like riding up high, it's also more difficult to see what the heck I'm doing. That 175 with weighted wheels is about 8,400 lbs. of ground tearing pressure. I've dug more ruts on my land trying to turn around 1/2 acre radius to make another pass. At first it didn't bother me but it's intended for larger field work. Sometimes on cold mornings it's quite difficult to start so I'm sure that Perkins has some wear.
 

JustPassinThru

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Joined
Dec 13, 2011
Messages
2,711
Likes
1,527
Location
a better place
He's offering a straight up trade. He sold me the 175 for only $3500 and said that if he puts the MF-135 up for sale he'd ask a minimum of $4k due to the engine rebuild and more popularity with the smaller tractors in my area. There's no losers and if he didn't need it for his hay operation he wouldn't be offering. As much as I like riding up high, it's also more difficult to see what the heck I'm doing. That 175 with weighted wheels is about 8,400 lbs. of ground tearing pressure. I've dug more ruts on my land trying to turn around 1/2 acre radius to make another pass. At first it didn't bother me but it's intended for larger field work. Sometimes on cold mornings it's quite difficult to start so I'm sure that Perkins has some wear.
I think that's a no-brainer, then.

I don't know how big your operation is; or how to mate tractor-size to it. But now that you've got that big loader...maybe what you really need is a Cub.

The loader with a three-point can do some of your big tasks.

Anyway...I'd take the deal and run those three you have, with an eye for which one ought to be sold for a smaller tractor.
 

Argent Dragon

Site Support
Site Bus
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 29, 2010
Messages
8,267
Likes
2,974
Location
Lone Star State
Here's the controls / dash ~ I'm hoping that tack still works. I also like the levers being off the floor / transmission tunnel.........that area is a trip hazard otherwise.

Garden 027.jpg Garden 025.jpg
 

JustPassinThru

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Joined
Dec 13, 2011
Messages
2,711
Likes
1,527
Location
a better place
Just Passing Thru: Horsepower sells cars, Torque plows fields. Ignore those horsepower numbers. look at the peak torque vs rpm, then match that to your work.
Well...they're different measurements of roughly the same quantity: engine power.

I know what you're saying; and my complaint about the Ford threes was exactly that: No torque. Probably more power than the 25-horse fours; but no torque.

That said, a six that size, even a long-stroke one, should really pump out more raw horsepower - unless the carb or exhaust is strangling it.
 

Argent Dragon

Site Support
Site Bus
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 29, 2010
Messages
8,267
Likes
2,974
Location
Lone Star State
That said, a six that size, even a long-stroke one, should really pump out more raw horsepower - unless the carb or exhaust is strangling it.
This might help clarify some things or at least make this discussion more interesting.

[TABLE="class: tdData3, width: 100%"]
[TR]
[TD="class: thdr, colspan: 2"][h=2]Nebraska Tractor Test 968:[/h][/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD="colspan: 2"] [TABLE]
[TR]
[TD]
[/TD]
[TD][/TD]
[/TR]
[/TABLE]
[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD="class: tfld"]Test Date:[/TD]
[TD="class: tdat"]October 31 - November 29, 1967
[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD="class: tfld"]Type:[/TD]
[TD="class: tdat"]Gasoline hydrostatic 2WD
[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD="class: tfld"]PTO power (rated engine speed):[/TD]
[TD="class: tdat"]65.8 hp [49.1 kW]
[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD="class: tfld"]PTO fuel use (engine speed):[/TD]
[TD="class: tdat"]6.3 gal/hour [23.8 l/hour]
[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD="class: tfld"]PTO power (rated PTO speed):[/TD]
[TD="class: tdat"]60.81 hp [45.3 kW]
[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD="class: tfld"]PTO fuel use (PTO speed):[/TD]
[TD="class: tdat"]5.6 gal/hour [21.2 l/hour]
[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD="class: tfld"]Drawbar power (max):[/TD]
[TD="class: tdat"]50.09 hp [37.4 kW]
[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD="class: tfld"]Drawbar fuel use (max):[/TD]
[TD="class: tdat"]6.4 gal/hour [24.2 l/hour]
[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD="class: tfld"]Drawbar pull (max):[/TD]
[TD="class: tdat"]7,587 lbs [3441 kg]
[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD="class: tfld"]Max pull gear:[/TD]
[TD="class: tdat"]2.3 mph
[/TD]
[/TR]
[TR]
[TD="class: tfld"]Test report:[/TD]
[TD="class: tdat"]PDF file[/TD]
[/TR]
[/TABLE]
 

Argent Dragon

Site Support
Site Bus
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 29, 2010
Messages
8,267
Likes
2,974
Location
Lone Star State
My next (dream) tractor............now here's some POWER !!!

b18f8549fe7860be0f066eeb4597fa21.jpg
 

pitw

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Jun 25, 2013
Messages
3,276
Likes
3,723
Location
Eastern Alberta.
Do as you will to help keep the farmer friend happy but I wouldn't trade a 135[got one] for a 175 in a gazillion years unless I had absolutely trashed the 175 first. Just my opinion as I ain't in your shoes or your area.