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mtnman

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Voodoo

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Ruh Roh.... This isn't getting better. Diesel fuel canisters definitely need to be full.


Anyone know what this line in the article is attempting to say?

“I never thought that somebody could say ‘ah, gas has fallen below 100 per megawatt hours is really cheap’.”

Gas less than 100 per megawatt hours? Wtf does that even mean? Afaik, "megawatt hours" is a way of measuring electricity, not gas.
 

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the_shootist

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Anyone know what this line in the article is attempting to say?

“I never thought that somebody could say ‘ah, gas has fallen below 100 per megawatt hours is really cheap’.”

Gas less than 100 per megawatt hours? Wtf does that even mean? Afaik, "megawatt hours" is a way of measuring electricity, not gas.
Careful what you read and who you follow. There are dark days ahead
 

viking

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Anyone know what this line in the article is attempting to say?

“I never thought that somebody could say ‘ah, gas has fallen below 100 per megawatt hours is really cheap’.”

Gas less than 100 per megawatt hours? Wtf does that even mean? Afaik, "megawatt hours" is a way of measuring electricity, not gas.
Electricity 1 kilowatthour = 3,412 Btu
Natural gas 1 cubic foot = 1,037 Btu
1 therm = 100,000 Btu
Motor gasoline 1 gallon = 120,286 Btu

etc…

1 Megawatt = 1000 Kilowatts
 
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the_shootist

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Electricity 1 kilowatthour = 3,412 Btu
Natural gas 1 cubic foot = 1,037 Btu
1 therm = 100,000 Btu
Motor gasoline 1 gallon = 120,286 Btu

etc…
Most people I've known don't associate gasoline with megawatt hours
 
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viking

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Most people I've even known don't associate gasoline with megawatt hours

Probably because that is just a conversion, not practical. As a car engine would not be 100% efficient. EV might do better.

Another example, an LED bulb producing more lumens than incandescent one for same wattage.
 

Joe King

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Most people I've even known don't associate gasoline with megawatt hours
Exactly. It's an asinine way of putting it, and the way it's worded makes the person who wrote it come across as an idiot.
 

mtnman

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Exactly. It's an asinine way of putting it, and the way it's worded makes the person who wrote it come across as an idiot.
They use that language to keep those that don't understand it in the dark while trying to make themselves look superior.
 

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. “I never thought that somebody could say ‘ah, gas has fallen below 100 per megawatt hours is really cheap’.”

Even though the sentences above this one were talking about diesel and gasoline, it takes further reading to figure out this comment is about natural gas. Since natural gas is used for electric generation, it can make sense to look at the price of natural gas in terms of megawatt hours. Without knowing if they're talking about the energy content of the gas or the resulting electrical output, it's hard to do any serious analysis. It could be they don't even meter the gas going into the power plant and just measure the electrical output. For all of this article's flaws, I give them one big credit for comparing an energy unit to another energy unit. Way more than half of the articles I read about power and energy use incorrect units of measure.
 

chieftain

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I'm not sure whats happening in the US but gasoline prices have tanked in Australia. Retail pricing went as high as AUD$2.20 a litre (US$6 a gallon) but have dropped over 50c per litre in the space of 10 days ($1.40 a gallon).

LPG (liquefied petroleum gas) has also dropped, was as high as AUD$0.99 a litre (US$2.50 a gallon) but is under 85c per litre now.
 

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I'm not sure whats happening in the US but gasoline prices have tanked in Australia. Retail pricing went as high as AUD$2.20 a litre (US$6 a gallon) but have dropped over 50c per litre in the space of 10 days ($1.40 a gallon).

LPG (liquefied petroleum gas) has also dropped, was as high as AUD$0.99 a litre (US$2.50 a gallon) but is under 85c per litre now.
Perhaps your government gives a care?
 

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I'm not sure whats happening in the US but gasoline prices have tanked in Australia. Retail pricing went as high as AUD$2.20 a litre (US$6 a gallon) but have dropped over 50c per litre in the space of 10 days ($1.40 a gallon).

LPG (liquefied petroleum gas) has also dropped, was as high as AUD$0.99 a litre (US$2.50 a gallon) but is under 85c per litre now.

same thing is going on in US commod market. rbob has pulled back. with a lag, it will show up at the pumps

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the_shootist

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$3.84 for regular ethanol locally is the cheapest as of today
 
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Well, truth be told that would help. I've been seeing people pull a NASCAR race from red light to red light for decades...most people don't look further ahead than the end of their hood while driving. I look a few blocks down the road and adjust accordingly as lights change. Other people stomp their gas and accelerate into a red light for some reason that I can't fathom.The

Those People as my Father said don't have the common sense that God Stuck in a Ducks ass !!!
 

the_shootist

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<SLV>

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Local store is down from a high of $4.10 to $3.80. Not a huge pullback at all.
 

chieftain

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Perhaps your government gives a care?

Yeah I'm not so sure there HH. The treasurer announced a 22cpl halving of the fuel excise last week but the price drops are far beyond that. Usually the gas stations are slow to pass on any price drops (either due to taxes or actual price) but for some reason, the retreat in retail pricing has not only been swift, but massive.
 

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$3.84 for regular ethanol locally is the cheapest as of today
Central KY, is still hanging at $3.99 Unleaded Reg w/ CASH, $3.93 w/ some gas debit card Circle K gimmick, SPEEDWAY/SUPERAMERICA( 7/11) give THREE cent off using their Fuel Card & another 3 cents OFF with their SPEEDY REWARDS CARD. aka STILL HIGH
 

hammerhead

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A place to the north has regular @ $4.05. Everyone else is $4.10 to 4.15.
 

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Well, truth be told that would help. I've been seeing people pull a NASCAR race from red light to red light for decades...most people don't look further ahead than the end of their hood while driving. I look a few blocks down the road and adjust accordingly as lights change. Other people stomp their gas and accelerate into a red light for some reason that I can't fathom.
Puberty Blockers
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SilverCity

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NEW YORK, April 6 (Xinhua) -- Oil prices dipped on Wednesday after news that members of the International Energy Agency (IEA) are planning a big release of emergency reserves.

The West Texas Intermediate (WTI) for May delivery lost 5.73 U.S. dollars, or 5.6 percent, to settle at 96.23 dollars a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange. Brent crude for June delivery decreased 5.57 dollars, or 5.2 percent, to close at 101.07 dollars a barrel on the London ICE Futures Exchange.


The pullback came as IEA's Executive Director Fatih Birol tweeted Wednesday that the IEA is moving ahead with a collective oil stock release of 120 million barrels.

The release includes 60 million barrels from the United States as part of the country's overall draw from its Strategic Petroleum Reserve, said Birol, noting further details will come soon.

Oil prices were also pressured by an unexpected rise in U.S. crude stockpiles.

The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported Wednesday that the nation's crude inventories increased by 2.4 million barrels during the week ending April 1. Analysts polled by S&P Global Commodity Insights had expected the EIA publications to show a fall of more than 1.85 million barrels in U.S. crude inventories.

 

Uglytruth

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NW Ohio 3.59 to 3.99. I paid 3.89 yesterday
 

ttazzman

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our lowest in SW MO is 3.45 currently ..but were a low tax state
 

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I pulled five gallons from my sandrail today that I paid $0.99 for with a dollar off at Fry's.
Those were the days.
I've only got ten more gallons of the cheap gas in my reserve.
 

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3.75.....................and.....................some miscreant had put an "I did that sticker" on the gas pump.

I blame the BLM people.......they obviously don't like the white guy
 

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Filled up last night 3.33 at Sams club. Prolly the last I'll see of that.
 

viking

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Filled up last night 3.33 at Sams club. Prolly the last I'll see of that.
Costco today is $3.459 Regular. Minus 4% if you use their VISA CC. So $3.32.
 

Casey Jones

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Local store is down from a high of $4.10 to $3.80. Not a huge pullback at all.
The price shot up in anticipation of spiraling crude prices. Remember, a business has to charge, not what their inventory cost, but the cost of REPLACING the inventory. If there's nothing but bad nooze and spiraling prices at the wholesaler's, that has to be figured - a station cannot sell their inventory at $4.10 when getting the next load off the tanker costs the store $4.25.

Prices have stabilized, somewhat, for whatever reason. So pump prices have moved down - $3.95 from $4.09.
 

southfork

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I agree on no jackrabbit starts saving gas, but with regard to driving slower, it takes you longer to get there so your driving longer which uses more gas?
 

Casey Jones

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I agree on no jackrabbit starts saving gas, but with regard to driving slower, it takes you longer to get there so your driving longer which uses more gas?
It's a basic law of physics. To increase speed by a factor of two (double it) you increase energy demands by two-squared (four times). Also increases the stopping force required. That's why a knock that's just a fender-bender at 20 mph can total a car at 40 mph.

To stop from 60 mph, takes four times the distance than it does from 30 mph. In practice, traveling at 60 doesn't use four times the fuel - there are other, static energy demands - but it does increase the fuel-use-per-minute (not per mile) at more than double.

Just in my recent sojourn to Florida, with a trailer...I found that by dropping my speed from 80 mph (actual travel speed on most interstates) to 60 (not really safe, but I did do it in light traffic in places) I increased my miles-per-gallon from 13 to about 17. Considerable gain.
 

mtnman

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It's a basic law of physics. To increase speed by a factor of two (double it) you increase energy demands by two-squared (four times). Also increases the stopping force required. That's why a knock that's just a fender-bender at 20 mph can total a car at 40 mph.

To stop from 60 mph, takes four times the distance than it does from 30 mph. In practice, traveling at 60 doesn't use four times the fuel - there are other, static energy demands - but it does increase the fuel-use-per-minute (not per mile) at more than double.

Just in my recent sojourn to Florida, with a trailer...I found that by dropping my speed from 80 mph (actual travel speed on most interstates) to 60 (not really safe, but I did do it in light traffic in places) I increased my miles-per-gallon from 13 to about 17. Considerable gain.
I like doing 60 with my trailer on the interstate while everyone else is doing 80+. All the cars are always past me so I don't have to watch so close for brake lights. It's almost like you're by yourself on the road, and the scenery's better.
 

Casey Jones

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Must be less crowded where you're at, or more adult.

I've been cut off, brake-checked, had idiots get in front of a slower-moving truck and then pace him, to force me not to be able to pass. Like my traveling slower was an affront to him, personally.

I'm well aware of life in the slow lane. Back in the 1980s, I had a well-preserved but well-worn Pinto wagon...with a problem with the steering rack. It was a 1973 - the 1974s to the end of the Pinto run, were far different. The first years weren't so popular, making wrecking yard parts scarce. Money was more scarce.

So, since the car was otherwise sound and I liked it, I lived with it. It drove fine in town - just get it above 50, and the front end would go wonky. One end of the steering rack had come open - bellows busted, and all the shims/bushings, fallen out. The internal part of the rack on the curb side was just flopping around. And a legit repair would have cost more than the $750 I paid for it.

I of course avoided interstate travel, but when you live in a metro area, sometimes it's not avoidable. So, I'd have angry truckers ride my bumper like their Peterbilt wanted to boink some horse-flesh.

I try to blend in, but with gas prices doing what they are, I'm giving second thoughts to a Double-Nickel state of mind, on the roadways.
 

mtnman

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Must be less crowded where you're at, or more adult.

I've been cut off, brake-checked, had idiots get in front of a slower-moving truck and then pace him, to force me not to be able to pass. Like my traveling slower was an affront to him, personally.

I'm well aware of life in the slow lane. Back in the 1980s, I had a well-preserved but well-worn Pinto wagon...with a problem with the steering rack. It was a 1973 - the 1974s to the end of the Pinto run, were far different. The first years weren't so popular, making wrecking yard parts scarce. Money was more scarce.

So, since the car was otherwise sound and I liked it, I lived with it. It drove fine in town - just get it above 50, and the front end would go wonky. One end of the steering rack had come open - bellows busted, and all the shims/bushings, fallen out. The internal part of the rack on the curb side was just flopping around. And a legit repair would have cost more than the $750 I paid for it.

I of course avoided interstate travel, but when you live in a metro area, sometimes it's not avoidable. So, I'd have angry truckers ride my bumper like their Peterbilt wanted to boink some horse-flesh.

I try to blend in, but with gas prices doing what they are, I'm giving second thoughts to a Double-Nickel state of mind, on the roadways.
All of the first paragraph can only happen if you are jockeying around with the rest of the traffic. I cruse at a consistent speed and like I said usually by my self cause everyone else have passed me. I did have a truck driver just the other day follow me on my bumper. We were on the four lane and theirs a red light about five miles ahead. He jumped out of his truck at the light. BIG guy yelling insults and walking up to my window. Before he got there he did prove he had just a little sense. I yelled at him. "If you come to my window I will shoot you" He stopped and got back in his truck. So yes I do have to deal with crazies now and then.
 

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It's a basic law of physics. To increase speed by a factor of two (double it) you increase energy demands by two-squared (four times). Also increases the stopping force required. That's why a knock that's just a fender-bender at 20 mph can total a car at 40 mph.

To stop from 60 mph, takes four times the distance than it does from 30 mph. In practice, traveling at 60 doesn't use four times the fuel - there are other, static energy demands - but it does increase the fuel-use-per-minute (not per mile) at more than double.

Just in my recent sojourn to Florida, with a trailer...I found that by dropping my speed from 80 mph (actual travel speed on most interstates) to 60 (not really safe, but I did do it in light traffic in places) I increased my miles-per-gallon from 13 to about 17. Considerable gain.
But it took 25% longer for you to get there so is there really a gain or is it just the wash I need wash time on the whole venue
 

Casey Jones

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But it took 25% longer for you to get there so is there really a gain or is it just the wash I need wash time on the whole venue
:ponder:

Miles-per-gallon measures the fuel used on a trip. It tends to increase when going slower (not always, due to gearing, engine design, other factors) but if you get more miles out of every gallon, you're using less fuel on the trip.

Now if TIME costs you - say, another day away from whatever paying project you're involved with, now that is a cost that has to be factored. If time is, directly, money, then it might make sense to just fly, even at a four-figure ticket price.

But just figuring out the costs of speed. There's the physics of the energy involved in keeping a moving body moving at a given speed. Part of that, is, atmospheric resistance - negligible at, say, walking speed; and brutally forceful at 80 mph. A city bus, say, that's perfectly happy scooting around with a Detroit Diesel V6 (how GMC made them, in the day) but would top out at 55 mph or so. There just wasn't the power to push that brick faster through the air. (Granted, it also ran out of gears at that speed, but a higher gear would be pointless without a bigger engine...as GMC demonstrated with "Suburban" models of their New Look coaches, in the 1970s).

So, it's all a spreadsheet chart. As it happened, on that Florida trip, my time was essentially free. I could make up the slower speeds by driving a little longer - easy since I was stealth-camping at truck stops (and Buc'ee's, in the Southeast, nice places, cheap gas) and could stop anytime, no worries about NO VACANCY). So, it was all money saved. Relatively speaking.