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Filming The Speed of Light At 10 Trillion FPS

BarnacleBob

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#1
 

JayDubya

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I find it utterly amazing that we can do this...

...but weeks, even months, after elections, some elections official don't know how many people voted, who they voted for, and in many instances, even where their ballots are.
 

Professur

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This is what happens when your university focuses on science instead of whining.
 
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Can anybody explain how this is possible when the camera and associated electronics are limited by the speed of light? At 10 trillion FPS, how can you save two consecutive snapshots when the signal couldn't even have traveled a fraction of an inch, much less been sent to any storage device?

The only way I can think of is to have a whole bunch of independent cameras taking snapshots at the 10 trillion FPS intervals in parallel.

Unfortunately, from searching for details of this research online, it's sort of gobbledygook. I get the distinct feeling that they're cheating somehow, such as by interpolating frames instead of actually recording them at such short intervals.
 

Strawboss

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Can anybody explain how this is possible when the camera and associated electronics are limited by the speed of light? At 10 trillion FPS, how can you save two consecutive snapshots when the signal couldn't even have traveled a fraction of an inch, much less been sent to any storage device?

The only way I can think of is to have a whole bunch of independent cameras taking snapshots at the 10 trillion FPS intervals in parallel.

Unfortunately, from searching for details of this research online, it's sort of gobbledygook. I get the distinct feeling that they're cheating somehow, such as by interpolating frames instead of actually recording them at such short intervals.
The cameras were recording what happened in the past...

Meaning - as the light went by and was photographed...each frame was captured some amount of time AFTER the light had already gone by. So...it was able to capture the light - just not in "real time"...

Make sense?
 
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#8
The cameras were recording what happened in the past...

Meaning - as the light went by and was photographed...each frame was captured some amount of time AFTER the light had already gone by. So...it was able to capture the light - just not in "real time"...

Make sense?
Sure... except that's pretty much the way all cameras work, no? We never see things at the exact instant they happen, but at the instant the signal hits our retinas, a camera CCD, or whatever other device picks up the photons.
 

Bottom Feeder

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#9
Hummm.
Seems like you would need your whole system running at that 'frame rate' to record anything; that is 10,000,000,000,000 Hz.
So the fastest clock speed of readily available CPUs is around 6 or 7 MHz (7,000,000,000 Hz) they're about a thousand times short of being able to record at one trillion FPS without some sort of interpolation (as GBE says) or a liberal application of that magic fairy dust.
Maybe they just, somehow, merged 1,000 computers together — sequencing them somehow...

Ah, well, it's u-tube
BF