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Brio

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[h=1]This Garlic Soup: 100 Times Stronger Than Any Antibiotic On The Market[/h]

Have you made this soup? It looks really interesting.

Tonight I'm using up old bananas in a muffin recipe. I already burned one batch of buns.
 

TAEZZAR

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This is the recipe for the Chanterelle soup I posted in "Health Benefits of Hiking in the Woods".
This is actually the benefits from ocean fishing & being in the woods.
This is my own concoction.

TAEZZAR’S Chanterelle/Crab Chowder
2 cups crab meat (fresh/frozen Dungeness)
6 cups fresh Chanterelle Mushrooms – chopped bite size
6 slices bacon cut into small pcs.
1 can or 4 fresh cobs of corn
1 med/large onion chopped med.
3 cloves garlic chopped as desired
2 med. Yukon Gold potatoes chopped small
2 med. Carrots chopped small
1 can beer
2 cups chicken broth - homemade or low sodium
½ stick butter
½ tsp each, tarragon & thyme
¼ tsp turmeric
Cayenne pepper to taste, I start with 1/8 tsp
Fresh ground pepper to taste (Start with no salt, there is enough natural salt here)
Preparation
In a large non-stick pan, DRY ( no oil or butter) sauté Chanterelle mushrooms, on high heat, reserve liquid, set aside in a bowl.
Fry bacon crisp, remove bacon & add onions, caramelize onions to slightly brown, add garlic. & cook a couple of minutes more.
Roast corn.
In the pan used to fry the bacon, put in mushrooms & fry to hearty them up, about 3-5 min’s, add bacon & fry 2 -3 minutes more.
In a large soup pot, add beer, chicken stock, potatoes & carrots. Bring to a boil, add spices & butter, simmer until soft enough to use a hand blender to liquefy, leave it a little course.. After liquefying, add mushrooms/bacon, onions & corn.
Simmer for 15 minutes, stir occasionally, add crab meat & let stand 15 minutes. Serve

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Brio

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Making cranberry butter tart squares today.

base:
1 cup flour
2 tbsp br sugar
1/2 cup butter

cut butter into flour and br sugar and pat into greased 9x11 pan, bake @ 350 for 15 min.

whisk:
2 large eggs
1 1/2 cup br sugar
1/2 cup rolled oats
1/4 tsp salt
1/2 tsp baking powder
1 tsp vanilla
1/2 cup chopped nuts
1 cup dried cranberries
Spread mix evenly on base and bake for 20 - 25 min

:coolbeer:
 

Merlin

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Cranberry butter tart squares sounds good to me. How did they turn out, Brio?

Has anyone on the forum ever eaten a Dublin Coddle? I found a recipe on the Internet and the pictures make it look really delicious. But it contains only sausage, bacon, diced onion, potatoes, salt and pepper, and beef broth. Seems almost too simple to be good. Anyone ever try it?

Edit: Well, since I didn't get a response, I decided to go ahead and make it myself. Dublin Coddle should be ready to eat in about one more hour. I'll let you know how it turned out.

Edit: Well, it was good. And not greasy at all (yeah, right.)
 
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Low Calorie Cole Slaw:

1lb. of shredded cabbage
1 Cup of shredded carrots +/-
1/2 Cup of Mayonaise
1/3 Cup of Splenda / Sucralose
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1/4 cup of milk
1/4 cup of buttermilk or 2 1/2 Tablespoons of Buttermilk Salad Dressing
2 1/2 Tablespoons of lemon juice

EXCLUDING cabbage & carrots COMBINE remaining ingredients and mix until smooth.
Toss cabbage and carrots to mix.
Pour the liquid ingredients over the cabbage/carrots mix thoroughly.
Chill at least two hours before serving.

Great for those who are watching their sugar intake, like "dry" (No Sauce) smoked ribs or pulled pork and good roughage. ;)
 

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This is one that everyone could use...

Ice Cubes

View attachment 45824

Total Time: 2 hrs 2 mins
Prep Time: 2 mins
Cook Time: 2 hrs

2 cups water (approximately)
2 tablespoons water (additional if needed)

This is my forte'. Ice Cubes. Extraction is important too!

Hold the trays over an open flame until you hear the tell-tale pops and cracks of the ice separating from the ice tray.

Linger a little past what you think is necessary. This establishes a nice water-boundary between the cubes and the tray.

Optimally, the cubes should fall out of the tray, unmolested.

Another great recipe:

GRILLED BRUSSEL SPROUTS

Wash/ Quarter the sprouts.

Toss the quartered chunks in olive oil. Add salt/pepper/misc. seasoning to taste.

No need to wait. The idea is simply to coat them with the oil/seasoning mixture.

Make an aluminum-foil platter and turn up the edges so the oil doesn't run off and foul your grill.

Throw it all on the barbie and turn the chunks as they brown.

[15 - 20 min cooking time.] Sprinkle some parmesean cheese on top before serving.

Yum!
 

Gennie

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Marking my spot in here, I love to cook and since we have 4 kids, well, it's a necessity. Right now I'm trying out using homemade kefir as a base for sourdough bread. I didn't make it as a starter this time around, but used the kefir in place of water for no-knead bread. You can find some more information about the process here - http://www.culturesforhealth.com/learn/milk-kefir/how-to-use-kefir-as-sourdough/ Hopefully it'll turn out good, we'll see....it's so hot today that I'll wait until this evening to make it.
 
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TAEZZAR

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Lord, I would LOVE to see a thread like this for recipes using only stockpiled goods. I mean, we've all got pails of rice, beans, flour, cornmeal, oats, etc, etc; but what exactly are you going to do with your stores? Maybe one of you super-cooks could start us a thread for SHTF recipes, when we likely won't have fresh milk, eggs, fresh fruit & vegetables, and all the other goodies we're used to. Anyone???

Just use your imagination & your taste buds to create great, sometimes, meals.
Cooking should be fun & creative !!!

Behold the turtle,
for he only makes progress,
when he sticks his neck out !!
 

Irons

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I eat a lot of deer and I stumbled upon a recipe that is fantastic! I usually just pan fry deer steaks in butter and sauteed onions with garlic.
That's my all time favorite, er... it was.
smilegrin.gif


Well I got bored last week and went looking for the Fryin Magic that we use on Morel mushrooms in the spring.
Not seeing any I found instead Pork Shake N Bake! Hmmmmm.

So I shook the deer steaks in the pork shake n bake and then pan fried them in butter. IT WAS FANTASTIC! They come out dark and crispy and the pork seasoning just works great with the natural flavor of the venison.

I called my friend out in Colorado and he tried it with elk steaks and reported it was great with them too.

So if you are a venison eater give it a try! I had some this morning!
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REO 54

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Marking my spot in here, I love to cook and since we have 4 kids, well, it's a necessity. Right now I'm trying out using homemade kefir as a base for sourdough bread. I didn't make it as a starter this time around, but used the kefir in place of water for no-knead bread. You can find some more information about the process here - http://www.culturesforhealth.com/learn/milk-kefir/how-to-use-kefir-as-sourdough/ Hopefully it'll turn out good, we'll see....it's so hot today that I'll wait until this evening to make it.


Some pics of that would nice. Mm mm, with fresh butter.....Also, add a smell O vision link too. Thanks!

(lol)
 

GoldenPoet

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up your vitamin a with carrots...
put carrots in blender with water and pulverize... strain and use the lovely orange carrot water for
cooking lentils
cooking soups
adding to smoothies
cooking rice

it makes everything taste better too!
 

TAEZZAR

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I make my own spice blends of Greek & Cajun spices.
The Greek is really good on chicken & pork.
I think the Greek would go well on venison too.

TAEZZAR'S Greek blend
1/2 cup Kosher salt
1/2 cup oregano
1/3 cup garlic powder
1/3 cup onion powder
1/4 cup corn starch
1/4 cup fresh ground black pepper
1/4 cup parsley
1 tablespoon of all the following:
cinnamon
nutmeg
cilantro (dried)
paprika
thyme
basil (dried)
Mix well in a food processor.
Makes enough for a year.
Use to taste
 

Gennie

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Some pics of that would nice. Mm mm, with fresh butter.....Also, add a smell O vision link too. Thanks!

(lol)
Can I upload a pic here? I did get a pic of the loaves when they were done baking, the bread had a WONDEFUL, robust flavor! Now, it wasn't true sourdough and I guess I couldn't have waited longer but well....that turned into dinner. We had sandwiches for dinner, delicious :)
 

TAEZZAR

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Can I upload a pic here? I did get a pic of the loaves when they were done baking, the bread had a WONDEFUL, robust flavor! Now, it wasn't true sourdough and I guess I couldn't have waited longer but well....that turned into dinner. We had sandwiches for dinner, delicious :)
Yes you can, it's easy, just go to the little button down in the right corner (upload a file) and choose your picture from your file.
 

Goldbrix

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Outside of a generic Toss Salad, my Low Carb. Coleslaw( No Sugar Added), Green Beans w/ Smoked Ham Hock my last vegi-offer will be:

Low Carb. Broccoli Salad:
2-3 good size broccoli crown, just the floret portion. ( some mince them up, I just cut the florets to fork size).
8-10 slices of fried crispy bacon OR 1/3 cup of REAL Bacon bits ( not the artificial wannabees)
1/3 Cup chopped, diced onion
1/3 Cup of Sunflower Seeds ( obviously Hulled)
1/3 Cup of Dried Cranberries
1/2 Cup of Mayonaise
1T. Extra Virgin Olive oil OR your favorite monounsaturated salad oil.
1 T. Apple Cider Vinegar ( some choose to omit)
1T. Splenda
1/8 t. Salt or Seasoning Salt
1/8 t. Black Pepper

I mix all the wet ingredients plus the salt and pepper in a large (2cup)measuring cup until smooth.
In a large bowl slightly TOSS the Broccoli, Bacon, Onion, Seeds, Cranberries together.
AFTER a few tosses pour in the wet ingredients and toss until all ingredients have a mixed well coating all the florets.

Cover and Chill for at least one hour, preferably 2 hours before serving. ( some may to add more salt and pepper to taste).
ENJOY !
 

Gennie

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Yes you can, it's easy, just go to the little button down in the right corner (upload a file) and choose your picture from your file.
Okay, will attempt a picture lol. This was the bread still hot from the oven and in the pan, unfortunately I didn't get a pic of it after because I was busy cutting and then making sandwiches but was very yummy!
 

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TAEZZAR

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See, Gennie, wasn't that easy.
Welcome to GIM2.
 

gringott

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Restaurant style coleslaw.
This is the closest I have got to the type of coleslaw I used to get in a little paper cup at diners back in the 1960s-1970s with a sandwich.

1 lb. chopped coleslaw mix [cabbage & carrots]. You can buy this pre-chopped just about everywhere or make it yourself.
2 tablespoons finely diced onion.
2/3 cup mayonnaise. I use the type with olive oil in it, but any will generally do, it's to your taste. Even that stuff called "Salad dressing" I guess.
3 tablespoons extra light olive oil. Or ordinary vegetable dressing if you have nothing else.
1 tablespoon sugar [or less]
1 tablespoon vinegar.
1/4 teaspoon salt.
1 teaspoon poppy seeds.

Combine coleslaw mix & finely chopped onion in a large bowl.

Combine all other ingredients and mix together well.

Pour mixture over coleslaw mix and combine thoroughly.

Cover and chill two hours or more. Longer = better.

I usually eat the next day aka 24 hours of chilling.

The original recipe I got this from called for 1/2 cup of sugar. Way excessive IMHO.
I am now down to 1 tablespoon, and am experimenting going lower.
I am constantly tinkering with the amount of each ingredient. This is where I am at right now.

I started making this as I can't eat the crap they sell at the supermarket labeled coleslaw. I don't care what they call it, it is crap. The stuff with the cabbage diced into small pieces. That isn't "coleslaw" it is something else. Also they dump corn syrup into most of that I have seen, like everything else in the supermarket.

This is great with fried chicken, sandwiches, hamburgers/hot dogs, really anything informal and in a cook out type situation. Personally I like it with grilled hot Italian sausage sandwiches with hot giardiniera mix, helps taper the heat off the tongue.
 

Gennie

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Something I was thinking about trying...from http://commonsensehome.com/dandelion-wine-recipe/

Dandelion Wine Recipe

Ingredients

Directions

1) Collect the blossoms when they are fully open on a sunny day. Remove any green parts; they will impair fermentation (and ruin the taste of the wine).

2) Bring the water to a boil and pour it over the flowers in a large pot or crock. Cover and let steep for three days.

3) Prepare the oranges and the lemon. I used organic oranges and lemon, zested about half the skin off and cut the rest off in very thin strips to minimize the amount of white pith I added to the brew. (I love, love, love my Microplane grater
ir
for zesting.) I peeled the citrus completely and sliced them into thin rounds. (My mom just sliced them in rounds without peeling when she made the wine.)

4) Add the orange and lemon zest to the flower-water mixture and bring to a boil. Remove from heat, strain out solids, then add the sugar (I used one pound Florida Crystals and two pounds white sugar), stirring until it is dissolved. Allow to cool.

5) Add the orange and lemon slices, yeast, and raisins to the liquid. Put everything into a crock with a loose lid (so gas can escape) to ferment. (I covered it with a clean cotton towel held down by a rubber band.)

6) When the mixture has stopped bubbling (2 days to a week), fermentation is complete. Strain the liquid through several layers of cheesecloth (I think my jelly bags
ir
would work well for this, too) and transfer to sterilized bottles. Slip a deflated balloon over the top of each bottle to monitor for further fermentation. When the balloon remains deflated for 24 hours, fermentation is complete. Cork the bottles and store in a cool, dark place for at least six months before drinking.

NOTE: Be sure not to seal these tightly before they finish fermenting, and don’t put them somewhere warm. Otherwise, you’ll end up with exploding bottles, like my sister Mary when she stashed them in the closet at the trailer house when she was first married. Apparently it sounded like there were bombs going off or they were being shot at.
 

Brio

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This is a twist on Yorkshire pudding and my DH asked me to bake a second batch when he tasted one. My kid took all that was left. Quite easy and very amazing good.

Cheesy Herbed Popovers

herbpopovers_basket2-300x450.jpg

Print
Prep time
5 mins
Cook time
45 mins
Total time
50 mins

These savoury little puffs are flavoured with sharp cheddar and lightly dried herbs. They're perfect for serving with fluffy scrambled eggs and bacon for a weekend brunch, or stuff them with your favourite sandwich fillings for a light mid-day meal.
Author: Isabelle Boucher (Crumb)
Recipe type: Brunch
Serves: 10
Ingredients
  • 1 cup lukewarm milk
  • 3 large eggs
  • 1 cup flour
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted (plus more for greasing the pan)
  • ½ cup grated cheddar cheese
  • 2 tbsp Gourmet Garden Lightly Dried herbs (use your favourite herb or a mix)
Instructions
  1. Preheat over to 450F. Very generously grease 10 cups of a regular muffin tin (preferably non-stick), and fill the remaining 2 cups with a small amount of water.
  2. Using a blender, mix together the milk and eggs. Add the flour and salt, and blend briefly to incorporate the flour. Scrape down the sides with a spatula then, with the blender running, drizzle in the melted butter. Blending until the batter is smooth and mostly lump-free. Stir in the grated cheddar and herbs.
  3. Pour batter into well-greased muffin tins or cast iron popover pans. Pour the batter into the greased cups, filling them about ¾ full.
  4. Bake in preheated oven for 30 minutes, the lower heat to 350F and continue baking for 15 minutes or until puffed and golden brown.
Wordpress Recipe Plugin by EasyRecipe

Read more: http://www.crumbblog.com/cheesy-herbed-popovers/#ixzz4LwO6PUbt
 

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10 cups of a regular muffin tin (preferably non-stick), and fill the remaining 2 cups with a small amount of water.

First I've seen adding water to a muffin tin.
Is this just to keep the empty 2 from scorching or harming the non stick surface, or is it to keep some extra humidity in the oven, so that the muffins stay a bit more moist?
 

Brio

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First I've seen adding water to a muffin tin.
Is this just to keep the empty 2 from scorching or harming the non stick surface, or is it to keep some extra humidity in the oven, so that the muffins stay a bit more moist?
Even baking I think. I added an extra egg and some flour so had no empty spaces but yeah. Even baking.
 

Merlin

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Brio, I'd like to try this recipe. It reminds me, in a way, of pastry puffs my mother used to make that she filled with pudding :) Question: would they be good cold, or perhaps reheated? There are only two of us in the house, and Sam is diabetic. We shouldn't sit and pig out on them, no matter how good they may be. We're carb counting.
 

Brio

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Brio, I'd like to try this recipe. It reminds me, in a way, of pastry puffs my mother used to make that she filled with pudding :) Question: would they be good cold, or perhaps reheated? There are only two of us in the house, and Sam is diabetic. We shouldn't sit and pig out on them, no matter how good they may be. We're carb counting.

Can't help but pig out on these Merlin LOL! But they are very good reheated. And they'd be incredible stuffed with salmon or whatever. I'm making more for lunches this week.
 

Zed

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Marking my spot in here, I love to cook and since we have 4 kids, well, it's a necessity. Right now I'm trying out using homemade kefir as a base for sourdough bread. I didn't make it as a starter this time around, but used the kefir in place of water for no-knead bread. You can find some more information about the process here - http://www.culturesforhealth.com/learn/milk-kefir/how-to-use-kefir-as-sourdough/ Hopefully it'll turn out good, we'll see....it's so hot today that I'll wait until this evening to make it.

How did it go?

Thanks for the link.
 

TAEZZAR

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Let's share some healthy food ideas & recipes, as an aid to better health. Long live GIM2 !

I will start it with a great recipe for stuffed bell peppers.

KETO STUFFED BELL PEPPERS.png
 

TAEZZAR

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I grew up HATING mushrooms. I learned how healthy they are.
Now I hike the mountains picking them, Chanterelles , Hedgehogs, Morels & others.


What is the nutritional value of mushrooms?
If you buy something through a link on this page, we may earn a small commission. How this works.
Mushrooms are edible fungus that can provide several important nutrients. The many kinds of mushroom have varying compositions and nutritional profiles.
From puffballs to truffles, mushrooms can range from everyday fare to a costly delicacy. People can buy them fresh, canned, or dried.
In 2015, each person in the United States consumed, on average, around 3 pounds of mushrooms, according to the Agricultural Marketing Resource Center.
Beyond the diet, mushrooms feature in some types of traditional medicine.
In this article, learn about the nutritional contents and possible health benefits of eating mushrooms. We also give some tips on preparing and serving them and describe the risks.

Health benefits

mushrooms-in-a-bowel-on-a-dark-table.jpg
Share on PinterestThe protein, vitamins, and minerals in mushrooms may be beneficial to a person’s health.
Mushrooms contain protein, vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. These can have various health benefits.
For example, antioxidants are chemicals that help the body eliminate free radicals.
Free radicals are toxic byproducts of metabolism and other bodily processes. They can accumulate in the body, and if too many collect, oxidative stress can result. This can harm the body’s cells and may lead to various health conditions.
Among the antioxidant agents in mushrooms are:
Learn more about antioxidants here.
Cancer
The antioxidant content in mushrooms may help prevent lung, prostate, breast, and other types of cancer, according to the National Cancer Institute.
Some sources have suggested that selenium may help prevent cancer, but a Cochrane review, from 2017, found no evidence to confirm this.
Mushrooms also contain a small amount of vitamin D. There is some evidence that vitamin D supplementation may help prevent or treat some kinds of cancer, though according to a 2018 report, the effect may vary from person to person.
Choline is another antioxidant in mushrooms. Some studies have suggested that consuming choline can reduce the risk of some types of cancer, but at least one other study has indicated that it may increase the risk of prostate cancer.
It is worth noting that consuming a nutrient as a supplement is not the same as consuming it in the diet.
What links are there between cancer and the diet? Find out here.
Diabetes
Dietary fiber may help manage a number of health conditions, including type 2 diabetes.
A 2018 review of meta-analyses concluded that people who eat a lot of fiber may have a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes. For those who already have it, fiber may help reduce blood glucose levels.
A cup of sliced, raw mushrooms, weighing 70 grams (g), provides almost 1 g of fiber.
The Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend that adults consume 22.4–33.6 g of dietary fiber each day, depending on sex and age.
Mushrooms, beans, some vegetables, brown rice, and whole-grain foods can all contribute to a person’s daily requirement of fiber.
Try our 7-day diabetes meal plan.
Heart health
The fiber, potassium, and vitamin C in mushrooms may contribute to cardiovascular health.
Potassium can help regulate blood pressure, and this may decrease the risk of hypertension and cardiovascular disease. The American Heart Association (AHA) recommend reducing the intake of added salt in the diet and eating more foods that contain potassium.
According to current guidelines, people should consume around 4,700 milligrams (mg) of potassium each day. Mushrooms appear on the AHA’s list of foods that provide potassium.
A 2016 study concluded that people with a vitamin C deficiency were more likely to experience cardiovascular disease and suggested that consuming vitamin C may help prevent this illness. They did not find evidence that vitamin C supplements can reduce the risk of this type of disease.
There is some evidence that consuming a type of fiber called beta-glucans may lower blood cholesterol levels. Beta-glucans occur in the cell walls of many types of mushrooms.
The stem of the shiitake mushrooms is a good source of beta-glucans.
The Mediterranean diet includes a range of plant foods, such as mushrooms. Find out more.
In pregnancy
Many women take folic acid, or folate, supplements during pregnancy to boost fetal health, but mushrooms can also provide folate.
A cup of whole, raw mushrooms contains 16.3 micrograms (mcg) of folate. Current guidelines recommend that adults consume 400 mcg of folate each day.
What foods should you eat and avoid during pregnancy? Find out here.
Other benefits
Mushrooms are rich in B vitamins, such as:
  • riboflavin, or B-2
  • folate, or B-9
  • thiamine, or B-1
  • pantothenic acid, or B-5
  • niacin, or B-3
B vitamins help the body get energy from food and form red blood cells. A number of B vitamins also appear to be important for a healthy brain.
The choline in mushrooms can help with muscle movement, learning, and memory. Choline assists in maintaining the structure of cellular membranes and plays a role in the transmission of nerve impulses.
Mushrooms are also the only vegan, nonfortified dietary source of vitamin D.
Several other minerals that may be difficult to obtain from a vegan diet — such as selenium, potassium, copper, iron, and phosphorus — are available in mushrooms.

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Nutritional content

Many types of mushroom are edible, and most provide about the same quantities of the same nutrients per serving, regardless of their shape or size.
The table below shows how much of each nutrient a 96-g cup of whole, raw mushrooms provides. It also shows how much of each nutrient adults should consume every day, depending on their sex and age.
NutrientAmount of nutrient in 1 cup of mushroomsRecommended daily intakeEnergy (calories)21.11,600–3,200Protein (g)3.046–56Carbohydrate (g)3.1, including 1.9 g of sugar130Calcium (mg)2.91,000–1,300Iron (mg)0.58–18Magnesium (mg)8.6310–420Phosphorus (mg)82.6700–1,250Potassium (mg)3054,700Sodium (mg)4.82,300Zinc (mg)0.58–11Copper (mcg)305890–900Selenium (mcg)8.955Vitamin C (mg)2.065–90Vitamin D (mg)0.215Folate (mcg DFE)16.3400Choline (mg)16.6400–550Niacin (mg)3.514–16
Mushrooms also contain a number of B vitamins, including thiamine, riboflavin, B-6, and B-12.


Tips for preparing mushrooms

There are around 2,000 edible varieties of mushrooms, but only a handful are available on the American market.
They include:
  • white, or “button”
  • brown cremini
  • portobello
  • shiitake
  • oyster
  • wood ear
  • enoki
Seasonal varieties available at farmer’s markets and some grocery stores include:
  • morel
  • chanterelle
Some people pick wild mushrooms, but it is essential to know which are edible, as some contain deadly toxins.
Tips for buying
When buying fresh mushrooms, chose ones that are firm, dry, and unbruised. Avoid mushrooms that appear slimy or withered.
Store mushrooms in the refrigerator. A person should not wash or trim them until it is time to cook with them.
A wide range of mushroom products is available for purchase online.
Tips for serving
The Environmental Working Group, which assesses foods for their pesticide contents, placed mushrooms that grow in the U.S. in its 2019 list of the 15 cleanest foods, referring to relatively low traces of pesticides.
However, people should still wash and clean them carefully before using them to remove any soil and grit. If necessary, trim the ends of the stalks. You can use mushrooms whole, sliced, or diced.
To incorporate more mushrooms into the diet, try:
  • sauteing any type of mushroom with onions for a quick, tasty side dish
  • adding mushrooms to stir-fries
  • topping a salad with raw, sliced cremini or white mushrooms
  • stuffing and baking portobello mushrooms
  • adding sliced mushrooms to omelets, breakfast scrambles, pizzas, and quiches
  • sauteing shiitake mushrooms in olive oil or broth for a healthful side dish
  • removing the stems of portobello mushrooms, marinating the caps in a mixture of olive oil, onion, garlic, and vinegar for 1 hour, then grilling them for 10 minutes
  • adding grilled portobello mushrooms to sandwiches or wraps
To prepare dried mushrooms, leave them in water for several hours until they are soft.



Possible health risks

Wild mushrooms can make a tasty dish, but the toxins in some mushrooms can trigger fatal health issues. Some wild mushrooms also contain high levels of heavy metals and other harmful chemicals.
To avoid these dangers, only consume mushrooms from a reliable source.


Takeaway

Mushrooms can be a healthful addition to a varied diet. They are easy to prepare and provide a range of nutrients.
People should only eat mushrooms from a reliable source, as some types are toxic.
Q:

Is there any way to know whether a mushroom that grows in my yard or garden is edible?

A:

Unless you are a true expert in mushroom foraging, steer clear of mushrooms growing wild in your yard or garden.
If you are even slightly unsure, do not eat them. Many mushrooms are toxic to humans and can cause death if people consume them.

Katherine Marengo LDN, RDAnswers represent the opinions of our medical experts. All content is strictly informational and should not be considered medical advice.
 

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I love mushrooms. I don't think they're medicine, I just like to eat them.
 

TAEZZAR

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I love mushrooms. I don't think they're medicine, I just like to eat them.

Healthy, natural food is better than medicine.
Healthy, natural foods keep you healthy, medicine is taken only when you are sick !
 

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darn it Taezz,

I thought you would start it off with something from your Egyptian days
 

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Scorpio

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ok, the threads have been merged with the old one.

I will sticky it for now, and we will see how it goes,

I did retain Taezz's headline rather than the original which had died off 4 yrs ago
 

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Found these up on a ledge growing from a cowpatty, I was actually looking for a flowering cactus when I found them. Stuck them in my pocket for later identification.

Have no intention of ingesting them. They were completely dried and sticking up from the cowpatty - it had rained for several days and then it was clear, sunny, and dry when I found them. They looked a little faded, also.
mush.jpg
 

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Dana Pullen's Chicken Feet and Rice

You can't get chicken feet at the supermarket these days so you got to go to a butcher store and beg for them (they're usually thrown away). Once you get them, rince them off, drop them into a pot of hot boiling water for five minutes, and then take them out and the outer skin will just roll right off. Make sure you get it all off because there's no telling where the chicken's been walkin'.

Now that the skin is cleaned off, take your cast-iron Dutch oven cover the bottom with oil, put in the feet and fry til golden brown. Then put a handful of chopped onions and one toe of garlic (flattened). Fry the onions until you can see through them, put in the desired amount of rice (depending on the number of people you're feeding), and cover with water. Salt, pepper, and bring to a boil. Put the lid on and cook the rice til fluffy and the chicken feet are tender.

The only way to eat a chicken foot is to gnaw on it. The round ball of the foot is the best part. They are a gristly kid of thing and can be used in soups, but when you fry them they're really good. Serve with potato salad, greens, and biscuits.
edit, because I hit the post button too soon LOLOLOL

You can't get chicken feet at the supermarket these days so you got to go to a butcher store and beg for them get your own
IMG_0089.JPG

IMG_0092.JPG
 
Last edited:

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edit, because I hit the post button too soon LOLOLOL

You can't get chicken feet at the supermarket these days so you got to go to a butcher store and beg for them get your own
View attachment 163079
View attachment 163080

Heck, EVERY grocery around here - even Walmart sells chicken feet. Pigtails, Hog Chitlins, Maws, Neckbone, Tripe, Pig Ears, Feet... Make some pretty good stuff from low on the hog... I like Chicken Feet Chinese style.

https://www.seriouseats.com/2014/09/braised-chicken-feet-phoenix-claws.html

RR
 

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There should be a mushroom thread. How do you sample without killing yourself? I've spent some time looking & trying to match up to pictures but only even found the Chicken of the woods and never eaten any of them. Mine are not that good looking in the back yard but they are there.
1588300648817.png
 

TAEZZAR

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Heck, EVERY grocery around here - even Walmart sells chicken feet. Pigtails, Hog Chitlins, Maws, Neckbone, Tripe, Pig Ears, Feet... Make some pretty good stuff from low on the hog... I like Chicken Feet Chinese style.

https://www.seriouseats.com/2014/09/braised-chicken-feet-phoenix-claws.html

RR

Ooooh, I know, but a friend in Kansas had a chicken that lost her feet due to a fungus & he was fixing a chicken feet meal, I couldn't resist taking a pic of the chicky & the pot of feet & putting them together . :2 thumbs up::finished::chef::rotf:
 

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Here is one of my favorite Mexican dishes, it take a few hours, but we think it's worth it.
CHILI VERDE 1.jpg

CHILI VERDE 1.jpg


CHILI VERDE 2.jpg