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Freaky Physics Proves Parallel Universe Exists

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http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2010/04/05/freaky-physics-proves-parallel-universes/

Freaky Physics Proves Parallel Universes Exist

Look past the details of a wonky discovery by a group of California scientists -- that a quantum state is now observable with the human eye -- and consider its implications: Time travel may be feasible.


Look past the details of a wonky discovery by a group of California scientists -- that a quantum state is now observable with the human eye -- and consider its implications: Time travel may be feasible. Doc Brown would be proud.

The strange discovery by quantum physicists at the University of California Santa Barbara means that an object you can see in front of you may exist simultaneously in a parallel universe -- a multi-state condition that has scientists theorizing that traveling through time may be much more than just the plaything of science fiction writers.

And it's all because of a tiny bit of metal -- a "paddle" about the width of a human hair, an item that is incredibly small but still something you can see with the naked eye.

UC Santa Barbara's Andrew Cleland cooled that paddle in a refrigerator, dimmed the lights and, under a special bell jar, sucked out all the air to eliminate vibrations. He then plucked it like a tuning fork and noted that it moved and stood still at the same time.

That sounds contradictory, and it's nearly impossible to understand if your last name isn't Einstein. But it actually happened. It's a freaky fact that's at the heart of quantum mechanics.

How Is That Possible?

To even try to understand it, you have to think really, really small. Smaller than an atom. Electrons, which circle the nucleus of an atom, are swirling around in multiple states at the same time -- they're hard to pin down. It's only when we measure the position of an electron that we force it to have a specific location. Cleland's breakthrough lies in taking that hard-to-grasp yet true fact about the atomic particle and applying it to something visible with the naked eye.

What does it all mean? Let's say you're in Oklahoma visiting your aunt. But in another universe, where your atomic particles just can't keep up, you're actually at home watching "The Simpsons." That may sound far-fetched, but it's based on real science.

"When you observe something in one state, one theory is it split the universe into two parts," Cleland told FoxNews.com, trying to explain how there can be multiple universes and we can see only one of them.

The multi-verse theory says the entire universe "freezes" during observation, and we see only one reality. You see a soccer ball flying through the air, but maybe in a second universe the ball has dropped already. Or you were looking the other way. Or they don't even play soccer over there.

Sean Carroll, a physicist at the California Institute of Technology and a popular author, accepts the scientific basis for the multi-verse -- even if it cannot be proven.

"Unless you can imagine some super-advanced alien civilization that has figured this out, we aren't affected by the possible existence of other universes," Carroll said. But he does think "someone could devise a machine that lets one universe communicate with another."

It all comes down to how we understand time.

Carroll suggests that we don't exactly feel time -- we perceive its passing. For example, time moves fast on a rollercoaster and very slowly during a dull college lecture. It races when you're late for work . . . but the last few minutes before quitting time seem like hours.

Back to the Future

"Time seems to be a one-way street that runs from the past to the present," says Fred Alan Wolf, a.k.a. Dr. Quantum, a physicist and author. "But take into consideration theories that look at the level of quantum fields ... particles that travel both forward and backward in time. If we leave out the forward-and-backwards-in-time part, we miss out on some of the physics."

Wolf says that time -- at least in quantum mechanics -- doesn't move straight like an arrow. It zig-zags, and he thinks it may be possible to build a machine that lets you bend time.

Consider Sergei Krikalev, the Russian astronaut who flew six space missions. Richard Gott, a physicist at Princeton University, says Krikalev aged 1/48th of a second less than the rest of us because he orbited at very high speeds. And to age less than someone means you've jumped into the future -- you did not experience the same present. In a sense, he says, Krikalev time-traveled to the future -- and back again!

"Newton said all time is universal and all clocks tick the same way," Gott says. "Now with Einstein's theory of Special Relativity we know that travel into the future is possible. With Einstein's theory of gravity, the laws of physics as we understand them today suggest that even time travel to the past is possible in principle. But to see whether time travel to the past can actually be realized we may have to learn new laws of physics that step in at the quantum level."

And for that, you start with a very tiny paddle in a bell jar.

Cleland has proved that quantum mechanics scale to slightly larger sizes. The next challenge is to learn how to control quantum mechanics and use it for even larger objects. Do so -- and we might be able to warp to parallel universes just by manipulating a few electrons.

"Our concepts of cause and effect will fly out the window," says Ben Bova, the science fiction author. "People will -- for various reasons -- try to fix the past or escape into the future. But we may never notice these effects, if the universe actually diverges. Maybe somebody already has invented a time machine and our history is being constantly altered, but we don’t notice the kinks in our path through time."
 
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#2
I'm trying to wrap my head around this parallel universe thing. You are saying there is another me somewhere else? Is this me in the past or the future? If you believe in God, he already knows your past, present, and future. He knows what you have done, will do, and won't. He can also change everything in the present at faster than the blink of an eye.

So say you were able to go back in time and make changes? How would you get out of the loop? You would go back forever.
 

RealJack

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#3
Perhaps there is no getting out of forever.

But what if I have done all this before so many times that I went into the future and expanded and expanded until I, for all intents and purposes, became God.

And then I Am spoke, and brought into being a place in which to reside. Again. And again. Until all possibilities are exhausted, which of course is forever.

And I Am thou, and thou art in heaven.
 
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#4
Real jack, if you went back to the past the future that you left is gone forever. Its a one way trip. And still you can't assume the younger of yourself- life.

The only way to change the future is to do it now. But whose to say that wasn't the destiny?
 

Juristic Person

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I'm trying to wrap my head around this parallel universe thing. You are saying there is another me somewhere else? Is this me in the past or the future? If you believe in God, he already knows your past, present, and future. He knows what you have done, will do, and won't. He can also change everything in the present at faster than the blink of an eye.

So say you were able to go back in time and make changes? How would you get out of the loop? You would go back forever.
I didn't write the article. An editor from Fox News did. The scientific experiment was conducted at UCSB.

But to answer your question, I believe time is a concept, not an actual thing. Past, present and future is all one in God's eyes.
 
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I didn't write the article. An editor from Fox News did. The scientific experiment was conducted at UCSB.

But to answer your question, I believe time is a concept, not an actual thing. Past, present and future is all one in God's eyes.
Of course you didn't, but I was assuming you agreed with their findings. There is no past or future in my eyes. Nobody can visit the same event twice.
Which invalidates time travel.
 

platinumdude

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#7
So John Titor was really from the future. And Mr. Spock really did have an evil twin in that parallel universe.
 

RealJack

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Real jack, if you went back to the past the future that you left is gone forever. Its a one way trip. And still you can't assume the younger of yourself- life.

The only way to change the future is to do it now. But whose to say that wasn't the destiny?
Dude, I didn't say anything about going backwards in time, I suggested going into the future and creating my present self which should be at least plausible since I would still have my current memories... unless I imbibe in something that erases those memories.

Besides, I think that in an infinite universe or multiverse absolutely everything conceivable is already happening. Once conceived, the universes are compelled to accommodate that conception. If it has not ever been conceived in any observers imagination, then and only then does it not exist, but mathematically in an infinite universe, impossibility is impossible, which is to say the impossible is not only possible, but inevitable.

I wish you people would get that straight in your little heads. lol :lollypop:
 
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#9
Real Jack, the message I'm getting from this topic is we live in a multi universe...

what was, was is, and what could be. My parallel selves.
 

GoldRocks

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The multi-verse theory says the entire universe "freezes" during observation, and we see only one reality. You see a soccer ball flying through the air, but maybe in a second universe the ball has dropped already. Or you were looking the other way. Or they don't even play soccer over there.

Sean Carroll, a physicist at the California Institute of Technology and a popular author, accepts the scientific basis for the multi-verse -- even if it cannot be proven.

"Unless you can imagine some super-advanced alien civilization that has figured this out, we aren't affected by the possible existence of other universes," Carroll said. But he does think "someone could devise a machine that lets one universe communicate with another."
It's been done already. Jet Li starred in it.
 

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AMforPM

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#11
I did not understand the article.

That said my personal impression of time is that it is not really linear as most of us experience it on earth.
 
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#12
The article suggested my parallel self saw something else I did not. Its called what wasn't. Jet li, the one? That was cool.
 

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Here is more than you want to know about time. :haha:

Snip:
Wired.com: Can you explain your theory of time in layman’s terms?

Sean Carroll: I’m trying to understand how time works. And that’s a huge question that has lots of different aspects to it. A lot of them go back to Einstein and spacetime and how we measure time using clocks. But the particular aspect of time that I’m interested in is the arrow of time: the fact that the past is different from the future. We remember the past but we don’t remember the future. There are irreversible processes. There are things that happen, like you turn an egg into an omelet, but you can’t turn an omelet into an egg.

And we sort of understand that halfway. The arrow of time is based on ideas that go back to Ludwig Boltzmann, an Austrian physicist in the 1870s. He figured out this thing called entropy. Entropy is just a measure of how disorderly things are. And it tends to grow. That’s the second law of thermodynamics: Entropy goes up with time, things become more disorderly. So, if you neatly stack papers on your desk, and you walk away, you’re not surprised they turn into a mess. You’d be very surprised if a mess turned into neatly stacked papers. That’s entropy and the arrow of time. Entropy goes up as it becomes messier.

So, Boltzmann understood that and he explained how entropy is related to the arrow of time. But there’s a missing piece to his explanation, which is, why was the entropy ever low to begin with? Why were the papers neatly stacked in the universe? Basically, our observable universe begins around 13.7 billion years ago in a state of exquisite order, exquisitely low entropy. It’s like the universe is a wind-up toy that has been sort of puttering along for the last 13.7 billion years and will eventually wind down to nothing. But why was it ever wound up in the first place? Why was it in such a weird low-entropy unusual state?

That is what I’m trying to tackle. I’m trying to understand cosmology, why the Big Bang had the properties it did. And it’s interesting to think that connects directly to our kitchens and how we can make eggs, how we can remember one direction of time, why causes precede effects, why we are born young and grow older. It’s all because of entropy increasing. It’s all because of conditions of the Big Bang.
From: What Is Time? One Physicist Hunts for the Ultimate Theory
 

keehah

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#14
Subatomic particles are better understood as waves, up down up down or in out in out or tick tock tick tock.

When old school physicists try to see everything as particles, and not energy bundles of angular momentum, they are just looking at tick...tick...
When they come across a tock they get all wonky, and of course Fox can spin this to keep the sheep even more confused.

http://www.16pi2.com/joomla/aetherphysics/physicstime.html
Time is only half of a frequency. We only see the forward moving part of the frequency. In reality, time moves a half step forward and then a half step backward. This is why subatomic particles are observed to have "half spin". We see the effect of the Aether spinning a ring of one dimensional mass forward in time, but we can't see the ring of mass spinning backward in time.
However once a 'particle' is not directly engaging in its creation with the aether, i.e. is built from other particles, reverse time no longer exists for it. That includes humans of course. Our existence is built from other ups, ins, or ticks however one wants to describe what we call the building blocks of our matter.


http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=124820013&ps=cprs
Cleland says at first, scientists thought the laws of quantum mechanics applied to objects on the atomic scale. Cleland says it's true — physicists have observed quantum effects in structures as large as 60 atoms. That's large for the atomic world, but totally invisible in our world.

Cleland wanted to see if he could find the size where the laws of quantum broke down and everyday laws take over.

Technically speaking, Cleland and his colleagues used a "microwave-frequency mechanical oscillator coupled to a quantum bit." While true, that's not very informative for most of us. Let's just say that they took something very small...

They cooled their structure to nearly absolute zero, and to their surprise and delight, the structure they created still behaved in a quantum way
Everyone remember this movie of an electron? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ofp-OHIq6Wo
Well the more modern wave theories show atoms can also be thought of to exist as a single vibratory state. As this article states groups of atoms can behave this way too. Probably helps explain why colloids can have properties of individual atoms as well as a solid.

So by cooling the temperature to near absolute zero, that is individual atoms are not vibrating in relation to each other, they can exhibit a dominant vibrational state as well.
Now to make the leap from this predictable observation to parallel universes is just ignorance or sheep herding .
 
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Oldmansmith

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I thought that subatomic particles were better understood as vibrations.
 

gnome

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There is indeed a parallel universe and it is called... uh... it shall remain nameless. :bandit:

And, yes, many here do lead parallel lives over there, :551: though I am not that kind of gnome. :Chillin:
 

RealJack

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There is indeed a parallel universe and it is called... uh... it shall remain nameless. :bandit:

And, yes, many here do lead parallel lives over there, :551: though I am not that kind of gnome. :Chillin:
You know, you're right. I myself have observed the parallel universe you speak of, and generally speaking, perhaps do to it's similarities or close proximity, a sort of bleed through has occurred
in which it appears that the sense of humor in this universe is steadily being sucked into that universe, so much so that I'm kind of concerned that this universe may eventually dry up like a gigantic prune. Scary.
 

JFN111

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#19
A friend of mine was in the air force. He would always joke about a new member of the crew that once asked him "what time is it". They were on a long flight over the pacific and the only only answer he could give him was "what time is it where?":wub:
The moral is time is relevant to a particular place.
 

Mouse

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I didn't write the article. An editor from Fox News did. The scientific experiment was conducted at UCSB.

But to answer your question, I believe time is a concept, not an actual thing. Past, present and future is all one in God's eyes.
You are a shill and puppetmaster. "FREE WILL" - That is the only variable, all others are constants.

I dislike your posts in every category, although I admire some of your thinking.

If it is all planned out, in a computer (As I believe), there is only FREE WILL to distinguish the reality from the potential realities. FREE WILL is God's gift to us in the MATRIX of our (virtual) REALITY.

Nothing is permanent. All of this is a fake, just like the economy.

THE DUCK......KNow's the onE TRuTH:confused::dance::wub::bear_tongue::bandit::banana:
 

Saul Mine

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#21
I am not waiting for a time machine. I am waiting for a scientist who can explain in plain English WTF he's talking about. Until they get to that point they don't actually know anything.

It's ok to admit you don't know something. It is a disgrace to pretend you know something when you don't.
 

RealJack

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I am not waiting for a time machine. I am waiting for a scientist who can explain in plain English WTF he's talking about. Until they get to that point they don't actually know anything.

It's ok to admit you don't know something. It is a disgrace to pretend you know something when you don't.
I wouldn't hold your breath. Lay people... like me really, are still trying to comprehend a Newtonian physical reality as that's pretty much how far plain English has gotten us.

Visionary mystics bards and poets of the past have traditionally been the ones to make the leaps of intuitive consciousness necessary to expand language to fit the expansion of metaphysics, so I suppose it would apply to physical science as well.