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Getting Ready for Deer Season

BarnacleBob

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#1
Last week sprayed a mix of gly & 2-4D to kill weeds in two separate areas that will be disced, cultipacked and planted in a mix of winter cereal rye, oats, 4010 or 6040 peas, forage radish & clover on or before Sept 15..... This mix was discovered over at the QDMA site:

http://www.qdma.com/forums/showthread.php?t=25851

Sure wish we had planted this mix last winter as the winter was unusually harsh amd the game has eaten my food plots down to bare dirt.... During last winter & post spring turkey season I performed TSI & also hinge cut prolly hundreds of undesirable "weed" trees to provide bedding, fawning & nesting areas around the property..... The TSI (girdle cuts) and hinge cutting has been a huge success in itself.... the deer are drawn into these safe havens in normally open hard woods..... I designed & made our food plots like old logging roads that wind around the woods except about three times wider.
The trees that were taken out were cut into firewood and donated to needy families, while some of the wood was deployed to create 20' brushpiles as safehavens for small critters....

In spring I like to put out cheap peanut butter for the protein it provides after winter for pregnant does.... the Coons really like it too, but they will eat the entire contents of the jar until its gone.... I would use 3 drywall screws to fasten the jars lid to a tree, cut the bottom of the jar off, then screw the jar onto the lid fastened to the tree.... as I stated the coons decimated my offering.... To solve the problem I used a 26" length of 2" pvc pipe a flat 2" pvc cap and a 16" piece of 4" pvc pipe.... I glued the cap onto the 2" pipe and fastened the pipe horizontally level to the side of a tree using long screws. Then I slide the 4" pipe over the 2" pipe so that it would revolve. Then attached the jar lide to the pvc pipe.... This has stopped the coons.... as when they attempt to climb out to the peanut butter, the 4" pipe revolves sending the coon to the ground...

The deer are highly attracted to the PB & best I can tell they will scent it from long distances as they almost seemingly come running when new PB is put out. Which, during season would legally be considered baiting if it was placed where deer could consume the product.... however temporarily placing the product 5'+ up in a tree would only allow the PB as a scent bait, which is legal..... I have not tried this, but dont see why it wouldnt work.... especially if the deer in your area have previously had a taste of PB...

A lil trick I use when deer hunting is to urinate on the ground just prior to entering the deer woods.... I then step into the pee with my boots covering the foot wear with the scent... I cant tell you how many times I have watched both does & bucks with their noses to the ground following the fresh scent trail that was produced with this method.

Another lil trick I was recently taught by some of the locals is to put out a 50# salt block, add 25# of sugar & 4 or 5 pkgs. of grape Kool-aid as a lick.... The deer really like this combo, they like humans also possess a sweet tooth... sweet -n- salty, but for some unknown reason the secret ingredient is the "grape" kool-aid.... I suspect they like the scent of it.... Once the deer are accustomed to the sweet sugar, they become attracted to it.... it was said that once you reach your stand, take some kool-aid and pour some of the pkgs on low hanging limbs and vegetation as a scent attractant. I havent tried this method yet.... but I dont see why it wouldnt provide results.

I can purchase a lot of PB & kool-aid for the.price of the so called attractants such as deer cane and the various liquid scents that DONT perform.... It has been my experience that deer are very inquisitive creatures that will investigate almost any new scents that they are not familiar with.... my experiments have led me to believe to stay away from any alcohol based scents such as artificial vanilla, etc... they will come to it, but they will be on high alert.... evidently they sense danger when alcohol and other artificial chemicals are present in the scents....

These are just a few methods in my deer tool box... I normally dont deer hunt and havent for several decades.... I am a turkey getter, that is my passion... but this season I am going to start trophy hunting again....

Please share any of your tricks that you may employ to lure in your deer.

TIA
 

pitw

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#2
A 10,000 bushel grain pile usually does the trick. We spend more time fencing the SOB's out than luring them in up here. Seems like you are trying to domesticate them almost.
 

nickndfl

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In spring I like to put out cheap peanut butter for the protein it provides after winter for pregnant does.... the Coons really like it too, but they will eat the entire contents of the jar until its gone.... This has stopped the coons.... as when they attempt to climb out to the peanut butter, the 4" pipe revolves sending the coon to the ground...

TIA
Why not just put out watermelon and fried chicken?
 

TnAndy

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Lure in my deer ? ahahahaaaaaaaaaaa

I've been building fences, having to circle new fruit trees with fence, and killing the big brown rats off for years.....sure don't need any lures.
 

Rusty Shackelford

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#5
Trick number 1: become a good woodsman and understand how deer use the property. This technique makes you a hunter. Baiting deer just makes you a shooter.
 

michael59

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OK there Rusty....then what does using my old Buick make me :) I mean is that not why they put up those deer Xing signs? I mean come on I have music, beer, and can keep out of the rain or snow.....

just kidding, just kidding...The old Buick is all banged up from previous hunting seasons and just won't pass a safety inspection any more so I tow it out and use it as a decoy....damm deer will walk a long way around it and seem to just jump right into my freezer now :)
 

Tecumseh

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#7
It sounds to me like he has invested a lot of time, effort and money in providing a quality deer habitat - how is that different than becoming a good woodsman?
 

hoarder

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#8
Trick number 1: become a good woodsman and understand how deer use the property. This technique makes you a hunter. Baiting deer just makes you a shooter.
I see it in terms of carrying capacity. So much game habitat has been displaced by farming and development, if the sport is going to continue we must maximize the habitat we have left by planting forage crops that benefit wildlife year round.
Throwing corn out in the fall is baiting, planting food plots is not. In many cases people plant forage crops for deer that don't even get much action during hunting season, just for the purpose of growing the deer population.
 

Rusty Shackelford

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#9
Deer are the most adaptable animal i know. We have record populations and had those prior to QDM programs. If you are planning on attracting and luring deer in, be prepared to harvest the heck out of them. Buck/doe ratios are the utmost important factor. 1:1 or 1:2 is crucial. Seeing deer for the sake of seeing deer is not neccesarily a good thing. Quality over quantity. Shoot does and pass on little bucks. Skip all the marketing that says you got to spend money to grow deer.

The QDM industry has done a super job of convincing the hunting community to buy into their theory of habitat improvement. I equate their message of habitat improvement is the crucial for success to a guy telling you how to get a river to tie downhill.
 

hoarder

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#10
Deer are the most adaptable animal i know. We have record populations and had those prior to QDM programs. If you are planning on attracting and luring deer in, be prepared to harvest the heck out of them. Buck/doe ratios are the utmost important factor. 1:1 or 1:2 is crucial. Seeing deer for the sake of seeing deer is not neccesarily a good thing. Quality over quantity. Shoot does and pass on little bucks. Skip all the marketing that says you got to spend money to grow deer.

The QDM industry has done a super job of convincing the hunting community to buy into their theory of habitat improvement. I equate their message of habitat improvement is the crucial for success to a guy telling you how to get a river to tie downhill.
Around here wolves are the utmost important factor. The various state game agencies have no intention of maintaining those ratios. I can get a doe tag about once every four years by drawing. We only get about 12 inches precipitation around here and deer can't live off pine needles all summer and expect to live through the Montana winter. Things are different than back East where you get fourty inches of rain.
 

hoarder

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#12
My understanding is that the winters is the biggest factor in population control in Montana.
It was before wolves were introduced 15 years ago. Deer and Elk population density never was that great to begin with since it's less than ideal habitat, but at least the hunting opportunities were good due to all the open public land. It does take a lot more acres to support one deer or one elk than it does in states that have rain and acorns. The wolves have decimated almost 90% of the elk. Deer are more work and less meat for a pack of wolves, but now that the elk have been decimated, the deer have been getting a lot of pressure.
 

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#13
Around my bug-out place, I can shoot deer from the bedroom window if I need to, and I do - they strip the trees of bark, eat anything going except meat, and there are far too many of them to sustain on the island. I use slugs normally, and only bring home the backstraps - I've already had to buy another freezer just for venison!
My brother is a lazy f**k, and would sleep till noon if you let him - I find sneaking into his room, opening the window, and popping off a slug or two wakes him up pretty quickly.
If I actually NEED meat, I prefer the crossbow - more sporting, if you know what I mean.
I don't mind lying in the damp undergrowth for a couple of hours, if it bags me a good 10 point buck and maybe a tender roe at the same time - never had the heads mounted, I prefer the skulls and horn. My mantelpiece is around 12ft long, and I still have to store some away!
 

michael59

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#14
Homesteader season is always in effect, it is not a sport until you purchase a tag or license. when filling the freezer you just have to have properly dressed meat, and no this does not mean monkeys or dogs...though if that is how you roll then that is how it is.
 

BarnacleBob

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Our area is mostly hardwoods and fescue hay fields that once the fall acorn crops are consumed it doesnt leave much remsining for the wildlife.... a few yrs ago "blue tongue" disease swept over the area and thinned the herd.... My food plots were created to attract spring turkey, provide a food source for polts, brooding & nesting areas... All in all these plots have enhanced the wildlife in our area....

I dont usually hunt deer here as the meat is unusually wild tasting w/o proper preparation, same goes for the turkeys... hard woods just dont provide good nourishment for the critters...

We have the same does & bucks in our area yr after yr... which is really neat until they devour the garden... the food plots have really helped to keep them out of the garden tho....

QDM is a lot of work, but it is rewarding.... Prior to performing TSI as a part of QDM I never realized just how many "weed trees" were on our property.... the property was clear cut in mid-sixties and has never until now had the undesirable trees removed, hinge-cut or girdled.... Two yrs of TSI, a bumper crop of acorns and a prescribed burn has produced many new oak seedlings emerging from the forrest floor.... which is a good thing that benefits both the wildlife and future income.

There is much more going on than just feeding deer...
 

ttazzman

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+1 on Bobs above post.............

other than we do harvest deer annually and mostly grind the meat up .........around here we substitute it for hamburger meat at which it tastes equal or better than hamburger
 

ttazzman

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Bob.....i usually add turnips to the food plots for winter forage they will dig them in the winter......or if we get a lot of long term snow cover i just put out a timed feeder with corn in it to get them through hard times......