• "Spreading the ideas of freedom loving people on matters regarding high finance, politics, constructionist Constitution, and mental masturbation of all types"

GM's new Corvette is so powerful, it's warping the frame in tests

Scorpio

Скорпион
Founding Member
Board Elder
Site Mgr
Midas Supporter
Joined
Mar 25, 2010
Messages
27,351
Likes
34,144
#1
GM's new Corvette is so powerful, it's warping the frame in tests, report says

Nathan Bomey,USA TODAY 5 hours ago


The redesigned 2020 Chevrolet Corvette's new engine is reportedly so powerful that it's compromising the vehicle's structural integrity in testing, causing General Motors to delay the car's reveal, according to an industry report.
Sports car fans have been anxiously awaiting the debut of the eighth generation of the Corvette, which got its last total overhaul with the 2014 Corvette Stingray.
But the 2019 Detroit auto show, which would have provided a major global stage for the vehicle's unveiling, came and went in January with no reveal.
What gives?

https://www.usatoday.com/story/mone...-powerful-engine-is-warping-frame/3149723002/
 

Buck

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Site Supporter
Joined
Apr 13, 2011
Messages
5,418
Likes
4,934
#4
If GM wants strength, stop using old Budweiser cans for their frames

Strength comes from Steel
 

newmisty

Splodey-Headed
Midas Member
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
24,575
Likes
34,406
Location
Qmerica
#5
"Aluminum spaceframe" "glass hatch covering the engine" Uhhh yeah, 1000hp will not be kind to those materials.
 

JayDubya

Platinum Bling
Platinum Bling
Joined
Apr 5, 2010
Messages
4,915
Likes
5,875
#6
I remember an episode of Top Gear where the Corvette they were putting through the paces was literally falling apart.

I've never been able to justify plunking down that knda money on a GM product when there's so many other options.
 

chomper

Purveyor of Filth
Silver Miner
Joined
Feb 10, 2011
Messages
800
Likes
665
#8
This engine must be a torque monster if it can twist the frame to such an extent.
 

Zed

Size doesn't count!
Midas Member
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
12,814
Likes
10,564
Location
Springfield
#9
Way to put a positive spin on "our engineers can't do the math to build the thing properly in the first place".

Koenigsegg, that tiny little Swedish company, don't seem to have that issue with their hyper cars.... just sayin.
 

Zed

Size doesn't count!
Midas Member
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
12,814
Likes
10,564
Location
Springfield
#11
Koenigsegg use carbon fibre space frames.
… and?

They got the math right! The material is irrelevant really isn't it? The HP and the properties of the material used are known ahead of design completion so the design should be quite close to right first time. In this day and age with simulation it shouldn't be anymore than small issues that crop up IF the design work was done correctly.

Get it wrong with carbon and the failure is spectacular!
 
Joined
Jan 25, 2019
Messages
17
Likes
54
#12
I'm calling BS. This is just another setup to generate publicity. Don't tell me the GM engineers can't calculate the forces of the engine on the frame--it's compete bunk to make the corvette sheep salivate over the new release in rapt expectation.

Nice try for a new marketing ploy.
 

Zed

Size doesn't count!
Midas Member
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
12,814
Likes
10,564
Location
Springfield
#13
Koenigsegg use carbon fibre space frames.
+ it's not really a space frame, kind of a monocoque with metal frames hanging off it... probably titanium or unaffordium! LOL.

Station2c-6-of-8.jpg
 

chomper

Purveyor of Filth
Silver Miner
Joined
Feb 10, 2011
Messages
800
Likes
665
#14
… and?

They got the math right! The material is irrelevant really isn't it? The HP and the properties of the material used are known ahead of design completion so the design should be quite close to right first time. In this day and age with simulation it shouldn't be anymore than small issues that crop up IF the design work was done correctly.

Get it wrong with carbon and the failure is spectacular!
It's quite possible they cocked up the numbers, but there is a real possibility that unless they go for billet sections of frame, the usual pressed Al space frame trusses might not be up to the job.

Carbon fibre does fail spectacularly, but it can handle far higher loads.
 

Zed

Size doesn't count!
Midas Member
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
12,814
Likes
10,564
Location
Springfield
#15

Zed

Size doesn't count!
Midas Member
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
12,814
Likes
10,564
Location
Springfield
#17
Carbon fibre does fail spectacularly, but it can handle far higher loads.
In some respects, but it isn't a wonder material suitable for all applications hence the use of metal front and rear in the koni. You must be right with carbon, especially if you are going for minimum weight which, after all, is the purpose of using it. Point being, what ever you do it must be engineered correctly.
 

Zed

Size doesn't count!
Midas Member
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
12,814
Likes
10,564
Location
Springfield
#19
As long as it's not chinesium :D
The Chinese are buying "Free Valve" off Koni, their engines are going to take a quantum leap soon. They will not be crap for ever... I hope that Chinglish improves, especially if the best cars end up coming from China, the manuals will be hell otherwise!
 

Zed

Size doesn't count!
Midas Member
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
12,814
Likes
10,564
Location
Springfield
#20
Either way, me thinks deep down that the usual GM and Ford cost cutting is at work here.
Occam's Razor

Yes... most probably.
 

GOLDZILLA

Harvurd Koleej Jeenyus
Midas Member
Joined
Apr 1, 2010
Messages
7,787
Likes
7,570
#21
Or they built the frame to government standards for street vehicles that drive inside normal speed limits and affordability rather than to indy 500 specs.
 

chomper

Purveyor of Filth
Silver Miner
Joined
Feb 10, 2011
Messages
800
Likes
665
#22
The Chinese are buying "Free Valve" off Koni, their engines are going to take a quantum leap soon. They will not be crap for ever... I hope that Chinglish improves, especially if the best cars end up coming from China, the manuals will be hell otherwise!
I'm not so sure, China doesn't have the innovation mentality that the Japanese and Koreans have. They've relied on IP theft for so long, it will be a long time before they change tune.
 

Zed

Size doesn't count!
Midas Member
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
12,814
Likes
10,564
Location
Springfield
#23
I'm not so sure, China doesn't have the innovation mentality that the Japanese and Koreans have. They've relied on IP theft for so long, it will be a long time before they change tune.
No... but they are buying things like "Free Valve" from Koni and they have the scale to apply it. The Koreans bought a heap of Audi talent after VW started to get on the nose and now look @ their product. The power train in my newish Hyundai is really, really good. I don't see western car makers being as aggressive, more sitting on their laurels.
 

Zed

Size doesn't count!
Midas Member
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
12,814
Likes
10,564
Location
Springfield
#24
Or they built the frame to government standards for street vehicles that drive inside normal speed limits and affordability rather than to indy 500 specs.
Reached into the parts bin and thought what can we recycle into this thing... yeah... that will probably do it!
 

the_shootist

Midas Member
Midas Member
Midas Supporter
Joined
May 31, 2015
Messages
30,855
Likes
39,565
#25
Matching an over powered engine to an under designed frame makes perfect sense to me. That's why Detroit is the paradise that it is! American ingenuity at its zenith!!
 

tigerwillow1

Silver Member
Silver Miner
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
716
Likes
1,079
#26
I'm calling BS. This is just another setup to generate publicity. Don't tell me the GM engineers can't calculate the forces of the engine on the frame--it's compete bunk to make the corvette sheep salivate over the new release in rapt expectation.

Nice try for a new marketing ploy.
I should have thought of that on my own, but adding to it: The program is running late, and somebody came up with the idea to turn the lemons into lemonade. Same concept as changing software bugs into features.
 

<SLV>

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Apr 1, 2010
Messages
3,813
Likes
4,832
#27
I am an engineer, and I can tell you that there is a ton of pressure from management to reduce cost and weight while increasing power and capacity. They want us to design Rolexes that cost the same as a Timex. The quest for profit pushes people to play too close to the line (safety/reliability). Engineers always want to go overboard on safety factor, but there is a ton of pushback because of cost. Usually the dollar is stronger than the math and wins the tug of war.
 

oldgaranddad

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Midas Supporter
Joined
Feb 21, 2012
Messages
4,551
Likes
7,511
Location
On the top shelf.
#28
... I don't see western car makers being as aggressive, more sitting on their laurels.
Not to say the US can’t build good stuff. Honda produces 4 out of the top 10 US parts made cars (3 Honda, 1 Accura) as per cars.com

Don’t confuse the nameplate with the country. Nowadays with Italian Chrysler’s and Jeeps, Indian Volvos, and German Rolls Royces nothing is how it seems.
 

tigerwillow1

Silver Member
Silver Miner
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
716
Likes
1,079
#30
I am an engineer, and I can tell you that there is a ton of pressure from management to reduce cost and weight while increasing power and capacity.
Back when I was in an organization that built PC peripherals, we had a PC ISA board that had 3 status LEDs on it. Over all of the engineers objections, the management decided that in future manufacturing runs those 3 LED positions would not be stuffed. Saved about 6 cents per board manufacturing cost.

Defending the stuppid decisions a little bit, it is a balance. Bring something to market fast with bugs and it gets a bad reputation that will stick even after the product is fixed. Hold it back for too long to get the bugs out, then somebody else releases their buggy product and corners the market share. At least the many bugs that came out of my organization didn't lead to any deaths (as far as I'm aware of).