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Good news: I'm on KINDLE!!

Unca Walt

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I have absolutely no fargin idea when this occurred. But somehow my novel "The Cadet - The Adventures of a New World Pioneer in the 17th Century" is now available on Kindle.

Instead of a tank of gas, it only costs a gallon of gas. YAY.

https://www.amazon.com/s?k=the+cadet...ref=nb_sb_noss

Folks often ask me why there is the disclaimer that it is a work of fiction and anybody mentioned is just coincidental... That is so I don't get sued for naming names. Like a van Dyke (as in Dick's gggggrampa) who murdered an Injun chief's daughter and caused a massacree that was up there with Custer.

ONE MORE "HOLY JEEPERS!" THING I NEVER SAW BEFORE: The reader reviews. I've gotten letters and such -- even from Hollywood, yet -- but I never saw the reviews.

My head is NEVER gonna fit in my hat ever again. What a wonderful way to start a morning!!! ALL 5-star reviews! WOW.

And Brother Keefie's review... Holy smokes! :Proud::godfather:beer::Proud:

"A rugged/unique history well written from a rugged/unique first person perspective..

"The LAST of the Mohicans" equals "The FIRST of the Snedekers." A mandatory read for any serious student of 1600s North American History and would make the kind of movie I usually watch late at night on Netflix.

A volume (in Hardcover) as epic as 'War and Peace' which covers our pre-colonial period from an 'average citizen' perspective, who just happens to be employed by the Dutch West India Society. Simply written, as if you were logged into a very ancient/old uTube account and could eves drop on the day to day events along his way. With plenty of interesting little tid-bits thrown in to bring a chuckle/tear to ur eye. Like I never knew it was against village law not to utter a warning before emptying your morning commode on the streets from a high window
Look out below!

A little known, pre-americano, treasure chest of colonial history.


Far out.
 

newmisty

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Attaboy Unca.
 

newmisty

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Here's a couple more reviews:
:

Patricia Eggers

5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Reviewed in the United States on January 2, 2017
Format: Kindle Edition

Great teaching opportunity

I chose this book for my 8th grade Ss and ELA class to teach about the people who founded our neighborhood



Mike M

5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Reviewed in the United States on June 11, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
Outstanding, a real treat for the reader!
I finished The Cadet this afternoon. Like the B&B War, it was very difficult to put down, maybe moreso! Really, an excellent piece of work. I can't imagine the research that went into it, I can sense this was a true labor of love. This is a book, where one reading will not suffice. The author really has the master's touch when it comes to character development.

The best parts are that many of the characters are ancestors of the author and the book covers a little-known part of American History, Dutch colonialism in the US and the beginnings of New York City.

Get this book, you will not regret it!!
 

newmisty

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Unca Walt

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In order:

Cigarlover said:
I want an autographed hardcopy. :) I'm ordering 1 today. :)

Can I get a copy of the paperback autographed? I'd like one too!
Bushpilot: Me three!

I will be happy to inscribe anything you'd like... but it is gonna be a PITA for you guys to get that: The books would be sent to you, then you'd have to send them to me (I do not have any copies to send out) and then I could inscribe/sign and send them back to you.

My signature ain't worth that much hoop-jumpin' (although one signed copy was on e-bay for $80). It'd be easier and cheaper to get all three of my novels out there for under ten bucks by Kindle.

Faerie Diamonds
The Bat and Balloon War -- An Alternate History of WWII
The Cadet -- The Adventures of a New World Pioneer in the 17th Century


All on Amazon.

Clearly, I ain't in it to get rich. Hillary never bought a dozen skids of the hardcopy.

But I DO hafta brag on one thing: 87% of respondents admit to The Cadet making them all teary. Both for sad AND for happy. I got one guy on the LAST PAGE.

Congrats, Walter. Ya think hollyweird might come knockin at yer door soon?

BF
Well, we came within a fargin millimeter of The Cadet being made into a miniseries. (*sigh*)

“Finished. Speechless. Stunned. Wow. What a great book! I can’t wait to see the movie. Yeah. Really, its that good!” -- Richard Saxon

"I finished the book.... if you want to know if it made me cry, the answer is: yes! yes! yes! many times. The book is wonderful, I could feel myself in the journeys of life from Holland to the New World and in New Amsterdam in the 1600's along with Jan and all his friends and family. I felt joy, I laughed, I had some feelings of nausea caused by the Indians, I cried, I got red in the face with anger like Jan, and I loved every word I read. Thank you for writing such a wonderful treasure." -- Becky Corn
"I received my copy of The Cadet, and read it all the next day... Superb!! Loved every bit of it! I must admit I shed a few tears in that last chapter. Really, you did an incredible job. Oh yes... the inscription: couldn't have been better!" -- Bob Harris

"I took every spare moment – because I simply couldn’t put it down -- to read The Cadet. I was moved to tears. It is a great book!" -- Leona Heitsch
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 

Unca Walt

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Since it would be hard to screw up this thread any worser, here is an excerpt from the book. Everything happened exactly as written, every character is real and did as depicted. Little Annetjie (Annettie) was Jan's daughter:

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Reprieve


January, 1641


Little Annetje was playing in the snow again. She was not only wearing her “soul warmer”, the woolen sweater that crossed double in the front and then was tied in the back, but also the leathern sleeves that attached above her elbows and hooked to her thumbs. Still, she always got cold quickly when she played in the snow, so it was definitely a short-term joy that had to be hurried. The lot between the Snedeker Tavern and the van Elslant house was covered in nearly three inches of soft, powdery coldness.

The bright sun made her squint as she looked down Pearl Street. Manuel The Giant was not yet in sight, and her nose and feet were already getting cold. Manuel did not speak very well, but Little Annetje loved the huge black slave. She knew that he had chores to do before he could come down the street to join her, but she wished he’d hurry. She sighed with a little girl’s impatience, and began flapping her arms, pretending she was a bird trying to keep warm.

Little Annetje wandered toward the back of the lot, looking up the tumbled slope of the Fort. It was really a lot of trouble to get up the slope when it was snow covered, but it was equally a lot of fun to slide down. She was debating the effort versus the gains when the brightness of the sunlight suddenly diminished.

There was a man-shaped shadow on the ground in front of her. Little Annetje smiled in joy, and turned around expecting to see her giant.

But the black man in front of her was the one that always just stared at her as he walked by.

“Hello. Do you know where Manuel The Giant is?” she asked.

The man leaned down and took Little Annetje by the arm, and led her over to the angle of the house that was not visible from the street. Little Annetje looked up at him and was about to ask again when the black slave suddenly picked her up and clamped his hand over her mouth.

His hand was cold and smelled funny. Little Annetje didn’t like it, and tried to squirm out of his grasp. But she couldn’t move very much at all.

Then she felt his other hand slide up between her legs.

Little Annetje struggled frantically, making mewling noises through her nose. She could not get away from his hand, and began to cry.

A load roar came from right beside her, and she was suddenly thrown to the snow-covered ground.

Little Annetje looked up through her tears to see Manuel The Giant holding the other slave by the throat with one of his huge hands. As she watched, the other hand of the huge man also gripped the man’s throat. Then, both hands twisted, and there was a loud crackling-popping noise. The body of her attacker began to vibrate.

Manuel The Giant dropped the body, where it lay on the ground shaking for several moments longer. Then he picked up the crying little girl and carried her around to the front of the house. The door thundered as he pounded on it.

Jan opened the door to see the huge slave standing in the street, the tears in his eyes matching those of his daughter. Little Annetje reached for her father’s arms, crying. He took her and held her to him as Manuel The Giant turned and walked away down Pearl Street.

The dead man at the side of the house was not found for almost a full day. Little Annetje had gone immediately into an exhausted and deep sleep without saying anything. Jan had assumed she had just fallen and been frightened, and her giant friend had brought her home. Much later, when Jan went out to get some more firewood from the box, he was staggered to see the body laying there with its neck bent at an impossible angle. Jan’s cry of surprise was noted by people on the street, and before long a large crowd had gathered to gawk and comment.

It did not take any great amount of detective work to find out who had done it. When Manuel The Giant was asked if he had killed the slave, he simply nodded in the affirmative.

Willem Kieft quickly pronounced that Manuel The Giant was to be hanged on the evening next day for the murder of the slave. It would be only the second hanging in the history of Nieuw Amsterdam.

The entire colony was abuzz with the news. Discussion of the murder and its locale caused a temporary boost in the number of customers in the taproom. Little Annetje soon heard what was going to happen the next day, and ran to her father in tears.

“Daddy! You’ve got to save Manuel The Giant!” she wailed.

“I’m sorry, Little Blossom, but he admitted to killing that slave. That is murder, and murder is punished by hanging.”

“But Daddy, he was just protecting me!” Little Annetje related the whole incident to her father, and Jan’s blood ran cold.

Jan went immediately to Willem Kieft’s house to explain what had happened. Kieft listened attentively, but when Jan was done, he shook his head. “It is too bad, Jan Snedeker, but I have already pronounced the sentence. It would look bad for me to call it back – after all, a murder is a murder.”

“He was protecting my daughter! It wasn’t murder.”

“He could have just pulled the man away and let the authorities handle the situation.” Kieft continued, shaking his head negatively. “He had no authority to kill the slave himself.”

Jan was enraged with frustration. “The man is a half-wit! He was only doing what he thought was right and necessary!”

“Still… unless there are other circumstances, I cannot rescind the order. He will have to hang tomorrow at sundown.”

Jan stormed out of Kieft’s house. His mind boiled. This was injustice of the worst stripe, he thought. He wracked his brain to find a way to convince not only Willem Kieft, but also everybody in the colony that Manuel The Giant should not be hanged. And he had to do it within the next day.

He went home to think.

Annetje looked at the tortured face of her husband and knew he had had no success with the Governor. “May God damn Willem Kieft’s soul to Hell,” she said with a completely uncharacteristic vehemence. “The man just likes to see death dealt everywhere.”

She was straightening the leatherworking equipment up in the back room as she spoke. Jan joined her. Sometimes, working with his hands helped him to think. He started helping her clean up.

“Maybe the rope will break,” she said hopelessly.

“Not likely. I’ve seen the hangman’s rope that is stored in the Place of Justice. It’s very strong and thick. So there is no chance of it breaking short of Divine Providence.”

And there it was.

Jan’s face lit up. “I’ve got an idea! I must go see Dominie Everardus Bogardus right away!” He ran out of the back room, through the taproom and into the street without even stopping for his coat.

Even with running, Jan was fairly chilled by the time he was pounding on the door of the Dominie. When it opened, to Jan’s inner delight he saw that the Dominie was well into his cups again.

“Come in, come in quickly. You’ll freeze us both.” A souse he might have been, but Bogardus and Jan had always gotten along well. A good deal of that was due to the mutual antipathy they shared for Willem Kieft. Everardus Bogardus hurried back over to the fire, and Jan followed right behind him. Bogardus hesitated a long few seconds, then sighed and said, “You look like you could use a tot of brandy.” He reached up to the top of the mantle, and brought down the warmed bottle and a small cup. He placed it on the table next to his own larger cup (filled to the brim) and poured a small amount into Jan’s.

“So what brings you to my abode without so much as a coat, my friend?”

Jan took a welcome sip of the fiery liquid. “Ahh. Thank you Everardus. Next time you stop at the tavern, have a tankard of good beer on me.”

“That I will do, you may rest assured,” Bogardus answered with a smile. “Now, as I said, why are you here… and panting like a bull from running in the meadow?”

“How would you like to force Willem Kieft to retract his death sentence on Manuel The Giant – especially since I just came from him where he denied that he would ever do such a thing?”

“Oh, that would be great sport!” Bogardus took a deep draught of his brandy. “He would never listen to anything I say, that is a certainty, but if I could do it I most definitely would. Especially,” he took another sip, “if he really was against doing such a thing. That would be grand.”

“Manuel The Giant was protecting Little Annetje from the slave he killed. Little Annetje told me what happened. The slave had taken my Little Blossom around the corner of my house out of sight of the road, and was…” Jan’s face clouded and his throat caught. “Anyway, Manuel The Giant loves her dearly. He came on the scene just in time. He picked up that piece of dog dirt and broke his neck for him.”

“You told this to Governor Kieft and he still did not rescind the hanging sentence?”

“You know very well, Everardus, that Kieft loves to see killing done. Especially in front of him.” Jan took his last sip, emptying the little cup. “He would never rescind the order unless he had to.”

“That’s true, Jan. Before that evil man would rescind a hanging he had pronounced, he would have to be faced with…”

“…Divine intervention,” Jan finished.

“There is something here which I have not caught on to yet, my friend. Out with it. You look like you have just received a letter from the Angel Gabriel.”

Jan smiled conspiratorially. “Suppose, Everardus, that some Dominie – Oh, I don’t know who – called upon Divine intervention to foil the hanging of Manuel The Giant when everyone is at the Place of Justice tomorrow evening.”

“Keep going, you scoundrel,” Bogardus took another gulp of brandy. “I smell something cooking in the Snedeker kitchen, I do.”

“Well,” Jan tapped the cup on the table, but the Dominie affected not to notice. “Suppose the rope broke? And when they brought out a new rope, that one broke also? Could any Dominie you know of make something of that?”

A wide grin broke out across Bogardus’ face.

“Oh, but couldn’t I, just?”

“Suppose then, some scoundrel you knew happened to have some leatherworking chemicals that are well-known – among those in the trade – to cause hemp to become quite brittle? Suppose also that that same scoundrel could have those ropes positively soaked with them before this night is out – do you think a certain Dominie could deal a good, sound blow to Willem Kieft while saving the life of an innocent man?”

Both men were grinning.

“As I see it, Jan Snedeker, we shall be doing the Lord’s work. Have another brandy!”

Just after supper when it was full dark, Jan took his glass bottle down Pearl Street, turned right, and ambled casually to the Place of Justice. No one was afoot in the snow-blanketed cold night, and this suited him just fine. He had lightly warmed the bottle by the fireplace during dinner, as he knew the mixture worked better when warm. A simple latch held the door closed to the storeroom, and Jan was inside in a flash.

Once inside, he opened the shutters on the candle lantern and looked around. Implements, pulleys, and… rope. Two big coils of it, thicker than his thumb. He had already planned how he would wet the ropes down, so he uncoiled them as much as possible on the storeroom floor in order to be able to work with the entire lengths of both ropes.

Jan knew the liquid he was putting on the ropes would slightly discolor them, therefore he wanted to make sure the color was uniform by painting the entire lengths of both of the ropes. Another consideration was if he only wet down a small section, that section may not have been the weight bearing section when the rope was used.

Better to do the lengths of both ropes evenly.

The candle was guttering before he was done. He realized that he probably did not really have to do as neat a job of coating the ropes as he had done, but his father’s teachings about extra care while working were hard to throw off. He grinned in the dark.

The crowd began to gather by the gallows in the Place of Justice fairly early in the afternoon. Dominie Everardus Bogardus took advantage of the extra time to preach a generalist sermon well sprinkled with anecdotes about forgiveness and mercy. When the time for the execution came closer and the crowd was nearly at its maximum, he was completely unable to avoid casting more and more pointed aspersions upon Governor Kieft for condemning an innocent man to death.

Kieft was just arriving about the time Dominie Everardus Bogardus was nearly finished, and with the masterful oratory for which he was justly famous, he called upon God and the Holy Spirit to intervene in the favor of the innocent – and to foil the naked bloodlust of the unholy.

“Pretty strong stuff,” Jan whispered in an aside to Bogardus as the Dominie stepped down off the gallows platform to join the crowd. Governor Willem Kieft was red in the face with rage at the obvious reference to him.

“Bring out the prisoner!” he called.

Manuel The Giant came shambling forward, flanked by two militiamen with spears. His hands were tied with multiple loops in front of him, and he was hobbled.

Jan was delighted to see the ropes tying the big man’s hands and feet were sections of the ropes he had treated the night before. He whispered this wonderful news to the Dominie. Everardus Bogardus’ eyes lit up as he saw further opportunity opening before him.

Manuel The Giant did not realize what was going on, except that he knew it was not good. He was docile as he was led up the five steps of the gallows scaffold, and did not complain when the noose was placed around his neck. The crowd was silent.

“I call upon you, Governor Willem Kieft, to free this innocent man!” The Dominie’s voice called out into the stillness. “Will you do so?”

“No!” came the terse reply. “This man killed a slave. He is to hang.”

“Then I call upon God Almighty to save this innocent man from your injustice!”

In answer, Willem Kieft gave the signal, and the trap door opened. Manuel The Giant dropped through, and wound up sitting with a dazed look on the ground as the rope snapped. He had found the fall amusing, and smiled happily.

“Bring another rope!” Willem Kieft’s voice cracked as he shouted.

Quickly, the second rope was brought forward and a new noose fashioned. The black giant was again led up the steps to the platform. As the noose was placed around his neck, everyone heard the stentorian tones of Dominie Everardus Bogardus.

“Governor Willem Kieft! I call upon you to cease defying Almighty God with your need to slake your bloodlust, and let this innocent man go!”

“Guards! Remove that man!” Kieft yelled. There was an uproar at this, and Willem Kieft looked around and said, “Never mind, let the old drunk prattle.”

“Again, I call upon God Almighty to save this innocent man from the injustice of Governor Kieft!”

With a wary eye, Kieft again gave the signal. This time, Manuel The Giant began laughing, and got up without prompting. He hobbled up the steps as fast as he could, ready to play again. The crowd roared with laughter.

The Dominie seized his moment to perfection.

“Manuel The Giant!” he shouted, “Receive the strength and power from God as did Samson when bound with ropes of perfidy! Burst your bonds asunder!”

The big black man looked at the Dominie in confusion.

Somebody yelled, “Go ahead and break the ropes, Manuel!”

Manuel The Giant grinned at this game, and easily parted the many coils of ropes around his wrists. They fell in several pieces at his feet. When he looked at his feet, he almost absently broke those ropes also.

The crowd went wild.

Even Willem Kieft was caught up in the fervor. His shouted pardon for Manuel The Giant was clearly heard by the whole crowd.

Dominie Everardus Bogardus went home and got gloriously drunk.
 

Bushpilot

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#13
UncaWalt, you order the book, pm me how much for the book and your address and I’ll send u
you a check and pm you my address and the inscription. It will be an honor to get it!
 

Unca Walt

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UncaWalt, you order the book, pm me how much for the book and your address and I’ll send u
you a check and pm you my address and the inscription. It will be an honor to get it!
Well, dang. Wilco.

BLAM! Done. Took one fargin minute.

Here's the actual. It will ship to me in 1-2 days. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/141079668X/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_hsch_vapi_thcv_p1_i0

I AM the shittiest salesman on earth. I could not sell pardons in a women's prison. I could not sell heated drysuits on the back deck of the Titanic.

Want proof? I JUST NOW DISCOVERED THAT I HAVE A WEBSITE ON AMAZON!!

Just lookit this:

https://www.amazon.com/Walt-C-Snedeker/e/B00J1QV8QO/ref=dp_byline_cont_pop_ebooks_1


:don't    know2::rage 1:don't    know2::dduck::rotf:


Which gave me an idea: I upped the order for a buncha more copies. If someone ever wants a copy, I can oblige.

If not, I'll save them for a "Bonfire Of Unca's Panties Vanities". And read a LOT. :read::read::read::read:
 

Unca Walt

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#16
Cool, Walter. Why don't you put yer picture in that little box on top, there? The one of you at the lathe would be a fine one.

:Happy::Happy:
BF
Might just do dat... cool:whistle:

Just found this fargin page -- can you believe it?

The book jacket has my phiz on it. I'll check to see if I can add it to the page... Although that may impede sales.
 

<SLV>

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#20
Congrats, Unca Walt! Nothing feels as good as success!
 

DodgebyDave

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#21
do you have a wikipedia page?
 

newmisty

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Unca, if you self published through Amazon, you should be able to order author copies at cost rather than paying the amazon price, that’s what I did for my kids book.
You wrote a kids book PJ?
 

dacrunch

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#23
I have absolutely no fargin idea when this occurred. But somehow my novel "The Cadet - The Adventures of a New World Pioneer in the 17th Century" is now available on Kindle.

Instead of a tank of gas, it only costs a gallon of gas. YAY.

https://www.amazon.com/s?k=the+cadet...ref=nb_sb_noss

Folks often ask me why there is the disclaimer that it is a work of fiction and anybody mentioned is just coincidental... That is so I don't get sued for naming names. Like a van Dyke (as in Dick's gggggrampa) who murdered an Injun chief's daughter and caused a massacree that was up there with Custer.

ONE MORE "HOLY JEEPERS!" THING I NEVER SAW BEFORE: The reader reviews. I've gotten letters and such -- even from Hollywood, yet -- but I never saw the reviews.

My head is NEVER gonna fit in my hat ever again. What a wonderful way to start a morning!!! ALL 5-star reviews! WOW.

And Brother Keefie's review... Holy smokes! :Proud::godfather:beer::Proud:

"A rugged/unique history well written from a rugged/unique first person perspective..

"The LAST of the Mohicans" equals "The FIRST of the Snedekers." A mandatory read for any serious student of 1600s North American History and would make the kind of movie I usually watch late at night on Netflix.

A volume (in Hardcover) as epic as 'War and Peace' which covers our pre-colonial period from an 'average citizen' perspective, who just happens to be employed by the Dutch West India Society. Simply written, as if you were logged into a very ancient/old uTube account and could eves drop on the day to day events along his way. With plenty of interesting little tid-bits thrown in to bring a chuckle/tear to ur eye. Like I never knew it was against village law not to utter a warning before emptying your morning commode on the streets from a high window
Look out below!


A little known, pre-americano, treasure chest of colonial history.

Far out.
CONGRATS!!!
When is the AudioBook coming out?
It might be the 1st one I actually PURCHASE (I've pirated thousands over the years on the Pirate Bay)... but wouldn't do that to YOU ;)
 

PhucilliJerry

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#24

Merkin

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#25
Since it would be hard to screw up this thread any worser, here is an excerpt from the book. Everything happened exactly as written, every character is real and did as depicted. Little Annetjie (Annettie) was Jan's daughter:

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Reprieve


January, 1641


Little Annetje was playing in the snow again. She was not only wearing her “soul warmer”, the woolen sweater that crossed double in the front and then was tied in the back, but also the leathern sleeves that attached above her elbows and hooked to her thumbs. Still, she always got cold quickly when she played in the snow, so it was definitely a short-term joy that had to be hurried. The lot between the Snedeker Tavern and the van Elslant house was covered in nearly three inches of soft, powdery coldness.

The bright sun made her squint as she looked down Pearl Street. Manuel The Giant was not yet in sight, and her nose and feet were already getting cold. Manuel did not speak very well, but Little Annetje loved the huge black slave. She knew that he had chores to do before he could come down the street to join her, but she wished he’d hurry. She sighed with a little girl’s impatience, and began flapping her arms, pretending she was a bird trying to keep warm.

Little Annetje wandered toward the back of the lot, looking up the tumbled slope of the Fort. It was really a lot of trouble to get up the slope when it was snow covered, but it was equally a lot of fun to slide down. She was debating the effort versus the gains when the brightness of the sunlight suddenly diminished.

There was a man-shaped shadow on the ground in front of her. Little Annetje smiled in joy, and turned around expecting to see her giant.

But the black man in front of her was the one that always just stared at her as he walked by.

“Hello. Do you know where Manuel The Giant is?” she asked.

The man leaned down and took Little Annetje by the arm, and led her over to the angle of the house that was not visible from the street. Little Annetje looked up at him and was about to ask again when the black slave suddenly picked her up and clamped his hand over her mouth.

His hand was cold and smelled funny. Little Annetje didn’t like it, and tried to squirm out of his grasp. But she couldn’t move very much at all.

Then she felt his other hand slide up between her legs.

Little Annetje struggled frantically, making mewling noises through her nose. She could not get away from his hand, and began to cry.

A load roar came from right beside her, and she was suddenly thrown to the snow-covered ground.

Little Annetje looked up through her tears to see Manuel The Giant holding the other slave by the throat with one of his huge hands. As she watched, the other hand of the huge man also gripped the man’s throat. Then, both hands twisted, and there was a loud crackling-popping noise. The body of her attacker began to vibrate.

Manuel The Giant dropped the body, where it lay on the ground shaking for several moments longer. Then he picked up the crying little girl and carried her around to the front of the house. The door thundered as he pounded on it.

Jan opened the door to see the huge slave standing in the street, the tears in his eyes matching those of his daughter. Little Annetje reached for her father’s arms, crying. He took her and held her to him as Manuel The Giant turned and walked away down Pearl Street.

The dead man at the side of the house was not found for almost a full day. Little Annetje had gone immediately into an exhausted and deep sleep without saying anything. Jan had assumed she had just fallen and been frightened, and her giant friend had brought her home. Much later, when Jan went out to get some more firewood from the box, he was staggered to see the body laying there with its neck bent at an impossible angle. Jan’s cry of surprise was noted by people on the street, and before long a large crowd had gathered to gawk and comment.

It did not take any great amount of detective work to find out who had done it. When Manuel The Giant was asked if he had killed the slave, he simply nodded in the affirmative.

Willem Kieft quickly pronounced that Manuel The Giant was to be hanged on the evening next day for the murder of the slave. It would be only the second hanging in the history of Nieuw Amsterdam.

The entire colony was abuzz with the news. Discussion of the murder and its locale caused a temporary boost in the number of customers in the taproom. Little Annetje soon heard what was going to happen the next day, and ran to her father in tears.

“Daddy! You’ve got to save Manuel The Giant!” she wailed.

“I’m sorry, Little Blossom, but he admitted to killing that slave. That is murder, and murder is punished by hanging.”

“But Daddy, he was just protecting me!” Little Annetje related the whole incident to her father, and Jan’s blood ran cold.

Jan went immediately to Willem Kieft’s house to explain what had happened. Kieft listened attentively, but when Jan was done, he shook his head. “It is too bad, Jan Snedeker, but I have already pronounced the sentence. It would look bad for me to call it back – after all, a murder is a murder.”

“He was protecting my daughter! It wasn’t murder.”

“He could have just pulled the man away and let the authorities handle the situation.” Kieft continued, shaking his head negatively. “He had no authority to kill the slave himself.”

Jan was enraged with frustration. “The man is a half-wit! He was only doing what he thought was right and necessary!”

“Still… unless there are other circumstances, I cannot rescind the order. He will have to hang tomorrow at sundown.”

Jan stormed out of Kieft’s house. His mind boiled. This was injustice of the worst stripe, he thought. He wracked his brain to find a way to convince not only Willem Kieft, but also everybody in the colony that Manuel The Giant should not be hanged. And he had to do it within the next day.

He went home to think.

Annetje looked at the tortured face of her husband and knew he had had no success with the Governor. “May God damn Willem Kieft’s soul to Hell,” she said with a completely uncharacteristic vehemence. “The man just likes to see death dealt everywhere.”

She was straightening the leatherworking equipment up in the back room as she spoke. Jan joined her. Sometimes, working with his hands helped him to think. He started helping her clean up.

“Maybe the rope will break,” she said hopelessly.

“Not likely. I’ve seen the hangman’s rope that is stored in the Place of Justice. It’s very strong and thick. So there is no chance of it breaking short of Divine Providence.”

And there it was.

Jan’s face lit up. “I’ve got an idea! I must go see Dominie Everardus Bogardus right away!” He ran out of the back room, through the taproom and into the street without even stopping for his coat.

Even with running, Jan was fairly chilled by the time he was pounding on the door of the Dominie. When it opened, to Jan’s inner delight he saw that the Dominie was well into his cups again.

“Come in, come in quickly. You’ll freeze us both.” A souse he might have been, but Bogardus and Jan had always gotten along well. A good deal of that was due to the mutual antipathy they shared for Willem Kieft. Everardus Bogardus hurried back over to the fire, and Jan followed right behind him. Bogardus hesitated a long few seconds, then sighed and said, “You look like you could use a tot of brandy.” He reached up to the top of the mantle, and brought down the warmed bottle and a small cup. He placed it on the table next to his own larger cup (filled to the brim) and poured a small amount into Jan’s.

“So what brings you to my abode without so much as a coat, my friend?”

Jan took a welcome sip of the fiery liquid. “Ahh. Thank you Everardus. Next time you stop at the tavern, have a tankard of good beer on me.”

“That I will do, you may rest assured,” Bogardus answered with a smile. “Now, as I said, why are you here… and panting like a bull from running in the meadow?”

“How would you like to force Willem Kieft to retract his death sentence on Manuel The Giant – especially since I just came from him where he denied that he would ever do such a thing?”

“Oh, that would be great sport!” Bogardus took a deep draught of his brandy. “He would never listen to anything I say, that is a certainty, but if I could do it I most definitely would. Especially,” he took another sip, “if he really was against doing such a thing. That would be grand.”

“Manuel The Giant was protecting Little Annetje from the slave he killed. Little Annetje told me what happened. The slave had taken my Little Blossom around the corner of my house out of sight of the road, and was…” Jan’s face clouded and his throat caught. “Anyway, Manuel The Giant loves her dearly. He came on the scene just in time. He picked up that piece of dog dirt and broke his neck for him.”

“You told this to Governor Kieft and he still did not rescind the hanging sentence?”

“You know very well, Everardus, that Kieft loves to see killing done. Especially in front of him.” Jan took his last sip, emptying the little cup. “He would never rescind the order unless he had to.”

“That’s true, Jan. Before that evil man would rescind a hanging he had pronounced, he would have to be faced with…”

“…Divine intervention,” Jan finished.

“There is something here which I have not caught on to yet, my friend. Out with it. You look like you have just received a letter from the Angel Gabriel.”

Jan smiled conspiratorially. “Suppose, Everardus, that some Dominie – Oh, I don’t know who – called upon Divine intervention to foil the hanging of Manuel The Giant when everyone is at the Place of Justice tomorrow evening.”

“Keep going, you scoundrel,” Bogardus took another gulp of brandy. “I smell something cooking in the Snedeker kitchen, I do.”

“Well,” Jan tapped the cup on the table, but the Dominie affected not to notice. “Suppose the rope broke? And when they brought out a new rope, that one broke also? Could any Dominie you know of make something of that?”

A wide grin broke out across Bogardus’ face.

“Oh, but couldn’t I, just?”

“Suppose then, some scoundrel you knew happened to have some leatherworking chemicals that are well-known – among those in the trade – to cause hemp to become quite brittle? Suppose also that that same scoundrel could have those ropes positively soaked with them before this night is out – do you think a certain Dominie could deal a good, sound blow to Willem Kieft while saving the life of an innocent man?”

Both men were grinning.

“As I see it, Jan Snedeker, we shall be doing the Lord’s work. Have another brandy!”

Just after supper when it was full dark, Jan took his glass bottle down Pearl Street, turned right, and ambled casually to the Place of Justice. No one was afoot in the snow-blanketed cold night, and this suited him just fine. He had lightly warmed the bottle by the fireplace during dinner, as he knew the mixture worked better when warm. A simple latch held the door closed to the storeroom, and Jan was inside in a flash.

Once inside, he opened the shutters on the candle lantern and looked around. Implements, pulleys, and… rope. Two big coils of it, thicker than his thumb. He had already planned how he would wet the ropes down, so he uncoiled them as much as possible on the storeroom floor in order to be able to work with the entire lengths of both ropes.

Jan knew the liquid he was putting on the ropes would slightly discolor them, therefore he wanted to make sure the color was uniform by painting the entire lengths of both of the ropes. Another consideration was if he only wet down a small section, that section may not have been the weight bearing section when the rope was used.

Better to do the lengths of both ropes evenly.

The candle was guttering before he was done. He realized that he probably did not really have to do as neat a job of coating the ropes as he had done, but his father’s teachings about extra care while working were hard to throw off. He grinned in the dark.

The crowd began to gather by the gallows in the Place of Justice fairly early in the afternoon. Dominie Everardus Bogardus took advantage of the extra time to preach a generalist sermon well sprinkled with anecdotes about forgiveness and mercy. When the time for the execution came closer and the crowd was nearly at its maximum, he was completely unable to avoid casting more and more pointed aspersions upon Governor Kieft for condemning an innocent man to death.

Kieft was just arriving about the time Dominie Everardus Bogardus was nearly finished, and with the masterful oratory for which he was justly famous, he called upon God and the Holy Spirit to intervene in the favor of the innocent – and to foil the naked bloodlust of the unholy.

“Pretty strong stuff,” Jan whispered in an aside to Bogardus as the Dominie stepped down off the gallows platform to join the crowd. Governor Willem Kieft was red in the face with rage at the obvious reference to him.

“Bring out the prisoner!” he called.

Manuel The Giant came shambling forward, flanked by two militiamen with spears. His hands were tied with multiple loops in front of him, and he was hobbled.

Jan was delighted to see the ropes tying the big man’s hands and feet were sections of the ropes he had treated the night before. He whispered this wonderful news to the Dominie. Everardus Bogardus’ eyes lit up as he saw further opportunity opening before him.

Manuel The Giant did not realize what was going on, except that he knew it was not good. He was docile as he was led up the five steps of the gallows scaffold, and did not complain when the noose was placed around his neck. The crowd was silent.

“I call upon you, Governor Willem Kieft, to free this innocent man!” The Dominie’s voice called out into the stillness. “Will you do so?”

“No!” came the terse reply. “This man killed a slave. He is to hang.”

“Then I call upon God Almighty to save this innocent man from your injustice!”

In answer, Willem Kieft gave the signal, and the trap door opened. Manuel The Giant dropped through, and wound up sitting with a dazed look on the ground as the rope snapped. He had found the fall amusing, and smiled happily.

“Bring another rope!” Willem Kieft’s voice cracked as he shouted.

Quickly, the second rope was brought forward and a new noose fashioned. The black giant was again led up the steps to the platform. As the noose was placed around his neck, everyone heard the stentorian tones of Dominie Everardus Bogardus.

“Governor Willem Kieft! I call upon you to cease defying Almighty God with your need to slake your bloodlust, and let this innocent man go!”

“Guards! Remove that man!” Kieft yelled. There was an uproar at this, and Willem Kieft looked around and said, “Never mind, let the old drunk prattle.”

“Again, I call upon God Almighty to save this innocent man from the injustice of Governor Kieft!”

With a wary eye, Kieft again gave the signal. This time, Manuel The Giant began laughing, and got up without prompting. He hobbled up the steps as fast as he could, ready to play again. The crowd roared with laughter.

The Dominie seized his moment to perfection.

“Manuel The Giant!” he shouted, “Receive the strength and power from God as did Samson when bound with ropes of perfidy! Burst your bonds asunder!”

The big black man looked at the Dominie in confusion.

Somebody yelled, “Go ahead and break the ropes, Manuel!”

Manuel The Giant grinned at this game, and easily parted the many coils of ropes around his wrists. They fell in several pieces at his feet. When he looked at his feet, he almost absently broke those ropes also.

The crowd went wild.

Even Willem Kieft was caught up in the fervor. His shouted pardon for Manuel The Giant was clearly heard by the whole crowd.

Dominie Everardus Bogardus went home and got gloriously drunk.
Damn Unca, you got me too. Merkin
 

Unca Walt

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Unca, if you self published through Amazon, you should be able to order author copies at cost rather than paying the amazon price, that’s what I did for my kids book.
I did not know that. Jeez. Oh, well, I pay full retail all the time for everything.

There HAS to be some pore sod who pays full retail for everything or they would not have full retail prices on everything. I am the pore sod. (*sigh*) Just laid out a coupla hunnert bucks so I would have some "in case" copies.

That's OK... they won't rot. For a while. I hope. Maybe.
 
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Unca Walt

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CONGRATS!!!
When is the AudioBook coming out?
It might be the 1st one I actually PURCHASE (I've pirated thousands over the years on the Pirate Bay)... but wouldn't do that to YOU ;)
crunchie: Wow. Never heard of Pirate Bay. I can see how that would piss off an author who spent three fargin years, international travel, and a blue ton of research... only to have it pirated. Oddly, I just want the story to get out there... so I really wouldn't care too much. The caring part for me would be that somehow I was being sorta disrespected. No big deal... I was disrespected by the guy that shot me. But then, I shot him better.
But if it was a choice of theft or nothing, go for the theft. Just read the fargin thing. :beer::read:

The Cadet is running at 87%. <-- That is the percentage of respondents who were brought to tears (both for happy and sad) at least once while reading it. So if ya read it, lemme know if I got you. The record is five different places in the novel for one person.

Oh, darn... now I gotta relate what one lady wrote me:

"I was traveling cross-country reading your novel, and as I sat there I began crying. The flight attendant came over to ask what was wrong. I answered: It's this damn' book!"

I made one homemade audio book for my father-in-law. He had macular degeneration, and could no longer see. Fargin book came out being FOURTEEN FARGIN CD's long! Jeez.

Ain't doin' that agin. Yeah, he is gone now... and I do not have the CD's I made him. (*another sigh*) :don't know:
 
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Unca Walt

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#28
do you have a wikipedia page?
Dave -- You kiddin' me? My enthusiasm for getting the novel there out may have misled folks here... to me, my books are for the folks that read them. I don't make money on them. Wait. If I work out my hourly wage for writing five books (the other two are a genealogy and a technical book), I have been making guaranteed no more than a penny an hour. If that. Probably not that much.

Went to Holland and Oldenburg for research. Had Middle Dutch church records from Sloten, Amersfoort, and Amsterdam translated by a guy named Pim Nieuwenhaus (he has passed).

To give y'all a sense of depth of research, Jan learned how to read and write (you will read about it) by being taught by the captain of the Hoop on the long journey across the pond. I actually have his autograph:

Jan Snedeker 1665. At the time he signed this, He was busy de-throning Pieter Stuyvesant so the British invasion would be bloodless. It is a funny, funny episode:

Jansignature.jpg


1584448571983.png


See the torn up paper? That is from the English you can see out there in the harbor. They put it back together. :Happy:

Oh... There are 38 illustrations in the novel ^^^^^^^^ that's two of them.
 
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Unca Walt

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This is the path he took from Oldenburg to Amsterdam. He killed two nobles on the way there. Saved the life of Prince the Duke Albrecht Wenzel von Wallenstein, commander of the armies of the Holy Roman Empire.


JANPATH2.JPG
VONW.JPG
 

Unca Walt

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#31
I see now — mayhem is in your ancestral blood.

BF
(*snork*)

Here's a bit more modern:

1584455281818.png


He was at strafing at 10 feet altitude, when a sharp-eyed Kraut took out his prop with a 20mm. He wound up capturing the entire Kraut Luftwaffe in Prague. TINS.

While I am at it. Here's the reason I did NOT join the Mahreen Coah. I am named after him (uncle).

Three stars. Commanded the Mahreens at Okinawa. Got the Navy Cross (1 down from MOH).

Lt. Gen. Ed Snedeker.jpg


My cousin Don was Captain of the Iwo Jima (sorta A/C carrier that also has 4000 combat troops). He's now on the Joint Chiefs of Staff. My brother and me? Sergeants. He was a lifer.
 
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dacrunch

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#32
crunchie: Wow. Never heard of Pirate Bay. I can see how that would piss off an author who spent three fargin years, international travel, and a blue ton of research... only to have it pirated. Oddly, I just want the story to get out there... so I really wouldn't care too much. The caring part for me would be that somehow I was being sorta disrespected. No big deal... I was disrespected by the guy that shot me. But then, I shot him better.
Out of the thousands of audio-books, movies, tv series... over 99% went to "delete" after the 1st few minutes... I hate to pay for "junk"... And my eyes already struggle to read web pages...
 

Uncle

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Well sprung Walter.

Kudows.

Golden Regards
Uncle
 

DodgebyDave

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#34
Walt, I asked that in the context of:

W) I was too lazy to look myself

A5X) You deserve a good wiki

You should write some adventure novels, like, Mack Bolan steals The Busted Flush and then teams up with Bungaman to thwart Muttons latest credit card escapade
 

Unca Walt

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Walt, I asked that in the context of:

W) I was too lazy to look myself

A5X) You deserve a good wiki

You should write some adventure novels, like, Mack Bolan steals The Busted Flush and then teams up with Bungaman to thwart Muttons latest credit card escapade
Well, bless yore pea-pickin' heart. :beer::godfather

Actually, my latest has gotta count as some kind of adventure novel, since it covers the entirety of WWII in near-daily increments. Complete with land/air/sea battles. The Bat and Balloon War -- An Alternate History of WWII
 

Unca Walt

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HEY! The books have arrived!

YAY. Now I get to read again.
 

specsaregood

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#37
I have absolutely no fargin idea when this occurred. But somehow my novel "The Cadet - The Adventures of a New World Pioneer in the 17th Century" is now available on Kindle.

Instead of a tank of gas, it only costs a gallon of gas. YAY.

https://www.amazon.com/s?k=the+cadet...ref=nb_sb_noss

Folks often ask me why there is the disclaimer that it is a work of fiction and anybody mentioned is just coincidental... That is so I don't get sued for naming names. Like a van Dyke (as in Dick's gggggrampa) who murdered an Injun chief's daughter and caused a massacree that was up there with Custer..
The first and maybe 2nd chapter, I didn't know if I was going to get into this book; but I was already in the hottub with a gin and tonic so I pressed on. By the end of the 3rd chapter or so, I discovered that I was completely engrossed. I'm 40% through it now and greatly enjoying it.
Well done.
 

Unca Walt

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The first and maybe 2nd chapter, I didn't know if I was going to get into this book; but I was already in the hottub with a gin and tonic so I pressed on. By the end of the 3rd chapter or so, I discovered that I was completely engrossed. I'm 40% through it now and greatly enjoying it.
Well done.
Channeling Old Lodgeskins: My heart... soars like a hawk! :finished 2: Thank you.

I've never asked this (because like the incompetent sales asshole I am, I never even thought about it before) but it'd be nice if you gave an honest review on Amazon when you finish.

On the plus side, now you know how to load and fire a wheellock musket.
 

specsaregood

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#39
I've never asked this (because like the incompetent sales asshole I am, I never even thought about it before) but it'd be nice if you gave an honest review on Amazon when you finish.
Will do. I read a lot of books, but I hardly ever buy any outright since I have a Kindle Unlimited subscription (which has plenty of books I enjoy). The only other books I've actually purchased this past year were James Clavell's Asian Saga, so IMHO you are in good company.