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GPS bug is Y2K Déjà vu

Weatherman

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#1
April 6 is a good day to stay home and relax.

Snip:
Don't look now, but there's another Y2K-like computer-calendar problem on the way, and this one arrives in just one month: April 6, 2019.

That's the day millions of GPS receivers will literally run out of time, rolling over their time counters back to zero, thanks to limitations in timekeeping for older GPS devices. Many navigation systems may be affected, such as on ships or older aircraft, although your smartphone will be fine.

But because GPS satellites are also crucial to digital timekeeping used by websites, electrical grids, financial markets, data centers and computer networks, the effect of April 6 may be even more wide-ranging.

"I'm not going to be flying on April 6," said one information-security expert during a presentation at the RSA 2019 security conference in San Francisco this week.

More at: https://www.tomsguide.com/us/gps-mini-y2k-rsa2019,news-29583.html
 

tigerwillow1

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#2
I don't see this as a bug because the time register is rolling over as designed. The question is if some systems will handle this correctly or not, which won't be known until after the rollover happens.
 

AgBar

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#4
I don't see this as a bug because the time register is rolling over as designed. The question is if some systems will handle this correctly or not, which won't be known until after the rollover happens.
This has happened before. Some old, badly-coded systems think that they're back in the 1990's. They still give the correct lattitude and longitude.
 

Bottom Feeder

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#5
...you may find your receivers start to behave strangely on – or more likely at some point after – 6 April 2019. The data they output may suddenly jump backwards in time, putting timestamps on your timing and navigation data that are nearly 20 years out of date.

This won’t affect the receiver’s ability to navigate and/or calculate precise time from the day level down to the microsecond level. But it will create week, month and year timestamps that are wildly wrong, which could seriously impact any systems and applications that rely on GPS data at that level.

(To give just one example, GPS trackers employed in a fleet management system to track deliveries could cause system errors or even a crash if they suddenly start to output location data timestamped with a date 20 years in the past.)

https://www.spirent.com/blogs/positioning/2018/january/gps-rollover-week