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Health Care In America

searcher

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#1
BREAKING NEWS: Health care bill passes in House of Representatives as Paul Ryan blasts 'collapsing' Obamacare law – and Democrats taunt the GOP majority with a chorus of 'Na-na, Hey-hey, Goodbye!'
  • House Speaker Paul Ryan has held a vote on the House GOP Obamacare replacement bill Thursday afternoon, and it passed 217-213
  • The result was expected to be a squeaker, but passed with enough votes to send it to the Senate for the next round of haggling
  • Several GOP moderates got on board with the plan Wednesday afternoon, breathing new life into President Trump's second attempt to repeal Obamacare
  • The song 'Na-na, hey-hey, goodbye' was heard rattling loudly through the House chamber as the vote tally was announced
  • It was a taunt from Democrats who believe they will kick out the GOP majority in the 2018 midterm elections as a result of the vote


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4474520/Health-care-bill-passes-House-Representatives.html#ixzz4g8e2HmRZ
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solarion

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#4
Hard to see how it gets through the senate without significant alteration given the narrow majority the red contingent of the uniparty has in the upper chamber.
 

Professur

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#5
What I wanna know is ... how many of the assclowns that just voted for and against this bill have actually read and understood it. I'll wager less than 10
 

edsl48

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#6
Insurers are dropping out by the day. Why make such a big deal out of it and just let the system implode on its own so the Democrat enactors take the blame?
Once again the Republicans shoot themselves in the foot.
 

Goldhedge

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#7
.....maybe we will get time to read it now.....
yeah, wasn't it his eminence who said he'd put all bills on the inet so everyone could read them before they got passed?

Obamacare will self-implode if the GOP doesn't step in to save what's left of it.
 

nickndfl

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#8
I have had enough of the games in Congress between the parties. Democrats need to suck it up like the Republicans did for the last 8 years. Time to get business done for the people instead of all of the treachery.
 

Goldhedge

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#9
Insurers are dropping out by the day. Why make such a big deal out of it and just let the system implode on its own so the Democrat enactors take the blame?
Once again the Republicans shoot themselves in the foot.
I think the plan all along was for it to blow up.

Then the government would step in under Hitlery (had she won) and take over the whole stinking mess and instill Single Payer as the solution.

Single Payer was always the end result no matter what they did prior. You can't force people to purchase what they don't want or need.
 

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#10
'People are definitely going down': Democrats ridicule Republicans by chanting 'Na-na, na-na, hey, hey, hey goodbye!' as Obamacare repeal squeaks through – as GOP leader blasts 'unprofessional' behavior
  • Democrats mocked House Republicans by chanting 'Na na na na, hey hey goodbye' to Republicans as they cast a risky vote to repeal Obamacare
  • Democrats believe the repeal vote for an unpopular bill could cost Republicans the House
  • 'Last chance!' yelled Rep. Joe Crowley
  • House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy calls the chant 'very unprofessional'
  • The Obamacare repeal bill has polled as low as 17 per cent as lawmakers eye the 2018 off-year elections


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4474758/Democrats-ridicule-GOP-chanting-Hey-hey-goodbye.html#ixzz4g9bYPlfc
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searcher

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#11
Steam - na na hey hey kiss him goodbye

 

Uglytruth

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#12
It's so good I'm sure they exempted themselves...................
 

edsl48

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'People are definitely going down': Democrats ridicule Republicans by chanting 'Na-na, na-na, hey, hey, hey goodbye!' as Obamacare repeal squeaks through – as GOP leader blasts 'unprofessional' behavior
  • Democrats mocked House Republicans by chanting 'Na na na na, hey hey goodbye' to Republicans as they cast a risky vote to repeal Obamacare
  • Democrats believe the repeal vote for an unpopular bill could cost Republicans the House
  • 'Last chance!' yelled Rep. Joe Crowley
  • House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy calls the chant 'very unprofessional'
  • The Obamacare repeal bill has polled as low as 17 per cent as lawmakers eye the 2018 off-year elections


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4474758/Democrats-ridicule-GOP-chanting-Hey-hey-goodbye.html#ixzz4g9bYPlfc
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
These are the supposed adults that are supposed to be running the country as well as making decisions about the USAs entry into global war/police actions the economy, health care and so on and so forth. Who would have thought that Congress would be made up of the recent past's student body of special ed student types?
 

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#15
These are the supposed adults that are supposed to be running the country as well as making decisions about the USAs entry into global war/police actions the economy, health care and so on and so forth. Who would have thought that Congress would be made up of the recent past's student body of special ed student types?
Um .. anyone who's been paying attention to what's coming out of universities today. Someone famous once made the point about letting your enemies teach your children.
 

Ensoniq

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#16
Hard to see how it gets through the senate without significant alteration given the narrow majority the red contingent of the uniparty has in the upper chamber.
Which doesn't matter at all because reconciliation only needs 51 votes

They just have to get anything at all passed

Then they can head for the cloak room, break out the cigars, and start the wheeling and dealing
 

gliddenralston

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#17
T didn't care what was passed, no matter how bad or ugly, now he can sit on the crapper at 3am & tweet how he repealed the ACA, Its Trumpcare now.
 

the_shootist

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#18
T didn't care what was passed, no matter how bad or ugly, now he can sit on the crapper at 3am & tweet how he repealed the ACA.
Me thinks you focus too much on Trump and not enough on the professional criminals in Congress who have been boning us for decades. They've done way more damage to us than Trump has and continue to do so.
 
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the_shootist

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#23
Philly.com seems a tad progressive in their viewpoints but perhaps I'm being overly critical
 

Agavegirl1

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#24
Guess I'll have to read this thing. It took days to wade through the ACA and try to get a handle on it. If I find anything of interest, I'll report back.
 

the_shootist

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#25
In actuality, nothing was actually passed into law. The House voted yes, that's it. All the leftists complaining about people dying as a result of this vote and causing as much trouble as they can are traitors who's only intent is to subjugate and undermine the present government of Donald Trump. They should be rounded up and shot as traitors of the USA
 

searcher

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#27
Guess I'll have to read this thing. It took days to wade through the ACA and try to get a handle on it. If I find anything of interest, I'll report back.
Not finalized yet. Still being put together as I type. Guess they are going to try to make it more attractive for the Senate.
 

solarion

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#29
Single payer was the goal all along and goobermint isn't going to let go of the sickness industry now that they have their hooks in so deep.
 

Uglytruth

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#32
"If" their goal is single payer....... raise rates by whatever means necessary and when it becomes single payer they are hero's for "free health care for all" and steal it directly from your paycheck.
Most are so dumb they will think they are getting a great deal & something for free........
 

searcher

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#33
Price Defends Pre-existing Condition Coverage

NBC News

Kailani Koenig1 hr ago


WASHINGTON — Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price on Sunday firmly defended health care legislation passed in the House this week against charges that people who have pre-existing conditions could see their insurance premiums rise under some circumstances.

Asked about the numerous health groups and organizations opposed to the bill during an interview on NBC's "Meet The Press," Price responded, "What I believe they are not recognizing is this is a different and we believe better way" to cover individuals with pre-existing conditions or injuries.

Price later added, "sometimes change can be disconcerting to folks. And that's why I would suggest that that list of groups that you had up earlier, say they now oppose it, the fact of the matter is, they're not focusing on the kinds of things that are going to improve the system."

The House of Representatives on Thursday narrowly passed their version of the American Health Care Act, a bill that attempts to "repeal and replace" Obamacare, but the bill is expected to go through significant alterations in the Senate.

In the House bill, states could seek waivers so insurers don't have to charge people who see their insurance lapse the same if they have a pre-existing condition.

States that get the waiver would be required to set up some kind of framework — such as a "high-risk pool" — to help out people who see their premiums rise so they can continue to maintain coverage. With the addition of new amendments, about $138 billion is allocated over the next 10 years to help people in these states pay for higher costs, but many insurance analysts predict even that won't be enough to cover everyone.

Pressed with statistics and his previous comments referring to the fact that older and sicker Americans would pay more, Price claimed, "those who are sicker, who are older, who are poorer — they will get larger subsidies so that they will able to get the kind of coverage they need and for their family."

Price also defended the Trump administration from reports that the White House has proposed cutting the budget at the Office of National Drug Control Policy by 95 percent. As a candidate, Trump had made fighting the opioid epidemic across the nation one of his signature campaign promises.

Price cautioned that "this is a budget that hasn't been completed yet," and that "the president has an absolute commitment to making certain that we fight the opioid crisis."

"Whether it's through an office within the White House or whether it's through a department, an agency of government, I don't think the American people care. What they care about is that we are absolutely addressing this opioid crisis in the most aggressive and effective manner possible."

Since the House passed its health care bill last week, members of Congress and the administration have been taking heat for a celebratory gathering in the White House Rose Garden after the vote — both because the victorious photo-op was seen as premature since the Senate had yet to consider the bill, and for the lack of diversity among the lawmakers present.

Price defended the optics to "Meet The Press" guest host Andrea Mitchell.

"Andrea, come on," he said. "Look at that picture. Congresswoman Diane Black, the chair of the Budget Committee, I was standing next to her, Seema Verma, the administrator of CMS (Center for Medicaid and Medicare Services), I was standing right next to her."

Pressed on only naming a few female names, Price responded, "These are prominent individuals who are leading, who are leading in this area of health care."

The lack of women involved has also become a point of criticism in the Senate's quest to address health care.

Also, on Sunday's "Meet The Press," Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., pointed to the working group of Senate Republicans trying to write their own measure — "13 white men, when you have five Republican women who are excluded," she said.

"It's all male, and women's health is a big part of this and women are a majority of the population and their health interests deserve to be contemplated in any reform," she added.

As the "repeal and replace" debate moves to over Senate, Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., said on "Meet The Press" that the House bill will not be "not dead on arrival," but they will also not be "taking the House bill and bringing it immediately on the floor," instead looking at some of the House efforts carefully and then incorporating what the Senate wants to do. "You know, this is the way legislation used to be passed."

"From the House's perspective, they added a few things late, but this is not a new issue. The Senate is going to have to have the kind of score they need to move this forward," Blunt added, noting the upper chamber will need a final score from the Congressional Budget Office before passing its own health care measure.

Sen. Feinstein said Democrats would be open to changes to Obamacare without dismantling the law, worrying about "a whole atmosphere of of unpredictability."

"What my position is and I believe this is the Democratic position: Don't repeal Obamcare," she said. "Take those sections, like the individual market, which has some problems in it, and deal with it and fix those sections, and it can be done. I'm really very worried that in the rush to judgement we create a major health care problem for people."

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/polit...tion-coverage/ar-BBAQ8I2?li=BBnb7Kz&ocid=iehp
 

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#34
Local paper.............

A cause for shame among Republicans

  • 12 hrs ago


The 217 Republican members of the House who last week voted in favor of the American Health Care Act did the nation no favors. Rather than patting themselves on the back at finally succeeding in dismantling much of the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare, after so many failed attempts, they should be hanging their heads in shame.

Not because of their efforts to reform health care. Lord knows that even most proponents of Obamacare agreed the law needed some fixing. Seven years after its passage, weaknesses in the ACA were all too apparent. Congress would have been remiss had it chosen simply to ignore the ACA's shortcomings. The law has been a blessing for millions of people, but it's clearly not all it was cracked up to be. We believe most people would have applauded something along the lines of reassess-and-repair rather than repeal-and-replace.

What should be causing those 217 Republicans serious embarrassment is that after seven years of railing against the Affordable Care Act; after condemning both the law and the president closely associated with it at every opportunity; after voting literally dozens of times without success to kill the law — after all that, the bill that was passed last Thursday by the slimmest of margins was the best the Republican Party could come up with.

It appears that Speaker Paul Ryan and the House leadership were so obsessed with passing something to undo the ACA that they either forgot or chose to ignore the true effect of their version of health care. Independent analysts, not pro-Obamacare observers, say the GOP bill will eventually increase the number of uninsured Americans on the order of millions; that it will chop an $800 billion hole in Medicaid, which serves those of limited means; and that it will significantly raise premiums and deductibles, especially for older people and those with pre-existing conditions.

There are so many holes in the House bill that it's remarkable that Ryan was able to muster enough votes to pass it. No Democrat voted for the bill, and some 20 Republicans rejected it as well, including 8th District Congressman Brian Fitzpatrick. The freshman Fitzpatrick said he found "some positive portions" in the legislation but couldn't support it because it ignored a number of issues, including the opioid epidemic.

President Trump was happy, of course, because he can finally claim a sort of legislative victory — even though he had little if anything to do with crafting the bill and probably doesn't even know a lot of what's in it.


The bill now moves to the Senate, where its prospects are uncertain. Which is good, because in its present form, the American Health Care Act is bad business, not much different from the bill that Ryan yanked weeks ago for lack of support and carrying a promise of hurting millions of American.

If Congress can't do better than this, the country is in worse shape than any of us thought.

Enjoying our content? Become a Bucks County Courier Times subscriber to support stories like these. Get full access to our signature journalism for just 44 cents a day.

http://www.buckscountycouriertimes....cle_b243a126-bfd8-536c-87a4-4912dfabd91a.html
 

Ensoniq

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#35
The Republicans will kill you all

Sincerely,
The Dems
 

Buck

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#37
Just wait for the Senate's version

Keep those helmets on good and tight
 

solarion

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#38
The article doesn't say much of anything specific. What does "rich" mean? How about "huge"? ZOMG a tax cut for guys like Buffet? Kewl, hopefully goobermint will have less funds to buy bombs to murder people then.

As to Warren himself, well this is from the linked article:
Buffett endorsed Hillary Clinton in the 2016 campaign and has been critical of President Trump and his policies, including his stern stance on immigration.
Yeah, credibility deficit for bubba. Buffet? Isn't that the same a-hole that made a big deal out of publicly asking the IRS to RAISE his taxes? Like he's unaware that one can simply send the IRS funds without making a show of it. Without even looking into it, I suspect good ole' Warren likely pays next to nothing in taxes due to an army of lieyers and bean counters...ya know the sorts of armies that small business owners and upper middle class folks cannot afford. What a piece of garbage.
 

Ensoniq

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#39

searcher

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#40
A Republican Principle Is Shed in the Fight on Health Care

The New York Times

By JEREMY W. PETERS
7 hrs ago


WASHINGTON — As they take their victory lap for passing a bill that would repeal and replace much of the Affordable Care Act, President Trump and congressional Republicans have been largely silent about one of the most remarkable aspects of what their legislation would do: take a step toward dismantling a vast government entitlement program, something that has never been accomplished in the modern era.

Fighting the expansion of the so-called welfare state is a fundamental premise of the American conservative movement. But as tens of millions of Americans have come to rely on coverage under the 2010 health law, Republicans have learned the political risks of being seen as taking a hatchet to the program, however imperfect it may be.

So conservatives have now cast aside their high-minded arguments of political principle, replacing them with dense discussions of policy. Pre-existing conditions, risk pools and premium costs — not the more conventional Republican disquisitions in favor of the free market, personal responsibility and smaller government — dominate the debate today.

This dramatic shift in focus has confirmed what conservatives said they always feared when Democrats granted the government expansive new powers over health care. The government can giveth, they said, but it can almost never taketh away.

The health care law, said Thomas Miller, a fellow at the conservative American Enterprise Institute, has underscored how new entitlements inevitably become part of what he called the “demilitarized zone” of politics.

“One of the problems Republicans have had in 2017 is that the narrative and the discussion have changed,” Mr. Miller said.

“The territory could not be liberated — you could only contain its expansion,” he added. “Unlike a speculative law which had not been fully unloaded, put in place with money starting to flow, people have gotten checks, they’ve gotten benefits. It’s taking away from what’s already there.”

But it is not just the tenor of the debate that has changed. The bill that the House passed last week was less ambitious than the full-on repeal that conservatives have argued for since President Barack Obama signed the law seven years ago.


“There’s a reason this has never been done before in the modern era,” said Tim Phillips, president of Americans for Prosperity. With new government benefits, he said, comes incredible political power.

“It builds constituencies, you have powerful special interests whose jobs suddenly depend on it, and the left fights intensely to protect government power once they’ve established it,” added Mr. Phillips, whose group, which is backed by the billionaire brothers David H. and Charles G. Koch, was one of the most ardent foes of the law from the moment Mr. Obama started pursuing it in 2009. “We knew then and we know now that this is not going to be easy.”

As politically useful as it may be to retain parts of the law, many conservatives have started asking whether the Republican Party is abandoning its core principles.

“If you can’t unbuild this structure, then what the hell are you doing here?” said William Voegeli, a senior editor at the Claremont Review of Books, a conservative journal.

Mr. Voegeli pointed to a long list of government programs that Republicans have promised to defund or eliminate — the National Endowment for the Arts, public broadcasting, the Department of Education and, of course, the Affordable Care Act — amid the expansion of the liberal “administrative state,” to use a term popular inside the Trump administration.

“You run on election cycle after election cycle with Republicans complaining but never taking the obvious next step,” he said. “And eventually you’re going to get a lot of restless conservatives out there.”

On Fox News over the weekend, the conservative columnist Charles Krauthammer said Republicans had basically given up on arguing for a more purely free-market health care system.

“They have sort of accepted the fact that the electorate sees health care as not just any commodity, like purchasing a steak or a car,” Mr. Krauthammer said. “It’s something now people have a sense the government ought to guarantee.”

The complexity of unraveling the Affordable Care Act became evident to Republicans even before Mr. Trump was sworn in, as they started planning their legislative agenda for his first 100 days. Led by Speaker Paul D. Ryan, the party assumed that a repeal would be one of the first items — if not the first — on its calendar.

Then Mr. Trump, who had campaigned on preserving programs, like Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid, that his party had aimed at in the past, said on Twitter less than two weeks before Inauguration Day that a replacement must accompany a repeal — much to the surprise of Mr. Ryan and the party leadership on Capitol Hill.

To the dismay of many conservatives, the promise to repeal had morphed into a pledge to replace. Even worse, some Republicans started talking about another dreaded R word: repair.

Mr. Ryan, speaking on Sunday on ABC News, used language not ordinarily heard from free-market, anti-entitlement conservatives like himself. The speaker, perhaps his party’s most vocal proponent of bringing down the cost of entitlements, argued for the House bill not on the basis of how much money it would save — in part because he rushed the vote before a proper accounting could be completed — but how many people would be left covered.

He called Republicans’ efforts a “rescue mission” to provide affordable health insurance, “especially and including to people with pre-existing conditions.”

The health and human services secretary, Tom Price, sounded a similar note, telling NBC News that the goal was something that Republicans usually dismissed as utopian fantasy: universal coverage.

“What we’re trying to do is to make certain that every single person has health coverage,” he said.

Even if the official party line is merely to provide access to coverage, the bill that the House passed aims to preserve some of the most popular parts of the 2010 law. For instance, Republicans say they have kept protections for people with health conditions that would have allowed insurers to deny them coverage before, though critics say they may face higher costs.

“They’re basically taking Obamacare and changing it around the margins,” said Adam Jentleson, a former senior aide to Harry Reid, who led Senate Democrats when the law was passed.

Also lost in the debate today is much of the disagreement over the proper scope of government authority. Republicans in the past often framed the debate in terms of personal freedom, choice and liberty — as opposed to the soft tyranny that can come through well-meaning laws.

“The debate over power and authority here is really a slugfest over who makes key decisions,” said Robert E. Moffit, a senior fellow at the Heritage Foundation, “and whether the key decisions in health care ultimately should end up in the hands of a government office or in the hands of individuals who are exercising free choice.”

Some saw another lesson for Republicans: that the general and philosophical are merely that.

“Republicans are strongest on these issues on the level of generality as opposed to the pragmatics,” Mr. Miller, of the American Enterprise Institute, said. That explains why their arguments have shifted to explaining how the law is failing rather than how it is a betrayal of the American tradition.

“What they were making was a consequential argument. It needed to be replaced because it wasn’t working, it wasn’t doing what people wanted,” he added, “as opposed to trying to say: ‘You know, we think this will work in a better way, but there are values at stake here. You need to be in control of your choices.’”

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/polit...n-health-care/ar-BBARyls?li=BBnb7Kz&ocid=iehp