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How to remove your property from taxation in Fl

Cigarlover

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#1
I'm on part 2 now. So far it's been real good. If you live in Fl grab a pen and paper as you listen. These guys list court cases and laws and constitutional stuff that you will want to take with you to the assessors office. They have had success and so far have 0 pushback from the state. I'll post the rest of the parts as I listen to them.


 
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Cigarlover

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#2
I'm sure at one point or another we have all wondered why we are paying property taxes. By now everyone should understand that the conversion of a right into a privilege is unconstitutional. Everyone should also know that rights are not taxable. And of course this brings up the question. Do we have a right to own property?
I haven't read the constitution of every state ( nowadays anyone can access the state they live in's constitution and see what it says. but here's what Ohio has to say.
Here's a link to the Ohio constitution. https://www.sos.state.oh.us/globalassets/publications/election/constitution.pdf
Article I: Bill of Rights
Inalienable rights.
§1 All men are, by nature, free and independent, and have certain inalienable rights, among which are those of enjoying and defending life and liberty, acquiring, possessing, and protecting property, and seeking and obtaining happiness and safety. (1851)
Limitation on tax rate; exemption.
§2 No property, taxed according to value, shall be so taxed in excess of one per cent of its true value in money for all state and local purposes, but laws may be passed authorizing additional taxes to be levied outside of such limitation, either when approved by at least a majority of the electors of the taxing district voting on such proposition, or when provided for by the charter of a municipal corporation. Land and improvements thereon shall be taxed by uniform rule according to value, except that laws may be passed to reduce taxes by providing for a reduction in value of the homestead of permanently and totally disabled residents, residents sixty-five years of age and older, and residents sixty years of age or older who are surviving spouses of deceased residents who were sixty-five years of age or older or permanently and totally disabled and receiving a reduction in the value of their homestead at the time of death, provided the surviving spouse continues to reside in a qualifying homestead, and providing for income and other qualifications to obtain such reduction. Without limiting the general power, subject to the provisions of Article I of this constitution, to determine the subjects and methods of taxation or exemptions therefrom, general laws may be passed to exempt burying grounds, public school houses, houses used exclusively for public worship, institutions used exclusively for charitable purposes, and public property used exclusively for any public purpose, but all such laws shall be subject to alteration or repeal; and the value of all property so exempted shall, from time to time, be ascertained and published as may be directed by law.
According to Ohio's constitution, a tax on property cannot exceed 1% of the real value. Any tax in excess of that must be voted on.
 

Cigarlover

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#3
What Ohio needs is a referendum stating that any taxes to be voted on, special taxes on property and or taxes in excess of the 1% can only be voted on by property owners who are affected by the taxes. There's a shit ton of special taxes on my property tax bills because any halfwit thats allowed to vote always votes for more free shit when they can just take my money to get it..

The other referendum I would like to see voted on is a limit on fines for traffic citations and 0 money on citations for court costs.
 

TRYNEIN

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#4
I'm sure at one point or another we have all wondered why we are paying property taxes. By now everyone should understand that the conversion of a right into a privilege is unconstitutional. Everyone should also know that rights are not taxable. And of course this brings up the question. Do we have a right to own property?
I haven't read the constitution of every state ( nowadays anyone can access the state they live in's constitution and see what it says. but here's what Ohio has to say.
Here's a link to the Ohio constitution. https://www.sos.state.oh.us/globalassets/publications/election/constitution.pdf




According to Ohio's constitution, a tax on property cannot exceed 1% of the real value. Any tax in excess of that must be voted on.

What year is that constitution from??

or more importantly, what year was Ohio admitted to the union??
 

Bigjon

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#5
I'm surprised to find this on wikidpedia:

From what I've read most states had an original constitution when they were granted statehood and then after the civil war during reconstruction they created a new constitution for the State of xxx.

Some people inferred that the reconstruction rewritten constitutions were like done on the sly and slipped in without much fanfare that hey folks we have a new set of rules to live by.

1802 Constitution[edit]
The Ohio territory's population grew steadily in the 1790s and early 19th century. Congress passed an enabling bill to establish a new state, which President Thomas Jefferson signed into law on April 30, 1802. A state constitutional convention was held in November 1802 in Chillicothe, Ohio, and it adopted what became known as the 1802 Constitution. See Ohio Constitutional Convention (1802). Largely due to the perception that territorial governor Arthur St. Clair had ruled heavy-handedly, the constitution provided for a "weak" governor and judiciary, and vested virtually all power in a bicameral legislature, known as the General Assembly. Congress simply recognized the existence of the "state of Ohio" rather than passing a separate resolution declaring Ohio a state as it had done and would do with other new states. On February 19, 1803, President Jefferson signed the bill into law. It provided that Ohio "had become one of the United States of America," and that Federal law "shall have the same force and effect within the said State of Ohio, as elsewhere within the United States."

Many tax protesters use this as an argument that Ohio was not a state until 1953. But see Bowman v. United States, 920 F. Supp. 623 n.1 (E.D. Pa. 1995) (discussing the 1953 joint Congressional resolution that confirmed Ohio’s status as a state retroactive to 1803).[2]

The first General Assembly first met in Chillicothe, the new state capital, on March 1, 1803. This has come to be considered the date of Ohio statehood.

1851 Constitution[edit]
In the early decades of statehood, it became clear that the General Assembly was disproportionately powerful as compared to the executive and judicial branches. Much of state business was conducted through private bills, and partisan squabbling greatly reduced the ability of state government to do its work. The legislature widely came to be perceived as corrupt, subsidizing private companies and granting special privileges in corporate charters. State debt also exploded between 1825 and 1840. A new constitution, greatly redressing the checks and balances of power, was drafted by a convention in 1850-51, as directed by the voters, and subsequently adopted in a statewide referendum on June 17, 1851, taking effect on September 1 of that year. This is the same constitution under which the state of Ohio operates. The later "constitutions" were viewed as such, but in reality were large-scale revisions.

1873 constitutional convention[edit]
A constitutional convention in 1873, chaired by future Chief Justice of the United States Morrison R. Waite, proposed a new constitution that would have provided for annual sessions of the legislature, a veto for the governor which could be overridden by a three-fifths vote of each house, establishment of state circuit courts, eligibility of women for election to school boards, and restrictions on municipal debt. It was soundly defeated by the voters in August 1873.

1912 Constitution[edit]
In the Progressive Era, pent-up demand for reform led to the convening of another constitutional convention in 1912. The delegates were generally progressive in their outlook, and noted Ohio historian George W. Knepper wrote, "It was perhaps the ablest group ever assembled in Ohio to consider state affairs." Several national leaders addressed the convention, including President William Howard Taft, an Ohioan; former president (and Bull Moose Party candidate) Theodore Roosevelt; three-time presidential candidate William Jennings Bryan; California's progressive governor Hiram Johnson; and Ohio's own reform-minded Gov. Judson Harmon.

Recalling how the 1873 convention's work had all been for naught, the 1912 convention drafted and submitted to the voters a series of amendments to the 1851 Constitution. The amendments expanded the state's bill of rights, provided for voter-led initiative and referendum, established civil service protections, and granted the governor a line-item veto in appropriation bills. Other amendments empowered the legislature to fix the hours of labor, establish a minimum wage and a workers compensation system, and address a number of other progressive measures. A home rule amendment was proposed for Ohio cities with populations over 5,000.

On September 3, 1912, despite strong conservative opposition, voters adopted 33 of the 41 proposed amendments. It was so sweeping a change to the 1851 Constitution that most legal scholars consider it to have become a new "1912 Constitution." Among the eight losing proposed amendments were female suffrage, the use of voting machines, the regulation of outdoor advertising and abolition of the death penalty. Voters also rejected a proposal to strike the word "white" from the 1851 Constitution's definition of voter eligibility. Although blacks could vote in all State and Federal elections in Ohio due to the Fifteenth Amendment, the text of the State Constitution was not changed until 1923.[3]

Current constitution[edit]
With numerous later amendments, the 1851/1912 Constitution remains the basic law of the state to this day.

The current state constitution contains the following articles:

  • Preamble - One of the shortest preambles of any state constitution:
"We, the people of the State of Ohio, grateful to Almighty God for our freedom, to secure its blessings and promote our general welfare, do establish this Constitution."
  • Article I: Bill of Rights
The "Ohio Constitution Bill of Rights" consists of 23 sections. The Ohio Constitution's Bill of Rights is substantially similar to its federal counterpart but also includes the right to alter, reform or abolish government; rights of conscience and education; rights for victims of crime; a prohibition of imprisonment for debt; and the right to payment of damages for wrongful death.
  • Article II - Legislative
  • Article III - Executive
  • Article IV - Judicial
  • Article V - Elective Franchise
In 1995 Article V, Section 8 was struck down as unconstitutional by the Supreme Court of the United States in U.S. Term Limits, Inc. v. Thornton. It had imposed term limits on federal representatives and senators.
See also[edit]
References[edit]
  1. ^ Cite web| url=https://www.legislature.ohio.gov/Assets/Laws/Constitution.pdf
  2. ^ "The Truth About Frivolous Tax Arguments - Feb. 16, 2012". US Internal Revenue Service -. Retrieved 2012-06-26.
  3. ^ Amendments submitted to the voters Archived 2012-01-31 at the Wayback Machine Ohio Secretary of State see page 6, November 6, 1923
External links
 

Goldhedge

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#6
From what I've read most states had an original constitution when they were granted statehood and then after the civil war during reconstruction they created a new constitution for the State of xxx.
The Act of 1871 created a lot of unconstitutional things...


2020-07-13_21-15-40.png


Lots more at link
http://usavsus.info/
 

Cigarlover

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#7
I live outside of Chillicothe but thats where I pay my taxes. The constitution link I provided I am not sure what year it's from.

I remember an article a couple years ago in the local paper. Someone had found some old documents. It was a storage place for an old bank or something.. The documents were land patents. Those things everyone says don't exist. I'm probably the only person that read the story that understood what they were.
 

Cigarlover

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#9
Inalienable: incapable of being alienated, surrendered, or transferred.

Now go back to my post #2. 1st paragraph has acquiring, possessing, and protecting property.

2nd paragraph (From a different section of the constitution. Art 12 i think.) has how much they are allowed to tax it.

Is it me or is the constitution itself in conflict? You cant have an inalienable right and then the Gov be allowed to tax it. If the Gov is allowed to tax it then it is a privilege and no longer a right.
 

TRYNEIN

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#10

As Bigjon and Goldhedge picked up on above, there are 2 different constitutions to the states

Your organic constitution for Ohio state
And the constitution for THE STATE OF OHIO

Find your organic constitution and us that language to shove up your politicians azz