• Same story, different day...........year ie more of the same fiat floods the world
  • There are no markets
  • "Spreading the ideas of freedom loving people on matters regarding high finance, politics, constructionist Constitution, and mental masturbation of all types"

Immigration & Trumps Wall

searcher

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Majority DISAPPROVE of Trump's handling of immigration finds poll in wake of family separation crisis and 49 per cent brand him a racist

  • 58 percent told a Quinnipiac University they disapprove of President Donald Trump's handling of the immigration issue
  • The poll found that 60 percent thought the separation of families was a violation of human rights
  • 83 percent said the administration has a responsibility to reunite families
  • 49 percent think Trump is a racist while 47 percent do not

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...ation-finds-poll-49-percent-brand-racist.html
 

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Attorney General Jeff Sessions rescinds guidance safeguarding the right of refugees, asylum seekers to work in the U.S.

NYDN
7 hrs ago


Attorney General Jeff Sessions on Tuesday rescinded a 2011 Justice Department guidance mandating that asylum seekers and refugees have a “right” to work in the U.S.

The Obama-era document was included on a list of 24 Justice Department guidances that Sessions scrapped because he said they were “unnecessary, outdated, inconsistent with existing law” or imposed without congressional approval.

“That’s wrong, and it’s not good government,” Sessions said in a statement.

The 2011 guidance, which was issued by the Office of Special Counsel for Immigration-related Unfair Employment Practices, ensured asylum seekers and refugees were “authorized to work indefinitely” and could obtain Social Security cards “without employment restrictions.”

The guidance also barred employers from demanding Department of Homeland Security-issued immigration documents from refugees and asylum seekers as long as they could present Social Security cards or American driver’s licenses.

In another blow to immigrants, Sessions included a 2009 guidance on the chopping block that urged employers to “avoid ‘citizens only’ hiring policies,” such as demanding a “particular immigration status” from job applicants.

Sessions’ sweeping rollback comes as the Trump administration continues to enforce its hawkish immigration agenda, including its “zero tolerance” policy on illegal entries, which resulted in the forced separations of thousands of children from their undocumented parents at the southern border.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/at...ekers-to-work-in-the-us/ar-AAzybVg?ocid=ientp
 

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Patrick J. Buchanan: The Liberal Stampede to 'Abolish ICE'
"No Borders! No Nations! No Deportations!" "Abolish ICE!"

Before last week, these were the mindless slogans of an infantile left, seen on signs at rallies to abolish ICE, the agency that arrests and deports criminal aliens who have no right to be in our country.

By last week, however, "Abolish ICE!" was no longer the exclusive slogan of the unhinged left. National Democrats were signing on.

Before his defeat in New York's 14thCongressional District, Joe Crowley, fourth-ranked Democrat in the House, called ICE a "fascist" organization.

After Crowley's rout by a 28-year-old socialist who called for killing the agency, Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., declaredICE to be "a cruel deportation force (that) we need to abolish."

Cynthia Nixon, a candidate for governor of New York, described ICE as a "terrorist organization ... terrorizing people who are coming to this country. ... We need to abolish ICE."

A star of "Sex and the City" castigated the men and women of ICE as terrorists at St. Paul and St. Andrew United Methodist Church in Manhattan. One wonders what the pastor thought of this Christian message.

Friday, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio joined the clamor: "We should abolish ICE." Over the weekend, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., signed on:

"President Trump seems to think that the only way to have immigration rule is to rip parents from their family (and) treat rape victims and refugees like terrorists and to put children in cages."​
What ICE does is "ugly" and "wrong," said Warren.

"We need to rebuild our immigration system from top to bottom starting by replacing ICE with something that reflects our morality."

Wisconsin Democratic Congressman Mark Pocan plans to introduce legislation to do exactly that—abolish ICE.

President Donald Trump describes this latest liberal campaign as social and political insanity: "You get rid of ICE you're going to have a country that you're going to be afraid to walk out of your house."

What is going on here?

Democrats, having just gone through the worst week in memory for progressives, are in imminent danger of losing it altogether.

Last week, the Supreme Court ruled that not only is the Trump travel ban constitutional, government unions have no right to extract "agency fees" from workers who do not wish to support the union.

Such fees violate the First Amendment rights of government workers not to promote policies or ideas in which they disbelieve.

Then came word that Justice Anthony Kennedy, the "swing vote" on the Supreme Court who was crucial to the decisions that established abortion, homosexuality and same-sex marriage as constitutional rights, will be stepping down

And Trump informed the press that he would announce Kennedy's successor on July 9, to be drawn from a list of 20 jurists and legal scholars, all of whom have been vetted by the Federalist Society.

Panic ensued.

"I'm scared. You're scared. We're all scared," says Warren in a video her campaign has released.

On Bill Maher's show, leftist film director Michael Moore called for a million citizens to surround the Capitol to prevent a vote on Kennedy's successor. How Moore's million-man march proposes to get into Mitch McConnell's Senate chamber was left unexplained.

At a fundraiser in Berkeley, California, Barack Obama tried to calm his terrified minions: "All these people that are out here kvetching and wringing their hands and stressed and anxious and constantly watching cable tv and howling at the moon, 'What are we going to do?' Their hair is falling out."

But liberal elites making fools of themselves is a less serious matter than the savage slanders Democrats are hurling at the 20,000 men and women of ICE who are daily protecting us and our country.

ICE, after all, was established to prevent another 9/11, when real terrorists, some of whom had overstayed their visas, massacred 3,000 innocent people, most of them Americans.

This vilification of ICE, writes Deputy Director Thomas D. Homan, represents both an injustice and an act of ingratitude:

"Since September 2016, ICE has arrested nearly 5,000 criminal aliens in New York—individuals with a criminal conviction in addition to their violation of immigrant laws. Many of these arrests were conducted at large in the community which ICE is increasingly forced to do due to sanctuary policies in the state that prevent us from taking custody of criminal aliens in the secure confines of a jail.
"Governor (Andrew Cuomo) supports these policies atthe expense of the safety of the very same communities he took an oath to protect."​
Whatever one may think of Trump's policy of "zero tolerance" of immigrants who break into our country, for elites to smear the 20,000 men and women who risk their lives to keep us safe, as "terrorists" and "fascists," is an especially egregious form of liberal ingratitude.

What is it in the DNA of the left that it is always ready to enlist in any new war on cops?

The issue of 2018: Should we, or should we not, abolish ICE and embrace the progressive alternative of open borders?
 

the_shootist

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Is the left still doing their 'splody head routine over immigrant chilren sperated from parents? Doesn't really matter. The following is an example of Oberry caring for the immigrant chilren, and thanks to the interwebz "way back machine"...


Obama DHS placed over a dozen migrant children with traffickers



Emmarie Huetteman
The New York TImes
Thu, 28 Jan 2016 16:19 UTC






© John Moore/Getty Images
A child from Honduras watched a movie at a United States Border Patrol detention center in McAllen, Tex., in 2014.
The Department of Health and Human Services placed more than a dozen immigrant children in the custody of human traffickers after it failed to conduct background checks of caregivers, according to a Senate report released on Thursday.

Examining how the federal agency processes minors who arrive at the border without a guardian, lawmakers said they found that it had not followed basic practices of child welfare agencies, like making home visits.

The Senate's Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations opened its inquiry after law enforcement officials uncovered a human trafficking ring in Marion, Ohio, last year. At least six children were lured to the United States from Guatemala with the promise of a better life, then were made to work on egg farms. The children, as young as 14, had been in federal custody before being entrusted to the traffickers.

"It is intolerable that human trafficking - modern-day slavery - could occur in our own backyard," said Senator Rob Portman, Republican of Ohio and the chairman of the subcommittee. "But what makes the Marion cases even more alarming is that a U.S. government agency was responsible for delivering some of the victims into the hands of their abusers."

In addition to the Marion cases, the investigation found evidence that 13 other children had been trafficked after officials handed them over to adults who were supposed to care for them during their immigration proceedings. An additional 15 cases exhibited some signs of trafficking.

The report also said that it was unclear how many of the approximately 90,000 children the agency had placed in the past two years fell prey to traffickers, including sex traffickers, because it does not keep track of such cases.

"Whatever your views on immigration policy, everyone can agree that the administration has a responsibility to ensure the safety of the migrant kids that have entered government custody until their immigration court date," Mr. Portman said.

In the fall of 2013, thousands of unaccompanied children began showing up at the southern border. Most risked abuse by traffickers and detention by law enforcement to escape dire problems like gang violence and poverty in Central America.

As detention centers struggled to keep up with the influx, the Department of Health and Human Services began placing children in the custody of sponsors who could help them while their immigration cases were reviewed. Many children who did not have relatives in the United States were placed in a system resembling foster care.

But officials at times did not examine whether an adult who claimed to be a relative actually was, relying on the word of parents, who, in some cases, went along with the traffickers to pay off smuggling debts.

Responding to the report, the Department of Health and Human Services said it had taken measures to strengthen its system, collecting information to subject potential sponsors and additional caregivers in a household to criminal background checks.

Mark Greenberg, the agency's acting assistant secretary of the Administration for Children and Families, said it had bolstered other screening procedures and increased resources for minors.

"We are mindful of our responsibilities to these children and are continually looking for ways to strengthen our safeguards," he said.
 

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US border guards blasted for trying to stop fisherman after their boat strayed into Canadian waters while they were 'chasing illegal immigrants'

  • The US patrol tried to stop the Canadian ship fishing off the Nova Scotia coast
  • Captain Nick Brown's boat informed them he was fishing in Canadian waters
  • Laurence Cook, of the Fishermen's Association, said they acted like 'bullies'
  • The Canadian Foreign Ministry has launched an investigation into the incident
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...-trying-arrest-fisherman-Canadian-waters.html
 

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Trump rants that immigration laws are ‘insane’ and must be replaced by ‘smart, fast and reasonable ones’ by Congress

  • Trump has sent mixed signals to Congress on immigration in the last month
  • Has told legislators that he wants changes to the system and then directed them to wait until after the November election
  • Trump, who has made immigration reform the centerpiece of his election message this year, seemingly directed Congress to try again on Thursday
  • Making himself clear in an all-caps tweet he said: 'Congress - FIX OUR INSANE IMMIGRATION LAWS NOW!'
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...s-immigration-laws-insane-fixed-Congress.html
 

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Philadelphia ICE protesters arrested as police raid camp
Philly.com



Published on Jul 5, 2018
For more on this: https://trib.al/U7DKGZ1

About a dozen protesters are arrested outside the Immigration and Customs Enforcement office in Center City Philadelphia Police ended their encampment, demanding an end to the agency’s policies and cooperation between the city of Philadelphia and ICE, Thursday July 5, 2018. DAVID SWANSON / Staff Photographer
 

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Police Break Up ICE Protest in Philadelphia
Associated Press


Published on Jul 5, 2018
Police have broken up an encampment outside an Immigration and Customs Enforcement office in Philadelphia, where dozens of protesters have taken over sidewalks to decry the separation of immigrant children from parents. (July 5)
 

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African Immigrant Climbs Statue of Liberty To Protest ICE, Child Separations (REACTION)
Anthony Brian Logan



Published on Jul 5, 2018
Cops say Therese Patricia Okoumou — a 44-year-old immigrant from the Democratic Republic of the Congo — was the person responsible for the Fourth of July protest.

She lives in the St. George neighborhood of Staten Island and is currently in federal custody, according to police sources.

Officers from the NYPD’s Emergency Service Unit transported her to a federal detention center Wednesday night following her three-hour standoff with authorities. Her case is being handled by prosecutors in the Southern District of New York.

Statue of Liberty climber identified as immigrant activist
https://nypost.com/2018/07/04/statue-...

Statue Of Liberty Climber Forces Liberty Island Evacuation After Earlier Protest
https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/...

Protestors Arrested After Unfurling 'Abolish I.C.E.' Banner at Base of Statue of Liberty
http://time.com/5330512/rise-and-resi...

Statue of Liberty protest: Climber with Rise and Resist pleads not guilty
https://www.amny.com/news/statue-of-l...

'This flag comes down today': Black activist arrested for scaling flagpole and removing Confederate flag from South Carolina's Capitol - but state workers raise it again
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/artic...
 

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US Army quietly discharging immigrant recruits

AP
2 hrs ago



SAN ANTONIO — Some immigrant U.S. Army reservists and recruits who enlisted in the military with a promised path to citizenship are being abruptly discharged, the Associated Press has learned.

The AP was unable to quantify how many men and women who enlisted through the special recruitment program have been booted from the Army, but immigration attorneys say they know of more than 40 who have been discharged or whose status has become questionable, jeopardizing their futures.

"It was my dream to serve in the military," said reservist Lucas Calixto, a Brazilian immigrant who filed a lawsuit against the Army last week. "Since this country has been so good to me, I thought it was the least I could do to give back to my adopted country and serve in the United States military."

Some of the service members say they were not told why they were being discharged. Others who pressed for answers said the Army informed them they'd been labeled as security risks because they have relatives abroad or because the Defense Department had not completed background checks on them.

Spokespeople for the Pentagon and the Army said that, due to the pending litigation, they were unable to explain the discharges or respond to questions about whether there have been policy changes in any of the military branches.

Eligible recruits are required to have legal status in the U.S., such as a student visa, before enlisting. More than 5,000 immigrants were recruited into the program in 2016, and an estimated 10,000 are currently serving. Most go the Army, but some also go to the other military branches.

To become citizens, the service members need an honorable service designation, which can come after even just a few days at boot camp. But the recently discharged service members have had their basic training delayed, so they can't be naturalized.

Margaret Stock, an Alaska-based immigration attorney and a retired Army Reserve lieutenant colonel who helped create the immigrant recruitment program, said she's been inundated over the past several days by recruits who have been abruptly discharged.

All had signed enlistment contracts and taken an Army oath, Stock said. Many were reservists who had been attending unit drills, receiving pay and undergoing training, while others had been in a "delayed entry" program, she said.

"Immigrants have been serving in the Army since 1775," Stock said. "We wouldn't have won the revolution without immigrants. And we're not going to win the global war on terrorism today without immigrants."

Stock said the service members she's heard from had been told the Defense Department had not managed to put them through extensive background checks, which include CIA, FBI and National Intelligence Agency screenings and counterintelligence interviews. Therefore, by default, they do not meet the background check requirement.

"It's a vicious cycle," she said.

The AP interviewed Calixto and recruits from Pakistan and Iran, all of whom said they were devastated by their unexpected discharges.

"Now the great feeling I had when I enlisted is going down the drain," said Calixto, 28. "I don't understand why this is happening."

In hopes of undoing the discharge, he filed a lawsuit in Washington, D.C., last week alleging the Defense Department hadn't given him a chance to defend himself or appeal. He said he was given no specific grounds other than "personnel security."

Calixto, who lives in Massachusetts and came to the U.S. when he was 12, said in an email interview arranged through his attorney that he joined the Army out of patriotism.

In the suit, Calixto said he learned he was being kicked out soon after he was promoted to private second class.

The Pakistani service member who spoke to the AP said he learned in a phone call a few weeks ago that his military career was over.

"There were so many tears in my eyes that my hands couldn't move fast enough to wipe them away," he said. "I was devastated, because I love the U.S. and was so honored to be able to serve this great country."

He asked that his name be withheld because he fears he might be forced to return to Pakistan, where he could face danger as a former U.S. Army enlistee.

Portions of the 22-year-old's military file reviewed by the AP said he was so deeply loyal to the U.S. that his relationships with his family and fiancee in Pakistan would not make him a security threat. Nonetheless, the documents show the Army cited those foreign ties as a concern.

The man had enlisted in April 2016 anticipating he'd be a citizen within months, but faced a series of delays. He had been slated to ship out to basic training in January 2017, but that also was delayed.

An Iranian citizen who came to the U.S. for a graduate degree in engineering told the AP that he enlisted in the program hoping to gain medical training. He said he had felt proud that he was "pursuing everything legally and living an honorable life."

In recent weeks, he said, he learned that he'd been discharged.

"It's terrible because I put my life in the line for this country, but I feel like I'm being treated like trash," he said. "If I am not eligible to become a U.S. citizen, I am really scared to return to my country."

He spoke on condition of anonymity because of those fears.

It's unclear how the service members' discharges could affect their status as legal immigrants.

In a statement, the Defense Department said: "All service members (i.e. contracted recruits, active duty, Guard and Reserve) and those with an honorable discharge are protected from deportation."

However, immigration attorneys told the AP that many immigrants let go in recent weeks were an "uncharacterized discharge," neither dishonorable nor honorable.

The service members affected by the recent discharges all enlisted in recent years under a special program aimed at bringing medical specialists and fluent speakers of 44 sought-after languages into the military. The idea, according to the Defense Department, was to "recognize their contribution and sacrifice."

President George W. Bush ordered "expedited naturalization" for immigrant soldiers in 2002 in an effort to swell military ranks. Seven years later the Military Accessions Vital to the National Interest program, known as MAVNI, became an official recruiting program.

It came under fire from conservatives when President Barack Obama added DACA recipients — young immigrants who were brought to the U.S. illegally — to the list of eligible enlistees. In response, the military layered on additional security clearances for recruits to pass before heading to boot camp.

The Trump Administration added even more hurdles, creating a backlog within the Defense Department. Last fall, hundreds of recruits still in the enlistment process had their contracts canceled. A few months later, the military suspended MAVNI.

Republican Congressman Andy Harris of Maryland, who has supported legislation to limit the program, told the AP that MAVNI was established by executive order and never properly authorized by Congress.

"Our military must prioritize enlisting American citizens, and restore the MAVNI program to its specialized, limited scope," he said.

Non-U.S. citizens have served in the military since the Revolutionary War, when Continental soldiers included Irish, French and Germans. The U.S. recruited Filipino nationals to serve in the Navy in the 1940s, and worked to enlist Eastern Europeans in the military over the next decade, according to the Defense Department.

Since Sept. 11, 2001, nearly 110,000 members of the Armed Forces have gained citizenship by serving in the U.S. military, according to the Defense Department.

Many service members recruited through the program have proven to be exemplary. In 2012, then-Sgt. Saral K. Shrestha, originally from Nepal, was named U.S. Army Soldier of the Year.

In general, the immigrant recruits have been more cost-effective, outperforming their fellow soldiers in the areas of attrition, performance, education and promotions, according to a recently released review by the RAND Corporation, a nonprofit research institution.

The AP spoke with a 26-year-old woman from Dominica who said she proudly enlisted in the immigrant recruitment program in 2016 while earning her nursing degree. She said she drilled each month with her reserve unit, which gave her an award, and had been awaiting a date to start basic training.

But in March, she said she looked up her profile on an Army portal and saw that the section about her security eligibility was marked "loss of jurisdiction," with no further explanation. The next month, her attorney said she found the reservist's name listed as "unsuitable" on a spreadsheet created by the Defense Department.

The reservist, who spoke on condition of anonymity because of concerns about her legal standing, said she received additional paperwork last month that indicated her case is awaiting a final decision.

"I have always been a good soldier and have always done what they ask me to do," she said. "I got into debt when I joined the Army because I can't work legally but, financially, I can't survive anymore. I don't want to give up because I genuinely like being in the Army. But I don't know who to turn to."

In recent years, a group of attorneys have been fighting to keep their recruited immigrant clients eligible for naturalization as delays have mounted. Some have been successful, including nearly 50 recruits who were granted a type of temporary status while their background investigations are being completed.

"Some of our clients have finally emerged through the system and at least are doing basic training," said Donald Friedman, a Washington attorney with Perkins Coie.
___

Burke reported from San Francisco.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/us...ging-immigrant-recruits/ar-AAzDJyx?ocid=ientp
 

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U.S. Army is quietly discharging immigrant recruits as Trump administration rolls back program offering enlistees path to citizenship

  • The exact number of foreign-born recruits being discharged is unknown
  • So far, at least 40 people say they've been abruptly kicked out of U.S. military
  • Recruits say they've been told by the Army they've been deemed 'a security risk'
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...y-quietly-discharging-immigrant-recruits.html
 

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Really don't understand this one.

America last! Trump's Mar-a-Lago resort club asks U.S. Department of Labor for permission to hire 40 foreigners as waiters

  • Trump's Florida has once again asked the Justice Department to approve waivers
  • The luxury club relies on foreign workers to fill service jobs
  • Trump has said it is 'very very hard to get help'
  • Application comes as unemployment rate ticked up to 4 per cent
  • Trump is leading a crackdown on immigration and blasts firms who give jobs to foreigners instead of Americans
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...Department-permission-hire-40-foreigners.html
 

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Minister who supported Trump now faces deportation under immigration crackdown


By Kate Morrissey, The San Diego Union-Tribune
7 hrs ago



SAN DIEGO - Jorge Ramirez, an Oceanside minister and immigrant in the country illegally, didn't think he would end up in line for deportation when he encouraged his daughter, a U.S. citizen, to vote for Donald Trump.

In line with his conservative religious beliefs, Ramirez considers himself a Republican, he said in an interview at Otay Mesa Detention Center, where he is awaiting deportation proceedings. Border Patrol picked him up after staking out his house early one May morning, and he's been in the detention facility since.

Ramirez said he does not know why he is being targeted for removal from the U.S. The Trump administration has said that it is targeting criminals and those who have already been ordered deported. Ramirez said he falls into neither category.

"Trump said, 'Let's keep all the good people here and all the bad people out,'" Ramirez said.

"That's great, but I'm here," Ramirez said of his detention situation. "If I'm here, anybody can be here. I'm not saying I'm the best person in the world, but I've tried to live a good life."

Ramirez worked as a satellite television technician, and frequently went to Camp Pendleton. Issues with his security clearance brought him to the attention of authorities in December.

He said he supports the Republican agenda on fiscal and social issues and that he still supports President Trump.

"Everything that he's said against immigrants - it's not that I'm in favor, but bad people don't belong here," Ramirez said. "In order to make America great, you have to have people contributing to this country."

Ramirez said he also encouraged his youngest daughter to volunteer with the campaign of Rep. Darrell Issa, R-Calif.

Ramirez came to the U.S. with his family when he was 11 and was raised in North County. In high school, Ramirez joined the Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps for the Marines, and when the Gulf War began, he tried to enlist. The military would not let him fight because of his immigration status.

"I'm USA all the way," Ramirez said. "It's that American spirit. It just gets into you."

He said wearing his uniform twice a week helped him to feel like he belonged. He recalled his earliest experiences in school in the U.S., when he didn't understand what anyone was saying and other students would make fun of him.

When he worked as a satellite television technician, he always tried to show the Marines he encountered how grateful he was for their service, he said.

"They sacrifice so much for freedom and for us," he said.

The issue he has with the way immigration policy is currently being implemented, he said, is that since he's been in immigration detention, he's seen good people in there.

"To think that undeserving people are coming here makes me sad," Ramirez said.

Ramirez believes that going to immigration detention is part of God's plan for him. He prayed for a way to sort out his immigration status not long before he was arrested by Border Patrol.

Inside the detention facility, he's been counseling and supporting other detainees with a message of hope and love, he said. Since he began attending a daily Bible study group in the facility, its numbers have grown to around 25 from about 10, he said.

Ramirez has spent his life as part of the Apostolic Church, where he is a music minister. His father served as a pastor, a post that led to the family coming to the U.S.

Ramirez said he met his wife, Silvia, through church. They married 22 years ago.

Being away from her has been one of the most difficult parts of being in detention, he said.

Ramirez hoped to get released on bond Thursday at an immigration court hearing. His three children, all U.S. citizens, came with Juan Hernandez, the pastor for their church, to watch. They prayed in the waiting room as they waited for their father's turn.

His attorney, Ruben Salazar, said he felt positive about Ramirez's potential for bond and for getting relief from deportation when he presents his full case in immigration court.

"He's the kind of immigrant America seeks to have," Salazar said.

As the family was escorted into the courtroom, Judge David Anderson was telling Salazar that he would need more time to read through the 210-page packet that Salazar had submitted that morning to show Ramirez's ties to his community. It included several letters of support, records of Ramirez's tax filings, his school achievements and the awards that his children have won.

Anderson rescheduled the hearing for August, so Ramirez will have to wait in detention for at least six more weeks. Salazar objected, unsuccessfully arguing that the delay violated Ramirez's constitutional rights.

As his children filed out of the courtroom, Ramirez's face remained tight, not seeking eye contact or showing emotion.

Outside the courtroom, their pastor consoled the Ramirez children. He reminded them that there must be a greater purpose in this moment.

They rehearsed lines to say to the Spanish-speaking media waiting for them outside. The youngest, Abisag, 17, volunteered to call their mother, who was waiting at home for news. By the time Ramirez has his rescheduled hearing, Abisag will be in New York for her freshman year of college.

Visit The San Diego Union-Tribune at www.sandiegouniontribune.com

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/mi...r-immigration-crackdown/ar-AAzGDId?ocid=ientp
 

FunnyMoney

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We don't need a trillion dollar wall. With just a slight increase in existing border protection funding and using the existing methods already in place (tunnel detection and desert patrol) the border could be 100% secure.

And this could have been done in the first 2 months of Trump's presidency.

The "wall" has to be one of the most stupid deceitful ideas to have ever been pulled over the American public - Trump and Fox news should be awfully proud of their propaganda capabilities. That and the stupidity of the American people to fall for it.
 

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Fewer than HALF of the children under the age of five who were swept up in Trump's zero tolerance policy are being reunited with their parents says civil rights group

  • The American Civil Liberties Union said late Sunday night that the Trump administration had turned over a list of children under the age of five
  • Of the 102 names provided, fewer than half were on track for reunification with their parents, ACLU said, by this Tuesday
  • An administration official told DailyMail.com on Monday morning that the government is working 'tirelessly' to reunite migrant children with their parents
  • Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar said said Thursday that the slow pace of reunions is intentional - officials are still confirming parentage
  • Trump administration faces a court-ordered a deadline of July 10 to reunite migrant children under the age of 5 and July 26 to reunite the rest
  • The children will be reunited with parents being held in detention centers in the custody of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement
  • HHS said it has just under 3,000 minors in its custody and about 100 of those are under the age of 5
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...dren-age-five-reunited-parents-ACLU-says.html
 

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Just a little food for thought. Take it fwiw and dyodd.

Who, Exactly, Are the “Illegals,” Anyhow?

Posted on July 9, 2018 by Lambert Strether

By Lambert Strether of Corrente.

As readers know, I deprecate the (informal: disparaging and dffensive) noun “illegals,” not only because it’s a slippery slope to “frugals,” “orals,” “regals,” and so forth, but because I can’t think of a good reason to insult people who are, often courageously, trying to improve their own lives and those of their families. (“Scab,” of course, is another pejorative for people with similar motives. So, for that matter, is “banker.” It’s complicated!) In any case, it’s these migrants[1] presence that’s illegal, not they themselves, so, heck, maybe it’s all just an innocent case of metonymy…. In this post, I want to straighten out not these, but another small kink in our political discourse, which shows up when you read this story from the Times carefully. The headline:

An ICE Raid Leaves an Iowa Town Divided Along Faith Lines

Parenthetically, and just for the record, allow me to insert this photo of a church congregation that became a crossroads for families and supporters of the men detained in the workplace raid in that small town:



I can’t quite put my finger on it, but I have the nagging feeling there’s something about that picture inconsistent with an important liberal Democrat construct, identity politics. Close parenthesis.

Immediately I asked, as one should ask, why is faith the chosen dividing line? After all, you can slice and dice a human population as many ways as you can a pineapple, or a cake. Could it be that there’s another, more interesting “divide” that the reporter’s choice elides? Why, yes. Yes, there is. The lead and the next three paragraphs set up the conflict the reporter wishes to highlight:

In the days after immigration agents raided a dusty concrete plant on the west side of town, seizing 32 men from Mexico and Central America, the Rev. Trey Hegar, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church, got into an impassioned argument on his Facebook page.​
“The Bible doesn’t promote helping criminals!!!!” a Trump supporter [here a novelist like Sterne would add “for a Trump supporter it was”] wrote.​
Mr. Hegar answered with Leviticus: “When a stranger resides with you in your land, you shall not do him wrong. The stranger who resides with you shall be to you as the native among you, and you shall love him as yourself, for you were aliens in the land of Egypt.”​
The Trump supporter came back with the passage in the Gospel of Mark about rendering unto Caesar the things that are Caesar’s, and added for good measure: “Immigration laws are good and Godly! We elected our leaders and God allowed it.”​

Leaving aside the idea that Leviticus is a good guide to public policy on immigration, any more than it’s a good guide to public policy on gender issues, and leaving aside a brain-bending theodicy which posits that [The] God[(ess)(e)(s) Of Your Choice, If Any] doesn’t allow evil in this world, I’ve underlined salient topics: “criminals”, “laws.” The reporter, slicing the pineapple by faith, ignores the question of law. We know who is subject to the law: The migrants, caught up in the raid. Is there anybody in the story who is not subject to the law? Why, yes. Yes, there is:

No charges have been filed against the owners of the Midwest Precast Concrete plant in Mount Pleasant that was raided. An ICE spokesman declined to comment, citing a continuing investigation.​

So, the elite have impunity when they break the law; et in Mount Pleasant ego. We know this, of course, from the Crash, so no surprises here. Oddly, or not, the reporter, when interviewing business owners, doesn’t raise this point:

The view that immigrants take jobs from citizens or depress wages was a common one, but it was disputed by local business owners. The unemployment rate in Henry County is 2.9 percent, and many factories display “Hiring” signs.​
Gary Crawford, who owns Mt. Pleasant Tire (“We keep you rolling”), said he paid tire installers $16 to $24 an hour, with full benefits. “I know most of the people who run the factories,” he said. “They just can’t find help.”​

It’s illegal to hire illegal immigrants. Would it have been so hard for the reporter to ask “Should the business owners who hire illegal immigrants be arrested too?” Apparently the answer — “Hell no!” — is so obvious that the question doesn’t need to be asked. After all, they need “help.” The pineapple (or cake) is sliced along faith lines, not along class lines. Just to ram the class perspective home, the reporter, in the final paragraph, consults a professional:

Her father was released on bond in early June to await a deportation hearing in immigration court, which has a five-year backlog of such cases, according to Bram Elias, a law professor at the University of Iowa. “By doing this raid,” he said, “the federal government has turned two dozen folks who were undocumented and living in the shadows into people definitely safe from deportation for five years, and possibly able to work lawfully.”​

Unexpected consequences aside, would it really have been so hard for the reporter to ask — as long as he had the good professor on the line — “Should the business owners who hire illegal immigrants be arrested too?”[2] It seems so. Oddly, employers are never “illegals.” Perhaps, of course, the reporter, a fully paid-up member of the 9.9%, has just as much reason to seek impunity from prosecution as the 0.1% do. We’ll look at the question of nannies in our next post. Meanwhile, it’s almost as if “illegals” are only to be found in the working class, isn’t it? Why not slice the pineapple upside-down cake along class lines, besides faith lines? A question that answers itself, once asked.

NOTES
[1] Yes, with “migrants,” just like everybody else, I’m glossing over the differences between “asylum seeker” (displaced person), “refugee” (displaced person granted state status) and “economic migrants” (living standards). The global human supply chain is complicated! For example, into which bucket do you throw people fleeing to the United States because of terrible conditions that the United States itself created?

None, apparently, or any; the categories themselves seem designed to obscure this question. Anyhow, whoever said avoiding torture or death didn’t constitute an improvement in living standards? For some definition of “living,” of course.

[2] One might almost think that the reporter was as slavish in their devotion to the existing order as the Trump supporter, whose name the Times originally misspelled, and had to correct.

UPDATE Today’s story from the AP on the same topic fails to ask the same thing. Even though hiring illegal immigrants is illegal, there is no such thing as an “illegal” employer.


This entry was posted in Banana republic, Globalization, Guest Post, Politics, Social policy, Social values, The destruction of the middle class on July 9, 2018 by Lambert Strether.

https://www.nakedcapitalism.com/2018/07/exactly-illegals-anyhow.html
 

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Trump Administration Will Miss Court-Mandated Deadline To Reunite Migrant Families


by Tyler Durden
Tue, 07/10/2018 - 09:15


As was widely expected after a judge ruled last month that the Trump Administration would have 30 days to reunite families separated at the border, the US government is struggling to meet the deadline, with Reuters reporting that only half of the detained children under age 5 will be back with their parents by a court-ordered deadline of Tuesday, according to a government attorney.

Sarah Fabian, an attorney with the US Department of Justice, said 54 children younger than 5 would be reunited with parents by the end of Tuesday, though that number could rise if background checks are completed more quickly. The administration is believed to have more than 2,000 immigrant children in custody, with 100 of them under the age of five. The parents of some of the children have been deported, while others either failed a criminal background check, were unable to prove they were the parent or had been released and couldn't be contacted by immigration officials, Fabian said. The children were separated from their parents after President Trump declared his "zero tolerance" policy for the prosecution of immigrants crossing the border illegally. The separations started in early May and continued until Trump signed an executive order to halt the practice last month.



The San Diego judge who delivered the ruling also ordered the government to come up with a plan to reunify families and submit it no later than Tuesday at 11 am Pacific Time. An attorney for the ACLU, which brought the case that led to the ruling, said he worried that the government wasn't complying with the order, though he acknowledged that "significant" steps had been taken in the past 48 hours.

Lee Gelernt, an attorney for the American Civil Liberties Union, which brought the case, said he did not think the government was complying with the reunification order. "It is very troubling that there are children and parents who are not in some kind of government tracking system," he said after the court hearing.​
He added that nonprofit groups were trying to find parents the government had failed to locate, who are mostly from El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras. He also questioned if the government’s list of children under the age of 5 was accurate.​
Gelernt added, however, that he believed the government had made "significant" steps in the past 48 hours to unite parents with their children, and he called the effort "a blueprint for going forward with the remaining more than 2,000 families."​
Fabian told the judge that once parents and children were reunited, they would likely be released from immigration custody. A legal settlement dating from the 1990s only allows the government to detain children in adult centers for a brief period. Gelernt said the ACLU was concerned that parents would be put on the street without any money in an unfamiliar city.​

Unsurprisingly, liberals and other critics of the Trump administration have been outraged by the delay while others joked that the government should outsource the reunions to the Thai Navy SEALs who freed 12 boys and their soccer coach in Thailand.

Now let’s run it back and reunite children separated from families by this corrupt government, yea? https://t.co/7dt3gaoZyH
— brown dude shining (@brownmusings) July 10, 2018
Meanwhile, a federal judge has rejected the administration's request to allow long-term detention of migrant children. Los Angeles U.S. District Court Judge Dolly Gee dismissed the DOJ's proposal to modify a 1997 settlement known as the Flores Agreement as "dubious" and "unconvincing," according to Reuters.

https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018...rt-mandated-deadline-reunite-migrant-families
 

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Dozens of immigrant children will be reunited with parents

AP
By ELLIOT SPAGAT, Associated Press
2 hrs ago


SAN DIEGO — Dozens of immigrant children will be released from detention centers and reunited with their parents Tuesday.

A government lawyer said Monday at least 54 children under the age of 5 would join their parents by a court-ordered deadline, only about half the 100 or so children covered by the order. The Trump administration was working on final background checks for another five children ahead of Tuesday's deadline.

Parents in U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement custody "for the most part" are being taken to locations near their children and the families will be released, Justice Department attorney Sarah Fabian said in court. She said locations would not be publicly disclosed, but children have been sent to shelters across the country.

More than 2,000 children were separated from their parents by U.S. immigration authorities at the border this spring before President Donald Trump reversed course on June 20 amid an international outcry. Last week, U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar said there were "under 3,000" separated children in all.

Late last month, U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw in San Diego set a 14-day deadline to reunite children under 5 with their parents and a 30-day deadline for older children. The 30-day deadline is up July 26.

American Civil Liberties Union attorney Lee Gelernt sought assurances from the government Monday that advocates would be in position to guide parents when they are released in a foreign land. The parents will be free while their cases wind through immigration court, which can take years, and may be required to wear ankle monitors.

On Monday, a federal judge in Los Angeles rejected the Trump administration's efforts to detain immigrant families in long-term facilities, calling it a "cynical attempt to undo a longstanding court settlement."

U.S. District Judge Dolly Gee said the government had failed to present new evidence to support revising a court order that limits the detention of children who crossed the border illegally.

The Department of Justice asked Gee to alter a 1997 settlement, which provides the framework for how to handle detained immigrant children, so it could detain families together for longer periods.

Three years ago, Gee rejected a similar effort by the Obama administration. She ruled at the time that immigrant children generally can't be held longer than 20 days.

Devin O'Malley, a Justice Department spokesman, said the department disagreed with Gee's Monday ruling and continued to review it.

ICE has three family detention centers with room for about 3,000 people in all, and the places are already at or near capacity. The Trump administration is trying to line up thousands of more beds at military bases.

Some attorneys and advocates prepared for Tuesday's reunions with little information.

The Annunciation House shelter in El Paso, Texas, was assisting four parents of children under 5 after their release from immigration detention, none of whom had reunited with their children as of Monday evening, said Taylor Levy, legal coordinator. Levy said that one mother of a 4-year-old was told by federal authorities to find a larger apartment if she wanted her son back.

Abril Valdez of the ACLU of Michigan said the government was "vague" on the time and place of the reunifications that could come Tuesday for two Honduran men he represents. Their 3-year-old sons were in temporary foster care in Grand Rapids while they were in a jail in Battle Creek.

Under-5 children who will remain separated for now include parents have already been released into the U.S., have been deported, or are behind bars on criminal charges.

Sabraw, an appointee of Republican President George W. Bush, said Monday that he was "very encouraged" by the efforts to reunite families by his deadline, calling it "real progress." He ordered both sides back in court on Tuesday to give another update and for him rule on differences over protocols to follow when reuniting the remaining children.

The two sides revealed in a filing late Monday that they are far apart on protocols for reunification, with the government arguing its practices are necessary under federal law to ensure child safety and the ACLU contending that many are too cumbersome under the circumstances. One area of disagreement is DNA testing on parents and children, with the government saying it should be the general rule and the ACLU saying it should be done only when no other evidence is available to prove parentage.

Other areas of disagreement include whether fingerprint checks should be run on other adult members of the household and parent participation a legal orientation program should be required before release.

___

Associated Press writers Brian Melley in Los Angeles, Nomaan Merchant in Houston, Morgan Lee in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and Corey Williams in Detroit contributed to this report.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/do...e-reunited-with-parents/ar-AAzPzbw?ocid=ientp
 

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Trump administration reaches out to Texas land owners about surveying their property for a border wall

  • Escobares, Texas, Mayor Noel Escobar said: 'I walk out the back door and what I'm going to see is a 30-foot fence'
  • Residents in Roma and Escobares, Texas, plus the Rio Grande City school district have received letters from the government asking to survey their land
  • Rep. Henry Cuellar said there have been over 200 survey requests made in his Congressional district
  • A border wall was one of President Donald Trump's earliest campaign promises
  • It's estimated to take $25 billion to fund the building of the wall, which Congress has yet to appropriate
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...nd-owners-surveying-property-border-wall.html
 

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Trump Administration Returns to ‘Catch and Release’ of Migrants

NYT
By KATIE BENNER, RON NIXON, CAITLIN DICKERSON and MIRIAM JORDAN
9 hrs ago


WASHINGTON — The government said on Tuesday that it would release hundreds of migrant families wearing ankle bracelet monitors into the United States, effectively returning to the “catch and release” policy that President Trump promised to eliminate.

Faced with a pair of court orders restricting immigration detentions, federal officials said they could not hold all of the migrant families who were apprehended at the southwestern border. They said their hands were tied by dueling requirements to release children from detention after 20 days and also keep them with their parents or other adult relatives.

Confronted by audio of crying children that drew widespread outrage, Trump administration officials also said they had stopped referring migrant adults who enter the United States with children for prosecution.

“Parents with children under the age of 5 are being reunited with their children and then released and enrolled into an alternative detention program,” Matthew Albence, the executive associate director of ICE’s enforcement and removal operations, told reporters on Tuesday.

He said that means the migrants will be given ankle bracelets “and released into the community.”

At the same time, the government said it was struggling to reunite 102 migrant children under 5 with their parents as required under a court order; only about one-third were expected to be reunited by the Tuesday deadline.

The reunification process was disorganized. Parents were warned that pickup and drop-off times could change throughout the day. Volunteers waited on standby in shifts, surprised by the addition of one more parent than they had expected. The federal agency that oversees the care of migrant children, the Department of Health and Human Services, was still conducting background checks on parents into Tuesday morning.

Citizens and politicians in Guatemala welcomed back 11 reunified families who had been deported from the United States. Among them was Donelda Pulex Castellanos, 35, who was separated from her 5-year-old daughter in early May after the two crossed the border near El Paso.

They remained apart for two months, with Ms. Pulex in detention in El Paso and her daughter sent to live with a foster family in Michigan.

“I thought that they were going to take my daughter away there,” she said. “It was a huge torment.”

The Justice Department has insisted that its “zero tolerance” immigration policy — which focuses on prosecuting all adults who illegally enter the United States but not necessarily detaining them — is still intact. The department has also maintained that it is prosecuting all of the cases it receives from immigration agents. Attorney General Jeff Sessions has predicted the tough immigration stance will discourage people from illegally entering the country.

Mr. Trump has for years railed against catch and release, blaming it for crimes and violence committed by illegal immigrants during the administration of President Barack Obama. But the Trump administration has similarly struggled with deterring waves of migrants from Central and South America — and, once they enter the country, processing them through the legal system humanely.

Migrants with children who are apprehended in the United States are now given a notice to appear in court and being told, “Welcome to America,” according to another senior Department of Homeland Security official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to be identified by name.

Mr. Albence said that the ankle bracelet monitor would track the families being released, but that ICE would consider other methods to ensure migrants show up for court. A total of about 80,000 migrants wearing tracking devices on their ankles currently live in the United States. They include migrants who were released from detention before the zero-tolerance policy was enacted in April.

Soon after the policy was announced, images of children in cages and audio of toddlers crying as they were separated from their parents sparked widespread public outrage, including from the Republican Party and Christian conservatives.

In response, on June 20, Mr. Trump issued an executive order that said migrant children could no longer be separated from their adult relatives. That effectively limited detention to 20 days — a timeline set under a 1997 court settlement known as Flores — for migrant adults apprehended with children.

The Trump administration has asked Judge Dolly M. Gee of Federal District Court in Los Angeles to amend the Flores settlement to allow children to be detained for longer periods of time. It also has asked Congress for new laws to override the court order.

On Monday, Judge Gee refused to amend the settlement.

“Defendants seek to light a match to the Flores agreement and ask this court to upend the parties’ agreement by judicial fiat,” Judge Gee, who was appointed by Mr. Obama, wrote in her order.

She called the Justice Department’s request to amend the settlement “cynical” and said it was an attempt to “shift responsibility to the judiciary for over 20 years of congressional inaction and ill-considered executive action that have led to the current stalemate.”

The administration is expected to appeal her decision. But for now, it has little choice but to release families with ankle bracelets and hope they will show up for court appearances.

The practice of catch and release is a term with no legal definition and has been used as a pejorative alternative to jailing illegal immigrants. Leon Fresco, a former senior Justice Department immigration lawyer, said putting ankle bracelets on migrants is a return to what the Trump administration itself has described as catch and release; ending its practice was a top priority of the labor union that represents Border Patrol agents and endorsed Mr. Trump’s candidacy.

Chris Rickard, a lawyer with the American Civil Liberties Union, accused the Trump administration of largely manufacturing the current immigration crisis.

“Border residents and people around the country realize it’s this administration making people stand in the sun, waiting to cross into the United States,” Mr. Rickard said. “It’s this administration separating children from their families. And it’s this administration taking this zero-tolerance policy stance when illegal immigration numbers historically have declined.”

That chaos was underscored on Tuesday by the government’s struggle to comply with the court order in San Diego to reunite children under the age of five with their families. Federal officials that they had reunited four families so far, with an additional 34 reunions scheduled by the day’s end.

Additionally, officials said gave no indication of whether they would meet a July 26 deadline to reunite all remaining migrant children who had been separated from their parents.

“These are firm deadlines. They’re not aspirational goals,” said Judge Dana Sabraw of Federal District Court in San Diego, admonishing the government.

Chris Meekins, a senior official in the Department of Health and Human Services, pointed to safety concerns to explain the delay and insisted that the reunifications could not be rushed.

“Our process may not be as quick as some might like, but there is no question that it is protecting children,” Mr. Meekins, the chief of staff of the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, said in a conference call with reporters.

In some cases, he said, “If we had just reunited kids with the adults, we would be putting them in the care of a rapist, a kidnapper, a child abuser, and someone who was charged with murder in their home nation.”

One of the biggest operators of migrant-youth shelters in the United States, Southwest Key Programs, said its staff had dispatched several children from its shelters to return to their parents on Tuesday.

“Our staff came in early, made sure every backpack was full and every child got a hug and a goodbye,” Juan Sánchez, the nonprofit group’s president and chief executive, said in a statement. “And the kids hugged us back. They were excited to be on their way to be with their families. And we were thrilled for them.”

The nonprofit declined to discuss how many children under 5 were released.

The reunification process has highlighted how traumatic the Trump administration’s decision to separate children has been.

One Honduran father had been warned by border agents that his child would be taken away, and had been given an opportunity to explain to his son what would happen. He beamed while his son asked questions and played with toys when they were reunited at a federal immigration office in Michigan on Tuesday.

A second father was not given a chance to tell his three-year-old son they would be separated, according to Abril Valdes, a lawyer for both men. His child had stopped talking soon after being taken into government custody. The father and son cried throughout the reunification meeting as he pet his sons hair. The boy said little and refused to take any toys or leave his father’s arms.

“I feel like he’s still in shell shock,” said Ms. Valdes, their lawyer.

Get politics and Washington news updates via Facebook, Twitter and the Morning Briefing newsletter.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/tr...nd-release’-of-migrants/ar-AAzTHki?ocid=ientp
 

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Trump refuses to take blame for missing deadline to reunite immigrant children with their families, saying the solution is to 'Tell people not to come to our country illegally'

  • Government missed the deadline of July 10 to reunite immigrant children under five with their families
  • Administration officials say that they won't be able to confirm a child's parentage by the deadline if DNA testing is inconclusive
  • They've been forced to roll back many of the family separations that resulted from its 'zero-tolerance' border enforcement policy
  • Trump conceded they'd missed the deadline, and said the solution was to simply tell asylum seekers fleeing their homes, not to come
  • 'Tell people not to come to our country illegally. That's the solution. Don't come to our country illegally. Come like other people do. Come legally'
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5940423/Trump-Tell-people-not-come-country-illegally.html
 

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Woman arrested in beating of 91-year-old Mexican man in California


By Jason Hanna, Stella Chan and Paul Vercammen, CNN
31 mins ago

A week after a 91-year-old Mexican man says he was beaten with a concrete block in Southern California, a woman has been arrested in connection with the assault, authorities said.

Laquisha Jones, 30, was arrested Tuesday night in Los Angeles on suspicion of beating Rodolfo Rodriguez last week, the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department said.

She was being held on a charge of assault with a deadly weapon, with bail set at $200,000.

'I just passed her .... and she hit me'

Rodriguez, who is recovering at his relatives' Willowbrook home south of Los Angeles, said he was walking to a park on July 4 when he passed a woman and a girl.

Without warning, the woman hit him with a concrete block, he said, and enlisted a group of men to kick him.

"I didn't even bump into her kid," Rodriguez said. "I just passed her, and she pushed me and she hit me until she was done."

A witness, Misbel Borjas, said she saw a woman hitting Rodriguez in the head with the block.

"I heard her saying, 'Go back to your country; go back to Mexico,' " she told CNN by phone.

Authorities said Jones is black and a Los Angeles resident.

Rodriguez, who said he travels about twice a year from his home in Mexico to visit relatives in Willowbrook, suffered a broken jaw, broken cheekbones, two broken ribs and bruises on his face, back and abdomen, his family said.

He spent five or six hours in a hospital, his family said.

Rodriguez said he doesn't know why he was attacked. He said that at one point, the woman ran up to some men and told them Rodriguez was trying to take her daughter away from her -- so the men joined her and started kicking him as he lay bleeding on a sidewalk.

"But that's not true," he told CNN about the woman's allegation, through tears. "In the years I have been alive I have never offended anyone."

'I'm in so much pain'

The sheriff's department said it is trying to determine a motive for the attack, and it hasn't specified what led to Jones' arrest.

Earlier, the department said it was looking for a woman seen in a photo that Borjas had taken. In the photo, a woman is holding what appears to be a piece of concrete or a brick.

Borjas also posted to Instagram a video of a bloodied Rodriguez sitting on grass between a sidewalk and a street shortly after the attack.

"When I tried to videotape her with my cell phone," Borjas said of the attacker, "she threw that same concrete block, tried to hit my car."

The sheriff's department said it was trying to determine if others were involved in the attack.

Rodriguez's family started a GoFundMe campaign to help cover his medical costs.

Rodriguez said he'd never been hurt like this before in a life working fields with cattle and corn. He recalled the attack while lying back in a reclining chair at his relatives' Willowbrook home.

"I can't walk," Rodriguez said. "I'm in so much pain."

CNN's Andrea Diaz contributed to this report.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/wo...xican-man-in-california/ar-AAzVrl9?ocid=ientp
 

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EXCLUSIVE: 'Tell Daddy, enough!' Ivanka and Jared's wealthy neighbors hold protest outside their Washington DC home over the Trump administration's failure to reunite separated migrant families

  • Dozens of people took the street outside Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner's home, in the upmarket neighborhood of Kalorama, on Wednesday evening
  • Mainly local neighborhood residents, they held candles and signs which read 'Love thy neighbor', 'Tell Daddy, enough!' and 'Reunited'
  • Protest came just a day after it was revealed that the Trump administration wouldn't meet its federal court ordered deadline to reunite migrant families
  • Trump's failure to reunite migrant families has sparked protests across America
  • Around 100 protesters also confronted Ivanka while she was visiting a school in Syracuse, New York on Monday, chanting 'Shame!'
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...ilent-protest-outside-Washington-DC-home.html
 

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Mexican immigrant in ICE custody kills himself in his cell- the eighth to die in the agency's care

  • Efrain De La Rosa, 40, was found dead in his cell at a detention center in Georgia
  • The Mexican immigrant was held in ICE custody since March and to be deported
  • ICE says the preliminary cause of death appears to be self-inflicted strangulation
  • De La Rosa is the eighth person to die in ICE custody this year
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5948011/ICE-Immigration-detainees-death-appears-suicide.html
 

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US judge criticizes plan to reunify families split at border

AP
4 hrs ago


SAN DIEGO — A federal judge, responding to a plan to reunify children separated at the border, said he was having second thoughts about his belief that the Trump administration was acting in good faith to comply with his orders.

The Justice Department on Friday filed a plan to reunify more than 2,500 children age 5 and older by a court-imposed deadline of July 26 using "truncated" procedures to verify parentage and perform background checks, which exclude DNA testing and other steps it took to reunify children under 5.

The administration said the abbreviated vetting puts children at significant safety risk but is needed to meet the deadline.

Chris Meekins, deputy assistant Health and Human Services secretary for preparedness and response, filed a declaration that he is fully committed to meeting the deadline. However, he does not believe "the placing of children into such situations is consistent with the mission of HHS or my core values."

U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw took umbrage at Meekins' statement, disputing the official's interpretation of his orders and saying that safe reunification could and will occur by July 26.

"It is clear from Mr. Meekins's declaration that HHS either does not understand the court's orders or is acting in defiance of them," the judge wrote late Friday. "At a minimum, it appears he is attempting to provide cover to defendants for their own conduct in the practice of family separation, and the lack of foresight and infrastructure necessary to remedy the harms caused by that practice."

Sabraw, an appointee of President George W. Bush, said Meekins' statement calls into question his comments in court hours earlier that the administration was acting in good faith.

Sabraw said in court Friday that the administration had largely complied with orders but, at the same time, he indicated he will be monitoring its actions ahead of the deadline.

The judge said the administration must provide a list of names of parents in immigration custody and their children by Monday and complete background checks for them by Thursday. He scheduled four hearings over the next two weeks for updates, including one on Monday.

"The task is laborious, but can be accomplished in the time and manner prescribed," he wrote in his order.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/us...amilies-split-at-border/ar-AAA4Fx8?ocid=ientp
 

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'Don't give up': Migrant father who was reunited with his five-year-old son after eight weeks tells separated families to never give up hope

  • Eris Hidalgo Ramirez, of Honduras, was reunited with five-year-old son, Jostin
  • Father and son were separated for eight weeks after crossing US-Mexico border
  • They were reunited on Friday in the Bronx where Jostin was being cared for
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...-son-tells-separated-families-never-hope.html
 

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Trump closed little-known door for family reunification, leaving refugees stranded

LAT
By Andrea Castillo, Los Angeles Times
7 hrs ago

She dreamed for 16 years of bringing her children from El Salvador to live with her near San Francisco.

Her youngest daughter and her grandson were set to arrive in February 2017, thanks to a federal program that reunited Central American children with their parents in the United States. But the month came and went without their expected flight confirmation from immigration authorities.

It wasn't until August that the mother, identified by her lawyers as S.A., found out that the Trump administration the program had ended.

"When I realized that everything had come crashing down, I suffered a lot," S.A., 52, said in a recent phone interview while on a break from her job at a lice-removal company. "It still hurts not having them here."

The demise of the program was just the latest rollback under President Donald Trump of an Obama administration humanitarian relief initiative. The current administration has abruptly ended programs including the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals and a case management program meant to keep asylum-seeking families out of detention.

The Central American Minors program was created in late 2014 in response to a surge of tens of thousands of unaccompanied children fleeing violence in the region. The program was billed as a safe alternative to a dangerous journey north through Mexico. It allowed immigrants who were lawfully present in the U.S. to apply for refugee status or humanitarian parole on behalf of their children under 21, their spouses and grandchildren living in El Salvador, Guatemala or Honduras.

The program failed to stem the flow of unaccompanied children. But it worked as a way to reunite some families.

"The CAM program, as modest as it was, was always an effort to create a safer way of coming to the United States for people who actually had an eligibility to come," said Doris Meissner, - who led the Immigration and Naturalization Service from 1993 to 2000 and now is director of the U.S. immigration policy program at the Migration Policy Institute. Ending the program worsens what the Trump administration says it's trying to deter, she said.

S.A. is one of six plaintiff families in a class-action lawsuit filed this month in California against the administration over the termination of the refugee program.

The lawsuit alleges that the government secretly ended the program days after Trump took office in January 2017 but didn't publicly announce the decision until August, violating their constitutional rights to due process and equal protection.

Lawyers say U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services did this despite continuing to accept money from applicants, including $400 for DNA tests, $100 or more for medical exams and $1,400 for each child's plane ticket. In response to a Freedom of Information Act request by the International Refugee Assistance Project, the citizenship agency released emails showing that it had canceled more than 2,000 CAM interviews scheduled beginning in January.

A spokeswoman said the agency could not comment on pending litigation.

When the program ended, more than 2,700 young people had their conditional approvals to move to the U.S. rescinded, according to the complaint.

All had left the Northern Triangle, the area in Central America made up of El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras. The three countries have some of the highest murder rates in the world because of rampant corruption, drug trafficking and gang activity.

The complaint asks that the court reinstate those conditional approvals and allow the beneficiaries the opportunity to travel to the U.S.

Among the applicants to the program was S.A.'s daughter - identified as J.A. in the complaint - who had completed every step of the process and was awaiting flight information from the U.S. government when the administration blocked her travel.

S.A. has had temporary legal protection in the U.S. since 2001 under a program designed to help citizens of countries experiencing armed conflict or other conditions that prevent them from returning safely.

Her husband left while she was pregnant with J.A., their third child, during the country's civil war. She peddled household goods door-to-door in a violence-wracked San Salvador neighborhood to make ends meet.

Leaving her children in the care of her father and sister, S.A. immigrated to the U.S. in search of work. Now she sends money twice a month and talks to them almost every day.

J.A. was 20 and her son was a year old when S.A. applied to the CAM program on their behalf in August 2015. Her other children, now 25 and 27, were too old to qualify.

In February 2017 she sent money for their flight reservations - bringing the total she paid to nearly $5,000 - and was told that they'd be able to travel about two weeks after the payment was received.

Six months later, S.A. called migration authorities in El Salvador and learned that her daughter and grandson would not be allowed to come to the U.S.

Other plaintiffs include a teenage girl who was forced to drop out of high school a few months short of her graduation because an MS-13 gang member was trying to forcibly "date" her and she feared that she could be raped or killed; a teenage boy beaten so badly after refusing to join MS-13 that he required surgery and now uses a cane to walk; and another teenage boy whose uncle was shot and killed by MS-13 outside the boy's home.

Under the program, applicants were screened in their home countries for refugee resettlement.

Even if the applicant didn't meet the specific refugee eligibility criteria, they were automatically considered for renewable parole if the U.S. government determined that they were "at risk of harm."

During the time that the program existed, more than 15,000 people applied, according to the State Department. More than 2,100 were resettled as refugees, the government said, meaning they could apply for legal residency after one year. Fifteen hundred others were allowed into the U.S. as parolees, permitted to remain only as long as their work permits remain active.

One such case involves Andrea, a 22-year-old Salvadoran woman who arrived two years ago as a parolee to reunite with her mother after nearly two decades apart. Andrea's work permit expired last month, leaving her and her 4-year-old son Mateo without legal protection.

Her mother, Maria, had been caught illegally crossing the border in the Arizona desert in 1998. She spent a month in immigrant detention but later became a beneficiary of Temporary Protected Status.

Maria, who now lives in Orange County, Calif., said she didn't want her daughter to risk making the same journey through Mexico and entering the country illegally.

"I didn't want her to suffer how I suffered," she said.

Instead, Andrea was raised by her grandparents in San Salvador. She had all but stopped leaving the house except to go to work as a hairstylist after seeing two dead bodies at a nearby open-air market.

"I'll never forget the faces of those people," she said. "I didn't want my son to see that."

She dreamed for 16 years of bringing her children from El Salvador to live with her near San Francisco.

Her youngest daughter and her grandson were set to arrive in February 2017, thanks to a federal program that reunited Central American children with their parents in the United States. But the month came and went without their expected flight confirmation from immigration authorities.

It wasn't until August that the mother, identified by her lawyers as S.A., found out that the Trump administration the program had ended.

"When I realized that everything had come crashing down, I suffered a lot," S.A., 52, said in a recent phone interview while on a break from her job at a lice-removal company. "It still hurts not having them here."

The demise of the program was just the latest rollback under President Donald Trump of an Obama administration humanitarian relief initiative. The current administration has abruptly ended programs including the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals and a case management program meant to keep asylum-seeking families out of detention.

The Central American Minors program was created in late 2014 in response to a surge of tens of thousands of unaccompanied children fleeing violence in the region. The program was billed as a safe alternative to a dangerous journey north through Mexico. It allowed immigrants who were lawfully present in the U.S. to apply for refugee status or humanitarian parole on behalf of their children under 21, their spouses and grandchildren living in El Salvador, Guatemala or Honduras.

Andrea, who spoke on the condition of anonymity out of concern that she could be deported, now works full time cleaning a hotel. In March, she got married and is preparing to file for legal residency through her husband.

According to the complaint over the CAM program's end, some parents took out loans to pay for plane tickets, sometimes with only days notice from migration authorities. Some paid hundreds of dollars to safely transport their children from their hometowns to attend numerous interviews in the capital cities of each country.

Parents waited nearly a year for flight reimbursements. The only other costs reimbursed were for DNA tests. Many spent extra money on accommodations and new clothes for their children's arrival.

After the CAM program was terminated, the International Organization for Migration told applicants who had been conditionally approved for parole - and all of whom had been deemed ineligible for refugee resettlement - that they could file a request for review of the denial of refugee status within 90 days.

Linda Evarts, an attorney with the International Refugee Assistance Project who represents the plaintiffs, said most haven't heard back.

A few months after finding out the CAM program had been terminated, S.A. was diagnosed with breast cancer. Her only relatives in the U.S. are nephews, most of them in other states, and she lamented not having the support of her daughter during surgery and chemotherapy.

Meanwhile, J.A. remains in her small hometown three hours from San Salvador. She relies on the money her mother sends to survive.

"Her dream was to come here and give her son a better life," her mother said. "All I can hope for is a miracle."

Visit the Los Angeles Times at www.latimes.com

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/tr...aving-refugees-stranded/ar-AAA6zEy?ocid=ientp
 

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EXCLUSIVE: ICE attorneys STILL trying to deport immigrant children WITHOUT their parents despite Trump's promises to reunify families

  • ICE attorneys are still trying to deport immigrant children without their parents
  • This is despite Trump saying the government is doing all it can to reunify families
  • Immigration judges will decide if children are deported alone to home countries
  • ICE officials say attorneys must represent the agency's position on a case-by-case basis and efforts to deport children don't necessarily preclude reunification
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...despite-Trumps-promises-reunify-families.html
 

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UC Berkeley Students Outraged By On-Campus Bank's Ties To ICE


by Tyler Durden
Mon, 07/23/2018 - 17:15

Authored by Grace Gottschling via Campus Reform,

University of California, Berkeley students want the university to cut ties with its on-campus bank because it does business with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE).



In an editorial Thursday, The Daily Californian argues that the school should break a ten-year contract with Bank of the West, which is owned by BNP Paribas, an international French bank that has invested in several private U.S. prisons that happen to have contracts with ICE, according to an earlier Daily Californian article.

The editorial argues that the associated connection with ICE is “unacceptable” considering that “the University of California has an estimated 4,000 undocumented students on its campuses, 500 of whom are at UC Berkeley.”

“When UC Berkeley is tied to companies like this, so is its revenue,” the editorial points out. “In 2015, when UC Berkeley’s 10-year contract with Bank of the West was announced, it was predicted that the campus would make $17 million from this partnership. This money is tied, however indirectly, to the abhorrent practice of separating families at the border.​
If UC Berkeley really wants to show its commitment to supporting its undocumented community members, it needs to end its partnership with Bank of the West as long as BNP Paribas continues to maintain its holdings in these private prison companies,” the editorial argues.​
“It’s time to call on donors and sponsors to fill the hole Bank of the West would leave,” the editorial staff adds. “Ultimately, money comes and goes, but an association with moral corruption is something that will leave a stain on this campus for decades.”
UC Berkeley, for its part, is reacting cautiously to the petition, saying that it is withholding judgment until Bank of the West conducts an internal review of the students’ claims.

“At the time of the initial publication in The Daily Californian, UC Berkeley was unaware of the investments made by the bank's parent company, BNP Paribas,” university spokesman Roqua Montez told Campus Reform. “Since becoming aware of this information, the campus has voiced its concerns to Bank of the West, which has prompted both Bank of the West and BNP Paribas to conduct an internal evaluation into the details of the investment. They plan to have an updated report to our campus within the next few days.”​
“UC Berkeley is committed to ensuring our campus community and all partner relationships align with the university's values, standards, and mission,” Montez added.​
“Once we’ve received the updated report from the bank, we will review internally with our banking working group and campus leadership. At that point we will provide additional information.”


 

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Spike in illegal entries to the U.S. over the northern border is blamed on new rules allowing Mexicans to enter Canada without a visa

  • 267 apprehensions this fiscal year along Vermont border versus 132 in all of last
  • People are paying smugglers up to $4,000 to guide them past civilian guards
  • The U.S.-Canada border is guarded but far less so than its southern equivalent
  • At places the border line is marked only by a row petunias and other flowers
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...ng-getting-sophisticated-northern-border.html
 

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New study shows that 22 per cent of US citizens do not speak English as their first language at home and that the number of foreign-born Americans is at its highest level ever with approximately 44 million

  • The Migration Policy Institute discovered that 22 per cent of the US population prefers to speak another language at home
  • 'Spanish was the top non-English language spoken at home in the country overall,' the study found
  • The Washington, DC-based think tank also noted in their study that the number of foreign-born US citizens represents 13.5 per cent of the population
  • The data also suggests a trend showing immigrants dispersing across the country instead of gravitating to a few states and cities
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...-22-cent-citizens-not-speak-English-home.html
 

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New study shows that 22 per cent of US citizens do not speak English as their first language at home and that the number of foreign-born Americans is at its highest level ever with approximately 44 million

  • The Migration Policy Institute discovered that 22 per cent of the US population prefers to speak another language at home
  • 'Spanish was the top non-English language spoken at home in the country overall,' the study found
  • The Washington, DC-based think tank also noted in their study that the number of foreign-born US citizens represents 13.5 per cent of the population
  • The data also suggests a trend showing immigrants dispersing across the country instead of gravitating to a few states and cities
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...-22-cent-citizens-not-speak-English-home.html
If 22 percent of Americans don’t understand english then how are they going to understand all that bullcrap “Q” is dishing out?
 

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Many immigrant parents 'are never going to see their kids again' after being separated at the southern U.S. border, former ICE official says

  • Former ICE official says many immigrant parents may never see their kids again
  • Some children will go into the U.S. foster care system and may be adopted out
  • Trump administration faces a court-ordered deadline today to reunify families
  • At least 462 parents have been deported without their children after separation
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...rant-parents-never-kids-separated-border.html