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Immigration & Trumps Wall

nickndfl

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As soon as Trump builds the wall his popularity will increase exponentially. That is one reason why the democrats are obstructing.
 

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Stephen Miller is a product of “chain migration,” his uncle says

Vox
Emily Stewart
12 mins ago


Stephen Miller, the senior policy adviser to the president and one of the ideologues pushing the administration’s hardline immigration policies, is a product of the so-called “chain migration” he and President Donald Trump often deride. That’s according to his uncle, who penned an essay in Politico outlining Miller’s family’s immigration story on Monday.

David Glosser, a retired neuropsychologist and Miller’s uncle on his mother’s side, detailed the story of how the family came to live in the United States. Miller’s great-great-grandfather Wolf-Leib Glosser left the village of Antopol in what is now Belarus amid “violent anti-Jewish pogroms” there and came to the US. He landed on Ellis Island in 1903 and, over time, was able to bring over the rest of his family.

Through that generation and the next, the family built a chain of supermarkets and discount department stores run by Miller’s great-grandfather and his grandfather Izzy. The family eventually became American citizens. It’s the type of “chain migration” — or family-based migration — that immigration hardliners, including Miller, say they hate.

“I have watched with dismay and increasing horror as my nephew, who is an educated man and well aware of his heritage, has become the architect of immigration policies that repudiate the very foundation of our family’s life in this country,” Glosser wrote.

The essay is in part a rejection of the immigration policies his nephew supports and at the same time a plea for him to reconsider:

I shudder at the thought of what would have become of the Glossers had the same policies Stephen so coolly espouses — the travel ban, the radical decrease in refugees, the separation of children from their parents, and even talk of limiting citizenship for legal immigrants — been in effect when Wolf-Leib made his desperate bid for freedom. The Glossers came to the US just a few years before the fear and prejudice of the “America First” nativists of the day closed U.S. borders to Jewish refugees. Had Wolf-Leib waited, his family would likely have been murdered by the Nazis along with all but seven of the 2,000 Jews who remained in Antopol. I would encourage Stephen to ask himself if the chanting, torch-bearing Nazis of Charlottesville, whose support his boss seems to court so cavalierly, do not envision a similar fate for him.

Miller, 32, is a fierce proponent of restricting both legal and illegal immigration to the United States.

As Vox’s Jane Coaston writes, he was passionate about the subject even in high school and bonded with his former boss, then-Sen. Jeff Sessions, over the matter. Miller designed the initial version of Trump’s travel ban and agreed with former White House chief strategist Steve Bannon when in a March 2016 radio interview Bannon complained that the number of immigrants in the country is a “massive problem.”

In his Politico essay, Glosser wrote that perhaps Miller and Trump “have become numb to the resultant human tragedy and blind to the hypocrisy of their policy decisions” after spending so much time “in the theater of right wing politics.” But he also noted that Miller isn’t the only family with chain immigration in Trump’s orbit: Trump’s grandfather is reportedly a German migrant, his mother fled Scotland for the US, and, of course, first lady Melania Trump’s parents became citizens just last week.

“No matter what opinion is held about immigration, any government that specifically enacts law or policy on that basis [of ethnicity, country of origin, or religion] must be recognized as a threat to all of us. Laws bereft of justice are the gateway to tyranny,” Glosser wrote. “Today others may be the target, but tomorrow it might just as easily be you or me.”

You can read the full essay for Politico here.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/polit...gration”-his-uncle-says/ar-BBLSpO0?ocid=ientp
 

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Naturalized Americans could lose their citizenship with thousands of cases under review

MH
By Brenda Medina, El Nuevo Herald
14 hrs ago



MIAMI - Federal officials are reviewing the citizenship petition process of more than 2,500 people who became naturalized American citizens, in search of possible fraud committed during the process.

A spokeswoman for the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) told EFE news agency this week that about 100 of the 2,500 cases "have a reasonable suspicion" and were referred to the Department of Justice.

The DOJ will evaluate whether to initiate legal proceedings in these cases. Part of the process could include revoking a person's U.S. citizenship, spokeswoman Claire Nicholson told EFE.

The review is part of a multimillion-dollar effort by the Trump administration, which seeks to identify people who have committed fraud during the process to obtain citizenship or permanent residence, or who committed crimes before naturalizing and did not report them, officials have said.

This summer, the government announced it tapped a group of lawyers and investigators, operating under Customs and Immigration, to review the naturalization procedures. USCIS staff has been reviewing potential cases for citizenship revocation since January 2017, the agency's director, L. Francis Cissna, told the Associated Press.

The Department of Homeland Security (under which USCIS operates) also plans to devote more than $207.6 million in a separate initiative involving the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). ICE will use the funds to hire new agents for the National Security Investigations division to look for possible citizenship and green card fraud, according to ICE's budget plan for 2019.

One of the tasks is to identify applicants who were ordered to leave the country but stayed behind and naturalized under another identity.

To determine possible cases of fraud, researchers focus on fingerprint records on deportation orders from the 1990s and prior years, which were not digitized. This information is now being compared with more recent files. The authorities plan to refer some 1,600 of these types of cases to the DOJ.

Efforts to revoke citizenship are not new but have accelerated under the Trump administration.

Between 1990 and 2017, there were 305 legal cases of denaturalization, an average of 11 per year. Under former President Barack Obama, the number of cases increased to 15 in 2016, his last full year in office. The number of cases doubled to 30 in 2017 under President Donald Trump and is expected to be higher this year.

Immigration activists and attorneys have said they fear the plan is to scare immigrants. They said the measures could affect people who committed fraud decades ago.

"I'm worried that people who have been citizens for a long time will now be targeted for denaturalization, and that the effort to defend against a federal denaturalization claim is so expensive that people will just give up," Matthew Hoppock, a Kansas City immigration lawyer who has been following the changes in denaturalization policy, told the Herald in July.

Hoppock was referring to cases such as that of Norma Borgono, a 63-year-old Peruvian woman who has lived in Miami for 28 years.

Borgono was sentenced in 2012 to one year of house arrest and four years of probation for her involvement in a $24 million fraud a decade ago. As secretary of an export and import company called Texon Inc., she prepared documents for her boss, who pocketed money from loans fraudulently received from the U.S. Export-Import Bank. Borgono did not profit from the fraud and cooperated with the authorities in the investigation.

Borgono, who has a rare kidney disease, served her sentence and paid the restitution of $5,000 little by little. But this year, a week after the birth of her granddaughter, she received a letter from the federal government warning her that they are seeking to revoke her citizenship and deport her to Peru.

The government alleges that she naturalized after the fraudulent operation began. Although she had not been charged when she petitioned for citizenship, the Justice Department now argues that Borgono lied by not disclosing her illegal activities in the application.

Borgono's lawyers argue that the case represents an abuse of federal officials' discretion in filing cases of "denaturalization."

The USCIS said in a statement to the Herald that people who has used a false identity to naturalize shouldn't be surprised to be referred to the Department of Justice to withdraw their citizenship.

"We go to great lengths to ensure individuals aren't susceptible to instances of error, misunderstanding, or special circumstances," the statement said.

___

(Reporters Adiel Kaplan and Johanna A. Alvarez contributed with this report.)

Visit Miami Herald at www.miamiherald.com

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/na...s-of-cases-under-review/ar-BBLYPan?ocid=ientp
 

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Detained Dads: ICE Re-Separated Our Families as Punishment

The Daily Beast
By Scott Bixby
2 hrs ago



Attorneys for more than a dozen immigrant fathers currently being held at a Texas detention center say their clients were re-separated from their children last week as punishment for protesting their treatment at the hands of the government.

In a conference call organized by Refugee and Immigrant Center for Education and Legal Services (RAICES), three of those men and one boy told reporters that the unexplained re-separation was a terrifying indicator that their court-ordered reunification can be ended at any time, and for any reason.

“I could not imagine being separated from my child again, without being able to say goodbye,” one father said tearfully in Spanish, through an interpreter. “It was as if we were criminals.”

The incident began around midday on Wednesday, when armed officers with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement began arresting fathers currently detained at the Karnes Family Residential Center in Karnes City, Texas. The Karnes facility currently houses roughly 630 immigrant men and their sons who were separated under the Trump administration’s “zero-tolerance” immigration policy, before being reunited by order of a federal judge.

Sixteen fathers in total were handcuffed, re-separated from their children and were taken to the South Texas Detention Complex in Pearsall, Texas, more than 90 minutes away.

“They told me ‘hands up’ and handcuffed us as a criminal, as if I was ‘El Chapo’ Guzman,” one father said, in reference to the infamous kingpin of the Sinaloa drug cartel. “They took us out without giving us any information—they waited for our kids to be in the school to do this to us.”

Some of the fathers told reporters that they were not told where they were going, or what was happening to their children.

“I was told, ‘no more questions for you,’” another father said.

Meanwhile, the men’s children were placed in two separate rooms, with no information about where their fathers had been sent—or whether, only weeks after being reunited, they would ever see them again.

“I cried the whole day, and I knew that my dad was crying,” one boy, under ten years told, told reporters through an interpreter. “I saw the other kids crying, and they knew that their dads would be crying as well.”

All of the men who were re-separated are currently pursuing legal resident status in the United States, including many who have sought asylum status. Illegally entering the United States to pursue an asylum claim is not grounds for dismissing such a claim.

When RAICES attorney Ryan Clough demanded to know why the fathers had been re-separated from their children, he was initially told that the men and their children didn’t want to “go with the flow.”

“We originally just got an email from an ICE officer... saying it was due to quote unquote ‘disruptive behavior,’” Clough told reporters, which purportedly included refusing to participate in activities, eat meals and attend classes.

Nine of the 16 fathers who were re-separated from their children were allegedly planning to go on a hunger strike in protest of their conditions and in the hope of expediting their immigration and asylum cases, with some of their sons planning a similar protest by refusing to attend school at the detention center.

“A handful of the dads that were transferred were the dads that were most vocal with their distrust and dissatisfaction with the situation that they were in,” said RAICES legal assistant Maria Osornio.

Others, RAICES legal assistant Casey Miller told reporters, were merely relaxing in their rooms after a morning of English classes. “They were in their rooms, just laying on their beds,” Miller said of two fathers who were handcuffed and re-separated from their sons.

In that context, the unexplained re-separations “strongly seem to suggest for retaliation for otherwise perfectly lawful peaceful protest,” Clough said.

Three weeks after the expiration of a federal judge’s deadline to reunite hundreds of immigrant families who separated in violation of their due-process rights under the Trump administration’s “zero-tolerance” immigration policy, those still being held in government custody have begun protesting the slow pace of their asylum cases. At the beginning of the month, hundreds of men detained at Karnes announced that they would go on strike in hopes of expediting their asylum and immigration cases. ICE has characterized the strikes as a few “sit-ins.”

“ICE has consistently claimed that family detention facilities are humane and civil in nature, even comparing them to summer camps,” said Osornio. However, she noted, “summer camps do not get stormed by armed guards who arrest their campers and separate them from their children solely to retaliate against non-violent protest.”

In a statement provided to The Daily Beast, ICE spokesperson Nina Pruneda said that roughly 40 men at the Karnes detention facility “were involved in a disturbance,” and that it had deployed law enforcement “to control the situation.”

After noting without elaboration that 16 adult residents were held overnight at Pearsall, ICE stated that the fathers have since been reunited with their children, and that “no one was injured during this incident.”

But the trauma of separating the families a second time, RAICES lawyers cautioned, may already be done.

“It’s very difficult to see grown men crying,” Miller told reporters. “Everyone I met, the men at some point broke down in tears… there’s a lot of fear, there’s a lot of sadness, and there’s a lot of anger.”

Each of the three fathers on the call ended their stories with a plea to the American people: help us.

“It’s unjust,” one father said. “Please, whatever authority you have, please help us.”

Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast here

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/de...-families-as-punishment/ar-BBMa2xt?ocid=ientp
 

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Sarah Sanders salutes her boss and under-fire ICE agency for deportation of 'despicable' 95-year-old former SS member and Nazi concentration camp guard saying Trump 'got the job done!'

  • Jakiw Palij has been arrested and deported by US immigration authorities
  • Palij left on a plane from Teterboro Airport in New Jersey on Monday evening
  • He immigrated to the US in 1949 and become a US citizen eight years later
  • White House Press Secretary tweeted about the deportation Tuesday
  • She credited Trump and ICE, an agency some Democrats called to abolish over child separation policy and other enforcement measures
  • Her tweet didn't mention the Justice or State Departments, which also were involved
  • White House organizing a press call to tout the deportation where an ICE official said it 'required a whole of government approach'
  • Trump held a White House event heralding ICE
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...-deportation-despicable-former-SS-member.html
 

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Trump ties midterms to immigration, warning Democrats will bring 'crime and open borders' while Republicans will bring 'safety and strength'

  • Immigration was one of the issues that helped elect Donald Trump in 2016
  • It's an issue the president returns to time and time again at his campaign rallies and in his tweets
  • It's also a rallying cry for President Trump's base, who he will need to come to the polls in November in order to help elect Republican lawmakers
  • Trump on immigration: 'I think we're going to do very good in the midterms, and I think this is one of the big reasons'
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...emocrats-bring-crime-GOP-brings-strength.html
 

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'You hate us so much, but you have us here': Three undocumented immigrants open up about working inside the Trump International Hotel in D.C.

  • An undocumented immigrant had the chance to meet Trump as a result of working at the BLT By David Burke restaurant inside a Trump Hotel in D.C.
  • Three undocumented workers spoke to Univision about how easy it was to gain employment with one of the top steakhouses near the White House
  • Although the restaurant said they followed strict hiring practices, the workers claimed they were never asked to show proof of their legal statuses
  • 'The documentation part was easy. They didn't tell me anything at any moment'
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...ented-immigrants-working-Trumps-hotel-DC.html
 

Joe King

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the workers claimed they were never asked to show proof of their legal statuses
Probably because they did, they'd be afraid of being accused of discrimination?
The documentation part was easy.
If they were never asked for proof (documentation) how could it have not been easy? Or do they really mean that the fake documents they presented were never questioned?
 

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Iowa murder draws attention to agriculture industry's hiring of undocumented immigrants

USA Today
Alan Gomez
4 hrs ago

Dane Lang, a co-owner of Yarrabee Farms outside of Brooklyn, Iowa, stood outside his family farm this week and lamented that he had employed the undocumented immigrant charged in the murder of 20-year-old Mollie Tibbetts.

Then he was asked if any other non-U.S. citizens were among the 10 employees on the dairy farm.

"I don't think I can comment to that," Lang said.

That vague answer highlights the worst-kept secret in the agriculture business: roughly half of the nation's 1.4 million field workers (47 percent, or 685,000 workers) are undocumented immigrants. And that estimate, from the Labor Department, is a conservative one with labor experts citing far higher percentages.

While presidents have approached undocumented immigrants living in the U.S. in vastly different ways, Republicans and Democratic administrations — under heavy lobbying from the agricultural industry — have always treated undocumented farm workers differently.

While the federal government was herding more than 100,000 Japanese immigrants into internment camps during World War II, it was also administering the Bracero Program, which allowed millions of Mexicans to enter the U.S. to work on farms.

When President Ronald Reagan signed a landmark immigration law in 1986 that granted amnesty to nearly 3 million undocumented immigrants, those who worked on farms were given the easiest path to U.S. citizenship.

A bipartisan immigration reform bill that passed the Senate (but not the House) in 2013 would have created a special "blue card" just for agricultural workers and their immediate families that granted them legal status and the chance to become U.S. citizens.

And now, many Republicans are citing Tibbetts' death as a reason to pass a bill requiring all U.S. companies to use the federal E-Verify system to check the immigration status of all job applicants. But even that bill — the Legal Workforce Act filed by Rep. Lamar Smith, R-Texas — gives farmers 2.5 years before they must start vetting their field workers, the only such exception.

Chris Chmielenski, deputy director of NumbersUSA, a group that advocates for lower levels of legal and illegal immigration, said that history reflects both the power of the agricultural industry, and the willingness of politicians to help them out.

He says the easiest solution would be to require that all U.S. business use E-Verify, which allows employers to check the immigration status of job applicants using a government website. The Iowa farm that employed Cristhian Bahena Rivera, who is charged with first-degree murder in Tibbetts' death, initially said they used that program to screen Rivera, but later backtracked and conceded that they had used a different system not designed to flag immigration violations.

"That would have a pretty big impact on future flows of illegal immigration," Chmielenski said.

But farmers, ranchers, and other business owners who rely on undocumented immigrants say passing an E-Verify bill would cripple their industries. Already struggling to recruit enough Americans to do the back-breaking field work, and operating under the constant threat of raids by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, they say implementing E-Verify with no other changes to the immigration system would put untold numbers of companies out of business.

That's why the U.S. Chamber of Commerce said that it would only support mandatory electronic worker verification if it's coupled with an overhaul, and expansion, of the country's guest worker programs. The American Farm Bureau Federation goes a step further, arguing that passing E-Verify alone would cause production to drop by $60 billion and food prices to increase by 5 to 6 percent.

"Farmers and ranchers get that we have immigration laws in our country, and they want nothing more than to be able to attain their workers legally," said John-Walt Boatright, the national affairs coordinator for the Florida Farm Bureau. "But we cannot have E-Verify without a workable, functioning, accessible guest work program in place."

Farmers across the country saw exactly what would happen if the government took an enforcement-only approach after Arizona passed an anti-immigration bill in 2010, leading a half-dozen states to follow suit. The laws, which included the requirement that all businesses use the E-Verify system, sent undocumented immigrants out of those states in droves.

Alabama's immigration law pushed up to 80,000 workers out of the state, according to a study conducted by the University of Alabama.

Georgia's immigration law led to more than $140 million in unharvested crops in 2011 because so many workers fled the state, according to a report commissioned by the Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association.

The fleeing workers in Arizona resulted in an average 2 percent drop in the state's gross domestic product every year through 2015, according to an analysis conducted by The Wall Street Journal.

Finding American workers to make up for the shortfall was just as difficult. In Georgia, Gov. Republican Nathan Deal turned to people on probation in 2011, but most walked off the jobs almost immediately.

That same year in North Carolina, as 489,000 people were unemployed statewide, the North Carolina Growers Association listed 6,500 available jobs, but just 268 North Carolinians applied, 163 showed up for work, and only seven finished the season, according to a study by the Partnership for a New American Economy.

The solution, according to farmers, is a nationwide guest worker program that improves on the current H2A visa program that has been a headache for farmers for decades.

Those visas are designed for temporary, seasonal workers, and have been used more frequently in recent years. The number of H2A visas approved has increased from 74,192 in 2013 to 161,583 in 2017, according to State Department data.

"That doesn't mean it's a great program," he said. "It just means it's the only program."

Boatright said the H2A program is too rigid to accommodate the unpredictable timing of harvests. He said it's overloaded with too many regulations that often requires farms to have immigration attorneys on staff just to fill out paperwork. And because the visas cannot be used for year-round workers, Boatright said it makes dairies, nurseries, and livestock ranches ineligible.

Chmielenski said his organization, which can successfully pressure Washington by activating its network of thousands of supporters to flood congressional offices with calls, emails, and Tweets, is willing to consider a tandem bill that includes mandatory E-Verify with improvements to the agricultural guest worker program. And that, in the end, may be the only way to get a bill through Congress.

"We acknowledge the fact that H2A could be cleaned up," he said. "We're willing to work with them on that and to give them a pool of foreign workers they can tap into when there's not an American worker willing to do that for a decent wage."

https://www.goldismoney2.com/threads/immigration-trumps-wall.130894/page-20
 

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When the incentives stop and the penalties increase for all involved including Mexico then a wall that was paid for during the Reagan amnesty dupe will not be needed.
Mr. 3d chess master cannot figure that out but millions of regular Joes have.
Like to see the kick backs from contractors for this fence building bs.
 

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Toddler girl dies after catching a lung infection while held by ICE in Texas detention center alongside her mother

  • Mariee was 21 months old when she died in May, weeks after she was released
  • She developed a cough and a 104 F fever while at the Dilley detention center
  • The child lost 2 pounds - nearly eight percent of her body weight - there as well
  • Day after release she went to the ER and suffered irreversible brain damage
  • Law firm accuses ICE of releasing Mariee without medical treatment, guidance
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6103977/Law-firm-criticizes-ICE-toddlers-death-release.html
 

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Trump vows his border wall WILL be paid for by Mexico, prompting immediate denial from them that 'we will NEVER pay for a wall'

  • 'The wall will be paid for very easily, by Mexico,' President Trump said
  • He made his declaration one day after he signed a trade deal with Mexico
  • But Mexico's Secretary of Foreign Affairs tweeted an almost immediate denial
  • 'We will NEVER pay for a wall,' Luis Videgaray Caso wrote
  • Trump's border wall is estimated to cost $25 billion
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...d-Mexico-prompting-immediate-denial-them.html
 

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Immigration officials arrest 150 workers in massive raid on Texas trailer manufacturer

NYDN
15 hrs ago

Immigration and Customs Enforcement arrested 150 undocumented immigrants working at a Texas-based trailer company Tuesday in one of the largest workplace raids in the last 10 years.

The raid was part of an ongoing criminal Homeland Security Investigation into Load Trail, a trailer-manufacturing business in Sumner, Texas.

The investigation began when HSI received tips that the company had knowingly hired undocumented immigrants, and that the illegal workers were using fraudulent identification documents, ICE said in a press release.

“Businesses that knowingly hire illegal aliens create an unfair advantage over their competing businesses,” said Special Agent in Charge Katrina Berger. “In addition, they take jobs away from U.S. citizens and legal residents, and they create an atmosphere poised for exploiting their illegal workforce.”

The administrative arrests were made as part of a joint enforcement action led by HSI — the federal law enforcement agency responsible for enforcing the 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act.

Arrested parties will be interviewed and “all illegal aliens encountered will be fingerprinted and processed for removal from the United States,” the press release said.

Berger emphasized the scope of the raid.

“It’s a big deal. This is probably one of the larger, single-site worksite operations in the last 10 years,” she said.

She said it could take months, or even years for the agency to complete its criminal investigation.

A criminal search warrant was issued but no criminal arrests were made Tuesday, Berger said.

“We are still collecting and vetting data,” she said, adding that “the administrative arrests are just one part of our criminal investigation.”

Berger insisted that significant planning went into the operation to make sure “the people we are administratively arresting are humanely treated or well-treated throughout the entire event.”

Load Trail was founded in 1996 and employs about 500 people on its 100-acre site, according to the company’s website.

An ICE report shows that in 2014, the company was fined $445,000 for hiring more than 179 unauthorized workers.

Dennis Perry, a current Load Trail employee, said armed agents moved in from “every corner” Tuesday.

“They drew their guns and told everyone to hit the ground,” he told The Dallas News.

He said some workers searched for cover and were tackled.

HSI set up a hotline for detainee’s family members to identify their detention location, status, and the removal process.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/im...as-trailer-manufacturer/ar-BBMzKZ1?ocid=ientp
 

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U.S. is denying passports to Americans along the border, throwing their citizenship into question

Washington Post
Kevin Sieff
2 hrs ago


PHARR, Tex. —On paper, he’s a devoted U.S. citizen.

His official American birth certificate shows he was delivered by a midwife in Brownsville, at the southern tip of Texas. He spent his life wearing American uniforms: three years as a private in the Army, then as a cadet in the Border Patrol and now as a state prison guard.

But when Juan, 40, applied to renew his U.S. passport this year, the government’s response floored him. In a letter, the State Department said it didn’t believe he was an American citizen.

As he would later learn, Juan is one of a growing number of people whose official birth records show they were born in the United States but who are now being denied passports — their citizenship suddenly thrown into question. The Trump administration is accusing hundreds, and possibly thousands, of Hispanics along the border of using fraudulent birth certificates since they were babies, and it is undertaking a widespread crackdown.

In a statement, the State Department said that it “has not changed policy or practice regarding the adjudication of passport applications,” adding that “the U.S.-Mexico border region happens to be an area of the country where there has been a significant incidence of citizenship fraud.”

But cases identified by The Washington Post and interviews with immigration attorneys suggest a dramatic shift in both passport issuance and immigration enforcement.

In some cases, passport applicants with official U.S. birth certificates are being jailed in immigration detention centers and entered into deportation proceedings. In others, they are stuck in Mexico, their passports suddenly revoked when they tried to reenter the United States. As the Trump administration attempts to reduce both legal and illegal immigration, the government’s treatment of passport applicants in South Texas shows how U.S. citizens are increasingly being swept up by immigration enforcement agencies.

Juan said he was infuriated by the government’s response. “I served my country. I fought for my country,” he said, speaking on the condition that his last name not be used so that he wouldn’t be targeted by immigration enforcement.

The government alleges that from the 1950s through the 1990s, some midwives and physicians along the Texas-Mexico border provided U.S. birth certificates to babies who were actually born in Mexico. In a series of federal court cases in the 1990s, several birth attendants admitted to providing fraudulent documents.

Based on those suspicions, the State Department during the George W. Bush and Barack Obama administrations denied passports to people who were delivered by midwives in Texas’s Rio Grande Valley. The use of midwives is a long-standing tradition in the region, in part because of the cost of hospital care.

The same midwives who provided fraudulent birth certificates also delivered thousands of babies legally in the United States. It has proved nearly impossible to distinguish between legitimate and illegitimate documents, all of them officially issued by the state of Texas decades ago.

A 2009 government settlement in a case litigated by the American Civil Liberties Union seemed to have mostly put an end to the passport denials. Attorneys reported that the number of denials declined during the rest of the Obama administration, and the government settled promptly when people filed complaints after being denied passports.

But under President Trump, the passport denials and revocations appear to be surging, becoming part of a broader interrogation into the citizenship of people who have lived, voted and worked in the United States for their entire lives.

“We’re seeing these kind of cases skyrocketing,” said Jennifer Correro, an attorney in Houston who is defending dozens of people who have been denied passports.

In its statement, the State Department said that applicants “who have birth certificates filed by a midwife or other birth attendant suspected of having engaged in fraudulent activities, as well as applicants who have both a U.S. and foreign birth certificate, are asked to provide additional documentation establishing they were born in the United States.”

“Individuals who are unable to demonstrate that they were born in the United States are denied issuance of a passport,” the statement said.

When Juan, the former soldier, received a letter from the State Department telling him it wasn’t convinced that he was a U.S. citizen, it requested a range of obscure documents — evidence of his mother’s prenatal care, his baptismal certificate, rental agreements from when he was a baby.

He managed to find some of those documents but weeks later received another denial. In a letter, the government said the information “did not establish your birth in the United States.”

“I thought to myself, you know, I’m going to have to seek legal help,” said Juan, who earns $13 an hour as a prison guard and expects to pay several thousand dollars in legal fees.


In a case last August, a 35-year-old Texas man with a U.S. passport was interrogated while crossing back into Texas from Mexico with his son at the McAllen-Hidalgo-Reynosa International Bridge, connecting Reynosa, Mexico, to McAllen, Tex.

His passport was taken from him, and Customs and Border Protection agents told him to admit that he was born in Mexico, according to documents later filed in federal court. He refused and was sent to the Los Fresnos Detention Center and entered into deportation proceedings.

He was released three days later, but the government scheduled a deportation hearing for him in 2019. His passport, which had been issued in 2008, was revoked.

Attorneys say these cases, where the government’s doubts about an official birth certificate lead to immigration detention, are increasingly common. “I’ve had probably 20 people who have been sent to the detention center — U.S. citizens,” said Jaime Diez, an attorney in Brownsville.

Diez represents dozens of U.S. citizens who were denied their passports or had their passports suddenly revoked. Among them are soldiers and Border Patrol agents. In some cases, Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents have arrived at his clients’ homes without notice and taken passports away.

The State Department says that even though it may deny someone a passport, that does not necessarily mean that the individual will be deported. But it leaves them in a legal limbo, with one arm of the U.S. government claiming they are not an American and the prospect that immigration agents could follow up on their case.

It’s difficult to know where the crackdown fits into the Trump administration’s broader efforts to reduce legal and illegal immigration. Over the past year, it has thrown legal permanent residents out of the military and formed a denaturalization task force that tries to identify people who might have lied on decades-old citizenship applications.

Now, the administration appears to be taking aim at a broad group of Americans along the stretch of the border where Trump has promised to build his wall, where he directed the deployment of National Guardsmen, and where the majority of cases in which children were separated from their parents during the administration’s “zero tolerance” policy occurred.

The State Department would not say how many passports it has denied to people along the border because of concerns about fraudulent birth certificates. The government has also refused to provide a list of midwives whom it considers to be suspicious.

Lawyers along the border say that it isn’t just those delivered by midwives who are being denied.


Babies delivered by Jorge Treviño, one of the regions most well-known gynecologists, are also being denied. When he died in 2015, the McAllen Monitor wrote in his obituary that Treviño had delivered 15,000 babies.

It’s unclear why babies delivered by Treviño are being targeted, and the State Department did not comment on individual birth attendants. Diez, the attorney, said the government has an affidavit from an unnamed Mexican doctor who said that Treviño’s office provided at least one fraudulent birth certificate for a child born in Mexico.

One of the midwives who was accused of providing fraudulent birth certificates in the 1990s admitted in an interview that in two cases, she accepted money to provide fake documents. She said she helped deliver 600 babies in South Texas, many of them now being denied passports. Those birth certificates were issued by the state of Texas, with the midwife’s name listed under “birth attendant.”

“I know that they are suffering now, but it’s out of my control,” she said, speaking on the condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of her admission.

For those who have received passport denials from the government, it affects not only their travel plans but their sense of identity as Americans.

One woman who has been denied, named Betty, said she had tried to get a passport to visit her grandfather as he was dying in Mexico. She went to a passport office in Houston, where government officials denied her request and questioned whether she had been born in the United States.

“You’re getting questioned on something so fundamentally you,” said Betty, who spoke on the condition her last name not be used because of concerns about immigration enforcement.

The denials are happening at a time when Trump has been lobbying for stricter federal voter identification rules, which would presumably affect the same people who are now being denied passports — almost all of them Hispanic, living in a heavily Democratic sliver of Texas.

“That’s where it gets scary,” Diez said.

For now, passport applicants who are able to afford the legal costs are suing the federal government over their passport denials. Typically, the applicants eventually win those cases, after government attorneys raise a series of sometimes bizarre questions about their birth.

“For a while, we had attorneys asking the same question: ‘Do you remember when you were born?’ ” Diez said. “I had to promise my clients that it wasn’t a trick question.”

kevin.sieff@washpost.com

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/us...tizenship-into-question/ar-BBMCBPS?ocid=ientp
 

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Backlogs in U.S. immigration courts are up 38 percent since Trump took office, with the biggest increases in Maryland, Massachusetts and Georgia

  • U.S. immigration courts have had a 38 percent increase in case backlog since President Trump took office
  • Nationwide, there are 746,049 pending cases before 351 immigration judges, up from 542,411 in January 2017
  • The Department of Justice has recently hired 23 new judges and streamlined the process for hiring judges, but many experts say other Trump administration policy changes continue to exacerbate the system
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...tion-courts-38-percent-Trump-took-office.html
 

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'Build bridges, not walls': Father of Mollie Tibbetts hits back at politicians for trying to use his daughter's murder to 'advance racist views' one day after Donald Trump Jr wrote an op-ed blaming Democrats for her death

  • Rob Tibbets wrote an op-ed published on Saturday in an Iowa newspaper
  • In the column, he slammed politicians for using the death of his daughter, Mollie Tibbetts, to 'advance racist views'
  • He ended the piece by calling on Americans to 'build bridges, not walls'
  • It comes after Donald Trump Jr penned a column on Friday in the same paper in which he slammed liberals
  • He said Democrats have downplayed the illegal alien status of her alleged killer
  • Cristhian Rivera, from Mexico, was charged last Tuesday in Tibbetts's murder
  • Other conservatives were also quick to point out Rivera's illegal status in their commentary of the murder
  • Tibbetts's cousin, Sam Lucas, lashed out at those conservatives last Wednesday, accusing them of using her death as 'political propaganda'

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...-Jr-writes-op-ed-blaming-Democrats-death.html
 

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'Build bridges, not walls': Father of Mollie Tibbetts hits back at politicians for trying to use his daughter's murder to 'advance racist views' one day after Donald Trump Jr wrote an op-ed blaming Democrats for her death

  • Rob Tibbets wrote an op-ed published on Saturday in an Iowa newspaper
  • In the column, he slammed politicians for using the death of his daughter, Mollie Tibbetts, to 'advance racist views'
  • He ended the piece by calling on Americans to 'build bridges, not walls'
  • It comes after Donald Trump Jr penned a column on Friday in the same paper in which he slammed liberals
  • He said Democrats have downplayed the illegal alien status of her alleged killer
  • Cristhian Rivera, from Mexico, was charged last Tuesday in Tibbetts's murder
  • Other conservatives were also quick to point out Rivera's illegal status in their commentary of the murder
  • Tibbetts's cousin, Sam Lucas, lashed out at those conservatives last Wednesday, accusing them of using her death as 'political propaganda'

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...-Jr-writes-op-ed-blaming-Democrats-death.html

There's some serious cognitive dissonance goin' on there.
....and merely pointing out the facts of the case is not propaganda. It's called communicating the truth about a matter or situation. Ie: what the news is supposed to do.
 

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Nearly 500 immigrant children still haven't been reunited with parents
Nearly 500 immigrant children separated at the Southern U.S. border still haven't been reunited with their parents more than two months after Trump signed an order ending the practice

  • The Trump administration separated 2,654 migrant children from their parents during a zero-tolerance immigration policy enforced at the Southern U.S. border
  • President Trump signed an executive order on June 20 to end family separations
  • However 497 children remain separated from their parents - and 22 are under 5
  • Of those, 322 children - or 65 percent - have parents who are outside of the country, in some cases after officials deported them without their children
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...migrant-children-havent-reunited-parents.html
 

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Sanctuary
Philly.com


Published on Sep 5, 2018
Two more families take sanctuary in a church in Philadelphia.
 

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Trump plans to sidestep limits on detaining immigrant children
Trump administration plans to sidestep limits on detaining immigrant children indefinitely

  • The Trump administration is proposing a new rule that would bypass court-imposed restrictions on detaining immigrant children for more than 20 days
  • The change is likely to face legal challenges from immigrant rights activists
  • The proposal would allow ICE to establish more family detention facilities where immigrant parents and children could be held together for longer periods
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...etaining-immigrant-children-indefinitely.html
 

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Arizona rancher films immigrants sneaking across the border onto his property
Build that wall: Arizona rancher supports Trump's campaign by sharing a 25-minute video of armed immigrants sneaking across his property into the US

  • John Chilton, 79, set up surveillance cameras on his Arizona ranch to show how many immigrants and drug mules sneak across the US-Mexico border
  • He said illegal immigrants use his 50,000 acre ranch as a gateway to the US
  • Some of the people caught on camera crossing the border are dressed in camouflage and brandishing guns
  • The rancher said most of the surveillance videos were filmed this year
  • Chilton is an outspoken Arizona backer of President Donald Trump's efforts to secure the US-Mexico border
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...ilms-immigrants-sneaking-border-property.html
 

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Atlanta Mayor orders city to end relationship with ICE and remove the agency's detainees from jail
Atlanta Mayor orders city to end relationship with ICE and remove ALL of the agency's detainees from jail

  • Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms ordered city to stop holding ICE detainees
  • She signed an executive order on Thursday and removed most detainees
  • As of Thursday evening just five detainees remained in the city jail, a major drop from 205 detainees counted in June
  • She said: 'We will no longer be complicit with a policy that intentionally inflicts misery on a vulnerable population'
  • In June the Democratic Mayor also signed a separate executive order that blocked the jail from taking in any new ICE detainees
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...anta-stop-holding-federal-detainees-jail.html
 

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What happened to Mexico? Are they still gonna buck it up?

Trump says he could use MILITARY to build his wall if Congress won't fund it through DHS
Trump says he could use the MILITARY to build his wall if Congress won't fund it through Homeland Security's budget - and he won't rule out another government shutdown to get his way

  • DailyMail.com asked the president on Air Force One if he was considering using the Army Corps of Engineers to build his border wall
  • Congress has been stingy with a Homeland Security budget for the project, providing barely $3 billion and leaving another $25 billion unfunded
  • Pentagon officials say the Corps of Engineers is suited to perform the work and Trump has boasted about budget increases he has won for the Pentagon
  • Trump says: 'We have two options: We have military, we have homeland security'
  • He also said he won't take a government shutdown off the table if Democrats on Capitol Hill keep playing hardball because of immigration politics
  • He believes a shutdown would be strategically and politically smart
  • But many Republican lawmakers are counseling patience because they fear being blamed for a shutdown in the final month of re-elecion campaigns
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...LITARY-build-wall-Congress-wont-fund-DHS.html
 

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Here's how the public can comment on Trump's border wall plan

USA Today
Beatriz Alvarado
13 hrs ago

Customs and Border Protection will extend the deadline for public input on the proposed construction of a border wall along the U.S.-Mexico border, about two months after a coalition of 40 organizations requested the agency allow more time for feedback.

The coalition of conservation, human rights, public interest, and faith-based organizations requested a 60-day extension in July for input on the project. The letter also encouraged the agency to host a series of public comment forums in the areas where the border wall would be built.

Customs and Border Protection announced Friday it would take public input via email through Nov. 6, a news release states. Comments, questions, or concerns can be emailed to CBP at commentsenv@cbp.dhs.gov.

The agency is extending the input period "based on the feedback received as part of its earlier outreach," the release states.

Earlier this year, the agency sent a letter to select residents and organizations requesting public input, but did not publish a public notice, the coalition's letter reads. The groups expressed concern that the solicitation for public comment didn't meet the standards for public consultation that the National Environmental Policy Act sets.

The groups also said the original comment period was “not adequate” and the agency had “distributed this notice in a manner inconsistent with transparent and informed decision-making.”

"CBP’s 30-day comment period, without even a single public meeting, strongly suggests a lack of sincere interest in obtaining thoughtful comments and broad engagement with the diverse constituencies affected by border barrier construction," the letter states.

The area of proposed construction spans about 33 miles and bisects numerous National Wildlife Refuge tracts, Bentsen-Rio Grande Valley State Park, Roma and La Lomita National Historic Districts, and dozens, if not hundreds, of private properties, the letter states.

THE WALL - an in-depth investigation into Donald Trump's border wall

Input is welcome on the potential border wall's impact on the environment, culture, and commerce, including potential socioeconomic impacts, and quality of life, the agency release states. The agency also will conduct environmental site surveys and assessments and is gathering data and input from state and local government agencies, federal agencies, Native American tribes, and landowners that may be affected by or otherwise have an interest in the construction projects.

"Helpful comments are fact-based, include links to data or research, and provide specific information concerning potential impacts to biological, cultural, and natural resources," the release states. "If known, your response should include any state and local restrictions, permitting or other requirements that CBP should consider during project siting, construction, and operation."

Last month, the U.S. Government Accountability Office published a report describing testing and evaluation methods used, as well as a summary of some of the findings, according to the Arizona Republic.

More: Trump's border wall prototypes fail design requirements and are riddled with deficiencies

The report points to structural issues in the design or with the construction of eight prototypes that were erected in a hilly area on the outskirts of San Diego, California.

On Wednesday, President Donald Trump threatened to shut down the government over funding for his border wall right before the midterm elections.

More: GOP leaders to Trump: Don't shut down government over wall funding right before midterm elections

The government runs out of money Sept. 30 at the end of the nation's fiscal year. Lawmakers in both chambers have passed appropriations bills in small clusters to get funding locked in for as many agencies as possible, according to reports. Then they hope to pass a short-term funding bill — known as a continuing resolution — to keep the leftover agencies funded at the current level while they continue to hammer out a solution.

Beatriz Alvarado (@CallerBetty) | Twitter
FY18 RGV Border Construction Projects Request for Input by Beatriz Alvarado on Scribd

Related coverage:
More: Trump's border wall prototypes fail design requirements and are riddled with deficiencies
More: GOP leaders to Trump: Don't shut down government over wall funding right before midterm elections

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world...trumps-border-wall-plan/ar-BBN3vGo?ocid=ientp
 

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Border patrol officers discover 55 illegal immigrants sealed inside a tractor trailer
Border patrol officers pull over driver at checkpoint and discover 55 illegal immigrants sealed inside a tractor trailer with temperatures inside pushing 100F

  • Agents rescued 55 immigrants from a tractor-trailer north of Laredo in Texas
  • Conditions inside were potentially lethal with temperatures nearly 100 degrees
  • The driver, who was a US citizen, was arrested and the tractor-trailer was seized
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...immigrants-sealed-inside-tractor-trailer.html
 

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US is now holding FIVE TIMES more illegal immigrant children in detention centers than they did in May 2017, even though courts have banned the separation of families

  • Department of Homeland Security said 12,774 people who crossed the border as families without immigration documents were taken into custody last month.
  • That number is the highest ever for a month of August, officials said Wednesday
  • The number jumped after US courts ordered the administration to stop separating immigrant children from their parents for lengthy periods
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...xican-border-despite-Trump-crackdown-DHS.html
 

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Police Are Still Working With ICE In Sanctuary Cities (HBO)
VICE News


Published on Sep 13, 2018
CHICAGO — When U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement arrested Irma Rodríguez-González, a cashier at a mini-mart in Chicago, at her work in August, they weren't weren’t acting alone. They were brought there by officers from the Chicago Police Department.

"When they were taking my information, I heard someone say that Homeland [Security] was there," Rodríguez-González said. "[The ICE agent] asked me to show him my green card. And I said that, well, that I didn't have one."

Rodríguez-González has lived in the U.S. for 25 years. She has three American-born children and no criminal record. And her arrest — executed by ICE but directly facilitated by the police — is exactly the kind of thing that’s not supposed to happen in a sanctuary city like Chicago, which prides itself on trying to be “the most immigrant friendly city in the country.”

So how did her arrest come to pass?

In Chicago, as in many other major sanctuary cities, the police still routinely work on joint task forces with Homeland Security Investigations, the unit of ICE that investigates transnational crimes. Typically, these task forces target suspected gang members or terrorists. In Chicago, the operation that netted Rodríguez-González focused on stores suspected of selling fake sports jerseys and other counterfeit goods.

Under the Trump administration, ICE is above all a deportation force, and its agents are under orders to detain any undocumented person they encounter in the course of their work — regardless of whether they’re suspected of a crime.

That’s what happened to Rodríguez-Gonzalez. But in spite of this fact, Democratic officials — even those who are among the biggest champions of sanctuary policy — are unwilling to sever the ties their police departments preserve with ICE. And that has neighborhood residents on edge.

"If I feel that calling the police is going to lead to my detention or my family's detention, why would I do that?" said Eréndira Randón, a DACA recipient that works at a nonprofit that helps immigrants in the community.

Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News

Check out VICE News for more: http://vicenews.com
 

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A second front in the immigration 'resistance'


By Andrea Castillo, Los Angeles Times


PINOLE, Calif. - When it comes to fighting the Trump administration's immigration policies, California has two "resistances." There's the official one, conducted by politicians, that includes the state's landmark "sanctuary" law.

Then there's the unofficial resistance, which includes people like Ann and Kent Moriarty.

In July, the couple got a call from an immigrant advocacy group about an asylum seeker who had spent seven months at an Irvine detention facility. The woman had just been granted a $15,000 bond and needed a place to stay. The Moriartys took in Veronica Aguilar, from El Salvador, and showed her around their Bay Area neighborhood.

They taught her how to navigate public transportation, where to get healthcare and how to sign up for English classes.

Ann Moriarty said her religious faith compels her to welcome strangers. But she said President Donald Trump's policies made it easier to do what she considered the right thing.

"We are responding to this elevation of hatred and meanness that feels like it is allowed now in this administration," she said. "It is unacceptable."

Since June, nearly 800 people around the country have pledged to offer housing through California-based Freedom for Immigrants. The organization has raised more than $100,000 this year to bond 50 immigrants, including Aguilar, out of detention. Immigrants eligible for release from detention must provide the address of a sponsor to immigration authorities.

Other organizations, including those associated with the sanctuary church movement, are also opening their doors to detained migrants in need of transitional housing.

"When the crisis of family separation hit the media and there was an outpouring of people who wanted to help - that's when we realized that we had an opportunity to really ask people to pledge more than monetary support," said cofounder Christina Mansfield. "The goal for us is to show that, if given the power, communities are willing and capable of being part of the solution of ending immigration detention and providing more-humane alternatives."

The Moriartys are registered with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement as Aguilar's legal sponsors. Kent, who speaks fluent Spanish, works as a mechanical engineer, and Ann writes science curriculum at UC Berkeley. In the past, the couple has housed young unaccompanied minors as they aged out of foster care.

Aguilar's journey to California started when she fled her home just north of San Salvador.

At age 20, she said, six months into her relationship with a man from her community, he shot and killed someone. She said she hadn't known he was a gang member or that she was pregnant with his child.

While the man remained in prison, Aguilar said, members of his gang pressured her to maintain the relationship. She refused and assumed that was the end of it. Then two years ago, some of those gang members were released from prison and threatened to kill her.

Aguilar fled to her mother's house two hours northeast, but the gang members found her a year later. In October, she bought a bus ticket to the Guatemalan border with Mexico, leaving behind an 18-year-old daughter and her now 15-year-old son. From there, she joined a caravan of 300 migrants who sought U.S. asylum a month later at the border in San Ysidro.

In early May, an immigration judge denied Aguilar's application for asylum and ordered her deported, according to court documents. Judge Nathan Aina said she had failed to provide sufficient proof that she would likely be persecuted or tortured if returned to El Salvador.

While she awaits her appeal, Aguilar said, she knows she can count on the American family that embraced her.

"To me, they are family," Aguilar said. "This feels like my home."

In nearby Concord, Joe Schellenberg and Mieke VanHout got a call in early August from the lawyer of a detained Guinean man they had been preparing to host, saying that he couldn't be released. Within three days, the couple had 70 letters and signatures from members of their Unitarian church in support of the young man, who is seeking asylum.

The man, who asked that most details about his situation be kept confidential out fear for his safety, was released on a $5,000 bond a couple of weeks later.

Schellenberg and VanHout - retired and empty-nesters - have volunteered for years serving detainees and farmworkers. After Trump took office, they decided to get more involved with Freedom for Immigrants.

For VanHout, a former nurse, the idea of allowing a stranger to live with her stems from her youth.

"I really thought I could change the world," she said.

Her husband sees it more simply: "I miss my kids," he said. The Guinean man, a native French speaker, calls them "mom" and "dad" - a sign of respect common in his culture.

"My whole life has pretty much been white privilege," said Schellenberg, a former financial manager. But his own children exposed him to different cultures. One son married a Chinese woman, another a Venezuelan woman and another a Serbian woman, and his daughter's boyfriend is from Poland.

Immigrant advocates say there is a huge need for sponsors.

Earlier this year, Clergy and Laity United for Economic Justice started getting calls from lawyers with detained clients who were eligible for release but didn't have sponsors.

The Los Angeles-based advocacy organization, known as CLUE, has long been involved in the sanctuary movement, in which religious institutions shield immigrants in the country illegally from deportation by offering them refuge. ICE historically has avoided conducting enforcement at "sensitive" locations, including churches.

Now congregations that had already established themselves as places of sanctuary are opening their doors to asylum seekers and other migrants being released from detention.

One of those congregations is Pastor Maria Elena Montalvo's of Grace Evangelical Lutheran Church in Bell. But since the building lacks a shower, she is hosting a Salvadoran couple and their 2-year-old daughter in her Compton home.

Lourdes, 20, her 24-year-old husband, Raul, and their daughter, Nicolle, arrived at the border near Tijuana in March and requested asylum. The Times is not using their last name because they fear persecution. Lourdes and Nicolle were detained for a day and then released, while Raul spent four months at the Adelanto Detention Facility near Victorville.

Lourdes said she was raped by three gang members at age 11. Her mother had helped police prosecute the men and fled to Mexico in 2016 after they repeatedly threatened her and demanded money. Last year, one of the men was released from prison and wanted revenge, Lourdes said.

The day after his release, the gang member stopped Raul in the street and demanded to know where his mother-in-law had gone. He threatened to take Lourdes and "disappear" him and their daughter.

The family joined Lourdes' mother in Guadalajara within days.

But after less than a year, Lourdes' mother started receiving calls from the gang members telling her they knew where she was. The family fled again.

CLUE raised the $3,000 to bond Raul out of detention and connected the family with Montalvo. Now they go to church with her every Sunday.

The pastor said it's not the first time she's taken in a family, and it won't be the last.

"I always say I'm not going to get involved anymore," she said. "But it's impossible to say no, because otherwise, what purpose am I serving?"

Visit the Los Angeles Times at www.latimes.com

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/a-second-front-in-the-immigration-resistance/ar-BBNlwAp?ocid=ientp
 

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Heartbreaking video shows immigrant mother in tears over fears that ICE will arrest her, separate her children and then deport the family if they seek shelter during Hurricane Florence

  • Iris is a mother-of-three and undocumented immigrant living in a mandatory evacuation zone near Wilmington, North Carolina
  • She was afraid to go to a public shelter believing that ICE would be there and arrest her, separate her children and then deport the family
  • Her daughter had told her she feared their home would be destroyed, but would rather face death at home than possible separation
  • ICE had stated that it would not arrest people seeking shelter during Florence earlier in the week, but a number of immigrants do not trust that statement
  • Reports emerged earlier this year that ICE had been arresting known immigrants they had met during their relief efforts for Hurricane Harvey in 2017
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...-fears-ICE-arrest-goes-hurricane-shelter.html
 

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Another 1,500 unaccompanied immigrant children have been lost under the Trump administration

  • The Trump administration does not know the whereabouts of 1,488 immigrant children who were in its care after entering the country illegally - and alone
  • It's at least the second time this has been an issue: in April Department of Health and Human Services officials admitted they had lost 1,475 immigrant children
  • A bipartisan effort in the Senate is pushing for new legislation that would require greater oversight in how these children are placed and kept track of in the future

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...grant-children-lost-Trump-administration.html
 

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67 MILLION people living in the US do not speak English at home including half of Houston and New York City, study finds

  • California has the highest percentage of non-English speakers with 44 percent
  • In Los Angeles, 59 percent of the population does not speak English at home
  • The fewest is in West Virginia where the number is less than two percent
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6186563/67-million-people-living-US.html
 

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https://breaking911.com/border-patr...ccompanied-children-in-the-rio-grande-valley/

GRANJENO, Texas – U.S. Border Patrol agents assigned to the McAllen station encountered 170 illegal aliens comprised of family units and unaccompanied children.

Just after midnight, the group of 170 smuggled illegal aliens sought the first Border Patrol agents they could find to turn themselves in. The group required additional agents to respond and assist, leaving other areas of the river area vulnerable.

As agents prepared the group for transport, the criminal organizations took advantage of the limited resources and simultaneously attempted to smuggle multiple other groups whom actively attempted to evade apprehension.
 

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Trump says that seeing 'gorgeous wall' at Flight 93 memorial renewed his resolve to build stalled Mexican border wall when mourned 9/11 victims

  • Trump tells Hill.TV in interview that visit on 9/11 to Shanksville, PA, memorial at site of Flight 93 crashing inspired him to continue with his wall
  • 'They built this gorgeous wall where the plane went down in Pennsylvania, Shanksville,' he told outlet
  • Stalled border wall remains Trump priority but has no funding in the latest spending bill passed by the Senate and headed to the House for vote there
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...morial-renewed-resolve-build-border-wall.html
 

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'I thought I had lost all my family': Guatemalan father-of-two is reunited with his six-year-old son four months after being separated when they were picked up just inside the US border

  • Edgar Garcia and his six-year-old son Dylan were seeking to enter the United States in May without the required legal immigration documentation
  • Garcia and his son made it across the Rio Grande River and walked four hours in US territory before they were intercepted May 14 by Border Patrol agents
  • Garcia was immediately separated from his son and spent 14 days detained before he was deported to his native Guatemala
  • After four months, the family was reunited Wednesday in their home coutry
  • Dylan was put placed under the supervision of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (OFR)
  • In June, OFR sent Dylan to the Cayuga Centers in June, an NYC shelter that continues to house children separated under Trump's 'Zero Tolerance' policy

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...d-six-year-old-son-four-months-separated.html
 

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18 states, D.C., back challenge of U.S. asylum rules

NBC News
Dennis Romero
2 hrs ago


Eighteen states and the District of Columbia filed a friend-of-the-court brief Friday in Washington to bolster plaintiffs challenging a new U.S. policy that denies asylum to those claiming to be victims of gang or domestic violence.

The policy was previewed in early June by Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who wrote in a legal opinion that asylum cannot be a "redress for all misfortune."

"The mere fact that a country may have problems effectively policing certain crimes—such as domestic violence or gang violence—or that certain populations are more likely to be victims of crime cannot itself establish an asylum claim," he wrote.

It was widely seen as another element of the Trump administration's crackdown on south-of-the-border immigration. On Aug. 7 the ACLU filed a lawsuit, known as Grace v. Sessions, against the policy in federal court.

The plaintiff, whose full name was not revealed, said she was abused by her partner "and his violent gang member sons." But she was denied asylum on July 20 and detained in Texas.

On Friday, Attorney General Karl A. Racine of the District of Columbia said in a statement that the new policy "ignores decades of state, federal, and international law."

The friend-of-the-court filing states, "Federal law requires that all asylum claims be adjudicated on the particular facts and circumstances of the claim, and such a bar violates that principle."

The brief says women and children are disproportionately affected by the attorney general's new guidelines because they're far more likely to suffer from domestic abuse.

"While state, federal and international policies and laws have recognized this harm, the new U.S. Department of Justice policy unlawfully ignores this fact," Racine said in the statement.

The brief argues that federal courts have long recognized the need for asylum among migrants who have been abused by partners or victimized by gangs—a cohort sometimes associated with Central Americans seeking entry.

The filing cited data indicating that immigrants in general are good for state economies because they're more likely to be entrepreneurs and because they "supply necessary labor."

In other words, the states are claiming in the brief that Sessions' new policy is hurting their bottom line and "threatens the economic and social growth of states and localities all across the country."

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/18...enge-of-us-asylum-rules/ar-BBNGKbD?ocid=ientp
 

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because they "supply necessary labor."

In other words,.....
....they provide downward pressure on wages for everyone else.

The price of labor is based upon the supply of that labor and the demand for it. More workers able to the same job means the ones who get the job will receive less pay for it.
 

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Hundreds of Migrant Children Quietly Moved to a Tent Camp on the Texas Border

NYT
By CAITLIN DICKERSON
58 mins ago



In shelters from Kansas to New York, hundreds of migrant children have been roused in the middle of the night in recent weeks and loaded onto buses with backpacks and snacks for a cross-country journey to their new home: a barren tent city on a sprawling patch of desert in South Texas.

Until now, most undocumented children being held by federal immigration authorities had been housed in private foster homes or shelters, sleeping two or three to a room. They received formal schooling and regular visits with legal representatives assigned to their immigration cases.

But in the rows of sand-colored tents in Tornillo, Tex., children in groups of 20, separated by gender, sleep lined up in bunks. There is no school: The children are given workbooks that they have no obligation to complete. Access to legal services is limited.

These midnight voyages are playing out across the country, as the federal government struggles to find room for more than 13,000 detained migrant children — the largest population ever — whose numbers have increased more than fivefold since last year.

The average length of time that migrant children spend in custody has nearly doubled over the same period, from 34 days to 59, according to the Department of Health and Human Services, which oversees their care.

To deal with the surging shelter populations, which have hovered near 90 percent of capacity since May, a mass reshuffling is underway and shows no signs of slowing. Hundreds of children are being shipped from shelters to South Texas each week, totaling more than 1,600 so far.

The camp in Tornillo operates like a small, pop-up city, about 35 miles southeast of El Paso on the Mexico border, complete with portable toilets. Air-conditioned tents that vary in size are used for housing, recreation and medical care. Originally opened in June for 30 days with a capacity of 400, it expanded in September to be able to house 3,800, and is now expected to remain open at least through the end of the year.

“It is common to use influx shelters as done on military bases in the past, and the intent is to use these temporary facilities only as long as needed,” said Evelyn Stauffer, a spokeswoman for the Health and Human Services Department.

Ms. Stauffer said the need for the tent city reflected serious problems in the immigration system.

“The number of families and unaccompanied alien children apprehended are a symptom of the larger problem, namely a broken immigration system,” Ms. Stauffer said. “Their ages and the hazardous journey they take make unaccompanied alien children vulnerable to human trafficking, exploitation and abuse. That is why H.H.S. joins the president in calling on Congress to reform this broken system.”

But the mass transfers are raising alarm among immigrant advocates, who were already concerned about the lengthy periods of time migrant children are spending in federal custody.

The roughly 100 shelters that have, until now, been the main location for housing detained migrant children are licensed and monitored by state child welfare authorities, who impose requirements on safety and education as well as staff hiring and training.

The tent city in Tornillo, on the other hand, is unregulated, except for guidelines created by the Department of Health and Human Services. For example, schooling is not required there, as it is in regular migrant children shelters.

Mark Greenberg, who oversaw the care of migrant children under President Barack Obama, helped to craft the emergency shelter guidelines. He said the agency tried “to the greatest extent possible” to ensure that conditions in facilities like the one at Tornillo would mirror those in regular shelters, “but there are some ways in which that’s difficult or impossible to do.”

Several shelter workers, who spoke on condition of anonymity for fear of being fired, described what they said has become standard practice for moving the children: In order to avoid escape attempts, the moves are carried out late at night because children will be less likely to try to run away. For the same reason, children are generally given little advance warning that they will be moved.

At one shelter in the Midwest whose occupants were among those recently transferred to Tornillo, about two dozen children were given just a few hours’ notice last week before they were loaded onto buses — any longer than that, according to one of the shelter workers, and the children may have panicked or tried to flee.

The children wore belts etched in pen with phone numbers for their emergency contacts. One young boy asked the shelter worker if he would be taken care of in Texas. The shelter worker replied that he would, and told him that by moving, he was making space for other children like him who were stuck at the border and needed a place to live.

Some staff members cried when they learned of the move, the shelter worker said, fearing what was in store for the children who had been in their care. Others tried to protest. But managers explained that tough choices had to be made to deal with the overflowing population.

The system for sheltering migrant children came under strain this summer, when the already large numbers were boosted by more than 2,500 young border crossers who were separated from their parents under the Trump administration’s zero-tolerance policy. But those children were only a fraction of the total number who are currently detained.

Most of the detained children crossed the border alone, without their parents. Some crossed illegally; others are seeking asylum.

Children who are deemed “unaccompanied minors,” either because they were separated from their parents or crossed the border alone, are held in federal custody until they can be matched with sponsors, usually relatives or family friends, who agree to house them while their immigration cases play out in the courts.

The move to Texas is meant to be temporary. Rather than send new arrivals there, the government is sending children who are likely to be released sooner, and will spend less time there—mainly older children, ages 13 to 17, who are considered close to being placed with sponsors.

Still, because sponsorship placements are often protracted, immigrant advocates said there was a possibility that many of the children could be living in the tent city for months.

“Obviously we have concerns about kids falling through the cracks, not getting sufficient attention if they need attention, not getting the emotional or mental health care that they need,” said Leah Chavla, a lawyer with the Women’s Refugee Commission, an advocacy group.

“This cannot be the right solution,” Ms. Chavla said. “We need to focus on making sure that kids can get placed with sponsors and get out of custody.”

The number of detained migrant children has spiked even though monthly border crossings have remained relatively unchanged, in part because harsh rhetoric and policies introduced by the Trump administration have made it harder to place children with sponsors.

Traditionally, most sponsors have been undocumented immigrants themselves, and have feared jeopardizing their own ability to remain in the country by stepping forward to claim a child. The risk increased in June, when federal authorities announced that potential sponsors and other adult members of their households would have to submit fingerprints, and that the data would be shared with immigration authorities.

Last week, Matthew Albence, a senior official with Immigration and Customs Enforcement, testified before Congress that the agency had arrested dozens of people who applied to sponsor unaccompanied minors. The agency later confirmed that 70 percent of those arrested did not have prior criminal records.

“Close to 80 percent of the individuals that are either sponsors or household members of sponsors are here in the country illegally, and a large chunk of those are criminal aliens. So we are continuing to pursue those individuals,” Mr. Albence said.

Seeking to process the children more quickly, officials introduced new rules that will require some of them to appear in court within a month of being detained, rather than after 60 days, which was the previous standard, according to shelter workers. Many will appear via video conference call, rather than in person, to plead their case for legal status to an immigration judge. Those who are deemed ineligible for relief will be swiftly deported.

The longer that children remain in custody, the more likely they are to become anxious or depressed, which can lead to violent outbursts or escape attempts, according to shelter workers and reports that have emerged from the system in recent months.

Advocates said those concerns are heightened at a larger facility like Tornillo, where signs that a child is struggling are more likely to be overlooked, because of its size. They added that moving children to the tent city without providing enough time to prepare them emotionally or to say goodbye to friends could compound trauma that many are already struggling with.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world...amp-on-the-texas-border/ar-BBNJwUO?ocid=ientp