• Same story, different day...........year ie more of the same fiat floods the world
  • There are no markets
  • "Spreading the ideas of freedom loving people on matters regarding high finance, politics, constructionist Constitution, and mental masturbation of all types"

Immigration & Trumps Wall

Buck

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Joined
Apr 13, 2011
Messages
4,610
Likes
4,017
Let The Bodies Hit The Floor

we didn't start the fire but we can put it out

Let The Bodies Hit The Floor

 

searcher

Mother Lode Found
Mother Lode
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
180,066
Likes
43,462
FWIW...…………..have to wait and see how it plays out.

Exclusive: Deal with Mexico paves way for asylum overhaul at U.S. border


Washington Post
Josh Partlow, Nick Miroff
20 mins ago



MEXICO CITY —The Trump administration has won the support of Mexico’s incoming government for a plan to remake U.S. border policy by requiring asylum seekers to wait in Mexico while their claims move through U.S. courts, according to Mexican officials and senior members of president-elect Andrés Manuel López Obrador’s transition team.

The agreement would break with long-standing asylum rules and place a formidable new barrier in the path of Central American migrants attempting to reach the United States and escape poverty and violence. By reaching the accord, the Trump administration has also overcome Mexico’s historic reticence to deepen cooperation with the United States on an issue widely seen here as America’s problem.

The White House had no immediate comment.

According to outlines of the plan, known as Remain in Mexico, asylum applicants at the border will have to stay in Mexico while their cases are processed, potentially ending the system Trump decries as “catch and release” that has until now generally allowed those seeking refuge to wait on safer U.S. soil.

“For now, we have agreed to this policy of Remain in Mexico,” said Olga Sánchez Cordero, Mexico’s incoming interior minister, the top domestic policy official for López Obrador, who takes office Dec. 1. In an interview with The Washington Post, she called it a “short-term solution.”

“The medium- and long-term solution is that people don’t migrate,” Sánchez Cordero said. “Mexico has open arms and everything, but imagine, one caravan after another after another, that would also be a problem for us.”

While no formal agreement has been signed, and U.S. officials caution that many details must still be discussed, the incoming Mexican government is amenable to the concept of turning their country into a waiting room for America’s asylum system.

While they remain anxious the deal could fall apart, U.S. officials view this as a potential breakthrough that could deter migration and the formation of additional caravans that originate in Central America and cross through Mexico to reach the United States. They have quietly engaged in sensitive talks with senior Mexican officials, attempting to offer a diplomatic counterbalance to President Trump’s threats and ultimatums.

Alarmed by Trump’s deployment of U.S. military forces to California, Arizona and Texas, and his threats to close busy border crossings, Mexican officials were further determined to take action after migrants traveling as part of a caravan forced their way onto Mexican soil last month, pushing past police blockades at the border with Guatemala.

The prospect of keeping thousands of Central American asylum seekers for months or years in drug cartel-dominated Mexican border states — some of the most violent in the country — has troubled human-rights activists and others who worry that such a plan could put migrants at risk and undermine their lawful right to apply for asylum.

“We have not seen a specific proposal, but any policy that would leave individuals stranded in Mexico would inevitably put people in danger,” said Lee Gelernt, an ACLU attorney whose team has won several legal victories against the Trump administration’s immigration initiatives in recent months.

“The Administration ought to concentrate on providing a fair and lawful asylum process in the U.S. rather than inventing more and more ways to try to short-circuit it,” Gelernt said.

The new measures could also trigger legal challenges, though Gelernt said it was too early to comment on potential litigation.

The deal took shape last week in Houston during a meeting between Marcelo Ebrard, Mexico’s incoming foreign minister, and top U.S. officials such as Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, according to U.S. and Mexican officials.

Nielsen has been fighting to keep her job since the midterms, and while Trump has told aides he plans to replace her, the president praised her this week for “trying.”

Dozens of U.S. asylum officers have been sent to San Diego, where they will begin implementing the new procedures in coming days or weeks, according to Department of Homeland Security officials. Under the new procedures, asylum seekers arriving at the border will be given an initial screening interview to determine whether they face imminent danger by staying in Mexico.

U.S. officials describing the new system on the condition of anonymity said they will be able to process at least twice as many asylum claims as they do now because they would not be limited by detention space constraints at U.S. ports of entry. The San Ysidro port of entry in the San Diego area currently accepts about 60 to 100 asylum claims per day.

Just over the border, nearly 5,000 Central Americans have arrived in Tijuana this month as part of caravan groups, and several thousand others are en route to the city, where a baseball field has been turned into a swelling tent camp. The city’s mayor declared a “humanitarian crisis” Friday and said the city’s taxpayers would not foot the bill for the migrants’ care.

A group of business leaders in the city said they have thousands of job openings at the city’s assembly plants, or maquiladoras, inviting Central American migrants to work in the factories. Though wages there are a small fraction of U.S. pay, Mexican officials said the work offer was one reason they believe the Remain in Mexico plan will succeed. Across the country, there are 100,000 jobs available to Central American asylum seekers, officials said.

“We want them to be included in society, that they integrate into society, that they accept the offer of employment that we are giving them,” Sánchez Cordero said. “That they feel taken care of by Mexico in this very vulnerable situation.”

Two senior members of López Obrador’s transition team said the new accord would formalize what is already occurring. By admitting so few people into the asylum process, the United States is already using Mexico as an antechamber.

U.S. immigration statistics show roughly 80 percent of Central Americans pass a perfunctory “credible fear” interview after reaching the United States, but fewer than 10 percent are ultimately granted asylum by a judge. The backlog of cases in U.S. immigration courts has ballooned past 750,000, giving many asylum seekers who do not qualify a chance to remain in the country for several years while waiting to see a judge.

This gap, Department of Homeland Security officials say, amounts to a “loophole” that has invited a flood of spurious asylum claims, giving applicants a way to live and work in the United States for years.

The new deal, however, could inadvertently increase illegal border-crossing attempts by discouraging asylum seekers from approaching official ports of entry. On Monday, a federal judge in California blocked the Trump administration’s attempt to render ineligible for asylum those who cross illegally, saying U.S. laws protect everyone who reaches U.S. soil.

Last month, the number of people taken into U.S. custody along the Mexico border or who attempted to enter without authorization topped 60,000, the highest of Trump's presidency.

For months U.S. officials sought an accord with Mexico that would obligate asylum seekers to wait south of the border or render those who pass through the country ineligible for humanitarian protections in the United States. They have viewed such an accord as the key step to stopping the sharp increase in asylum claims, which have quadrupled since 2014.

One version of the plan, known as a “Safe Third” agreement, was discussed extensively with the current government of president Enrique Peña Nieto. It would have barred Central Americans from applying for asylum in the United States, on the grounds that they would no longer face persecution after arriving in Mexico. But López Obrador’s landslide July 1 victory sunk those plans, and senior members of his transition team say a “Safe Third” is a non-starter.

Mexican officials consider the Remain in Mexico plan more palatable. It would not lock them into a formal, long-term agreement. And several Mexican officials privately acknowledge that the country’s border states are not, in fact, safe. U.S. State Department travel warnings also urge American visitors to avoid several Mexican border states.

U.S. officials involved in the talks said Mexico has not asked for financial assistance to implement the new procedures, which could result in significant costs if asylum seekers are made to wait for months or years. They described the deal as a collaboration, and senior officials from both governments insisted it was not imposed upon Mexico.

Both American and Mexican officials said they hoped the accord would pave the way to a broader regional cooperation aimed at stimulating job creation in Central America.

“Our engagement with Mexico is, first and foremost, based on mutual respect and on a commitment to work together to find creative solutions to our shared challenges,” said Kim Breier, a senior State Department official with purview of Mexico and Latin America who participated in the talks.

“As neighbors and friends, the United States and Mexico are committed to strengthening cooperation to advance the security and economic well-being of the citizens of both nations based on shared interests and respect for each country’s sovereignty and the rule of law,” Breier said in a statement.


A fixture on Mexico’s left for decades, López Obrador won on populist promises to fight corruption and help the poor. Many U.S. officials assumed he would bring a more confrontational approach toward Trump and the United States. During the campaign, he was generally restrained in his criticism of Trump, repeatedly expressing a desire for a positive relationship.

At times he offered harsh assessments, though: he referred to Trump as a “neo-fascist” last year as he was gearing up for his campaign, and later said that the Mexican government had been doing Washington’s “dirty work” by catching Central Americans.

Since his victory in July, López Obrador and Trump have traded compliments. Sánchez Cordero said the transition team’s interactions with the Trump administration have been “surprisingly cordial.”

“Trump has been very friendly, very courteous, very cordial with President López Obrador,” said Sánchez Cordero. “It’s been a very smooth relationship.”

U.S. asylum officers and other immigration officials who began receiving guidance this week on the implementation of Remain in Mexico were told the new procedures could take effect imminently, but senior officials from both governments say key details remain unresolved.

U.S. officials want to roll out the program at the San Diego border crossing to deal with the caravans that have become a source of frustration for Trump, but they envision it could be expanded to another five to seven crossings along the U.S.-Mexico border. Senior U.S. officials said they want more assurances on how Mexico intends to keep asylum seekers safe and to ensure they don’t get deported back to Central America before the asylum claim gets resolved.

After an initial fear screening at the port of entry, the asylum seeker would wait until their scheduled court appearance before an immigration judge. Then they would be escorted to a federal courthouse by U.S. officers, but would potentially have to return to Mexico again if the judge did not reach an immediate determination on their asylum claim.

Under the new rules, an applicant whose asylum claim is denied would not be allowed to return to Mexico. Instead, the person would remain in U.S. custody and face immediate deportation to their home country.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/polit...m-overhaul-at-us-border/ar-BBQ2WME?ocid=ientp
 

searcher

Mother Lode Found
Mother Lode
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
180,066
Likes
43,462
WTF?????????

No deal! Mexico DENIES agreement with Trump that would keep caravan asylum seekers out of America until their applications are approved, as tensions in border city of Tijuana reach boiling point

  • Mexico said there was 'no agreement' made with the United States that will require asylum seekers to wait in in the country while their claims move through US Courts
  • The denial followed reports of a deal with the Trump administration known as 'Remain in Mexico'
  • Trump later tweeted that migrants wouldn't be allowed to cross into the United States while they were applying for asylum, saying: 'We only will allow those who come into our Country legally'
  • He also threatened to close the border 'if necessary' following years of a 'costly and dangerous situation'
  • Meanwhile situation at the border continued to worsen and many were trying to cross the border illegally
  • Authorities said a young migrant mother was injured when she tried to scale the fence with two children

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...mb-barbed-wire-border-fence-two-children.html
 

searcher

Mother Lode Found
Mother Lode
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
180,066
Likes
43,462
Mexico's incoming government denies report Mexico supports Trump admin's new asylum proposal

By Sophie Tatum, Caroline Kelly and Rafael Romo, CNN
1 hr ago


Mexico's incoming government on Saturday night denied that an official deal had been made regarding migrants staying in the country before entering the United States, Mexico's incoming interior secretary, Olga Sánchez Cordero, said according to a statement acquired by CNN.

The statement is at odds with a previous report by The Washington Post, which had claimed that the incoming Mexican government supported a Trump administration plan that would require individuals seeking asylum to remain south of the US border while their applications are being processed.

Earlier on Saturday, the Post reported that the new Trump administration border policy had garnered the incoming Mexican government's support, citing Mexican officials and senior members of Mexican president-elect Andrés Manuel López Obrador's transition team. The Post report included quotes from Sánchez Cordero that the incoming government had agreed to the policy.

In the statement Saturday night, Sánchez Cordero explained that the next administration does not have any plans to make Mexico a "third safe country" for migrants.

"Mexico's next federal administration does not consider within its plans that Mexico assume the condition of "third secure country" for the attention of Central American migrants or citizens of other countries in Mexican territory or those who will have that intention in the future," Sánchez Cordero said in the statement.

She added that the incoming administration will focus on ensuring the migrant caravans will receive help in accessing food, health, shelter and protection of their human rights.

The incoming administration will assume office December 1.

However, according to The Post, the plan, called "Remain in Mexico," emerged after a meeting in Houston last week that included Mexico's incoming foreign secretary, Marcelo Ebrard, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, and other high ranking US officials, US and Mexican officials told the Post.

The White House reacts

Regarding the deal with Mexico, White House spokesman Hogan Gidley said in a statement: "President Trump has developed a strong relationship with the incoming Obrador Administration, and we look forward to working with them on a wide range of issues."

On Saturday evening, President Donald Trump tweeted about the border, saying he would close the US' southern border if necessary.

"Migrants at the Southern Border will not be allowed into the United States until their claims are individually approved in court. We only will allow those who come into our Country legally. Other than that our very strong policy is Catch and Detain. No "Releasing" into the U.S..." Trump wrote in his first tweet.

He continued in a subsequent one: "....All will stay in Mexico. If for any reason it becomes necessary, we will CLOSE our Southern Border. There is no way that the United States will, after decades of abuse, put up with this costly and dangerous situation anymore!"

In a statement Thursday, Pompeo said that he, Nielsen and Ebrard had met "to discuss the migrant caravans."

"We have affirmed our shared commitment to addressing the current challenge," he said. "The caravans will not be permitted to enter the United States."

US officials began receiving guidance on "Remain in Mexico" this week and were told it could be implemented soon, the Post reported, but US and Mexican senior officials stressed that elements of the plan had not yet been established and that no formal agreement has yet been signed.

If put into effect, the new policy would end the current practice of asylum seekers remaining in the United States while their applications are processed, disparaged as "catch and release" by Trump, who is a vocal opponent of the practice.

US officials told the Post that they hope to pilot the policy at San Diego's San Ysidro border crossing before potentially expanding it to five to seven other ports of entry along the southern border.

"For now, we have agreed to this policy of Remain in Mexico," Sánchez Cordero -- López Obrador's top domestic policy official as Mexico's interior secretary-elect -- told the Post, calling it a "short-term solution."

"The medium- and long-term solution is that people don't migrate," Sánchez Cordero also said to the Post. "Mexico has open arms and everything, but imagine, one caravan after another after another, that would also be a problem for us."

James McCament, Acting Homeland Security Under Secretary for Policy, said in a statement Saturday that the United States has been working with the current and impending Mexican governments "to identify and address shared issues of concern."

"These include our joint desire to promote beneficial legitimate trade and travel, interest in ensuring that those traveling to our borders do so safely and orderly, concern for the safety and security of vulnerable migrant populations, and respect for each nation's sovereignty," McCament added. "We appreciate the leadership and partnership the Mexican government has shown on these and other challenging issues."

Two senior members of López Obrador's transition team told the Post that "Remain in Mexico" would simply formalize the de facto situation.

Under the new policy, applicants seeking asylum at ports of entry would receive a credible fear screening and remain in the United States until their initial appearance with an immigration judge, according to the Post.

If the judge did not immediately rule on the case, the applicant could have to return to Mexico -- but if the judge denied the claim, the applicant would be detained in the United States for immediate deportation proceedings, the Post reported.

Two US officials speaking anonymously told The Post that the new policy would allow the government to double the number of asylum claims it could process, as it would no longer be limited by detention space.

CNN's Geneva Sands, Kiarinna Parisi, Bethlehem Feleke, Mark Kay Mallonee and Sarah Westwood contributed to this report.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/polit...ins-new-asylum-proposal/ar-BBQ345j?ocid=ientp
 

searcher

Mother Lode Found
Mother Lode
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
180,066
Likes
43,462
White House turns away foreign students taking a tour with their high school class because they didn't bring their passports

  • Seventh grade class from Henry Hudson Regional School in Highlands, New Jersey took a trip to Washington, D.C. on November 15
  • A snowstorm delayed their arrival to the White House, where they were scheduled to eat lunch on White House lawn and take a tour
  • The delay only left time for a tour, but three foreign students in the class were denied entry by Secret Service
  • The students - two from Sweden and one from Colombia - did not have their passports or other valid ID
  • The three students were forced to wait outside with the principal while the rest toured the first floor of the White House
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...-taking-tour-high-school-class-passports.html
 

Joe King

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
7,416
Likes
7,687
Location
Instant Gratification Land
In the statement Saturday night, Sánchez Cordero explained that the next administration does not have any plans to make Mexico a "third safe country" for migrants.
Then they shouldn't have allowed them into their nation to begin with. Mexico let them in because they knew they only wanted passage to America. If these people had come with the intention of living illegally in Mexico, they'd have been arrested and deported. Ie: Mexico is facilitating these people and their intentions to illegally enter the US.
 

searcher

Mother Lode Found
Mother Lode
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
180,066
Likes
43,462
New Jersey unveils new rules to limit police cooperation with ICE

The Hill
Tal Axelrod
5 hrs ago


New Jersey introduced a new directive to curtail local police's ability to inquire about someone's immigration status and turn undocumented immigrants over to immigration officials for deportation.

Attorney General Gurbir Grewal announced the new rules Thursday, saying they are intended to ameliorate relations between police officials and immigrant communities they serve, according to NJ.com.

"No law-abiding resident of this great state should live in fear that a routine traffic stop by local police will result in his or her deportation from this country," Grewal said.

Under the new rules, New Jersey police cannot stop or detain anyone based on their immigration status, cannot ask the immigration status of anyone unless it is part of an ongoing investigation into a serious crime, police officers cannot participate in ICE raids and ICE cannot utilize state or local resources.

Gov. Phil Murphy's administration has been working on revamping police guidelines regarding immigrants shortly after he was elected last year, according to NJ.com.

He said he would make New Jersey a "sanctuary state" during his campaign, but Grewal said the state would still go after criminals.

"If you break the law in New Jersey we will go after you no matter your immigration status," Grewal said.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement slammed the policy, saying it would make the public less safe.

"Ultimately, this directive shields certain criminal aliens, creating a state-sanctioned haven for those seeking to evade federal authorities, all at the expense of the safety and security of the very people the New Jersey Attorney General is charged with protecting," Matthew Albence, an ICE deputy director, told NJ.com.

Grewal said the new directive does not stop local or state police from complying with federal law or court orders, including those regarding undocumented immigrants. Police can still aid ICE in emergencies and work with it on joint task forces.

The news comes as the nation is consumed in a fierce debate over immigration laws as the White House takes steps to limit both legal and illegal border crossings and restrict migrants' paths to claiming asylum.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/ne...ce-cooperation-with-ice/ar-BBQhAOq?ocid=ientp
 

searcher

Mother Lode Found
Mother Lode
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
180,066
Likes
43,462
Trump warns Democrats he'll 'close the entire Southern Border' if they don't fund his wall as he signals Bush's death won't get in the way of his immigration demands

  • Many govt. agencies are scheduled to run out of money Friday at midnight
  • Congress and the president must agree on a new funding proposal
  • Trump wants $5 billion to fund his border wall; Democrats in no mood to deal
  • President George H.W. bush died Friday night and he will lie in state in the U.S. Capitol beginning on Monday afternoon
  • President Trump said he's willing to sign a two-week extension of current spending levels

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...der-dont-fund-wall-despite-Bushs-passing.html
 

searcher

Mother Lode Found
Mother Lode
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
180,066
Likes
43,462
PICTURED: A group of Hondurans in the migrant caravan scale the Mexican border wall in Tijuana, and are immediately taken into US custody as they set foot in San Diego

  • Dozens of migrants, including children, jumped across the border between the US and Mexico on Sunday
  • They were immediately arrested by American Border Patrol guards and planned to claim political asylum
  • Thousands of migrants are camped on the Mexican side of the border after walking there as part of a caravan
  • Migrants had to move shelter after the first one flooded, with doctors warning disease outbreak is inevitable
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...ravan-migrants-scale-Mexico-border-fence.html
 

Joe King

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
7,416
Likes
7,687
Location
Instant Gratification Land
They were immediately arrested by American Border Patrol guards and planned to claim political asylum
When caught, claiming asylum has become a standard last ditch effort to avoid deportation and is the only reason they claim it. If they hadn't been caught, they would have simply disappeared.

Is anyone really dumb enough to believe that they had every intention of illegally entering the country only to directly report to immigration officials so they could claim asylum?
 

searcher

Mother Lode Found
Mother Lode
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
180,066
Likes
43,462
Man born in Philadelphia sues sheriff's department after he was arrested and told he was being deported to Jamaica – even though he has only ever spent one day there on a CRUISE

  • Peter Sean Brown, 50, was detained on an ICE deportation request in April
  • The said the U.S. citizen from Philadelphia was to be deported to Jamaica
  • Despite repeated attempts to provide his birth certificate they refused him help
  • Spent three weeks in jail and sent to deportation center before release
  • He has only been to Jamaica one in his entire life, on a one-day visit on a cruise
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...-sues-ICE-arrested-told-returned-Jamaica.html
 

southfork

Site Supporter
Site Supporter
Mother Lode
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
15,503
Likes
14,311
Trump warns Democrats he'll 'close the entire Southern Border' if they don't fund his wall as he signals Bush's death won't get in the way of his immigration demands

  • Many govt. agencies are scheduled to run out of money Friday at midnight
  • Congress and the president must agree on a new funding proposal
  • Trump wants $5 billion to fund his border wall; Democrats in no mood to deal
  • President George H.W. bush died Friday night and he will lie in state in the U.S. Capitol beginning on Monday afternoon
  • President Trump said he's willing to sign a two-week extension of current spending levels

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...der-dont-fund-wall-despite-Bushs-passing.html
Trump fucked up when he caved on last budget, now theres a two week extension, he will cave again, no 5b for wall, no obama crime family prosecutions, he will not get a second term. Failed on two biggest campaign promises
 

searcher

Mother Lode Found
Mother Lode
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
180,066
Likes
43,462
What will happen to caravan members who cross illegally into the US?

By Kate Morrissey, Gustavo Solis and Kristina Davis, The San Diego Union-Tribune
11 hrs ago


SAN DIEGO - As the sun set Tuesday over Playas de Tijuana, four members of the migrant caravan that has been camped in the city for weeks climbed over a low spot in the new border barrier and were immediately caught by Border Patrol agents.

In the past several days, multiple media outlets have observed small groups of caravan members who have grown desperate in the conditions of temporary shelters in Tijuana and decided to try their luck climbing the border barrier, or in at least one instance swimming around the fence that extends into the ocean at Friendship Park.

Asylum seekers who cross the border illegally often look for immigration officials to turn themselves in and ask for protection, known to agents as "self-surrenders."

Tuesday's climbers chose a point in the recently replaced primary fence where the structure changes direction slightly and a shorter metal plate fills in the gap between taller bollard-style fencing. Migrants hung a white bed sheet on top of the metal plate to use to pull themselves over. It still hung on the barrier as dusk closed in on the area.

Border Patrol vehicles drove up and down, monitoring where the migrants had crossed. Mexican immigration officials also stood nearby. They said they planned to try to deter more migrants from crossing the border there.

A short while later, a group of eight, including one woman and a young girl, emerged in the darkness to follow the other group over. The girl was small enough to be able to squeeze in between the posts, and a man climbed up to help the adults over.\

When agents responded, the group quickly crossed back and disappeared toward Tijuana. The mother and daughter had planned to ask for asylum, but none of the men wanted to get caught.

While some are determined to wait out the ballooning asylum line at the San Ysidro port of entry, other members of the caravan see crossing illegally as a way to set foot on U.S. soil more quickly.

Juana Matutet, a 42-year-old woman from Honduras, said a smuggler came to the sports complex that through most of last week housed the caravan to offer to help people across to turn themselves in to U.S. officials for $150.

Noel Miguel Ramos, a 29-year-old man from El Salvador who joined the caravan in Mexico, said he planned to wait for heavy fog to roll in before trying to cross by himself. He's been studying Google Maps to plan his route.

"I don't have anything to lose," Ramos said. "Trump said he won't let us in."

Many of those who have crossed in recent days were subsequently apprehended by Border Patrol. However, it does not appear that many, if any, have been prosecuted criminally on illegal entry charges in federal court.

Even a man with a murder conviction in Honduras spotlighted by the Department of Homeland Security as evidence of "known criminals" in the caravan after he was caught by Border Patrol agents in late November has not been charged.

The U.S. Attorney's office referred the Union-Tribune to Customs and Border Protection when asked about the lack of criminal charges. CBP declined to say why some cases are forwarded for criminal prosecution and others aren't, including those who are part of the caravan.

The agency also would not say how many caravan members have been apprehended after crossing illegally nor how many have been referred for criminal prosecution.

The Trump administration began its "zero tolerance" policy shortly before the last migrant caravan arrived in Tijuana, pledging to charge everyone who crossed the border illegally. Though a class-action lawsuit over the separation of families led to fewer parents being prosecuted, zero tolerance has steadily charged adults caught crossing illegally.

The policy flooded border courts with cases, and judges in the Southern District of California implemented a program, known informally as "Streamline," used elsewhere along the border to speedily negotiate guilty pleas from border crossers.

Illegal entry is a federal misdemeanor, and those who plead guilty under Streamline are generally sentenced to time served and then handed back to immigration officials for deportation or asylum processing, depending on the individual case. Illegal reentry is a felony and can come with months or even years in federal prison.

Federal Defenders of San Diego, which provides legal defense to those who can't afford private attorneys, has been told in recent weeks to prepare to represent a large influx of caravan members, said supervisory attorney Kasha Castillo.

Defense attorneys say many of their clients in unrelated felony cases have been moved from federal custody in downtown San Diego to detention facilities around Southern California in the past week or so, possibly to clear bed space in San Diego in anticipation of caravan defendants.

On Monday, none of the 20 defendants in the Streamline court were identified as members of the caravan. On Tuesday, four defendants - an unusually low number for the Streamline docket - went before a judge. They also didn't appear to be part of the caravan. On both days, most, if not all, were from Mexico, not Central America.

President Donald Trump tried at the beginning of November to bar those who cross illegally into the U.S. from making asylum claims. Shortly thereafter, a federal judge blocked Trump's proclamation from taking effect, saying that Congress clearly set out in law that asylum seekers could make their claims irrespective of their manner of entry into the country.

"Whatever the scope of the President's authority, he may not rewrite the immigration laws to impose a condition that Congress has expressly forbidden," wrote U.S. District Judge Jon Tigar.

Despite the judge's order, someone crossing illegally could face additional hurdles in his or her asylum application, according to local attorneys.
When judges or immigration officials are making decisions that involve discretion, such as deciding whether to release someone from custody while his or her case is pending, having a criminal conviction for illegal entry could become a factor.

Following former Attorney General Jeff Sessions' changes to immigration case law, asylum officers received a memo in June telling them, among other things, to consider a person's manner of entry as a factor when deciding whether to allow someone to apply for asylum.

"USCIS personnel may find an applicant's illegal entry, including any intentional evasion of U.S. authorities, and including any conviction for illegal entry where the alien does not demonstrate good cause for the illegal entry, to weigh against a favorable exercise of discretion," the memo says.

It's not clear how much of an effect the memo has had on outcomes from asylum officers' interviews with migrants.

Immigration and criminal defense attorney Andrew Nietor said he would advise people to go through the port of entry even though there are well over 5,000 waiting in line in Tijuana to ask for U.S. protection. It will likely be at least a couple of months before those now at the back of the line reach the front.

Tammy Lin, a San Diego immigration attorney, said soon after the caravan's arrival that she worried some would get frustrated with the months-long wait at the port of entry and decide to cross illegally.

"What I tell people typically is this - asylum is already really hard to begin with," Lin explained. "The last thing you want to do is take some action that is putting you behind."

Jaruzelki Edimor, a 27-year-old from Honduras, said he understands the importance of being patient.

Crossing illegally "would complicate things because we'd be violating the law," Edimor said. "It is better to do things the right way."

Cristian Mejilla, an 18-year-old from El Salvador, said he's scared to cross illegally, but he's also afraid of applying for asylum because it's not guaranteed. Part of him wants to stay in Mexico, but his goal is to keep going north. He has heard of people crossing by the beach and the airport in Tijuana. Others have gone to Tecate.

"I made such a big effort to get here. I'm scared of getting caught and being deported," Mejilla said. "If there is no other way to go to the U.S., I will cross like them."

Visit The San Diego Union-Tribune at www.sandiegouniontribune.com

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/wh...s-illegally-into-the-us/ar-BBQwXU1?ocid=ientp
 

searcher

Mother Lode Found
Mother Lode
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
180,066
Likes
43,462
This one is a bit out there.

Church sparks controversy by putting Baby Jesus in a CAGE in nativity scene to highlight Trump's policy of splitting immigrant families at the border

  • The controversial display went up at St Susanna's, Dedham, Massachusetts
  • It shows the baby Jesus locked in a cage and the wise men surrounded by a wall
  • Above the nativity scene hang the thought-provoking words 'Peace on Earth?'
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...aby-Jesus-CAGE-Trump-immigration-protest.html


Tune time...………

 

Joe King

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
7,416
Likes
7,687
Location
Instant Gratification Land
Illegal entry is a federal misdemeanor, and those who plead guilty under Streamline are generally sentenced to time served and then handed back to immigration officials for deportation or asylum processing, depending on the individual case.
Or in other words, no punishment at all.


"I made such a big effort to get here. I'm scared of getting caught and being deported," Mejilla said. "If there is no other way to go to the U.S., I will cross like them."
Or in other words, give Mejilla what he wants or he'll just take it anyways.


Church sparks controversy by putting Baby Jesus in a CAGE in nativity scene to highlight Trump's policy of splitting immigrant families at the border
What a bunch of f'ing idiots.
 

searcher

Mother Lode Found
Mother Lode
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
180,066
Likes
43,462
‘A big problem’: Congress bickers over what makes a border wall


Politico
By Marianne LeVine and Burgess Everett
24 mins ago


Democrats and Republicans can’t even agree on the definition of a border wall — let alone the project itself — and the rift could lead to a partial government shutdown later this month.

Senators came to a bipartisan agreement this summer to provide $1.6 billion for 65 miles of a beefed-up barrier along the Southwest border. While not enough for President Donald Trump, the deal marked a breakthrough on an otherwise intractable fight over the president’s chief campaign promise.

But now the two parties can’t even agree on whether the $1.6 billion is for Trump’s wall or not. The legislation seems to purposefully avoid addressing Trump’s vision of a massive concrete border wall, instead using the word “fencing” and limiting repairs to “currently deployed fencing design along the southern border.”

That has led Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer to argue that the bill gives Trump zero dollars for the “wall” and instead provides for “border security,” even as some progressives urge the Senate to abandon the deal. In the face of Schumer’s stance, Republicans are defending the $1.6 billion pact as giving the president exactly what he’s requesting, worried that may be all that can get through the Senate and that anything more would lead to a shutdown just days before Christmas.

Sen. Shelley Moore Capito (R-W.Va.), who wrote the border funding bill with Sen. Jon Tester (D-Mont.) in June, said it is “not accurate” for Schumer and Senate Democrats to claim it stiffs Trump on his beloved wall.

“It’s for a wall system. It is a lot of wall, but it is also a part of a system. And then we have additional add-ons in the bill that have more manpower and more technology,” Capito said, referring to millions more for additional border security.

The disagreement over what the bill actually does, she added, is “a problem. It’s a big problem.”

Sen. Tammy Duckworth (D-Ill.) rejected Capito’s characterization of the bill: “I don’t think any of it goes towards a ‘wall.’”

"The money is going towards border security in general, and, frankly, the White House has already gotten money ... that they still haven't spent,” Duckworth said. “The president said Mexico is going to pay for a wall, so he should find money for that first. But as far as border security? I think everyone in the Senate supports more security.”

That may be true in principle, but the word “wall” has become a lightning rod for both political parties as they prepare for a funding fight that must be resolved by Dec. 21. Some conservative Republicans want as much as $25 billion for the border wall alone, while progressive activists have cast the $1.6 billion as intended “to terrorize immigrant communities.”

Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) said the Senate needs to figure out a way to please everyone and fast: “The government can’t close,” she implored her colleagues in an interview, predicting Congress will compromise on an amount greater than $1.6 billion for border barriers. Whether people will call it a wall or not is another question entirely.

“It depends on how you define border security. And part of it clearly is for the wall,” she said. “Maybe we can reach an agreement where everyone can call it what they want.”

It’s “optics,” agreed Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.). “There's no such thing as a wall. From a safety standpoint there's … high fencing, so I don't know. I think it's just semantics right now, just get over it.”

Yet what seems like inside baseball is actually the whole ballgame to the president, who balked at signing a spending bill in March because it fell far short of his spending ambitions for the wall. He’s dug in even more this time.

“Top Border Security, including a Wall, is $25 Billion. Pays for itself in two months. Get it done!” he tweeted this week.

And Trump himself appears to be playing close attention to the debate. He’s spoken several times with Republican leaders about the matter and seems dead set on finally getting this win.

Schumer sees it another way, accusing Trump of “trying to manufacture a shutdown to fire up his base.” He and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) are expected to meet with the president next week, in part to discuss how to fund the government.

In an interview with POLITICO last week, Trump said he wants $5 billion for the border wall alone and additional money for border security, a sign that the president is being kept apprised of the details during the back and forth between lawmakers.

The president is fixated on winning the border wall fight, putting other priorities on the back burner and raising the stakes for both parties. Senate Democrats say $1.6 billion was hard enough to get through the Senate Appropriations Committee; that it matches the initial White House request; and that it provides more than the $1.3 billion the president received for a border barrier last year.

“We did a deal six months ago on $1.6 billion, which is what the president asked for. That was before the election, it’s done. If the president says ‘No, we’re going to shut the government down for five [billion dollars],’ I think that’s unfair,” Tester said. “If he reneges on it, I think it’s bad, bad, bad.”

A news release accompanying the bill in June from the Appropriations Committee boasted that it "fully funds" Trump's fiscal 2019 request for the border wall system.

That measure would almost certainly pass the Senate, though House Republicans are still in the majority and have pushed for $5 billion for the wall. They might need Democratic votes to pass anything, leading to a stalemate that’s dragged on for a month since the election.

And if Trump doesn’t get $5 billion for a concrete border wall, there’s no guarantee he would sign whatever Congress passes, though some lawmakers are bullish they can write the legislation to satisfy everyone.

“It’s just a matter of what you call it,” said Sen. Roy Blunt (R-Mo.) of the border security funding.

House Democrats, meanwhile, are looking to give Trump a goose egg for Christmas on his chief legislative priority. Rep. Ro Khanna (D-Calif.) said the caucus is willing to talk about a compromise on cracking down on drug dealers or human traffickers “but not on the fence or the wall.”

That’s left Republicans in a difficult place. Trump has told Senate Appropriations Chairman Richard Shelby (R-Ala.) directly that he wants three times the funding that Shelby’s committee approved.

Regardless, there’s no way the GOP will concede that the bipartisan bill doesn’t meet the president’s definition of a wall.

“I thought it was for the wall. My understanding is it’s for the wall,” Shelby said. He added with a grin: “Maybe other people’s understanding is it’s border security.”

Heather Caygle and Sarah Ferris contributed to this report.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/polit...hat-makes-a-border-wall/ar-BBQzqAb?ocid=ientp
 

searcher

Mother Lode Found
Mother Lode
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
180,066
Likes
43,462
Pelosi not budging: Dem leader won't accept DACA deal in exchange for wall $$


Fox News
Andrew O'Reilly
28 mins ago


House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi is digging in amid the fight over funding for President Trump's promised border wall, signaling Thursday she won’t accept a deal on DACA in exchange for wall money.

Speaking to reporters, the likely next House speaker said DACA — the Obama-era Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program giving a deportation reprieve to some immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally as children, and now is at the center of a legal fight — and the border wall are “two different subjects.”

She said she wouldn't back a DACA deal in order to fund a wall along the United States’ southern border with Mexico.

Pelosi spoke to reporters shortly before the House approved a short-term spending bill to avoid a partial government shutdown. Known as a “CR” or “Continuing Resolution,” the measure re-ups all money for the seven remaining spending bills at current levels through Dec. 21. The measure now goes to the Senate for approval.

But the disagreement over border wall funding, which is at the center of the budget gridlock, has yet to be resolved.

The California lawmaker’s comments come after she released a statement pledging to pass legislation that would put so-called Dreamers — beneficiaries of the DACA plan — on a path to citizenship when Democrats take control of the lower chamber of Congress in January.

“Our House Democratic Majority will once again pass the Dream Act to end the uncertainty and fear inflicted on patriotic young men and women across the country,” Pelosi said in her statement on Saturday. “Of course, we will meet our responsibility to provide strong, smart border security that serves our country’s needs, is consistent with our values, and doesn’t squander billions of dollars on a border wall."

DACA allows children brought to the U.S. illegally by their parents to apply for a renewable two-year deferral from deportation and to become eligible for a work permit. It has been one of the most hotly contested issues in the immigration debate since it was announced eight years ago.

The Trump administration announced in September of last year plans to end the program and gave Congress six months to pass the so-called DREAM Act, which has been batted around in Congress since 2001 and would provide a path to citizenship for the 700,000 DACA recipients. A prolonged court battle, however, has kept the program alive.

Democratic lawmakers in the House have urged Pelosi to schedule a vote on legislation to protect DACA and immigrants with Temporary Protected Status (TPS) within the first 100 days of the 116th Congress. TPS is a program that allows certain immigrants who have fled armed conflicts or natural disasters — such as those from El Salvador and Haiti – to live and work in the U.S. for a limited time.

“We will protect TPS recipients and those fleeing unimaginable violence,” Pelosi said.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/polit...e-for-wall-dollardollar/ar-BBQAMVb?ocid=ientp
 

searcher

Mother Lode Found
Mother Lode
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
180,066
Likes
43,462
Making President Trump’s Bed: A Housekeeper Without Papers

NYT
By MIRIAM JORDAN
2 hrs ago


BEDMINSTER, N.J. — During more than five years as a housekeeper at the Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, N.J., Victorina Morales has made Donald J. Trump’s bed, cleaned his toilet and dusted his crystal golf trophies. When he visited as president, she was directed to wear a pin in the shape of the American flag adorned with a Secret Service logo.

Because of the “outstanding” support she has provided during Mr. Trump’s visits, Ms. Morales in July was given a certificate from the White House Communications Agency inscribed with her name.

Quite an achievement for an undocumented immigrant housekeeper.

Ms. Morales’s journey from cultivating corn in rural Guatemala to fluffing pillows at an exclusive golf resort took her from the southwest border, where she said she crossed illegally in 1999, to the horse country of New Jersey, where she was hired at the Trump property in 2013 with documents she said were phony.

She said she was not the only worker at the club who was in the country illegally.

Sandra Diaz, 46, a native of Costa Rica who is now a legal resident of the United States, said she, too, was undocumented when she worked at Bedminster between 2010 and 2013. The two women said they worked for years as part of a group of housekeeping, maintenance and landscaping employees at the golf club that included a number of undocumented workers, though they could not say precisely how many. There is no evidence that Mr. Trump or Trump Organization executives knew of their immigration status. But at least two supervisors at the club were aware of it, the women said, and took steps to help workers evade detection and keep their jobs.

“There are many people without papers,” said Ms. Diaz, who said she witnessed several people being hired whom she knew to be undocumented.

Mr. Trump has made border security and the fight to protect jobs for Americans a cornerstone of his presidency, from the border wall he has pledged to build to the workplace raids and payroll audits that his administration has carried out.

During the presidential campaign, when the Trump International Hotel opened for business in Washington, Mr. Trump boasted that he had used an electronic verification system, E-Verify, to ensure that only those legally entitled to work were hired.

“We didn’t have one illegal immigrant on the job,” Mr. Trump said then.

[Read more immigration coverage from Miriam Jordan]

But throughout his campaign and his administration, Ms. Morales, 45, has been reporting for work at Mr. Trump’s golf course in Bedminster, where she is still on the payroll. An employee of the golf course drives her and a group of others to work every day, she says, because it is known that they cannot legally obtain driver’s licenses.

A diminutive woman with only two years of education who came to the United States speaking no English, Ms. Morales has had an unusual window into one of the president’s favorite retreats: She has cleaned the president’s villa while he watched television nearby; she stood on the sidelines when potential cabinet members were brought in for interviews and when the White House chief of staff, John Kelly, arrived to confer with the president.

“I never imagined, as an immigrant from the countryside in Guatemala, that I would see such important people close up,” she said.

But Ms. Morales said she has been hurt by Mr. Trump’s public comments since he became president, including equating Latin American immigrants with violent criminals. It was that, she said, along with abusive comments from a supervisor at work about her intelligence and immigration status, that made her feel that she could no longer keep silent.

“We are tired of the abuse, the insults, the way he talks about us when he knows that we are here helping him make money,” she said. “We sweat it out to attend to his every need and have to put up with his humiliation.”

Ms. Morales and Ms. Diaz approached The New York Times through their New Jersey lawyer, Anibal Romero, who is representing them on immigration matters. Ms. Morales said that she understood she could be fired or deported as a result of coming forward, though she has applied for protection under the asylum laws. She is also exploring a lawsuit claiming workplace abuse and discrimination.

In separate, hourslong interviews in Spanish, Ms. Morales and Ms. Diaz provided detailed accounts of their work at the club and their interactions with management, including Mr. Trump. Both women described the president as demanding but kind, sometimes offering hefty tips.

While they were often unclear on precise dates of when events occurred, they appeared to recollect key events and conversations with precision.

Ms. Morales has had dealings with Mr. Trump that go back years, and her husband has confirmed that she would on occasion come home jubilant because the club owner had paid her a compliment, or bestowed on her a $50 or sometimes a $100 tip.

To ascertain that she was in fact an employee of the club, The Times reviewed Ms. Morales’s pay stubs and W-2 forms, which list the golf course as her employer. She also made available her Individual Taxpayer Identification, a nine-digit number that is issued by the Internal Revenue Service to foreigners to enable them to file taxes without being permanent residents of the United States. Having a number does not confer eligibility to work.

The Times also examined the documents Ms. Morales presented as proof that she was entitled to work — a permanent resident card, or green card, and a Social Security card, both of which she said she purchased from someone in New Jersey who produced counterfeit documents for immigrants.

The Times ran Ms. Morales’s purported Social Security number through several public records databases and none produced a match, which is often an indication that the number is not valid. The number on the back of the green card that Ms. Morales has on file at the golf course does not correspond to the format of numbers used on most legitimate resident cards. For example, it includes initials that do not match those of any immigration service centers that issue the cards.

Ms. Diaz produced similar documents, though since she has gained legal residence she has been issued a genuine Social Security card and green card.

The Trump Organization, which owns the golf course, did not comment specifically on Ms. Morales or Ms. Diaz. “We have tens of thousands of employees across our properties and have very strict hiring practices,” Amanda Miller, the company’s senior vice president for marketing and corporate communications, said in a statement. “If an employee submitted false documentation in an attempt to circumvent the law, they will be terminated immediately.”

The White House declined to comment.

That Ms. Morales appeared able to secure employment with what she said were fake documents is not surprising: An estimated eight million unauthorized immigrants are in the labor force, and it is an open secret that many businesses, especially in the service sector, hire them.

Mr. Trump has a long history of relying on immigrants at his golf and hotel properties. Though he signed a “Buy American, Hire American” executive order in 2017 tightening the conditions for visas for foreign workers, his companies have hired hundreds of foreigners on guest-worker visas.

In hiring workers who are already in the United States, employers are required to examine identity and work authorization documents and record them on an employment eligibility form. But companies are not required in most cases to take additional steps to verify the authenticity of documents. Because falsifying these documents is so easy, E-Verify, which is required in 22 states, goes the extra step of checking them against records kept by the Social Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

The federal list posted online of employers who use the E-Verify system includes Mr. Trump’s golf club in North Carolina, a state that requires it, but the Bedminster club in New Jersey, where it is not required under state law, does not appear on the list.

During his campaign, Mr. Trump called for expanding the program to workplaces around the country. So far, that has not happened.

Mr. Trump opened his trophy club in the affluent horse country of Somerset County, N.J., in 2004. After buying the 504-acre property from a group of investors in 2002, Mr. Trump planted a sweeping colonnade of maple trees at the entrance and built two 18-hole golf courses, their design inspired by the gardens of Versailles. The membership initiation fee is more than $100,000.

The property has an estimated 40 to 80 employees, depending on the season; the bulk of the basic service workers are foreign-born. Immigrants keep the greens watered and manicured. They clean and maintain the cottages and suites that surround the junior Olympic-size heated pool.

The president has spent all or part of about 70 days at Bedminster since taking office. He has a two-story residence on the property; his daughter Ivanka Trump and her husband, Jared Kushner, were married at the club in 2009, and also have a cottage.

The job at Bedminster, at which Ms. Morales earns $13 an hour, is one of several she said she has held since arriving in the United States in 1999, crossing undetected into California after a journey of nearly six weeks by bus and on foot.

After she first arrived in Los Angeles, a contact provided her with a false Social Security number and an identification card that she was told would enable her to secure employment. She then flew to New Jersey, where she joined her husband, who had arrived months earlier.

In early 2013, a friend who worked at the Trump golf club told her that management was looking for housekeepers.

Ms. Morales was keen: The pay would be $10 an hour, higher than the $8.25 that she was earning cleaning guest rooms at a hotel.

According to her account, when she arrived for her interview, the housekeeping supervisor showed her around and asked her to demonstrate how she cleaned. The supervisor asked her to report to work the next morning at 6 a.m. — with her documents.

Ms. Morales said she told her she had no legal working documents. “I told her I don’t have good papers. She told me to bring what I used at the hotel,” Ms. Morales recalled.

By the time Ms. Morales was hired, Ms. Diaz had been working at the club since 2010 and had the job of cleaning Mr. Trump’s residence.

She said she washed and ironed Mr. Trump’s white boxers, golf shirts and khaki trousers, as well as his sheets and towels. Everything belonging to Mr. Trump, his wife, Melania, and their son, Barron, was washed with special detergent in a smaller, separate washing machine, she said.

“He is extremely meticulous about everything. If he arrives suddenly, everyone runs around like crazy” because Mr. Trump inspects everything closely, Ms. Diaz said.

She recalled a nervous moment in 2012, when Mr. Trump approached her and asked her to follow him to the clubhouse, a renovated 1930s Georgian manor, where he proceeded to run his fingers around the edges of frames on the wall and over table surfaces to check for dust.

“You did a really great job,” she said he told her, and handed her a $100 bill.

That same year, she said, Mr. Trump had an outburst over some orange stains on the collar of his white golf shirt, which Ms. Diaz described as stubborn remnants of his makeup, which she had difficulty removing.

When Ms. Morales joined the housekeeping team in 2013, Ms. Diaz was in charge of training her, and began to take her to tend to Mr. Trump’s house. In November of that year, when Ms. Diaz quit, Ms. Morales and the housekeeping supervisor took on the job of cleaning Mr. Trump’s house together.

Ms. Morales said she will never forget the day Mr. Trump pulled up to the pro shop in his cart as she was washing its large, arched windows. Noticing that Ms. Morales, who is shy of five feet tall, could not reach the top, he said, “Excuse me,” grabbed her rag and wiped the upper portion of the glass.

Mr. Trump then asked Ms. Morales her name and where she was from, she recalled. “I said, ‘I am from Guatemala.’ He said, ‘Guatemalans are hard-working people.’” The president then reached into his pocket and handed her a $50 bill.

“I told myself, ‘God bless him.’ I thought, he’s a good person,” Ms. Morales recalled.

Soon after Mr. Trump launched his campaign for the presidency, in June 2015, Ms. Morales recalled, one of the managers summoned her to tell her that she could no longer work inside Mr. Trump’s house.

Around the same time, she said, several workers, who she said were also working illegally, had their work days shaved from five days to three days. “The workers panicked. A lot of people just left,” she said.

Two months after Mr. Trump’s inauguration, in March 2017, Ms. Morales said that she and other workers received a new employee handbook.

Under a section titled “Immigration Compliance,” the handbook stated that employees were required to present documents specified by the federal government. “Those that are found to have falsified information will not be eligible for employment,” the handbook stated.

Ms. Morales said she was given a new employment form to sign. She could not understand the form, she said, but her lawyer, Mr. Romero, said it was likely an updated I-9 employment eligibility document — a form that, like the previous one, referenced her falsified documents.

Sometime last year, she said, one of the managers told her she must get both a new green card and new Social Security card because there were problems with her current ones.

Ms. Morales provided a detailed account of what transpired, but it was not possible to independently confirm what happened. According to her recollection, she told the manager that she did not know how to obtain new forgeries.

“I don’t know where to get them,’ ” she said she told him.

The manager, she said, suggested she speak with a maintenance employee who he said knew where to acquire new documents. When the maintenance employee told her that the new papers would cost $165, Ms. Morales told the manager that she did not have the money. “He said, ‘don’t worry. I will lend you the money,’” she said.

Ms. Morales said the maintenance worker drove her to a house in Plainfield, N.J., where she waited in his car while he met with someone inside. Ms. Morales said that she had no record or recollection of the address.

The next day, she said, the maintenance worker brought her a new Social Security card and a realistic-looking green card to replace the one that had “expired.” She said the manager made copies of them for files kept at the club’s administrative headquarters.

Now that Mr. Trump was president, there was more than the usual excitement whenever he arrived. Ms. Morales was still asked to clean Mr. Trump’s residence on occasion, and had to wear a Secret Service pin whenever the president was on site, she said, most likely identifying her as an employee.

As the months went on, she and other employees at the golf club became increasingly disturbed about Mr. Trump’s comments, which they felt demeaned immigrants from Mexico and Central America. The president’s tone seemed to embolden others to make negative comments, Ms. Morales said. The housekeeping supervisor frequently made remarks about the employees’ vulnerable legal status when critiquing their work, she said, sometimes calling them “stupid illegal immigrants” with less intelligence than a dog.

Ms. Morales expects she will have to leave her job as soon as her name and work status are made public. She understands she could be deported. On Thursday, she spent the day with her lawyer, and as news of her disclosures spread, she did not answer a phone call from her supervisor at the golf course. She said she did not expect to return to work.

She said she is certain that her employers — perhaps even Mr. Trump — knew of her unlawful status all along.

“I ask myself, is it possible that this señor thinks we have papers? He knows we don’t speak English,” Ms. Morales said. “Why wouldn’t he figure it out?”

Maggie Haberman and Ben Protess contributed reporting from New York. Kitty Bennett contributed research.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/polit...sekeeper-without-papers/ar-BBQAYz2?ocid=ientp
 

searcher

Mother Lode Found
Mother Lode
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
180,066
Likes
43,462
Illegal immigrants with fake green cards reveal they cleaned Donald Trump's toilet, ironed his white boxers and tried to get make-up off his collar at Bedminster golf club – and even watched him interview cabinet picks

  • Victorina Morales says she cleaned toilet and dusted golf trophies at club
  • Guatemalan immigrant got job in 2013 using fake documents
  • Legal resident Sandra Diaz from Costa Rica says she got worked when she was illegal
  • The women say they worked for Trump for years but brought their stories to the New York Times due to his public 'insults' of immigrants
  • 'We are tired of the abuse, the insults, the way he talks about us when he knows that we are here helping him make money,' one said
  • They revealed life inside the golf club, where they ironed his white boxers, and there was a separate Trump washing machine with special detergent
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...oilet-ironed-boxers-Bedminster-golf-club.html
 

Joe King

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
7,416
Likes
7,687
Location
Instant Gratification Land
“I ask myself, is it possible that this señor thinks we have papers? He knows we don’t speak English,” Ms. Morales said. “Why wouldn’t he figure it out?”
So she intentionally employed deception to get a job, then tries to say, "they should have known I was lying!", really? All she accomplished was outing herself. I hope she likes goin' back to Guatemala. Hey, maybe she can join the next caravan. lol
 

searcher

Mother Lode Found
Mother Lode
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
180,066
Likes
43,462
Trump Organization responds to claims it hired illegal immigrants

Fox News
Frank Miles
8 hrs ago


The Trump Organization hit back at a bombshell report in The New York Times that said President Trump’s elite resorts had numerous illegal aliens as housekeeping, maintenance, and landscaping employees.

“We have tens of thousands of employees across our properties and have very strict hiring practices. If any employee submitted false documentation in an attempt to circumvent the law, they will be terminated immediately,” a spokesperson for the Trump Organization told Fox News via email.

The Times article spotlighted Victorina Morales, an undocumented immigrant from Guatemala, who has worked as a housekeeper at the Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, New Jersey, since 2013.

The Times reported that Morales has “made Trump’s bed, cleaned his toilet and dusted his crystal golf trophies.”

She said Trump would sometimes give her a $50 or $100 tip.

Morales, who reportedly crossed the American border illegally in 1999, said she’s hurt amid the Trump administration’s crackdown on undocumented immigrants.

“We are tired of the abuse, the insults, the way he talks about us when he knows that we are here helping him make money,” Morales told The Times. “We sweat it out to attend to his every need and have to put up with his humiliation.”

She said she didn’t have proper documentation, and she used false Social Security and permanent resident cards.

Morales told the news outlet she expects to be reprimanded severely with the report coming out.

“I ask myself, is it possible that this señor thinks we have papers? He knows we don’t speak English,” Morales told The Times. “Why wouldn’t he figure it out?”

Morales told The Times she is applying for asylum and is exploring a lawsuit claiming workplace abuse and discrimination.

Her lawyer, Anibel Romero, has called for federal and state investigations into the matter.

“This toxic environment was designed to intimidate these women, leaving them fearful for their safety and the safety of their families,” he said in a statement.

Trump has made border security a signature issue since he first began his presidential campaign on June 16, 2015, by saying: “When Mexico sends its people, they’re not sending their best... They’re sending people that have lots of problems, and they’re bringing those problems with [them]. They’re bringing drugs. They’re bringing crime. They’re rapists. And some, I assume, are good people.”

His administration has continued its push for a border wall at the nation's southern border.

Thousands of migrants have come up from Central America in recent weeks as part of caravans. Trump used his national security powers to put in place regulations that denied asylum to anyone caught crossing illegally, but a judge has halted that change as a lawsuit progresses.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/polit...ired-illegal-immigrants/ar-BBQBt1l?ocid=ientp
 

Joe King

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
7,416
Likes
7,687
Location
Instant Gratification Land
She said she didn’t have proper documentation, and she used false Social Security and permanent resident cards.
In other words she's a liar, but blames those she deceived for having believed her.


“I ask myself, is it possible that this señor thinks we have papers? He knows we don’t speak English,” Morales told The Times. “Why wouldn’t he figure it out?”
Seems like she's saying we should suspect any non-English speaking people who look like immigrants, as being illegal. Is that what she is saying here? If so, even the illegals agree that we need an "English only" law to weed them out.
 

southfork

Site Supporter
Site Supporter
Mother Lode
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
15,503
Likes
14,311
So it goes, nothing was unexpected, One of two main promises, does the Donal shut down .gov?


Nation & World

Posted Yesterday at 8:36 PM
increase font size

No money for border wall in exchange for ‘Dreamer’ legal protections, Pelosi says
The Democratic leader takes a hard line as spending bills to fund the government after Dec. 21 advance amid the president's threat of a shutdown over money to build the wall.
By MATTHEW DALYAssociated Press
Share





WASHINGTON — House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi on Thursday rejected the idea of paying for President Trump’s border wall in exchange for helping hundreds of thousands of young immigrants avoid deportation.
Funding for the wall – a top Trump priority – and legal protections for so-called Dreamers, a key Democratic goal, should not be linked, Pelosi said.



House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi speaks with the media on Thursday in Washington. Pelosi says building a border wall would be immoral. Associated Press/J. Scott Applewhite
“They’re two different subjects,” she said.
Her comments came as the House and Senate approved a stopgap bill Thursday to keep the government funded through Dec. 21. The measure, approved by voice votes in near-empty chambers, now goes to the White House.
Trump has promised to sign the two-week extension to allow for ceremonies this week honoring former President George H.W. Bush, who died last Friday. But he wants the next funding package to include at least $5 billion for his proposed wall, something Democrats have rejected. Trump is set to meet Tuesday at the White House with Pelosi and Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer.
Pelosi, who is seeking to become House speaker in January, said the lame-duck Congress should now pass a half-dozen government funding bills that key committees have already agreed on, along with a separate measure funding the Department of Homeland Security, which oversees the border. Funding for the homeland agency should address border security and does not necessarily include a wall, Pelosi said.
 

southfork

Site Supporter
Site Supporter
Mother Lode
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
15,503
Likes
14,311
WHAT AN EVIL FUCKING BITCH
Skip to content

POLITICUSUSA

POLITICUSUSA

Posted on Fri, Dec 7th, 2018 by Leo Vidal
Pelosi Reveals Plan to Avoid Government Shutdown With No Wall Funding
199
SHARES
FacebookTwitterSubscribeGooglePinterestPrintMailFlipboard


Rep. Nancy Pelosi of California is likely to become the next Speaker of the House of Representatives when Democrats take control next year. At a press conference on Thursday she said that she did not support President Trump’s proposal to build a border wall with Mexico. She called the proposed border wall “immoral, ineffective, and expensive” and promised it will not be funded under her watch. Then she added:
“Trump also promised Mexico would pay for it, so even if they did, it’s immoral still and they’re not going to pay for it.”

But Pelosi has to be careful because even as she takes a strong position, the president is threatening to shut down portions of the U.S. government if wall funding is not provided in the appropriations legislation passed by the House.

ADVERTISING





A shutdown would hurt the country and make both parties look bad in the eyes of the American people. To deal with Trump’s threats, Pelosi suggested that Congress “punt” on the idea at this time. She said that a debate over the president’s demand for the wall should be delayed until next fall in order to avert the government shutdown that Trump has threatened.
However, Pelosi made clear that she is still rejecting Trump’s $5 billion demand for border security. The Democratic leader told reporters she would refuse an offer from Trump and congressional Republicans to use the so-called ‘Dreamers’ as a bargaining chip. GOP leaders have said that they might be willing to permanently resolve the standoff over the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program in exchange for the requested money for a border wall.

“They’re two different subjects,” Pelosi said. She made clear that she wants to separate the debate over extending DACA from a fight in Congress over the border wall.

The House of Representatives and Senate passed a two-week stopgap funding measure Thursday afternoon, extending current government funding until December 21. This buys them more time to negotiate a long-term deal, although prospects for doing so are not very good.
The future Speaker said there should be some areas where agreement could be reached, and other areas where the funding decisions could be postponed through the use of continuing resolutions.
“We have before us all of the factors, all of the issues to make a decision. I think that what we can do that makes sense is to pass the six bills where the members of the appropriations committee have come to terms during ongoing negotiations,” Pelosi proposed. “Then have a continuing resolution only for Homeland Security as we go forward, and that’s pretty much where our position is now.”
Actually, a yearlong continuing resolution on funding for homeland security is a great idea, since that is the area where the two parties currently disagree very strongly. Also, she reminded everyone that the president could extend the DACA program on his own, and that would be the right thing for him to do. The young immigrants involved in DACA should not be held hostage by Trump in order to coerce Congress into funding his wall.
Rep. Pelosi then concluded her remarks to reporters with some optimistic comments, saying:
“We can move forward with this. We have a responsibility, all of us, to secure our borders, north, south, and coming in by plane, on our coasts — three coasts, north, south and west. And that — that’s a responsibility we honor, but we do so by honoring our values, as well.”



 

searcher

Mother Lode Found
Mother Lode
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
180,066
Likes
43,462
My border wall would pay for itself in just one MONTH claims Trump as he accuses Democrats of 'playing political games' and admits barrier could cost as much as $20 billion

  • Trump has claimed he needs just $5 billion to finish his border wall
  • But he admitted on Friday at a law enforcement conference that it could cost the taxpayers as much as $20 billion
  • He is in a standoff with Democrats to squeeze the money out of a spending bill
  • He'll host Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer at the White House on Tuesday morning for a negotiating session
  • Schumer has said that Trump can throw a 'temper tantrum' if he wants but he's not going to get the money he's demanding

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6472693/My-border-wall-pay-just-one-MONTH-claims-Trump.html
 

searcher

Mother Lode Found
Mother Lode
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
180,066
Likes
43,462
Appeals court denies Trump bid to reinstate asylum ban

The Hill
Chris Mills Rodrigo
8 hrs ago


The San Francisco-based 9th Circuit Court of Appeals on Friday denied the Trump administration's effort to delay a judge's order blocking enforcement of its asylum policy.

"We agree with the district court that the Rule is likely inconsistent with existing United States law. Accordingly, we DENY the Government's motion for a stay," reads the ruling from a three-judge panel of the court.


In early November, the Trump administration clamped down on asylum claims as part of its broader efforts to crack down on illegal immigration.

The Justice Department and Department of Homeland Security had earlier published a joint rule prohibiting certain people caught crossing the U.S. southern border from Mexico between ports of entry from claiming asylum.

Judge Jon Tigar of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California then sided with opponents of President Trump's policy, granting their request for a temporary restraining order against the policy denying asylum to migrants who enter the U.S. illegally.

"Whatever the scope of the President's authority, he may not rewrite the immigration laws to impose a condition that Congress has expressly forbidden," Tigar, an appointee of former President Obama, wrote in his decision last month.

Trump blasted the decision while dismissing Tigar as "an Obama judge" - a remark that drew a rare public rebuke from Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts.

"We do not have Obama judges or Trump judges, Bush judges or Clinton judges," Roberts responded in a statement before Thanksgiving. "What we have is an extraordinary group of dedicated judges doing their level best to do equal right to those appearing before them."

Trump continued to blast the decision last month while ripping into the 9th Circuit, which has issued a number of rulings against the administration and was set to rule on the federal judge's decision. Trump called the appeals court "a complete & total disaster."

The Trump administration appealed Tigar's decision in late November, saying that court's delay, which lasts for 30 days, undermined the president's determination that an immediate temporary suspension of entry between ports of entry was necessary to address the ongoing and increasing crisis facing our immigration system.

Friday's decision denies that appeal, meaning that the ban on illegal immigrants seeking asylum remains unapplied.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/polit...to-reinstate-asylum-ban/ar-BBQEKbN?ocid=ientp
 

searcher

Mother Lode Found
Mother Lode
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
180,066
Likes
43,462
Trump claims that illegal immigrants are bringing 'large scale crime and disease' into America and the military will build the wall if Democrats won't approve it in opening salvo on Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer

  • Congress and the president must agree on a federal funding proposal by Dec. 21
  • Trump wants $5 billion to fund his border wall and had Washington worried he would engineer a partial shut down of the government if he doesn't get it
  • Democrats are offering him $1.6 billion that can be used on fencing not concrete
  • He indicated Tuesday that he had a new strategy: have the military build the wall
  • Democratic senators warned just yesterday that the military does not have the authority to use defense funds to build border barriers on a bombing range in AZ
  • Trump fired off tweets that cast immigrants as disease-carrying lawbreakers hours before Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer were due at the White House
  • Democratic leaders will meet Trump at 11:30 am to hash out a spending deal
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...ary-build-wall-Democrats-wont-approve-it.html
 

searcher

Mother Lode Found
Mother Lode
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
180,066
Likes
43,462
BREAKING NEWS: Trump in public Oval Office shouting match with Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer as he threatens to shut down the government to get his wall built - and they call him a 'Pinocchio' and tell him: 'Elections have consequences'

  • Congress and the president must agree on a federal funding proposal by Dec. 21
  • Trump wants $5 billion to fund his border wall and had Washington worried he would engineer a partial shut down of the government if he doesn't get it
  • Democrats are offering him $1.6 billion that can be used on fencing not concrete
  • He indicated Tuesday that he had a new strategy: have the military build the wall
  • Democratic senators warned just yesterday that the military does not have the authority to use defense funds to build border barriers on a bombing range in AZ
  • Trump fired off tweets that cast immigrants as disease-carrying lawbreakers hours before Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer were due at the White House
  • Democratic leaders will meet Trump at 11:30 am to hash out a spending deal
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...ary-build-wall-Democrats-wont-approve-it.html
 

searcher

Mother Lode Found
Mother Lode
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
180,066
Likes
43,462
BORDER SECURITY President Trump Vs Pelosi, Schumer at EXPLOSIVE Press Briefing Border Wall Budget
Space Force News


Published on Dec 11, 2018
(No Ads now, Solely Your Support, Please Donate $1 https://bit.ly/2Dewqmz. Thank you very much!) 'You Put Words in My Mouth?' President Trump CLASHES Democrat Nancy Pelosi, Chuck Schumer in front of reporters at White House News Conference on Border Wall Spending Budget Bill
 

FoundingFathers

Founder
Founding Member
Site Mgr
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Mar 29, 2010
Messages
3,159
Likes
5,113
BORDER SECURITY President Trump Vs Pelosi, Schumer at EXPLOSIVE Press Briefing Border Wall Budget
Space Force News


Published on Dec 11, 2018
(No Ads now, Solely Your Support, Please Donate $1 https://bit.ly/2Dewqmz. Thank you very much!) 'You Put Words in My Mouth?' President Trump CLASHES Democrat Nancy Pelosi, Chuck Schumer in front of reporters at White House News Conference on Border Wall Spending Budget Bill
and this is why I love Trump.

Pence looks like how I looked as a kid when my parents started screaming at each other in front of me.
 

searcher

Mother Lode Found
Mother Lode
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
180,066
Likes
43,462
Today's morning laugh.

Migrant group demands Trump either let them in or pay them each $50G to turn around: report

Fox News
Louis Casiano
1 hr ago

Two groups of Central American migrants marched to the U.S. Consulate in Tijuana on Tuesday with a list of demands, with one group delivering an ultimatum to the Trump administration: either let them in the U.S. or pay them $50,000 each to go home, a report said.

Among other demands were that deportations be halted and that asylum seekers be processed faster and in greater numbers, the San Diego Union-Tribune reported.

The first group of caravan members, that included about 100 migrants, arrived at the consulate around 11 a.m. Alfonso Guerreo Ulloa, an organizer from Honduras, said the $50,000 figure was chosen as a group.

“It may seem like a lot of money to you,” Ulloa told the paper. “But it is a small sum compared to everything the United States has stolen from Honduras.”

He said the money would allow the migrants to return home and start a small business.

A letter from the group criticized U.S. intervention in Central America and asked the U.S. to remove Honduran President Orlando Hernandez from office. They gave the consulate 72 hours to respond.

A letter from the second group of about 50 migrants arrived at the consulate around 1:20 p.m. asking the U.S. to speed up the asylum process and to admit up to 300 asylum seekers each day at the San Ysidro Port of Entry in San Diego. Currently, around 40 to 100 are admitted.

“In the meantime, families, women and children who have fled our countries continue to suffer and the civil society of Tijuana continue to be forced to confront this humanitarian crisis, a refugee crisis caused in great part by decades of U.S. intervention in Central America,” the letter states.

Of the roughly 6,000 migrants who’ve traveled from Central America to Tijuana, around 700 have returned home, 300 have been deported and 2,500 have applied for humanitarian visas in Mexico, according to Xochtil Castillo, a caravan member who met with Mexican officials Tuesday.

Others have either crossed into the U.S. illegally, moved to other parts of Mexico or have fallen through the cracks, the Union-Tribune said.

“A lot of people are leaving because there is no solution here,” said Douglas Matute, 38, of Tijuana. “We thought they would let us in. But Trump sent the military instead of social workers.”

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/mi...g-to-turn-around-report/ar-BBQPKtI?ocid=ientp

Migrant theme song...………..

 

Joe King

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
7,416
Likes
7,687
Location
Instant Gratification Land
Migrant group demands Trump either let them in or pay them each $50G to turn around: report
Now resorting to blackmail? That'll really make people want to let them in.



He said the money would allow the migrants to return home and start a small business.
Start a business? In Honduras? Wait a minute. Back the f' up. The whole reason they were said to be fleeing Honduras was because it was said to be too violent to live there. If it's too violent to live there, it'd be too violent to take tens of thousands of dollars back with them and open a business.
This "demand" of theirs just proves what lying POS's they really are. All they want is what you the reader has, but without having to work for it like you had to.
 

searcher

Mother Lode Found
Mother Lode
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
180,066
Likes
43,462
Trump’s ultimatum on border wall boxes in fellow Republicans

Washington Post
Erica Werner, Sean Sullivan, Seung Min Kim
9 hrs ago


President Trump’s increasingly urgent push to construct a massive wall on the border with Mexico has created a nightmare scenario for congressional Republicans as they race to avert a partial shutdown of the federal government at the end of next week.

A day after Trump declared he would be proud to let funding lapse for dozens of government agencies if he does not get the money he wants for the wall, congressional Republicans signaled little appetite Wednesday to join his cause.

Some expressed befuddlement at Trump’s strategy, while others sidestepped his comments, marking a new rift between the president and his party on Capitol Hill with just weeks left at the helm of both chambers of Congress.

Subscribe to the Post Most newsletter: Today’s most popular stories on The Washington Post

“I don’t understand the strategy, but maybe he’s figured it out and he’ll tell us in due course,” said John Cornyn (Tex.), the No. 2 Senate Republican. “But I don’t understand it.”

The disconnect reflects the divergent priorities of Trump and Republicans in Congress during the twilight of their two-year grip on the federal government. While Trump made the wall a signature issue in his 2016 campaign, congressional GOP leaders have displayed less enthusiasm for it.

The divide comes weeks after a difficult midterm election for the GOP, in which Democrats won control of the House. The outcome presented Trump with even longer odds of securing wall funding in the new year.

Still, John Thune (S.D.), the third-ranking GOP senator, said there was no scenario under which he would be proud to shut down the government.

“It would not be good,” Thune said.

Pressed on whether Trump’s comments were helpful to the negotiations, Thune answered obliquely.

“The president has his own style and way of negotiating,” he said. “The only thing I would say is, it’s just simple math — that you’ve to got to get 60 votes in the Senate, and that’s going to require Democrats.”

In the wake of Trump’s contentious Oval Office meeting Tuesday with House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.), Republicans found themselves no closer to bridging the gap between Trump’s demand for $5 billion for his border wall in 2019 and the $1.3 billion Democrats are willing to spend on border fencing.

Instead, Republicans confronted a dilemma of Trump’s own making after he flipped the script by telling Pelosi and Schumer he’d be “proud to shut down the government for border security.”

The president’s off-the-cuff declaration in the televised Oval Office confab left talks at a virtual standstill and deprived Republicans of their ability to blame Democrats for a partial shutdown that could come at midnight Dec. 21, just before Christmas.

Republican lawmakers and members of Trump’s own administration have been talking for weeks about a “Schumer Shutdown” as they maneuvered to pin the blame on Democrats if a partial shutdown occurs. Democrats were delighted that Trump had taken ownership of a shutdown, and Republicans were forced to acknowledge that the president’s comments undermined their own efforts.

“I’m on the record saying numerous times I think a shutdown is a fool’s errand. Every shutdown we’ve been in, nobody wins. So I’m very discouraged by that,” said Sen. Shelley Moore Capito (R-W.Va.).

“I think he wants to reach an agreement, and I think he’ll realize — as he thinks about it — that a shutdown is really not going to gain anything for his position and, in a lot of ways, is more damaging to the American people,” Capito added.

Pelosi and Schumer urged the president in Tuesday’s meeting not to pursue a shutdown and instead take a deal that would provide $1.3 billion for border fencing by extending current levels of funding. Trump long has promised that Mexico would pay for the wall, a claim he repeated privately to Pelosi on Tuesday, saying the money could come from the newly renegotiated North American trade agreement. Pelosi dismissed that idea.

In the aftermath of the Oval Office meeting, House Republicans were struggling with whether to hold a vote on a spending bill containing $5 billion for the wall. It’s a priority for many conservatives in their final days in the majority, and it took on added urgency after Pelosi and Trump argued publicly Tuesday about whether it could pass the House, with Pelosi claiming it couldn’t and Trump insisting it could.

House GOP leaders claimed Wednesday to have the votes, but some questioned the wisdom of holding a vote that would face certain rejection in the Senate. And the risky proposition would come in the waning days of a lame-duck session, when it could be difficult to corral scores of defeated and retiring House Republicans who have been showing up only intermittently to vote.

“Do we have the votes for a measure that includes $5 billion for the wall? Yes,” said Rep. Patrick T. McHenry (N.C.), a member of the House GOP leadership. “The question of whether to do it is a question of wisdom and strategy and tactics, and it’s highly debatable about whether that’s the right move.”

That view was disputed by some House conservatives who campaigned along with Trump on delivering the wall and feel they must do it now before they fade into the minority. A few hard-liners said they were willing to back Trump even if his demands push the government into a partial shutdown.

“The president’s challenge is, and I’m with him on this, is that he needs to have $5 billion locked in and assured before the gavel falls on the 115th Congress,” said Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa).

“He said he would be proud to own it; that might have been a little hyperbolic,” King added. “But this is a line he’s drawn, and I’m going to defend it.”

The impact of any shutdown would be limited because about 75 percent of the federal government’s discretionary budget has been funded through next September. That includes major agencies like the Pentagon and the Health and Human Services Department.

And there would be no impact on the payment of Social Security, Medicaid or Medicare benefits because those programs fall under “mandatory” spending that is paid out without annual congressional approval. Mandatory spending makes up about 70 percent of federal spending.

In light of those facts, several Republicans downplayed the potential impact of a partial shutdown, suggesting that even if it did happen it wouldn’t be such a big deal.

“The fact is, the vast majority of the government is not going to be shut down under any scenario,” said Sen. Patrick J. Toomey (R-Pa.). “So there’s this little tiny sliver, and within that universe, anybody that is an essential employee still works. So I think this has all gotten a lot overblown.”

Still, the agencies that remain to be funded could be hit hard.

The Interior, Agriculture, Justice, Commerce, Transportation and State departments and NASA could be forced to send thousands of workers home without pay until an agreement is reached. This could lead to major disruptions and delays in services, although the precise implications will not be clear until each agency determines how it will operate after funding lapses.

Within Homeland Security, most employees are exempt from a shutdown and would report to their jobs regardless, including workers at the Federal Emergency Management Agency, Border Patrol, Coast Guard, Transportation Security Administration, and U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency. These workers could go unpaid if the shutdown dragged on, but they would eventually get back pay once it was over.

“We’re at an impasse at the moment,” said Senate Appropriations Chairman Richard C. Shelby (R-Ala.). Shelby said a shutdown is “probably more than possible right now, probably getting toward probable — unless something happens.”

erica.werner@washpost.com

sean.sullivan@washpost.com

seung-min.kim@washpost.com

Damian Paletta, Lisa Rein and Mike DeBonis contributed to this report.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/polit...s-in-fellow-republicans/ar-BBQR3b5?ocid=ientp
 

Joe King

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
7,416
Likes
7,687
Location
Instant Gratification Land
“I’m on the record saying numerous times I think a shutdown is a fool’s errand. Every shutdown we’ve been in, nobody wins. So I’m very discouraged by that,” said Sen. Shelley Moore Capito (R-W.Va.).
That's because the "shutdown" never actually affects the parts of gov that needs to be shutdown.