• Same story, different day...........year ie more of the same fiat floods the world
  • There are no markets
  • "Spreading the ideas of freedom loving people on matters regarding high finance, politics, constructionist Constitution, and mental masturbation of all types"

Is It Time For Mueller To Wrap It Up Or Step It Up?

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Sen. Elizabeth Warren: Mueller needs to be protected
CNN


Published on Aug 22, 2018
Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) tells CNN’s John Berman that Congress should pass a law to make sure that special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation is protected, but does not say whether the latest developments are grounds for impeaching President Trump.
 

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Sen. Elizabeth Warren: Mueller needs to be protected
CNN


Published on Aug 22, 2018
Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) tells CNN’s John Berman that Congress should pass a law to make sure that special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation is protected, but does not say whether the latest developments are grounds for impeaching President Trump.
Sundunce and Warren both think Mueller is a white hat, who would have thought it so.
 

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Sen. Elizabeth Warren: Mueller needs to be protected
CNN


Published on Aug 22, 2018
Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) tells CNN’s John Berman that Congress should pass a law to make sure that special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation is protected, but does not say whether the latest developments are grounds for impeaching President Trump.

Hip boots needed to listen to this BS.
 

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Robert Mueller gets 59 percent approval rate - and 40 percent of people think he will find evidence Trump committed crimes or is worthy of impeachment

  • A Fox News poll found special counsel Robert Mueller has a higher approval rating than President Donald Trump
  • 59 percent approve of Mueller's Russia investigation
  • Trump's approval rating was 45 percent in the same poll
  • The majority of the poll was conducted before Tuesday's double whammy of Paul Manafort's convictions and Michael Cohen's plea deal
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...val-rate-40-percent-think-evidence-Trump.html
 

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Mueller May Have Information on Trump's Tax Returns


Alexandra Hutzler
15 hrs ago

Robert Mueller may be closing in on Donald Trump's undisclosed tax returns, George W. Bush's former ethics attorney Richard Painter says.

In an interview with MSNBC's Brian Williams during a recent segment on The 11th Hour, Painter said that the president must be worried as an immunity deal was reported to be extended to the Trump Organization's chief financial officer Allen Weisselberg.

While the immunity deal doesn't necessarily mean direct trouble for Trump, it resulted in prosecutors investigating the president's former personal lawyer Michael Cohen getting information under oath from someone deeply involved in Trump's business.


"Now we have the chief financial officer of the Trump Organization turning state’s evidence," Painter told Williams on Friday. "I have to say that every white-collar criminal defense lawyer knows when the chief financial officer turns state’s evidence, everyone in the executive suite is in a lot of trouble because the chief financial officer knows exactly where the money is coming and going.”

Painter continued, saying that every time Mueller gets "anywhere near Donald Trump's money, Donald Trump starts threatening to fire Bob Mueller."

"It appears that they’re closing in on the basic financial structure of the Trump Organization. Perhaps the reasons why he’s not disclosing his tax returns. And what we may find there is really quite ugly," the ethics attorney added.

Mueller's special counsel investigation has been looking into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. Trump has repeatedly slammed the investigation as a total "witch hunt."

Trump did not respond to Weisselberg's immunity deal directly, instead bashing his former "fixer" Michael Cohen for betraying him and pleading guilty to federal prosecutors. Trump says that the move was called "flipping, and it almost ought to be illegal. It's not a fair thing."

Trump's tax returns have long been a controversial topic. The billionaire real estate mogul first refused to release them on the campaign trial, a normal tradition among presidential candidates. Then-candidate Trump has argued that he couldn't release the records because he was being audited by the Internal Revenue Service. But previous presidents and vice presidents have also been in the same situation, and have publicly released their tax returns.

After this past tax return deadline passed in April, the White House claimed that the president filed an extension for his 2017 tax return, "as do many Americans with complex returns."

"He will file his tax return by the extension deadline of October 15, 2018," White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said in a statement.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/polit...n-on-trumps-tax-returns/ar-BBMqz1n?ocid=ientp
 

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The noose is tightening Obama is next.
 

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Trump loyalist Roger Stone predicts Mueller will charge Don Jr with lying to the FBI, before begging supporters to donate to his OWN legal fund in case special counsel 'pressures HIM to testify against the President'

  • Longtime Trump ally Roger Stone made the prediction in interview on Friday
  • Said Don Trump Jr may be in legal jeopardy over statements about meeting
  • Trump Jr met with a Russian lawyer in infamous Trump Tower meeting in 2016
  • Publicly said it was about adoption laws, but turned out to be about Clinton dirt
  • Though the meeting was legal, Trump Jr could be charged with lying to FBI if he made contradictory statements to agents - but it's unknown whether he did
  • Stone also believes he himself will be indicted and seeks cash from supporters
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...Mueller-charge-Donald-Trump-Jr-lying-FBI.html
 

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Soon farther along Mueller, Rosenstein and Sessions (white hats) will set their sights on the Clinton cabal just be patient folks.
 

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Mueller May Have Information on Trump's Tax Returns


Alexandra Hutzler
15 hrs ago

Robert Mueller may be closing in on Donald Trump's undisclosed tax returns, George W. Bush's former ethics attorney Richard Painter says.

In an interview with MSNBC's Brian Williams during a recent segment on The 11th Hour, Painter said that the president must be worried as an immunity deal was reported to be extended to the Trump Organization's chief financial officer Allen Weisselberg.

While the immunity deal doesn't necessarily mean direct trouble for Trump, it resulted in prosecutors investigating the president's former personal lawyer Michael Cohen getting information under oath from someone deeply involved in Trump's business.


"Now we have the chief financial officer of the Trump Organization turning state’s evidence," Painter told Williams on Friday. "I have to say that every white-collar criminal defense lawyer knows when the chief financial officer turns state’s evidence, everyone in the executive suite is in a lot of trouble because the chief financial officer knows exactly where the money is coming and going.”

Painter continued, saying that every time Mueller gets "anywhere near Donald Trump's money, Donald Trump starts threatening to fire Bob Mueller."

"It appears that they’re closing in on the basic financial structure of the Trump Organization. Perhaps the reasons why he’s not disclosing his tax returns. And what we may find there is really quite ugly," the ethics attorney added.

Mueller's special counsel investigation has been looking into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. Trump has repeatedly slammed the investigation as a total "witch hunt."

Trump did not respond to Weisselberg's immunity deal directly, instead bashing his former "fixer" Michael Cohen for betraying him and pleading guilty to federal prosecutors. Trump says that the move was called "flipping, and it almost ought to be illegal. It's not a fair thing."

Trump's tax returns have long been a controversial topic. The billionaire real estate mogul first refused to release them on the campaign trial, a normal tradition among presidential candidates. Then-candidate Trump has argued that he couldn't release the records because he was being audited by the Internal Revenue Service. But previous presidents and vice presidents have also been in the same situation, and have publicly released their tax returns.

After this past tax return deadline passed in April, the White House claimed that the president filed an extension for his 2017 tax return, "as do many Americans with complex returns."

"He will file his tax return by the extension deadline of October 15, 2018," White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said in a statement.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/polit...n-on-trumps-tax-returns/ar-BBMqz1n?ocid=ientp
They simply can't let it go, stupid fools
 

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Robert Mueller gets 59 percent approval rate - and 40 percent of people think he will find evidence Trump committed crimes or is worthy of impeachment

  • A Fox News poll found special counsel Robert Mueller has a higher approval rating than President Donald Trump
  • 59 percent approve of Mueller's Russia investigation
  • Trump's approval rating was 45 percent in the same poll
  • The majority of the poll was conducted before Tuesday's double whammy of Paul Manafort's convictions and Michael Cohen's plea deal
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...val-rate-40-percent-think-evidence-Trump.html
Polls reported on by a progressive British newsrag :laughing:
 

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Soon farther along Mueller, Rosenstein and Sessions (white hats) will set their sights on the Clinton cabal just be patient folks.
I'll believe it when I see it
 

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‘Winter is coming’: Allies fear Trump isn’t prepared for gathering legal storm

Washington Post
Philip Rucker, Carol Leonnig, Josh Dawsey, Ashley Parker
1 hr ago


President Trump’s advisers and allies are increasingly worried that he has neither the staff nor the strategy to protect himself from a possible Democratic takeover of the House, which would empower the opposition party to shower the administration with subpoenas or even pursue impeachment charges.

Within Trump’s orbit, there is consensus that his current legal team is not equipped to effectively navigate an onslaught of congressional demands, and there has been broad discussion about bringing on new lawyers experienced in white-collar defense and political scandals.

The president and some of his advisers have discussed possibly adding veteran defense attorney Abbe Lowell, who currently represents Trump son-in-law and senior adviser Jared Kushner, to Trump’s personal legal team if an impeachment battle or other fights with Congress emerge after the midterm elections, according to people familiar with the discussions.

Trump advisers also are discussing recruiting experienced legal firepower to the Office of White House Counsel, which is facing departures and has dwindled in size at a critical juncture. The office has about 25 lawyers now, down from roughly 35 earlier in the presidency, according to a White House official with direct knowledge.

Trump announced Wednesday that Donald McGahn will depart as White House counsel this fall, once the Senate confirms Supreme Court nominee Brett M. Kavanaugh. Three of McGahn’s deputies — Greg Katsas, Uttam Dhillon and Makan Delrahim — have departed, and a fourth, Stefan Passantino, will have his last day Friday. That leaves John Eisenberg, who handles national security, as the lone deputy counsel.

Trump recently has consulted his personal attorneys about the likelihood of impeachment proceedings. And McGahn and other aides have invoked the prospect of impeachment to persuade the president not to take actions or behave in ways that they believe would hurt him, officials said.

Still, Trump has not directed his lawyers or his political aides to prepare an action plan, leaving allies to fret that the president does not appreciate the magnitude of what could be in store next year.

This account of the president and his team grappling with a potential crisis is based on interviews this week with 26 White House officials, presidential advisers, and lawyers and strategists close to the administration, most of whom spoke on the condition of anonymity to be candid.

Trump attorney Rudolph W. Giuliani said he and the president have discussed the possibility that special counsel Robert S. Mueller III will issue a damning report to Congress.

“We’ve talked a lot about impeachment at different times,” Giuliani said. “It’s the only thing that hangs out there. They can’t [criminally] charge him.”

If Democrats control the House, the oversight committees likely would use their subpoena power as a weapon to assail the administration, investigating with a vengeance. The committees could hold hearings about policies

such as the travel ban affecting majority-Muslim countries and “zero tolerance” family separation, as well as on possible ethical misconduct throughout the administration or the Trump family’s private businesses.

White House officials defended Trump’s lack of preparation by saying he is focused squarely on helping Republicans preserve their majorities in the Nov. 6 midterm elections rather than, in the words of one senior official, “panicking about something that could happen.”

Any Democratic salvos would not happen until new members take office in January, which Trump advisers said seems like eons away in an administration juggling so many immediate problems. As a result, preparing for possible impeachment proceedings is not at the top of Trump’s to-do list.

“I don’t know if he’s really thought about it in depth yet,” Giuliani said.

One source of growing anxiety among Trump allies is the worry that the president and some senior White House officials are not anxious enough. Although Trump sometimes talks about impeachment with his advisers, in other moments, he gets mad that “the i-word,” as he calls it, is raised, according to his associates.

“Winter is coming,” said one Trump ally in close communication with the White House. “Assuming Democrats win the House, which we all believe is a very strong likelihood, the White House will be under siege. But it’s like tumbleweeds rolling down the halls over there. Nobody’s prepared for war.”

Trump has told confidants that some of his aides have highly competent lawyers such as Lowell, who represents Kushner, and William A. Burck, who represents McGahn as well as former White House chief of staff Reince Priebus and former White House chief strategist Stephen K. Bannon.

“He wonders why he doesn’t have lawyers like that,” said one person who has discussed the matter with Trump.

Another adviser said Trump remarked this year, “I need a lawyer like Abbe.”

Giuliani said that he has not heard of Trump considering adding Lowell to the team but that he would be a great choice because of his thorough and aggressive style.

“This president might like that better,” Giuliani said. “If he thinks someone isn’t being tough enough, he has a tendency to go out to defend himself. And that’s not good.”

Lowell declined to comment, and people familiar with the talks said it was unclear whether he would have the time for or interest in working for Trump, considering that he already represents Kushner.

Mark Corallo, a former spokesman for Trump’s legal team, recommended that the president hire lawyers who are “real scholars of the Constitution” and who are well versed in history’s impeachment proceedings for Bill Clinton and Andrew Johnson.

“I would think that the type of lawyer most able to handle the impeachment scenario would be someone from the appellate and Supreme Court bar — someone of the Ted Olson or Paul Clement or Andy Pincus level, someone who knows how to make the kind of arguments should it come to a vote in the Senate,” Corallo said.

Emmet Flood, a White House lawyer and McGahn ally who handles the special counsel’s Russia investigation, has long been considered a top prospect to replace McGahn. People close to Flood said that if Trump offers him the counsel’s job, he would have to evaluate how best he could continue his priority of serving as the White House’s chief strategist with the Mueller probe.

Flood, often described as a lawyer’s lawyer, is in many ways the opposite of Trump and Giuliani, yet the president has told advisers he is impressed by Flood’s legal chops and hard-line positions defending the prerogatives of the White House.

“The next White House counsel needs to be prepared for a lot of interactions on the Hill,” said Sen. Lindsey O. Graham (R-S.C.). “If the Democrats do take back the House, you can expect the White House counsel to be center stage in answering subpoenas and really in the middle of it all.”

White House officials said Trump is working hard on the campaign trail to prevent Democrats from winning a majority in either the House or the Senate.

“We don’t expect Democrats to take over,” White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said. “Democrats have no message other than to attack the president. . . . If they want to go backwards, they can vote for Democrats. If they want to continue moving forward under President Trump, they should vote for people that support his policies.”

White House aides, including deputy chief of staff Johnny DeStefano and political director Bill Stepien, have tried to ratchet down Trump’s expectations for the elections, saying that projections look grim in the House.

Some of Trump’s advisers, including recently departed White House legislative affairs director Marc Short, have said that Democrats winning the House could help the president’s reelection chances in 2020 if they overplay their hand going after Trump, as Republicans did in Clinton’s second term.

Trump has so far not accepted that argument, often saying that Republicans are going to keep the House, according to people familiar with the talks.

Many Trump associates inside and outside the government say the opposite. They warn that a Democratic House majority could all but paralyze the White House with investigations, requests for documents and calls to testify on any number of issues, including Trump’s businesses.

One adviser recalled recently telling Trump, “They will crush you if they win. You don’t want them investigating every single thing you’ve done.”

Another concern is that the White House, which already has struggled in attracting top-caliber talent to staff positions, could face an exodus if Democrats take over the House, because aides fear their mere proximity to the president could place them in legal limbo and possibly result in hefty lawyers’ fees.

“It stops good people from potentially serving because nobody wants to inherit a $400,000 legal bill,” said another Trump adviser.

Trump allies privately worry that the West Wing staff is barely equipped to handle basic crisis communications functions, such as distributing robust talking points to key surrogates, and question how the operation could handle an impeachment trial or other potential battles.

Trump sees the administration as having a singular focus — him — and therefore is less concerned with the institution of the presidency and not aware of the vast infrastructure often required to protect it, according to some of his allies.

During the impeachment proceedings against Clinton, the White House staffed a robust war room in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building that included scores of lawyers, as well as communications staffers and other strategists.

Jack Quinn, who served as White House counsel under Clinton, said his office had at least 40 lawyers and as many as 60 during key times. He estimated that he spent between half and three-quarters of his time dealing with investigations.

“I appreciate that Rudy Giuliani is doing a lot of the public speaking and perhaps some other things,” Quinn said. But, he added, “it’s a little bit of a mystery to me who is doing the outside legal work.”

“The president needs to have the very best lawyers he can get both in the White House and outside representing him personally,” Quinn said.

Trump allies lament that the current administration has no such infrastructure and fret that there are no indications it is building one.

“What he really has to get ready for is an onslaught from all of these committees,” Giuliani said of congressional inquiries. “Because what the Democrats want is death by a thousand cuts.”

philip.rucker@washpost.com

carol.leonnig@washpost.com

josh.dawsey@washpost.com

ashley.parker@washpost.com

Rosalind S. Helderman contributed to this report.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/polit...r-gathering-legal-storm/ar-BBMDdCo?ocid=ientp
 

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What Has Come Out Of The Multiple Investigations Into President Trump? | Velshi & Ruhle | MSNBC
MSNBC


Published on Aug 30, 2018
Multiple investigations into President Trump’s campaign and businesses are growing and bearing fruit. Ali Velshi and Stephanie Ruhle explain why he should be concerned. Weighing in: NBC’s Geoff Bennett and MSNBC Contributor Joyce Vance.
» Subscribe to MSNBC: http://on.msnbc.com/SubscribeTomsnbc
 

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Representative Eric Swalwell On GOP's List Of Trump Scandals: ‘They Know’ | The Last Word | MSNBC
MSNBC


Published on Aug 30, 2018
Democratic Rep. Eric Swalwell says the Republicans' list of potential Trump investigations concerns him because it shows "they know" that Donald Trump is facing legal exposure. Rep. Swalwell also reacts to the President's new "impeachment" claims.
» Subscribe to MSNBC: http://on.msnbc.com/SubscribeTomsnbc
 

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Rudy Giuliani is preparing a report questioning Robert Mueller's legitimacy to be published when his Russia investigation wraps up

  • Rudy Giuliani has confirmed he is putting together a counter-report to be issued when Robert Mueller warps up his investigation into Russian election meddling
  • Giuliani, who has hinted at the report before but never discussed its contents, says it will question Mueller's legitimacy and respond to claims of collusion
  • He added that it will likely not contain any new information or interviews
  • Experts say it is a PR exercise aimed at deflecting the impact of Mueller's report
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...t-questioning-Robert-Muellers-legitimacy.html
 

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Rudy Giuliani is preparing a report questioning Robert Mueller's legitimacy to be published when his Russia investigation wraps up

  • Rudy Giuliani has confirmed he is putting together a counter-report to be issued when Robert Mueller warps up his investigation into Russian election meddling
  • Giuliani, who has hinted at the report before but never discussed its contents, says it will question Mueller's legitimacy and respond to claims of collusion
  • He added that it will likely not contain any new information or interviews
  • Experts say it is a PR exercise aimed at deflecting the impact of Mueller's report
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...t-questioning-Robert-Muellers-legitimacy.html
Rudy is playing the part of the nutcase who's charged with distracting the MSM from other goings on within the plan. He's doing a fine job too as he's getting a lot of press
 

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D.C. lobbyist pleads guilty and admits arranging for 'straw donor' to cover for Ukrainian businessman who gave $50,000 to Trump's inauguration – and is now cooperating with Mueller
  • W. Samuel Patten entered his plea in federal court in Washington
  • He worked with former Trump campaign chair Paul Manafort, who was found guilty this month of eight financial counts
  • Agrees to cooperate with special counsel Robert Mueller
  • Also an associate of Konstantin Kilimnik, who prosecutors say has ties to Russian intelligence
  • Failed to register his work as a foreign agent
  • Arranged U.S. citizen to be 'straw donor' for $50,000
  • Attended inauguration with 'Foreigner B' who made illegal contribution
  • Agreed to cooperate for a more lenient sentence
  • Trump last week bashed 'flipping' by witnesses and said it should perhaps be illegal
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6119041/DC-lobbyist-charged-failing-file-foreign-agent.html
 

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Mueller snubs Trump's attorneys' letter setting out interview conditions as speculation grips D.C. of an imminent move by special counsel - but DOJ says it's 'fake news'

  • Speculation was running rampant on the Friday before Labor Day,that Mueller could issue a final report and formally conclude his end of the investigation
  • But Mueller was also predicted to be planning a bombshell announcement that could send shockwaves through Washington
  • A spokeswoman for the Department of Justice told DailyMail.com on Friday morning it's 'fake news' that action is imminent
  • Special counsel's office declined a request for comment
  • Trump's legal team says it has not heard from Mueller in weeks
  • President warned Thursday that he could 'get involved' in the DOJ & FBI
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...neys-letter-setting-interview-conditions.html
 

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Papadopoulos says Sessions supported Putin campaign meeting

CNN
By Katelyn Polantz, CNN
1 hr ago

Convicted former Trump campaign adviser George Papadopoulos has publicly contradicted Attorney General Jeff Sessions' sworn testimony to Congress, saying both Sessions and Donald Trump apparently supported his proposal that Trump meet with Vladimir Putin during the 2016 campaign, according to a court filing late Friday night.

"While some in the room rebuffed George's offer, Mr. Trump nodded with approval and deferred to Mr. Sessions who appeared to like the idea and stated that the campaign should look into it. George's giddiness over Mr. Trump's recognition was prominent during the days that followed," Papadopoulos' lawyers wrote in a court filing Friday. Papadopoulos' legal team said that he has shared with special counsel Robert Mueller his recollections of the March 31, 2016, meeting.

Sessions, when asked about that meeting under oath, said that he "pushed back" on the idea of the Putin summit. CNN previously reported that Trump "heard him out," according to another adviser in the room, when Papadopoulos proposed the idea and offered to help execute it.

The new description came in a criminal sentencing request Papadopoulos' legal team filed to a federal judge late Friday night -- the same day a lobbyist for Ukrainians admitted in court to criminal obstruction when he lied to Congress, and amid the President's intensifying public feud with Sessions.

Papadopoulos "was the first domino, and many have fallen in behind," his attorneys write Friday. "Despite the gravity of his offense, it is important to remember what Special Counsel said at George's plea of guilty: he was just a small part of a large-scale investigation."

Papadopoulos pleaded guilty to one count of lying to investigators last October. He asked the judge to sentence him to only probation that he has already served during the year since his plea, effectively allowing him to go free after his sentencing next week.

In a long narrative about his experiences, Papadopoulos' attorneys attempt in the sentencing memo to portray Papadopoulos as a young and eager Trump campaign staffer who found himself unaware of the broad investigation into Russian interference in the election when he lied to the FBI last year.

"Mr. Papadopoulos is ashamed and remorseful," Papadopoulos' attorneys wrote Friday. "His motives for lying to the FBI were wrongheaded indeed but far from the sinister spin the government suggests."

The Trump-Putin idea

Papadopoulos goes into specifics for the first time about how he floated the idea of a meeting between Trump and Putin at a campaign roundtable at the Trump International Hotel in March 2016. Donald Trump, then-Sen. Jeff Sessions and others attended the meeting.

About a month later, Papadopoulos learned that the Russians had "dirt" on Trump's opposition, Hillary Clinton, in "thousands of emails."

A Trump-Putin get-together never happened during the campaign.

Seeking probation

Prosecutors previously asked the judge to imprison Papadopoulos for up to six months, after he thwarted their early attempts to question a foreigner who may have known about Russian interference in the presidential campaign. The prosecutors' sentencing request focused more on the repeated lies Papadopoulos told about his contact with foreigners when he spoke to the FBI last year, and less about his interactions inside the Trump campaign.

In the filing Friday, Papadopoulos' lawyers lay out the image of an intellectually curious, successful and worldly man. They describe his scholarly work on energy policy in foreign countries and his interest in working for Trump in 2016.

Papadopoulos had "no experience with US and Russian diplomacy" when he started with Trump's campaign in 2016 -- yet eventually became one of the future president's foreign policy advisers.

In March that year, Papadopoulos met Joseph Mifsud, a European professor working in London who claimed to have connections to the Russian government, Papadopoulos's lawyers said. "Professor Mifsud paid young George little attention until learning of his position as one of Trump's foreign policy advisers," they write.

Papadopoulos' defense team also describes the first time he spoke to the FBI, months before the appointment of Robert Mueller as special counsel. Papadopoulos thought the FBI agents who came to his mother's house while he showered in early 2017 wanted to speak with him about Russian businessman Sergei Millian -- then enmeshed in the Trump dossier news coverage, the filing says. Millian at one point had pitched Papadopoulos "an opportunity," the lawyers write, giving few other details.

Media reports around that time identified Millian as a source of information in the dossier, though CNN has not confirmed his involvement nor many of the details in the dossier about alleged Trump-Russia collusion.

Millian has denied being a source for the dossier and says he does not have any compromising information about Trump.

Papadopoulos also spoke to the FBI investigators at that time about another foreign policy adviser for Trump with Russia connections, Carter Page, and about Mifsud and others.

Papadopoulos admits to lying to the FBI about his knowledge of the hacked Clinton emails.

"Out of loyalty to the new president and his desire to be part of the administration, he hoisted himself upon his own petard," Papadopoulos' attorneys write.

Papadopoulos is scheduled to be sentenced on September 7 by federal district judge Randy Moss in DC.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/polit...-putin-campaign-meeting/ar-BBMJiwJ?ocid=ientp
 

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Manafort-Linked Lobbyist Admits To Steering Illegal Funds To Trump Inaugural | Hardball | MSNBC
MSNBC


Published on Aug 31, 2018
The operative pleaded guilty in court Friday and has agreed to cooperate with the Special Counsel.
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CNN, MSNBC=Fake News
 

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Democrats, Eyeing a Majority, Prepare an Investigative Onslaught

NYT
By NICHOLAS FANDOS
10 hrs ago


WASHINGTON — House Democrats, increasingly optimistic they will win back control in November, are mining a mountain of stymied oversight requests in preparation for an onslaught of hearings, subpoenas and investigations into nearly every corner of the Trump administration.

While they continue to distance themselves from the most extreme recourse — impeaching President Trump — senior Democrats who stand to control key House panels could soon oversee inquiries into some of the most precarious threats to Mr. Trump’s presidency. Those include whether his campaign coordinated with Russia to influence the 2016 election, if the president obstructed a federal investigation into the matter and what role Mr. Trump played in paying to silence two women in the closing weeks of the campaign who say they had affairs with him.

Their scrutiny could also extend beyond Mr. Trump’s legal troubles to include his administration’s remaking of federal regulations and other policies that the party has disagreed with.

“I am not looking for headlines,” said Representative Elijah Cummings of Maryland, the top Democrat on the powerful House Oversight and Government Reform Committee. “I am going to be defending the truth. We want to look at what is happening under this administration because all of us can agree this is not normal.”

Republicans, who have used their majority to systematically block Democratic demands of the administration, privately fear the onslaught could knock Mr. Trump’s government into a defensive posture or worse. In hopes of scaring voters to the polls, they have begun sounding sirens that Democrats will move quickly to impeach Mr. Trump.

“They are going to try to impeach,” said Representative Jim Jordan, an Ohio Republican who has been one of Mr. Trump’s staunchest allies on Capitol Hill. “We know that. This is why we have got to turn out our voters and win,” Mr. Jordan said. The congressman, a wrestling coach turned politician, is facing his own political scandal stemming from accusations that he was aware of sexual misconduct at Ohio State University but did nothing to stop it.

On Monday, Mr. Trump blasted Jeff Sessions, his attorney general, for bringing charges against two Republican House members ahead of the midterm elections, saying it put their re-election in jeopardy.

“Two easy wins now in doubt because there is not enough time. Good job Jeff,” Mr. Trump said on Twitter.

Democrats have been hesitant to loudly advertise the specifics of the potential investigative blitz, convinced that swing voters are more likely to back them based on kitchen-table economic issues like wages, health care and retirement benefits. Loyal Democratic voters do not need to be reminded that a Democratic House will check the power of the president, they argue.

“If this is a referendum on Trump, the way I would want to frame it is not ‘remove or retain’ but ‘contain or enable,’” said Representative Brad Sherman, Democrat of California, who has already introduced an article of impeachment against the president. “There are more votes for ‘contain’ than there are for ‘remove.’”

But with Mr. Trump’s longtime personal lawyer, Michael D. Cohen, implicating the president directly in the payoffs to Stephanie Clifford and Karen McDougal, the conviction of Mr. Trump’s former campaign chairman in federal court and a rash of indictments and other alleged wrongdoings swirling around House Republicans themselves, the Democrats are increasingly selling themselves as a much-needed antidote to a “culture of corruption” in the capital.

Democrats believe the Republicans abused the power of the majority to hobble the Obama administration, deeply damage Hillary Clinton and protect Mr. Trump. That frustration, coupled with what most lawmakers expect to be a wave of Democratic anti-Trump outrage fueling midterm victories, could overwhelm the instincts of more moderate members of the party to chart a different, more bipartisan course than Republicans have.

Democrats on the Oversight Committee, typically the House’s most muscular investigative body, have more than 50 subpoena requests that have been denied by committee Republicans since Mr. Trump took office, from the administration of security clearances at the White House to chartered jet travel by cabinet officials to Justice Department documents related to its decision not to defend the Affordable Care Act in court.

“It’s not like we have to go dig them up. They are right there sitting on the desk,” Mr. Cummings said.

In the Intelligence Committee, home to the House’s only investigation of Russian election interference, Democrats have shown interest in reopening what they viewed as an anemic inquiry that was prematurely closed by Republicans. They have outlined an ambitious list of witnesses worthy of potential subpoena, and Representative Adam B. Schiff of California, the committee’s top Democrat, says that unsubstantiated suggestions that Russia could have laundered money through the Trump administration are of “great concern.”

Party leaders could also choose to impanel a special committee to focus on the Russia matter, freeing the Intelligence Committee to more traditional oversight of the C.I.A. and the F.B.I.

But many of the most sensitive investigations directly touching Mr. Trump are likely to fall to the Judiciary Committee, one of Congress’s most partisan bodies, where impeachment proceedings must begin. Led by Representative Jerrold Nadler of New York, committee Democrats have repeatedly pressed for an investigation of whether Mr. Trump’s business profits violate anticorruption clauses of the Constitution. They titled a 56-page report on requests mothballed by Republicans “A Record of Abuse, Corruption, and Inaction.”

Perhaps more consequentially, Mr. Nadler and his colleagues have pushed for the committee’s own Russia investigation, as well as inquiries into the firing of James B. Comey as F.B.I. director last year and Mr. Trump’s attacks on the F.B.I. and the Justice Department. While not formal impeachment inquiries, studying those topics would allow the committee to begin to quietly set a foundation for a potential report from the special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III, or the presentation of new facts by prosecutors in the Cohen case.

“We have to see more,” Mr. Nadler said of impeachment. “We need more evidence. We need to see what Mueller comes up with. We may get there.”

In the wake of Mr. Cohen’s guilty plea last month, Mr. Nadler requested an emergency meeting of the committee to demand insight from the Justice Department into its continuing investigation of potential campaign finance violations, as well as a public hearing on presidential pardons. The committee’s Republican chairman, Representative Robert Goodlatte of Virginia, did not reply.

Less marquee committees — including the Financial Services, Veterans Affairs, Ways and Means and Energy and Commerce Committees — would probably carry out their own policy-oriented probes, digging out private communications behind divisive administration decisions and personnel, or even take a run at obtaining Mr. Trump’s long-sought tax returns.

Taken together, it would represent a sharp turn from the precipitous drop-off in congressional oversight since President Barack Obama left office. Republicans defend their record, arguing that they have called administration witnesses when appropriate and carried out a yearlong, politically unpopular investigation of Mr. Trump’s Russia ties.

But in the last year, that effort has been almost entirely overtaken by an investigation of those investigating Mr. Trump at the F.B.I. and Department of Justice. Representative Trey Gowdy of South Carolina, the chairman of the Oversight Committee, has yet to issue a single subpoena.

As a Democratic victory looks more likely, the possible reversal has increasingly worried Republicans. Axios reported on Sunday that Republicans have privately circulated a spreadsheet that catalogs more than 100 outstanding Democratic requests for testimony and documents, as well as the names of administration officials in their sights. Representative Devin Nunes of California, who has used his chairmanship of the Intelligence Committee to launch an aggressive investigation of those investigating Mr. Trump’s Russia ties, told supporters at a private fund-raiser that Republicans in Congress were essentially Mr. Trump’s last line of defense.

“If Sessions won’t unrecuse and Mueller won’t clear the president, we’re the only ones,” he said, according to a recording released in August by MSNBC, “which is really the danger.”

Even the most liberal members of the Democratic caucus, including those who have already filed articles of impeachment against Mr. Trump, have shaded toward political pragmatism as the levers of power have come into reach. Mr. Sherman said he has set aside time in December to update his article of impeachment with new details about Mr. Cohen and other matters. But in an interview he talked as much about political probabilities as principles.

Democrats are quick to reference the impeachment of President Bill Clinton in 1998 as reason for their caution. Republicans in the House lost seats in the run-up to the 1998 midterm elections, then successfully impeached Mr. Clinton largely along party lines. But they failed to come close to a conviction in the Senate and ultimately boosted Mr. Clinton’s popularity. Democrats fear a similar outcome that could end up strengthening Mr. Trump’s hand in the 2020 presidential election.

“We need to attack the problem of corruption we see in the administration and do our oversight. But Democrats are mindful of the fact that if we want to stay in the majority, we have to show that we are responsibly governing,” Mr. Schiff said in an interview.

Sidelining impeachment for now could set the body on a more gradual path toward the same end, liberal Democrats open to impeachment say. With subpoenas and gavels, they say, they could begin to unearth impeachable offenses, and embarrassing public hearings could build a public case against Mr. Trump as they await Mr. Mueller.

“I think you need to build a case,” said Representative Steve Cohen, Democrat of Tennessee, who has also introduced impeachment articles. “And then see where the politics are.”

Get politics and Washington news updates via Facebook, Twitterandthe Morning Briefing newsletter.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/polit...investigative-onslaught/ar-BBMPYl3?ocid=ientp
 

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Michael Avenatti: Trump is more interested in personal vendettas
CNN


Published on Sep 7, 2018
Michael Avenatti, the lawyer for Stormy Daniels, says that President Donald Trump is afraid to answer any questions under oath.
 

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Link between Trump campaign and Russia during 2016 election 'missing and may be dead'
Professor who acted as a 'link between Donald Trump's presidential campaign and the Kremlin' is 'missing and may be dead', court documents reveal

  • Joseph Misfud allegedly offered 'dirt' on Hillary Clinton to a Republican aide
  • The Maltese professor previously denied that he was a Russian agent
  • The Democratic National Committee are suing over the 2016 election
  • Court documents in New York allege that Misfud is 'missing and maybe dead'
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...mpaign-Russia-2016-election-missing-dead.html
 

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Trump Jr. on Mueller probe: I'm not worried about jail
CNN


Published on Sep 11, 2018
Donald Trump Jr. says he's not concerned about possible legal exposure in the special counsel's Russia probe but adds that investigators could "try to create something."
Asked in an interview that aired on ABC's "Good Morning America" whether he is afraid of any legal exposure in the investigation, President Donald Trump's eldest son said, "I'm not because I know what I did, and I'm not worried about any of that. That doesn't mean they won't try to create something, I mean, we've seen that happen with everything. But, again, I'm not."
 

mayhem

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My crystal ball is saying...

...Dems win house.
Start impeachment,
Trump pulls a Nixon.
Pence pardons.
A lot of fancy Lawyers get rich, Trump sits in Mar Largo watching the circus and really tweeting.

:dancing guy
 

gnome

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My crystal ball is saying...

...Dems win house.
Start impeachment,
Trump pulls a Nixon.
Pence pardons.
A lot of fancy Lawyers get rich, Trump sits in Mar Largo watching the circus and really tweeting.

:dancing guy
You might be right.
There are so many similarities it's remarkable.

 

Irons

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Hey, chin up lefties! Mueller and his band of 8000 leftist warriors in the fbi, cia, doj and the full spectrum of state run media have on;y been on the job for 2 years. It just doesn't matter they have found exactly nothing and their attempts to manufacture evidence has failed every time.

Give them 5 or 6 more years and I'm sure they will find something!


aacraz.gif
 

searcher

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Hey, chin up lefties! Mueller and his band of 8000 leftist warriors in the fbi, cia, doj and the full spectrum of state run media have on;y been on the job for 2 years. It just doesn't matter they have found exactly nothing and their attempts to manufacture evidence has failed every time.

Give them 5 or 6 more years and I'm sure they will find something!


View attachment 110933
lol

You might be right. But then again...………….who knows?
 

gnome

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Hey, chin up lefties! Mueller and his band of 8000 leftist warriors in the fbi, cia, doj and the full spectrum of state run media have on;y been on the job for 2 years. It just doesn't matter they have found exactly nothing and their attempts to manufacture evidence has failed every time.

Give them 5 or 6 more years and I'm sure they will find something!


View attachment 110933
Mueller, like Comey and Rosenstein are lifelong republicans. (Though Comey left the party after being fired).
And Trump has already surpassed the Nixon administration in criminal indictments in under 2 years, and the wheels of justice have only begun to turn.

FB_IMG_1536738963684.jpg
 

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Mueller, like Comey and Rosenstein are lifelong republicans. (Though Comey left the party after being fired).
And Trump has already surpassed the Nixon administration in criminal indictments in under 2 years, and the wheels of justice have only begun to turn.

View attachment 110938
You guys are trying to get rid of the president, not his janitors. Your score is still zero.
And BTW if President Trump decided to quit you still would not get hillary.


./
 

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Ken Starr: Robert Mueller Investigation Is 'Definitely Not A Witch Hunt' | The 11th Hour | MSNBC
MSNBC



Published on Sep 12, 2018
Former Independent Counsel of two investigations during the Clinton administration, Ken Starr, joins to discuss his new book, 'Contempt,' and reacts to the job Robert Mueller is doing.
» Subscribe to MSNBC: http://on.msnbc.com/SubscribeTomsnbc
 

mayhem

Merry Christmas y'all
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You guys are trying to get rid of the president, not his janitors. Your score is still zero.
And BTW if President Trump decided to quit you still would not get hillary.
Mr. Irons sir you can remove my name from those who wanted Hildabeast. You need some new brushes to paint with. The one you are using is much to broad. We don't want Hillary, we want R3volution. Trump turned into something just as bad as Hilder.
 

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All of Robert Mueller’s indictments and plea deals in the Russia investigation so far

Vox
Andrew Prokop
1 hr ago


With Paul Manafort’s new plea deal Friday, special counsel Robert Mueller’s team has now indicted or gotten guilty pleas from 32 people and three companies — that we know of.

That group is composed of four former Trump advisers, 26 Russian nationals, three Russian companies, one California man, and one London-based lawyer. Six of these people (including now all four former Trump aides) have pleaded guilty.

If you also count investigations that Mueller originated but then referred elsewhere in the Justice Department, you can add plea deals from two more people to the list.

It’s a sprawling set of allegations, encompassing both election interference charges against overseas Russians, and various other crimes by American Trump advisers.

However, Mueller hasn’t yet alleged any crimes directly connecting the two — that is, alleging that Trump advisers conspired with Russian officials to impact the election. He is continuing to investigate that.

Other reported focuses of Mueller’s investigation — such as potential obstruction of justice by the Trump administration — have also not resulted in any indictments yet.

The full list of known indictments and plea deals in Mueller’s probe
1) George Papadopoulos, former Trump campaign foreign policy adviser, was arrested in July 2017 and pleaded guilty last October to making false statements to the FBI.

2) Paul Manafort, Trump’s former campaign chair, was indicted on a total of 25 different counts by Mueller’s team, related mainly to his past work for Ukrainian politicians and his finances. He had two trials scheduled, and the first ended in a conviction on 8 counts of financial crimes. To avert the second trial, Manafort struck a plea deal with Mueller in September 2018.

3) Rick Gates, a former Trump campaign aide and Manafort’s longtime junior business partner, was indicted on similar charges to Manafort. But in February he agreed to a plea deal with Mueller’s team, pleading guilty to just one false statements charge and one conspiracy charge.

4) Michael Flynn, Trump’s former national security adviser, pleaded guilty last December to making false statements to the FBI.

5-20) 13 Russian nationals and three Russian companies were indicted on conspiracy charges, with some also being accused of identity theft. The charges related to a Russian propaganda effort designed to interfere with the 2016 campaign. The companies involved are the Internet Research Agency, often described as a “Russian troll farm,” and two other companies that helped finance it. The Russian nationals indicted include 12 of the agency’s employees and its alleged financier, Yevgeny Prigozhin.

21) Richard Pinedo: This California man pleaded guilty to an identity theft charge in connection with the Russian indictments, and has agreed to cooperate with Mueller.

22) Alex van der Zwaan: This London lawyer pleaded guilty to making false statements to the FBI about his contacts with Rick Gates and another unnamed person based in Ukraine.

23) Konstantin Kilimnik: This longtime business associate of Manafort and Gates, who’s currently based in Russia, was charged alongside Manafort with attempting to obstruct justice by tampering with witnesses in Manafort’s pending case this year.

24-35) 12 Russian GRU officers: These officers of Russia’s military intelligence service were charged with crimes related to the hacking and leaking of leading Democrats’ emails in 2016.

Finally, there are two other people Mueller initially investigated, but then handed over to others in the Justice Department to handle. Both eventually agreed to plea deals.

Michael Cohen: Trump’s former lawyer pleaded guilty to 8 counts — tax and bank charges, related to his finances and taxi business, and campaign finance violations, related to hush money payments to women who alleged affairs with Donald Trump.

Sam Patten: This Republican operative and lobbyist pleaded guilty to not registering as a foreign agent with his work for Ukrainian political bigwigs, and agreed to cooperate with the government.

That’s the full list, but we’ll delve into the charges in a bit more detail below.

The four ex-Trump aides who struck plea deals with Mueller
So far, no Trump associates have been specifically charged with any crimes relating to helping Russia interfere with the 2016 election.

Yet four have pleaded guilty to other crimes. Manafort and Gates were charged with a series of offenses related to their past work for Ukrainian politicians and their finances. Papadopoulos and Flynn both admitted making false statements with investigators to hide their contacts with Russians.

Papadopoulos: Back in April 2016, Papadopoulos got a tip from a foreign professor he understood to have Russian government connections that the Russians had “dirt” on Clinton in the form of “thousands of emails.” He then proceeded to have extensive contacts with the professor and two Russian nationals, during which he tried to plan a Trump campaign trip to Russia.

But when the FBI interviewed Papadopoulos about all this in January 2017, he repeatedly lied about what happened, he now admits. So he was arrested in July 2017, and later agreed to plead guilty to a false statements charge, which was dramatically unsealed in October 2017.

Initially, it seemed as if Papadopoulos was cooperating with Mueller’s probe. But we later learned that the special counsel cut off contact with him last year, after he talked to the press. In the end, he didn’t provide much information of note, Mueller’s team said in court filing. His involvement with the investigation is now over, and in September 2017, he was sentenced to 14 days incarceration.

Flynn: In December 2016, during the transition, Flynn spoke to Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak about sanctions that President Barack Obama had just placed on Russia, and about a planned United Nations Security Council vote condemning Israeli settlements.

But when FBI agents interviewed him about all this in January 2017, Flynn lied to them about what his talks with Kislyak entailed, he now admits. In December 2017, Flynn pleaded guilty to a false statements charge and began cooperating with Mueller’s investigation. We haven’t seen the fruits of his cooperation yet, and he has not yet been sentenced.

Manafort and Gates: This pair worked for Ukrainian politicians (and, eventually, the Ukrainian government) for several years prior to the Trump campaign, and made an enormous amount of money for it. Mueller charged them with hiding their lobbying work and the money they made from it from the government, as well as other financial crimes and attempts to interfere with the investigation.

Gates was the first to strike a plea deal. In February, Mueller dropped most of the charges he had brought against him. In exchange, Gates pleaded guilty to two counts — one conspiracy to defraud the United States charge encompassing the overall Ukrainian lobbying and money allegations, and a false statements charge. (With the latter, Gates admitted lying to Mueller’s team during a meeting this February. A Dutch lawyer, Alex van der Zwaan, also pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI related to his Ukrainian work with Gates.)

Manafort, meanwhile, fought the charges in two venues, Washington, DC and Virginia. His first trial was in Virginia, and in August, it ended with his conviction on 8 counts — 5 counts of subscribing to false income tax returns, 1 count of failing to report his foreign bank accounts, and 2 counts of bank fraud. The jury deadlocked on another 10 counts, so for those, the judge declared a mistrial.

The conviction finally brought Manafort to the table, and on September 14, he and Mueller’s team struck a plea deal requiring his cooperation. Manafort pleaded guilty to just 2 more counts — conspiracy to defraud the United States, and an attempted obstruction of justice charge. But he admitted that the other allegations Mueller previously made against him were true as well.

About two dozen overseas Russians have been charged with election interference
Mueller has also filed two major indictments of Russian nationals and a few Russian companies for crimes related to alleged interference with the 2016 election: the troll farm indictment, and the email hacking indictment.

The troll farm indictment: Brought in February, here Mueller alleged crimes related tothe propaganda efforts of one Russian group in particular: the Internet Research Agency. That group’s operations — which included social media posts, online ads, and organization of rallies in the US — were, the indictment alleges, often (but not exclusively) aimed at denigrating Hillary Clinton’s presidential candidacy and supporting Donald Trump’s.

Mueller indicted the Internet Research Agency, two other shell companies involved in financing the agency, its alleged financier (Yevgeny Prigozhin), and 12 other Russian nationals who allegedly worked for it.

The specific charges in the case include one broad “conspiracy to defraud the United States” count, but the rest are far narrower — one count of conspiracy to commit wire fraud and bank fraud, and six counts of identity theft. It is highly unlikely that the indicted Russian individuals will ever come to the US to face trial, but one company involved, Concord Catering, is fighting back in court.

No Americans have been charged with being witting participants in this Russian election interference effort. However, one American, Richard Pinedo of California, pleaded guilty to an identity fraud charge, seemingly because he sold bank account numbers created with stolen identities to the Russians. Pinedo agreed to cooperate with the probe as part of his plea deal.

The email hacking indictment: Brought in July, here Mueller charged 12 officers of the GRU, Russia’s military intelligence agency, with crimes committed to the high-profile hacking and leaking of leading Democrats’ emails during the 2016 campaign.

Specifically indicted were nine officers of the GRU’s “Unit 26165,” which Mueller alleges “had primary responsibility for hacking the DCCC and DNC, as well as the email accounts of individuals affiliated with the Clinton Campaign” like John Podesta. Three other GRU officers, Mueller alleges, “assisted in the release of stolen documents,” “the promotion of those releases,” “and the publication of anti-Clinton content on social media accounts operated by the GRU.”

A trial here is unlikely, since all of the people indicted live in Russia.

Konstantin Kilimnik, a longtime Manafort associate, has been charged with obstruction of justice
Then, Konstantin Kilimnik — who worked with Manafort in Ukraine and is now based in Russia — was charged alongside Manafort with obstruction of justice and conspiracy to obstruct justice, in June.

Mueller argued that, earlier in 2018, Manafort and Kilimnik worked together to contact potential witnesses against Manafort and encourage them to give false testimony. He argues that this is attempted witness tampering, and qualifies as obstruction of justice.

The alleged tampering relates to the “Hapsburg group”— a group of former senior European politicians Manafort paid to advocate for Ukraine’s interests.

Both Manafort and Kilimnik tried to contact witnesses to get them to claim the Hapsburg group only operated in Europe (where US foreign lobbying laws don’t apply). But Mueller says there’s ample evidence that the group did work in the US too, and the witnesses thought Manafort and Kilimnik were trying to get them to commit perjury.

In Manafort’s September plea deal, he admitted to this. Kilimnik, however, is in Russia, and will likely remain there rather than face charges.

Michael Cohen and Sam Patten struck plea deals after Mueller referred their investigations elsewhere
Last but not least, there are two known instances where Mueller surfaced incriminating information about people, but handed off the investigations into them to elsewhere in the Justice Department.

Michael Cohen: Mueller’s team was investigating Trump’s former attorney in 2017, but at some point, they referred the Cohen probe to the US Attorney’s office for the Southern District of New York (SDNY). It was SDNY that authorized the FBI raid of Cohen’s residence and office in April.

In August, Cohen cut a deal. He agreed to plead guilty to 8 counts. Six of them involved his own finances — 5 tax counts involving hiding various income related to his taxi medallion business and other financial transactions from the US government, and a bank fraud count.

More salaciously, Cohen admitted participating in a scheme to violate campaign finance laws in connection with hush money payments to women alleging affairs with then-presidential candidate Donald Trump.

Cohen admitted causing an unlawful corporate campaign contribution, by orchestrating a hush money payment of $150,000 from American Media Inc. (the parent company of the National Enquirer) to former Playboy model Karen McDougal.

He also admitted himself paying $130,000 to porn actress Stormy Daniels days before the 2016 general election, and said it was at candidate Trump’s direction. The crime here was in violating campaign donation limits (individuals are permitted to give only a few thousand dollars a year to a federal campaign, and Cohen’s payment was far above that).

Sam Patten: A GOP lobbyist who had worked in some of the same Ukrainian circles as Manafort and alongside Konstantin Kilimnik, Mueller’s team began investigating Patten, but at some point handed him off to the DC US attorney’s office. However, the plea deal Patten eventually struck obligated him to cooperate with Mueller.

According to a criminal information document filed by the DC US attorney’s office, Patten and Kilimnik (who is not named but referred to as “Foreigner A”) founded a lobbying and consulting company together. They did campaign work in Ukraine and lobbying work in the US, and were paid over $1 million between 2015 and 2017.

Specifically, the document claims that Patten contacted members of Congress and their staffers, State Department officials, and members of the press on behalf of his Ukrainian clients — all without registering under the Foreign Agents Registration Act, as required by law.

Patten also admits to helping his Ukrainian oligarch client get around the prohibition on foreign donations to Donald Trump’s inauguration committee. The oligarch sent $50,000 to Patten’s company, and then he gave that money to a US citizen, who bought the four tickets. The tickets were given to the oligarch, Kilimnik, another Ukrainian, and Patten himself.

Finally, Patten also admits to misleading the Senate Intelligence Committee and withholding documents from them during testimony this January. He pleaded guilty to one count of violating the Foreign Agents Registration Act.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/polit...ia-investigation-so-far/ar-AAA2rU0?ocid=ientp