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Is It Time For Mueller To Wrap It Up Or Step It Up?

southfork

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Need to shut down Mueller asap, dems coming in will wreck havoc with their attacks and investigations on trump,, drop the fuking hammer now Donald or your fuking dog meat
 

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Indictments? Final report? White House braces for Mueller

By ERIC TUCKER, JONATHAN LEMIRE and CHAD DAY, Associated Press
7 hrs ago


WASHINGTON — The White House is bracing for the probe of Donald Trump's presidential campaign to fire up again. Trump's advisers are privately expressing worries that the special counsel, who's been out of the news for the past month, has been stealthily compiling information and could soon issue new indictments or a damning final report.

Trump abruptly altered the chain of command above Mueller on Wednesday, putting his work under the supervision of a Republican loyalist who has been openly skeptical of the special counsel's authority and has mused about ways to curtail his power. But Trump and his aides are concerned about Mueller's next move with the work that is complete, according to a White House official and a Republican with close ties to the administration.

They insisted on anonymity to comment on conversations they were not authorized to describe.

Mueller kept a low profile for the past month as voters were mulling their choices for this week's elections.

But a flurry of activity during his quiet period, including weeks of grand jury testimony about Trump confidant Roger Stone and negotiations over an interview with the president, hinted at public developments ahead as investigators move closer to addressing key questions underpinning the special counsel inquiry: Did Trump illegally obstruct the investigation? And did his campaign have advance knowledge of illegally hacked Democratic emails?

Trump has told confidants he remains deeply annoyed by the 18-month-old Mueller probe, believing it is not just a "witch hunt" but an expensive and lengthy negative distraction. The latest indication of the fury came Wednesday when he forced out his attorney general, Jeff Sessions, whose recusal opened the door to Mueller's appointment.

To this point, Trump has heeded advice not to directly interfere, though a new chapter in the relationship with the probe may have begun with the appointment of Matthew Whitaker as new acting attorney general. Even if Whitaker, Sessions' former chief of staff, does not curtail the investigation, Trump could direct him to take a more aggressive stance in declassifying documents that could further undermine or muddle the probe, the White House aide and Republican official said.

The investigation until now has been overseen by Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, who appointed Mueller last year and granted him fairly broad authority.

"It's very significant because Whitaker's position on indictments or future indictments may be different than Rosenstein's, and Rosenstein had given Mueller a broad mandate to pursue various crimes," said Washington criminal defense lawyer Jeffrey Jacobovitz.

The Mueller investigation has so far produced 32 criminal charges and four guilty pleas from Trump associates. But the work is not done.

A clear focus concerns Stone, a longtime political dirty trickster. The special counsel's team has been investigating Stone's connection to WikiLeaks during the 2016 campaign and whether he had advance knowledge of the group's plans to release hacked material damaging to Democrat Hillary Clinton.

Stone has said he did not, but emails, Twitter messages and his own public statements show he portrayed himself as plugged into the WikiLeaks orbit. That includes implying he had inside knowledge in separate email exchanges with a Breitbart editor and Steve Bannon, the former Trump campaign chief executive, just days before WikiLeaks began releasing thousands of emails stolen from Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta.

Bannon and other Stone associates have been questioned, and multiple witnesses have appeared before the grand jury. One associate, Jerome Corsi, said in a video recording Monday that he's "been involved in a really constant basis" for two months with Mueller's investigation.

On Thursday, a federal appeals court heard a challenge to Mueller's authority brought by Stone aide Andrew Miller, who defied a grand jury subpoena last summer and was held in contempt by a judge.

In the president's orbit, there remains some concern about his eldest son, Donald Trump Jr., though there are no outward indications that charges are imminent, according to a Republican close to the White House not authorized to speak publicly about private conversations.

Beyond Mueller, but also within the Justice Department's oversight, is a federal investigation into Trump's longtime legal fixer, Michael Cohen, who admitted as part of a guilty plea in August to coordinating with Trump on a hush-money scheme to silence a porn actress and an ex-Playboy model who say they had affairs with Trump.

The president hasn't been charged with any wrongdoing, but federal prosecutors have said that a grand jury investigation is ongoing and it targets unspecified "others." Court papers show Trump's conduct and that of top executives at the Trump Organization, some of whom have received immunity, have been scrutinized.

It's unclear what additional charges prosecutors are pursuing and how much of it pertains to the president personally. Federal prosecutors have said in court papers that the case involves numerous "uncharged" third parties and have argued against disclosing search warrants and other documents that would "certainly result in a very public guessing game" about their identities.

Overseeing it all is Whitaker, a former college football player and U.S. attorney from Iowa who was brought into the Justice Department last year to serve as Sessions' chief of staff. In the months before, Whitaker was a familiar presence on CNN, where he questioned Mueller's scope and reach.

In one appearance, he defended a June 2016 Trump Tower meeting between Trump Jr. and a Kremlin-connected Russian lawyer, saying, "You would always take that meeting."

He also once tweeted an ex-prosecutor's opinion piece that described the Mueller team as a "lynch mob," and wrote his own op-ed saying Mueller would be outside his authority if he investigated Trump's family finances.

Trump had enjoyed Whitaker's cable TV appearances — including one on CNN in which he suggested that the Mueller probe be starved of resources — and the two men soon struck a bond. Trump told associates that he felt that Whitaker would be "loyal" and would not have recused himself from the Russia probe as Sessions had done, according to two Republicans close to the White House not authorized to speak publicly about private conversations.

Despite demands from Democrats that he recuse because of his past comments, Whitaker showed no signs Thursday that he intended to do so. And not everyone is convinced he needs to.

"Based on my experience with Matt," said John Richter, a former U.S. Attorney in Oklahoma and high-ranking Bush administration Justice Department official, "I think he will act consistently with the best traditions of the department and call things as he sees them.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/polit...ouse-braces-for-mueller/ar-BBPuJA6?ocid=ientp
 

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Mueller Is 'Ready to Indict Some Folks': Former FBI Assistant Director


Newsweek
Brendan Cole
1 hr ago


Special Counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into claims of Russian interference in the 2016 election may see charges laid soon, a former top figure from the FBI who used to work with him has said.

Ex-FBI Assistant Director Frank Figliuzzi told MSNBC what he thought would happen to the probe after the appointment of Matt Whitaker as acting attorney general. That move followed the resignation of Jeff Sessions.

It is not clear what role Whitaker will play in overseeing the inquiry, which he has criticized for going too far in investigating the family finances of President Trump. Democrats fear the hostility to the probe might spur him to sabotage it, The New York Times reported.

Whitaker has also defended the meeting that took place between Donald Trump Jr. and Russian lobbyists in Trump Tower in June 2016.

But Figliuzzi told the anchor of The 11th Hour, Brian Williams, he had “a theory” that Mueller has already indicated what he is going to do.

“I think he’s ready to indict some folks and through those indictments will tell the story of what he’s found against the president.

“I’m not saying he’s indicting the president. I’m saying there’s a middle ground where he tells us the story, locks it into the court system by indicting others, then files a report with Whitaker,” he added.

“Perhaps what we’ll see is Bob Mueller telling us the story of a corrupt president through indictments.”

Figliuzzi also suggested that Mueller knows his days are numbered and so would act soon.

“I think the Whitaker appointment steps up the timeline and I think perhaps if Mueller sticks to the strategy of telling us the story through indictments — the indictments speak to us — that he’ll speak to us soon, very soon, with additional indictments, perhaps that tell the story of a corrupt president,” he said.

Protesters gathered around the country on Thursday from New York to Los Angeles in support of the Mueller investigation, which they fear may be ended following the firing of Sessions. The action was coordinated by the group MoveOn.

“Donald Trump has installed a crony to oversee the special counsel's Trump-Russia investigation, crossing a red line set to protect the investigation. Our hundreds of response events are being launched to demonstrate the public demand for action to correct this injustice,” it said on its website.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/polit...-fbi-assistant-director/ar-BBPw2gv?ocid=ientp
 

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Democrat taking over Intelligence panel warns new acting AG Whitaker any involvement in Mueller probe 'will be exposed' as top Democrats call on 'political lackey' to RECUSE

  • Rep. Adam Schiff and other senior Democrats are demanding Whitaker's recusal
  • Schiff is taking over the House Intel panel that has provided cover for Trump
  • Says acting AG may be serving as 'back channel' for Trump
  • Trump forced out AG Jeff Sessions and named Whitaker 'acting'
  • Incoming Judiciary chair Jerry Nadler vows to summon or subpoena Whitaker
  • Democratic leaders penn joint letter demanding recusal
  • Schiff also said Whitaker appointment may be improper
  • Also gearing up for probes of Trump postal plan to hit Amazon, ATT merger
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...itaker-involvement-Mueller-probe-exposed.html
 

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What was Michael Cohen doing in Washington? Trump's former attorney is seen in DC with HIS lawyer as it's revealed Robert Mueller's team worked through Veterans Day

  • Trump's former personal attorney was seen arriving in Washington, DC, Monday
  • It's unclear why he was in DC, but he was with his criminal defense attorney
  • Cohen may have been in DC to prepare for 'an upcoming grand jury appearance'
  • Or he could have been there for an interview with special counsel Robert Mueller
  • Cohen is set to be sentenced next month for pleading guilty to tax fraud
  • He also pleaded guilty to bank fraud and campaign finance violations in August
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...rious-visit-DC-ahead-December-sentencing.html
 

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Democrat taking over Intelligence panel warns new acting AG Whitaker any involvement in Mueller probe 'will be exposed' as top Democrats call on 'political lackey' to RECUSE

  • Rep. Adam Schiff and other senior Democrats are demanding Whitaker's recusal
  • Schiff is taking over the House Intel panel that has provided cover for Trump
  • Says acting AG may be serving as 'back channel' for Trump
  • Trump forced out AG Jeff Sessions and named Whitaker 'acting'
  • Incoming Judiciary chair Jerry Nadler vows to summon or subpoena Whitaker
  • Democratic leaders penn joint letter demanding recusal
  • Schiff also said Whitaker appointment may be improper
  • Also gearing up for probes of Trump postal plan to hit Amazon, ATT merger
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...itaker-involvement-Mueller-probe-exposed.html
Dems playing hardball from day one, gutless fuking pubs sitting around with thumbs up their asses since day one
 

andial

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My thick head still thinks this Mueller investigation will boomerang back at the clinton cabal in due time.
Trust Q
Trust sessions
Trust huber
Trust mueller
WWGWWBTBTIRSAA
 

southfork

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My thick head still thinks this Mueller investigation will boomerang back at the clinton cabal in due time.
Trust Q
Trust sessions
Trust huber
Trust mueller
WWGWWBTBTIRSAA
Statue of limitations has already freed some of oatsams criminals, ie brennan, clapper
 

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Trump To Submit Written Replies To Mueller Probe Questions "In Coming Days"


by Tyler Durden
Tue, 11/13/2018 - 22:45


It's been nearly a year since Special Counsel Robert Mueller and his team of prosecutors started negotiating with President Trump's lawyers about the prospects for a presidential interview, a request that Trump once said he'd be happy - even eager - to oblige, until his lawyers explained that the downside risks (Trump falling into a perjury trap and possibly winding up in jail) far outweighed the upside (a minor PR victory).



Somewhere around July, Mueller began to realize that his only leverage to try and force an in-person interview, the possibility that he could subpoena the president, wasn't all that threatening. Given the very flimsy legal precedent and the confirmation of another friendly conservative justice (Neil Gorsuch), subpoenaing a sitting president would be more trouble than it was worth, and far too unorthodox for a man who has built his career on respecting precedents. So, over the summer, Mueller finally conceded, and agreed to accept written answers to his team's questions, while also agreeing to limit the scope of his inquiry to the probe's original purpose: The Trump campaign's ties to Russia (allegations of obstruction of justice would just have to wait).

Which brings us to Tuesday, when CNN reported that Trump's finalized and, we imagine, thoroughly vetted answers would be submitted to Mueller "in the coming days," just as his team is said to be busy working on another indictment, or string of indictments.

Trump reportedly met with his lawyers on Monday to give the answers one last review before submitting them.

The meeting was the latest as the responses are finalized, and the source said the answers could be submitted to the special counsel in the coming days. The questions focus on Russia collusion and not obstruction of justice and are part of an agreement reached with Mueller's team to "move forward," according to the source.
However, as CNN pointed out, there are still "issues that remain unresolved" - such as whether Trump will answer questions about whether he obstructed justice by firing former FBI Director James Comey, or whether an in-person interview might still be a possibility.

But there are other issues that have not been resolved, including answering questions about obstruction and whether the President will sit down for an interview with special counsel.

As CNN previously reported, Trump was meeting with lawyers about the questions before the midterms as he was preparing to remove Jeff Sessions as attorney general.​

The move to replace Sessions with acting Attorney General Matt Whitaker, who has been openly critical of the special counsel, comes as the White House braces for a return of public activity on the Russia investigation following a pre-election quiet period, according to people briefed on the matter.​

Whitaker will now oversee the Mueller investigation, which had previously been under the purview of Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein.​

However, Trump's appointment of Matt Whitaker as acting attorney general over Rod Rosenstein suggests that he has taken the necessary precautions to ensure that Mueller will wrap up his probe in a timely manner, as Whitaker has refused to recuse himself and Mitch McConnell has said that any legislation to protect Mueller would be dead in the water.

Drafts of what were said to be questions submitted by Mueller leaked back in May. But questions about whether these were the final set, or represented just one round in the negotiations, remain.

https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018...n-replies-mueller-probe-questions-coming-days
 

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Trump says Mueller investigators 'have gone absolutely nuts,' are 'a disgrace to our Nation'


Fox News
Adam Shaw
1 hr ago


President Trump on Thursday ripped into Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation, accusing investigators of having “gone absolutely nuts” and saying they are “a disgrace” to the country.


“The inner workings of the Mueller investigation are a total mess. They have found no collusion and have gone absolutely nuts,” Trump tweeted.

“They are screaming and shouting at people, horribly threatening them to come up with the answers they want. They are a disgrace to our Nation and don’t care how many lives the(y) ruin.”

He then focused his ire on Mueller, a former FBI director, who he accused of having conflicts of interest, though he did not elaborate on the accusation. Mueller served under both George W. Bush and Barack Obama.

“These are Angry People, including the highly conflicted Bob Mueller, who worked for Obama for 8 years. They won’t even look at all of the bad acts and crimes on the other side,” he said. “A TOTAL WITCH HUNT LIKE NO OTHER IN AMERICAN HISTORY!”

The barrage comes as Trump’s legal team is believed to be finalizing written answers to Mueller, concerning questions about whether the Trump campaign colluded during the 2016 race.

TRUMP TEAM FINALIZING ANSWERS TO MUELLER PROBE QUESTIONS, SOURCES SAY

The president has repeatedly denied any claims of collusion, and has dismissed the probe as a witch hunt. Late last month, Trump lawyer Rudy Giuliani told Bloomberg News that a face-to-face interview was "off the table," though he did not definitively rule out the possibility.

The Associated Press reported this week that Trump advisers are concerned that Mueller has been stealthily compiling information and could soon issue new indictments (it has so far produced 32 criminal charges) or a highly critical final report.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who recused himself from the Russia probe last year, was forced to resign last week by Trump, and replaced by Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker. Whitaker has been facing calls to recuse from the Russia probe due to his criticism of the investigation.

Fox News’ Samuel Chamberlain, Catherine Herridge and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/polit...-disgrace-to-our-nation/ar-BBPJYIN?ocid=ientp
 

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'I did not know that': Trump claims he knew nothing about acting attorney general Matt Whitaker's comments on Robert Mueller investigation

  • President Trump said he wasn't aware of Matt Whitaker's critical comments on the Russia probe before he appointed him acting attorney general
  • 'I did not know that. I did not know he took views on the Mueller investigation as such,' the president said on 'Fox News Sunday'
  • Whitaker has come under fire for critical comments he has made on special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation
  • Trump defended his pick and said Whitaker was right when he said there was no collusion between his presidential campaign and Russia
  • Trump: 'He's right. What do you do when a person's right? There is no collusion.'
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...-Whitakers-comments-Robert-Mueller-probe.html
 

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Trump has sent his written answers to Robert Mueller says his lawyer Rudy Giuliani as Russia probe into 2016 election meddling enters new phase

  • Rudy Giuliani says Trump has sent written answers to questions sent by Robert Mueller's special counsel probe
  • Giuliani said in a statement that 'much of what has been asked raised serious constitutional issues and was beyond the scope of a legitimate inquiry.'
  • Topics Trump covered included notorious June 2016 meeting between Don Jr. and Russians
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...swers-questions-special-counsel-Giuliani.html
 

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Mueller got some answers, but he's not done with Trump

Politico
By Darren Samuelsohn
1 hr ago


President Donald Trump on Tuesday finally submitted a set of written responses to Robert Mueller, signaling that he was done for good with the special counsel's questions.

But Mueller is far from done with him.

The special counsel still wants to question the president over his actions while in the White House — Tuesday's answers only covered Russian hacking during the 2016 election. It's a fight that could result in a historic subpoena and eventual Supreme Court ruling, pulling a defiant Trump into a legal squabble that could set groundbreaking precedent for presidential investigations for years to come. Depending on how the battle plays out, House Democrats may even try to pounce and launch impeachment proceedings.

Things could get explosive fast. Next comes the perilous round of negotiations between Trump’s lawyers and Mueller’s prosecutors covering topics like Trump's intentions when firing FBI Director James Comey in May 2017. That line of questioning — which Trump says he shouldn't have to answer — is tied to Mueller's ongoing obstruction of justice investigation.

“These are very deep waters and complicated questions,” said John Q. Barrett, a St. John’s University law professor and former associate who worked under independent counsel Lawrence Walsh during the Reagan-era investigation into secret U.S. arms sales to Iran.

If Mueller can't get the answers he wants, he will have to decide whether he’s ready to test his power to issue a subpoena for the president’s testimony. Mueller’s prosecutors reportedly have made the threat before, but now the step comes with the added wrinkle that it could spark an internal Justice Department riff with his new supervisor, acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker, who previously has been critical of the special counsel’s investigation.

Should the special counsel win DOJ approval and pull the subpoena trigger, he’d still have to face off against a president who has relished taunting Mueller and enter into a legal battle that could quickly elevate to the Supreme Court, where a newly enmeshed conservative majority is widely seen as friendlier to Trump’s arguments.

Round Two of Mueller versus Trump could also fizzle, though.

Legal experts say that the special counsel might have enough information from documents, presidential tweets and witnesses to wrap up the obstruction of justice portion of his investigation and file a report to his DOJ supervisors — all without forcing a court showdown just to nail down an interview with the president.

“My hunch, at least at this time, [is that] the special counsel doesn't need the president's testimony and that he has provided the president with the opportunity to testify simply so that the president does not later complain about the special counsel's further prosecutorial actions or the conclusions of his report when it is made public in one fashion or another,” said Jack Quinn, the former White House counsel under President Bill Clinton.

For now, it’s unclear what path the dispute will take.

Mueller on Tuesday stuck to the same no-comment posture he’s had throughout the 18-monthlong Russia investigation, refusing to show any of his cards in public beyond what’s required in legal filings.

That’s left a large vacuum that Trump and his attorneys have been eager to fill. The president told Fox News’ Chris Wallace in an interview that aired Sunday that he “probably” would not end up sitting for an interview with Mueller despite more than a year of his own public comments expressing a willingness to do so.

“I think we’ve wasted enough time on this witch hunt and the answer is probably, we’re finished,” the president said.

Trump and his attorneys have also left open some wiggle room for what’s next. Giuliani recently explained to POLITICO that while the president’s legal team has been focused on getting through the first round of questions related to the Russian hacking, they hadn’t foreclosed holding talks with Mueller about an in-person Trump interview.

“We both agreed to leave it open to discussion,” Giuliani said.

But Giuliani noted there is a catch: Trump’s lawyers would fight a special counsel subpoena forcing his testimony on topics tied to his time in the White House — whether the questions cover the Comey firing or other areas tied to an obstruction of justice probe.

“I wouldn’t argue that you can never a subpoena a president. I would argue that you can't in this particular case because to subpoena a president you have a burden you don't have with anybody else,” Giuliani said. “Because you're intruding on his presidential time. You've got to show a real need for it. A real need for it in terms of developing your case and not a real need in order to try to trap him. Trapping is not a legal legitimate objective.”

Whether Giuliani’s arguments would hold up in court is an open question, and many legal experts say Trump would be up against a unanimous 1974 Supreme Court ruling that found President Richard M. Nixon had to comply with the request of the Watergate special prosecutor to relinquish Oval Office recordings of conversations with his aides.

But despite that historic Nixon opinion, Trump allies and even some of his critics say there’s still wiggle room for a narrow ruling that deals directly with a subpoena for a sitting president’s testimony related to a criminal probe involving his time while in office.

“It would be a fascinating legal battle and probably a razor-thin margin,” said Elie Honig, a former federal prosecutor from New York.

Trump allies say they are also bolstered by the views of Brett Kavanaugh, the newly confirmed Supreme Court justice. While Kavanaugh once helped craft a set of graphic questions for Clinton about his sexual affair with a White House intern while serving on independent counsel Kenneth Starr’s team, he later opined in favor of a change in law that would protect a president from a criminal trial subpoena.

“Mueller has the most to lose in terms of litigating the authority of the Office of the Special Counsel,” said a source close to the Trump White House. “If the president gets a subpoena, he’s got a million ways to say, ‘no.’”

Andrew McCarthy, a former federal prosecutor and National Review columnist whom the president has cited on Twitter for Mueller matters, said the special counsel faces the burden of proving a presidential interrogation is necessary.

“I think that the prosecutor should neither interview or subpoena the president unless he’s got strong evidence implicating the president in a potential crime,” he said. “Mueller is no dope. He knows that, too.”

Trump’s first round of written answers do mark the end of one critical phase of the Mueller probe. The president told reporters in the spring of 2017 he was “100 percent” willing to testify under oath about alleged Russian ties to his campaign. He has since backtracked on the pledge and pushed instead for Mueller to accept written answers.

During the negotiations earlier this year, the Trump legal team compiled a list of about four dozen questions Mueller wanted to ask the president, covering everything from what knowledge he had of his former campaign chairman Paul Manafort’s outreach to Russia, to what he knew about national security adviser Michael Flynn’s call to the Russian ambassador to the U.S. after the 2016 election.

According to Giuliani, the special counsel also rejected the written Q&A format earlier this year but later acceded to try out the approach — though the Trump lawyer also insisted the president was under no obligation to answer all of Mueller’s questions.

Trump’s first round of written answers do have some downsides for prosecutors since the one-sided approach allows for evasive responses. His prosecutors also can’t ask in-person follow-ups.

“Written questions are a very poor substitute for an actual interview,” said William Jeffress, a white-collar defense attorney who represented Nixon after he left the White House.

But they do carry some legal weight. The president is indeed now locked in on answers that carry the same legal burden of truthfulness as an in-person session — and they can be used for years to come.

President Ronald Reagan, for example, delivered written answers in 1987 to the Iran-Contra investigators. Three years later, prosecutors relied on the submissions to cross-examine the former Republican president when he appeared as a witness during a trial of his former national security adviser, John Poindexter.

In Clinton’s case, one of the four articles of impeachment adopted in December 1998 by the GOP-led House Judiciary Committee accused the Democrat of “willfully” committing perjury and giving “false and misleading testimony” in writing as part of a federal civil rights lawsuit.

That specific article was later rejected on the House floor, though Clinton was nonetheless impeached on two other counts.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/polit...hes-not-done-with-trump/ar-BBPVnx0?ocid=ientp
 

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Rudy Giuliani says Trump will REFUSE to cooperate if Mueller subpoenas him and special counsel doesn't 'have any evidence of collusion of any kind'

  • White House thinks there's no legal case for obstruction of justice over James Comey's firing last year
  • Giuliani says Special counsel's written questions included only matters that dated from before Inauguration Day
  • Insists Trump would refuse to participate if Mueller subpoenaed him
  • Giuliani also believes Mueller has no evidence that Trump's campaign aides colluded with Russians in 2016
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...ate-Mueller-subpoenas-obstruction-claims.html
 

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Stone associate Jerome Corsi is in plea negotiations with special counsel, according to a person with knowledge of the talks

Washington Post
Rosalind Helderman, Josh Dawsey, Manuel Roig-Franzia
38 mins ago


Conservative writer and conspiracy theorist Jerome Corsi is in plea negotiations with special counsel Robert S. Mueller III, according to a person with knowledge of the talks.

The talks with Corsi — an associate of both President Trump and GOP operative Roger Stone — could bring Mueller’s team closer to determining whether Trump or his advisers were linked to WikiLeaks’ release of hacked Democratic emails in 2016, a key part of his long-running inquiry.

Corsi provided research on Democratic figures during the campaign to Stone, a longtime Trump adviser. For months, the special counsel has been scrutinizing Stone’s activities in an effort to determine whether he coordinated with WikiLeaks. Stone and WikiLeaks have repeatedly denied any such coordination.

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Stone has said that Corsi also has a relationship with Trump, built on their shared interest in the falsehood that President Barack Obama was not born in the United States.

David Gray, an attorney for Corsi, declined to comment, as did a spokesman for Mueller. Stone declined to comment on Corsi’s plea negotiations. An attorney for Trump declined to comment.

The deal is not yet complete and could still be derailed. Last week, Corsi said his efforts to cooperate with prosecutors had broken down and that he expected to be indicted on a charge of allegedly lying. He described feeling under enormous pressure from Mueller and assured his supporters that he remains supportive of the president.

In a webcast and a series of interviews, Corsi said he had spoken to prosecutors for 40 hours and feared that he could spend much of the remainder of his life in prison.

After two months of interviews, Corsi, 72, said he felt his brain was “mush.”

“Trying to explain yourself to these people is impossible ... I guess I couldn’t tell the special prosecutor what he wanted to hear,” he added.

At that time, he gave no indication that he intended to plead guilty, instead casting himself as an unfairly targeted victim of a Mueller campaign against Trump.

Then, Corsi abruptly fell silent, canceling a scheduled Nov. 13 interview with NBC. Gray, his attorney, told NBC that he had just spoken to the special counsel’s office and had advised Corsi to cancel.

Since then, Corsi has resumed talks with Mueller’s team about a possible deal that could result in him agreeing to plead guilty in exchange for leniency, according to the person familiar with the situation.

It is not clear what information Corsi could leverage to get a deal with prosecutors. However, he told the Daily Caller last week that prosecutors are focused on whether he had developed a source with inside information about WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange’s plans.

Corsi said he did not have a direct source to the group. Instead, he said he developed a theory that Assange had access to hacked emails belonging to Hillary Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta and that WikiLeaks would release them in October 2016.

He told the Daily Caller that he shared his prediction with many people, including Stone.

If Mueller could prove that Corsi learned about Podesta’s emails from Assange or another person in contact with him, he could try to link WikiLeaks’ releases to Stone or others in Trump’s world.

Stone told the publication that Corsi never relayed such information.

“He never told me that he had figured out or believed that John Podesta’s emails had been stolen,” Stone said.

On Aug. 21, 2016, Stone tweeted “it will soon the Podesta’s time in the barrel.” He has insisted his tweet had nothing to do with any plan by WikiLeaks and that it was based on research Corsi had provided to him about work Podesta and his lobbyist brother Tony had done involving Russia.

“He simply told me of their Russian business deals in banking gas and uranium,” Stone said in a text message this week to The Washington Post. “There was NO WikiLeaks context.”

Stone told the House Intelligence Committee in September 2017 that his Podesta tweet was “based on a comprehensive, early August opposition research briefing provided to me by investigative journalist, Dr. Jerome Corsi, which I then asked him to memorialize in a memo that he sent me on August 31st, all of which was culled from public records. There was no need to have John Podesta’s email to learn that he and his presidential candidate were in bed with the clique around Putin.”

Stone has since said that the information in the Aug. 31 memo — which he received 10 days after his now-infamous tweet — was similar to information that Corsi had relayed to him verbally before the tweet.

The prediction that Corsi said he made that Assange would publish Podesta’s emails was correct: on Oct. 7, 2016, WikiLeaks began publishing 50,000 emails stolen from Podesta’s account, releasing them in batches of a few thousand at a time each day leading up to the November election.

Corsi told the Daily Caller that he based his prediction on public sources of information, including the fact that Podesta was not among the Democrats whose emails had been published by WikiLeaks when the group released Democratic National Committee correspondence in July.

He said he concluded that WikiLeaks must be holding back Podesta’s correspondence to make a bigger splash later in the campaign.

Podesta did not work for the DNC and the emails were stolen from his private Gmail account, not an address linked to the Democratic Party.

Corsi told the Daily Caller that Mueller’s prosecutors did not believe his explanation and pressed him to name his WikiLeaks source. They were especially interested, he said, in a trip he took to Italy with his wife that he said coincided with his realization about the Podesta emails.

“They said they wanted me to tell the truth, but when I did tell the truth they told me it was preposterous, and they wouldn’t accept it,” Corsi said.

Stone is under scrutiny because he made a series of comments during the campaign that suggested he was in contact with Assange and knew of WikiLeaks’ plans.

Since then, Stone has vigorously contended that his comments were exaggerations based on public information, as well as tips from New York radio host and comedian Randy Credico.

Stone has also told The Post that Corsi had a relationship with Trump and spoke directly with the Republican candidate during the campaign.

Stone said the two men became friendly after Corsi published a book in 2011 advancing the false theory that Obama was not qualified to hold office because he was not born in the United States. Trump became a leading proponent of that falsehood.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/polit...-knowledge-of-the-talks/ar-BBQ17MZ?ocid=ientp
 

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Alan Dershowitz says Mueller report will be 'devastating' to Trump

By Paul LeBlanc, CNN
15 hrs ago


Legal scholar Alan Dershowitz, a frequent defender of President Donald Trump, said Sunday the forthcoming report on Russian interference in the 2016 election from special counsel Robert Mueller will be "devastating" politically to the President.

"I think the report is going to be devastating to the President," Dershowitz, a fomer Harvard law professor, said on "ABC This Week." "And I know that the President's team is already working on a response to the report."

"At some point when the report's made public -- and that's a very hard question considering the new attorney general who has the authority to decide when and under what circumstance to make it public -- it will be made public probably with a response alongside," he added, referencing Matthew Whitaker, the new acting attorney general who replaced the fired Jeff Sessions after the November midterm election.

Mueller was appointed to lead the special counsel investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election after Trump fired then FBI Director James Comey in May 2017 while he was leading the initial investigation into collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia.

Trump has repeatedly derided Mueller's investigation as a "witch hunt" and insisted there was "no collusion" between his campaign and Russia.

Dershowitz said despite his expectation for a "politically very devastating report," he doesn't think criminal charges will be brought forward.

"When I say devastating, I mean it's going to paint a picture that's going to be politically very devastating," he said. "I still don't think it's going to make a criminal case, because collusion is not criminal."

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/polit...be-devastating-to-trump/ar-BBQ4wv7?ocid=ientp
 

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Q says be patient trust Mueller, Rosenstein and Sessions plus munch on some microwave popcorn.
 

andial

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Bremember the popcorn machines that you had to put oil in?
Jiffy Pop was the big thing when i was growing up. Don’t remember The machines you speak of maybe a picture of one hh?
 

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Jiffy Pop was the big thing when i was growing up. Don’t remember The machines you speak of maybe a picture of one hh?
Here's what I grew up on.

1543268253100.png

It was a process. Put some cooking oil along with the popcorn in the pan, wait for it to heat up and wait for the popcorn to pop.
 

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Paul Manafort violated plea deal and lied to prosecutors says Robert Mueller and both sides want a judge to sentence former Trump campaign manager immediately

  • In court filings Monday night, Robert Mueller charged Paul Manafort with violating his plea deal by lying to prosecutors and the FBI
  • The former Trump campaign manager had made a deal with Mueller to turn on President Trump and help the special counsel with his Russia investigation
  • Manafort made the move in a bid for lighter jail time
  • Both sides are now asking a judge for an immediate sentencing
  • Manafort knew about the infamous June 2016 Trump Tower meeting attended by Donald Trump Jr., Jared Kushner and a lawyer with ties to the Kremlin
  • Prosecutors did not say what they think Mueller lied to them about
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...-lied-prosecutors-Robert-Mueller-charges.html
 

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'Right now would not be the time': Rudy Giuliani hints that President Trump could pardon Paul Manafort after Robert Mueller's prosecutors accuse ex-campaign chairman of lying to Special Counsel's prosecutors

  • Rudy Giuliani, President Trump's lawyer, refuses to rule out a pardon for former campaign chairman Paul Manafort
  • Manafort is facing lengthy prison sentence after Special Counsel Robert Mueller accused him of violating a plea agreement
  • Mueller believes Jerome Corsi, a conservative author, tipped off Trump associate Roger Stone months before WikiLeaks released emails linked to Hillary Clinton
  • According to documents, Stone asked Corsi to get in touch with WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange in an effort to get Clinton emails
  • Corsi denies that he had any knowledge beforehand that WikiLeaks was going to release hacked emails from Clinton's campaign
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6436585/Document-Mueller-focused-tip-WikiLeaks-plans.html
 

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Apparent Robert Mueller Documents Connect Dots From Trump Camp To Wikileaks | Rachel Maddow | MSNBC
MSNBC


Published on Nov 27, 2018
Rachel Maddow reports on apparent drafts of legal documents for a plea agreement for Jerome Corsi with Robert Mueller that describe Corsi's middle-man role between the Trump campaign and Wikileaks.
» Subscribe to MSNBC: http://on.msnbc.com/SubscribeTomsnbc
 

andial

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More popcorn.
 

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Trump appears consumed by Mueller investigation as details emerge

Analysis by Stephen Collinson, CNN
5 hrs ago


Donald Trump's behavior isn't doing much to bolster White House assurances that he's got nothing to worry about from Robert Mueller's probe, after a series of potentially ominous turns in the Russia investigation.

The President's recent barrage of tweets and comments and testimony from sources close to him -- coinciding with thickening intrigue around the special counsel -- hint instead at deep concern on Trump's part.

"Heroes will come of this, and it won't be Mueller and his terrible Gang of Angry Democrats," Trump tweeted on Tuesday, blasting the special counsel as a "conflicted prosecutor gone rogue."

Despite this outburst of fury, White House press secretary Sarah Sanders painted a portrait of a President who was serenely awaiting Mueller's findings.

"I don't think the President has any concerns about the report because he knows that there was no wrongdoing by him and that there was no collusion," Sanders told reporters at her first daily briefing in a month.

The explanation for Trump's angst over his predicament seems to lie in a flurry of startling and potentially significant developments and reports swirling around his jailed ex-campaign chairman Paul Manafort and other associates.

Trump, the most powerful man in the world who crafted a self-flattering image as the ultimate strongman boss, is in a deeply vulnerable spot and appears to feel cornered and in increasing peril.

He has no choice but to watch as Mueller, an adversary whose discrete public profile makes him an elusive target, grinds away, apparently getting ever closer to Trump's inner circle and perhaps even to the President himself.

"The Mueller investigation is what it is. It just goes on and on and on," Trump told The Washington Post Tuesday when asked about his relentless, unseen foe.

Trump's lawyer Rudy Giuliani offered a hint of the toll being inflicted on Trump behind the scenes when he told CNN's Dana Bash the President had been "upset for weeks" about "the un-American, horrible treatment of Manafort."



Details emerge


While the White House refuses to budge from its denial of collusion between Trump and Russia in 2016, a string of events now coming to light is stretching the notion that this is all one harmless coincidence to the limit of credulity.

In the space of a few days, it emerged that Manafort's cooperation deal collapsed after Mueller accused him of lying on multiple occasions.

The Guardian reported on Tuesday that Manafort met Wikileaks founder Julian Assange, who is accused of blasting out emails stolen by Russian spies to attack Hillary Clinton, on a number of occasions in the Ecuadorian embassy in London. Both Manafort and Wikileaks have issued strenuous denials of the report -- Manafort called it "totally false and deliberately libelous" and Wikileaks was "willing to bet the Guardian a million dollars and its editor's head that Manafort never met Assange."

The paper's sourcing was also vague, making it difficult to assess the veracity of the reporting. So for now, joining the dots cannot produce definitive conclusions.

CNN later obtained draft court documents Tuesday with which Mueller plans to show how Trump associate Roger Stone allegedly sought information and emails from Wikileaks using another operative, Jerome Corsi, as a go between.

In another development, CNN contributor Carl Bernstein reported Tuesday that Mueller's team has been investigating a meeting between Manafort and Ecuadorian President Lenin Moreno in Quito in 2017 and has specifically asked if WikiLeaks or Assange was discussed in the meeting, according to a source with personal knowledge of the matter.

Such is the secrecy around Mueller's investigation that no one outside knows what he knows. The special counsel has yet to lay out any case against Trump or his close associates on either alleged collusion or obstruction of justice.

If there is such supporting evidence, it is not clear that Mueller would be able to prove malicious intent by Trump. But all of the recent developments suggest that the special counsel has penetrated deeply into the events surrounding the troubled 2016 election.

In his dismissal of a cooperation agreement with Manafort, for instance, Mueller's team said it has evidence to prove the former lobbyist lied "on a variety of subject matters" -- a fact that alone must leave Trump wondering about the extent of his knowledge.

There was immediate speculation that Manafort's apparent attempts to mislead Mueller amounted to an implicit plea for a pardon from the President. The White House said there had been talk of such a step. But adding to speculation that Manafort is angling for a pardon, Giuliani told Bash that the two legal teams had been in contact. This also raised the possibility that Trump has a genuine window into Mueller's progress, another factor that might explain his recent anger.

The New York Times reported that the cooperation between the two legal teams had inflamed tensions between the special counsel and Manafort's lawyers.



Potential impact


Former Watergate special prosecutor Richard Ben-Veniste told CNN's Brooke Baldwin on Tuesday that if the report of Manafort-Assange meetings was correct it would be extraordinary.

"What in the world would Mr. Manafort be doing meeting with Julian Assange if not to talk about Assange's role as a cut out for disseminating information the Russians obtained by illegal hacking?" Ben-Veniste said.

It was not clear whether Manafort's alleged lies dealt with the reported meeting with Assange. But given that the fugitive Australian is confined to his hideaway in the embassy, he or his hosts are likely under surveillance, intelligence that Mueller would likely be able to access.

Mueller is not the only potential threat to the President interested in the deepening questions. Democrats, poised to take power in the House, are already gearing up to reinvigorate a congressional investigation on Russia.

"A meeting with Julian Assange would be the smoking gun," said Rep. David Cicilline, D-Rhode Island, who sits on the House Judiciary Committee.

The House Democratic majority could eventually pose a grave threat to Trump's presidency and represents a devastating erosion of the force field of political protection so far offered by the GOP majority on Washington power -- another possible reason for his mood.

In the long term, any sustained dip in Trump's popularity -- his disapproval rating climbed to 60% in Gallup's weekly tracking poll -- could even eventually raise questions about the solidity of his standing among Senate Republicans that has so far always been seen as impenetrable.



Expectations high


The latest drama around Manafort is even more tantalizing given the possibility that the collapse of the cooperation agreement could prompt Mueller to reveal more about his tightly private investigation.

Special counsel prosecutors plan to detail Manafort's alleged lies in a number of areas in a sentencing memo that could be filed with the court in the coming weeks.

Mueller has used indictments and court filings throughout his tenure to embroider a rich picture of Russian intelligence hacking, a social media campaign to disrupt the election and cozy ties between Manafort and pro-Russian political figures in Ukraine.

So expectations will be high ahead of his filing if it is done in public

"Without releasing a report, without another indictment, Mr. Mueller would be in a position to reveal a lot of information that we would all find very interesting about his investigation in open court," said Ben-Veniste.

Such a filing is also now seen in Washington as a potential way around any attempt to disrupt a final report of the Russia investigation by Trump's acting-Attorney General Matt Whitaker.

The new focus on the man picked to succeed the sacked Jeff Sessions may also point to another possible spur for the President's current fury.

Trump has often seemed to know more about the probe than is available, and it's possible that Whitaker, who is now in charge of overseeing Mueller, has read him in on the inside story of the investigation.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/polit...ation-as-details-emerge/ar-BBQbcEZ?ocid=ientp
 

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Mueller Is 'Ready to Indict Some Folks': Former FBI Assistant Director


Newsweek
Brendan Cole
1 hr ago


Special Counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into claims of Russian interference in the 2016 election may see charges laid soon, a former top figure from the FBI who used to work with him has said.

Ex-FBI Assistant Director Frank Figliuzzi told MSNBC what he thought would happen to the probe after the appointment of Matt Whitaker as acting attorney general. That move followed the resignation of Jeff Sessions.

It is not clear what role Whitaker will play in overseeing the inquiry, which he has criticized for going too far in investigating the family finances of President Trump. Democrats fear the hostility to the probe might spur him to sabotage it, The New York Times reported.

Whitaker has also defended the meeting that took place between Donald Trump Jr. and Russian lobbyists in Trump Tower in June 2016.

But Figliuzzi told the anchor of The 11th Hour, Brian Williams, he had “a theory” that Mueller has already indicated what he is going to do.

“I think he’s ready to indict some folks and through those indictments will tell the story of what he’s found against the president.

“I’m not saying he’s indicting the president. I’m saying there’s a middle ground where he tells us the story, locks it into the court system by indicting others, then files a report with Whitaker,” he added.

“Perhaps what we’ll see is Bob Mueller telling us the story of a corrupt president through indictments.”

Figliuzzi also suggested that Mueller knows his days are numbered and so would act soon.

“I think the Whitaker appointment steps up the timeline and I think perhaps if Mueller sticks to the strategy of telling us the story through indictments — the indictments speak to us — that he’ll speak to us soon, very soon, with additional indictments, perhaps that tell the story of a corrupt president,” he said.

Protesters gathered around the country on Thursday from New York to Los Angeles in support of the Mueller investigation, which they fear may be ended following the firing of Sessions. The action was coordinated by the group MoveOn.

“Donald Trump has installed a crony to oversee the special counsel's Trump-Russia investigation, crossing a red line set to protect the investigation. Our hundreds of response events are being launched to demonstrate the public demand for action to correct this injustice,” it said on its website.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/polit...-fbi-assistant-director/ar-BBPw2gv?ocid=ientp
eh - this is reporting from fake news. Anytime I see reporting from MSNBC, MSN, NBC, CBS, ABC, Yahoo or CNN, I immediately discount it as bogus political propaganda
 

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Revealed: Trump told Mueller he knew NOTHING about infamous Trump Tower meeting and claimed trickster Roger Stone didn't tip him off about impending WikiLeaks email release

  • President sent answers to Special Counsel Robert Mueller's questions last week
  • Two of his statements have leaked, about WikiLeaks and an infamous meeting
  • Trump claims Roger Stone never told him WikiLeaks was about to publish a trove of emails stolen from Hillary Clinton's campaign chairman
  • He and fellow conspiracy theorist Jerome Corsi are straining to explain email traffic that seemed to predict it
  • He also says he never knew in advance about a Trump Tower meeting his son convened, including a Kremlin-connected Russian lawyer
  • Trump attacked Mueller on Wednesday, claiming he and his team were 'viciously telling witnesses to lie about facts' in exchange for lenient treatment
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...-Tower-meeting-Stone-didnt-tip-WikiLeaks.html
 

searcher

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No my opinion. Its a fact!
lol Ok...………..you win. :show affection:

Have you checked out the getting in shape thread? Just did a major up date. Check it out.
 

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Note: This one does not paint Trump in a good light. It's from the evil MSNBC 'fake news' peeps.

Unlike Richard Nixon, Donald Trump Misconduct Piling Up In Full Public View | Rachel Maddow | MSNBC
MSNBC


Published on Nov 28, 2018
Rachel Maddow reviews the many ways that Americans have witnessed Donald Trump attempt to quash or otherwise undercut the special counsel investigation into his 2016 presidential campaign, unlike Richard Nixon, the full record of whose misdeeds were not publicly known until after his scandal had run its course.
» Subscribe to MSNBC: http://on.msnbc.com/SubscribeTomsnbc