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Jeff Sessions - Anything & Everything

nickndfl

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#41
I think Sessions is on the way out or at least gets a transfer. His latest project to turn back legal marijuana is misguided. William F. Buckley Jr. could run for president as a democrat and get elected if he advocated legal recreational pot.

Instead of being so anti-Trump, the democrats could pull out wins on that topic alone.
 

the_shootist

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#42
The Dems are in it up to their eyeballs. They have no intention of letting off the gas against Trump. It's a power struggle and if they go down they all go to the gallows, along with a significant number of RINOs
 

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#44
The Police State Complex have their hands shoved so far up Session's ass his ears look like fingers.
 

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#46
Sessions under fire from all sides

The Hill

Alexander Bolton
7 hrs ago

Attorney General Jeff Sessions's job security is in question after taking withering fire from fellow Republicans this week, including from two prominent House conservatives who called on him to resign.

Two leaders of the House Freedom Caucus, Reps. Mark Meadows (R-N.C.) and Jim Jordan (R-Ohio), called on Sessions to step aside in an op-ed Friday, charging he has lost control of the Department of Justice and the FBI.

Sessions has also come under criticism from Republicans and Democrats alike for his decision to rescind the Obama-era Cole memo, which gave states the space to legalize marijuana without fear of federal interference.

By withdrawing the memo, Sessions gave federal prosecutors more leeway to pursue cases against the legal marijuana industry, which is expanding rapidly in several states.

Sen. Cory Gardner (R), whose home state of Colorado is host to a booming legal cannabis industry, ripped Sessions on the Senate floor Thursday and accused him of breaking a personal pledge not to change the Obama-era policy.

"When you have Republicans calling for you to step down and you're in a Republican administration just entering your second year, that's trouble. He's really on borrowed time," said Brian Darling, a Republican strategist and former Senate aide.

"This is an attorney general who has been ridiculed by his own boss on Twitter," he said, referring to President Trump. "At one point he didn't have the confidence of his own boss and he's losing the confidence of the Freedom Caucus and conservatives in the House and Senate."

Trump reiterated his frustration with Sessions in a recent interview, again criticizing his decision to recuse himself from the Justice Department's investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

"I thought it was certainly unnecessary, I thought it was a terrible thing," Trump told The New York Times.

A new report this week revealed the lengths to which Trump went to keep Sessions from turning over the Russia probe to Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein.

The president took the unusual step of sending White House counsel Don McGahn to lobby Sessions against recusal, according to The Times. Sessions told McGahn his mind was made up, saying he had been advised to do so by other officials in the Justice Department.

The recusal has become a sore spot in the relationship between Trump and Sessions. The president reportedly blames his attorney general for the appointment of Robert Mueller as special counsel, a move that was made by Rosenstein.

"There's a feeling on the right that Rod Rosenstein is running the Justice Department, not Jeff Sessions. He's not doing anything. He's recused himself to the point that he can't do his job anymore," Darling said.

Sessions is still taking heat from the president's allies over the decision.

Meadows and Jordan argued in an op-ed published in the Washington Examiner on Friday that the FBI investigation into Russian collusion has run amok.

"It would appear he has no control at all of the premier law enforcement agency in the world," they wrote.

"If Sessions can't address this issue immediately, then we have one final question needing an answer: When is it time for a new attorney general? Sadly, it seems the answer is now," they concluded.

Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-Calif.) in an interview Friday accused Sessions of betraying Trump by giving special counsel Robert Mueller unfettered ability to investigate the president.

"He is a Cabinet-level pi ata. He doesn't seem to enjoy the confidence and trust of the president. He's done a number of things on immigration and the most recent on marijuana that seem not to be playing well across the country," said Ross K. Baker, a professor of political science at Rutgers University.

"I'm sure there are days that Attorney General Sessions wishes he were back in the United States Senate," he added.

A Trump administration official, however, said Friday that there's little chance that criticism from Meadows, Jordan or other congressional Republicans would pressure Sessions to resign.

"If the president starts to criticize him again, that's a different story," the source said.

Sessions offered his resignation to Trump earlier this year but the president declined to accept it.

The official said Sessions has responded to Trump's earlier criticism that the Department of Justice hadn't done enough to investigate his 2016 rival Hillary Clinton.

The department has reopened an investigation into Clinton's use of a private email server while secretary of state and launched a new probe into the Clinton Foundation.

"He has started to rebut the earlier criticism," the source said of Sessions.

Ironically, Sessions's biggest allies may be Democrats who don't want him to step down as attorney general. They fear a new attorney general who is not bound by a recusal could bring the Russian investigation to a swift end.

Even though he opposed his nomination to head the Justice Department last year, Senate Democratic Leader Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) said Thursday that he wants Sessions to keep his job.

"My view now is very simple: nothing, nothing should ever interfere with the Mueller investigation," he said.

Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.), a member of the Judiciary Committee, which would hold hearings and vote on a new attorney general, told CNN, "I don't think the case has been made for his resigning," referring to Sessions.

"It would be problematic in a lot of ways," he said.

Republican strategists say Sessions will probably stay in the job because his resignation or dismissal would cause a major uproar and spark accusations of political interference in the Russia investigation.

"Because of the prominence of the Russia probe it's very hard to see him leaving the administration even though he has gone against the wishes of the White House in recusing himself," said Ford O'Connell, a Republican strategist. "How are you going to get a new attorney general through Congress?"

The Senate Republican majority has shrunk to 51 seats, and there are several GOP senators who have been outspokenly critical of Trump, including Sens. John McCain (Ariz.), Jeff Flake (Ariz.) and Ben Sasse (Neb.). That could make the confirmation process for a new attorney general exceedingly difficult.

"The biggest gripe against Sessions is his recusal," O'Connell said.

"A lot of the other things that Sessions has done, particularly now that we have an investigation into the Clinton Foundation, I think that overall people are relatively happy with Sessions," he said.

Politico reported Friday that Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt - a former attorney general of Oklahoma - has expressed interest in replacing Sessions if he resigns.

Some GOP officials believe Trump could move Pruitt or another Senate-confirmed senior administration official into the attorney's job temporarily, but Trump would spark a firestorm if he skipped the Department of Justice's line of succession, which would call for Rosenstein to replace Sessions.

One Senate Republican parliamentary expert said the president could not unilaterally appoint someone to fill the attorney general's job permanently and with full power without Senate confirmation.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/polit...rom-all-sides/ar-BBHXpnc?li=BBnb7Kz&ocid=iehp
 

searcher

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#47
Jeff Sessions’s Endless War on Marijuana
By THE EDITORIAL BOARD
JAN. 7, 2018


The key to understanding the Trump administration’s approach to policy, it seems, is to look at what most Americans want and then imagine the opposite.

Consider the new guidance on marijuana that Attorney General Jeff Sessions issued last week, which reverses Obama-era policy and gives prosecutors more leeway to enforce federal laws against the drug in states where it is legal. Mr. Sessions has been on a lifelong crusade against the plant, which he considers the root of many of society’s ills.

And yet more than six in 10 Americans, and seven in 10 of those under 30, believe marijuana should be legal, twice as many as in 2000. Three-quarters of the public believe the federal government should not prosecute the drug’s sale or use in states where it is legal.

In other words, the new policy is deeply unpopular. Many of its harshest critics are members of the president’s own party, who expressed outrage at the reversal of Mr. Trump’s campaign promise to leave the matter to the states.

Senator Cory Gardner, Republican of Colorado, where legalized marijuana has spawned a $1 billion industry, threatened to block all nominees to the Justice Department until the new policy is dropped.

Representative Dana Rohrabacher, a California Republican, laid the blame at the feet of Mr. Sessions, saying he “betrayed us on this.” A 2014 law co-sponsored by Mr. Rohrabacher prohibits the Justice Department from going after users, growers or sellers of medical marijuana in states where it is legal. The use of recreational marijuana became legal in California on Jan. 1. Even Matt Gaetz, the Florida representative last seen trying to get the special counsel Robert Mueller fired, said the new policy showed Mr. Sessions’s “desire to pursue an antiquated, disproven dogma instead of the will of the American people.”

None of this will bother the attorney general, a lifelong antidrug crusader who runs the Justice Department like it’s 1988, when the war on drugs was at full throttle and the kneejerk political response was to be as punitive as possible. Mr. Sessions has long held a particular enmity for pot, which he continues to demonize. “Good people don’t smoke marijuana,” he said in 2016.


This is wrongheaded for so many reasons. It’s out of step with current knowledge about the risks and benefits of marijuana, which the federal government classified as a Schedule I drug in 1970. By that definition, it has no accepted medical use and is more dangerous than cocaine. Obviously this is outdated, and Congress needs to do its part by removing marijuana from Schedule I. But nothing is stopping Mr. Sessions in the meantime from accepting scientific facts.

The new policy is also blind to the massive cultural shift toward legalization that has been happening at the state level in recent years, after decades of outrageously harsh punishments that have fallen disproportionately on the shoulders of people of color. Eight states have now legalized marijuana for recreational use. California is now the world’s largest legal market for pot. Twenty-nine states and the District of Columbia allow marijuana to be used for medical purposes. By the end of this year, it is estimated that legal marijuana will be a $9 billion industry.

Finally, to the extent the new policy redirects scarce government resources toward more marijuana prosecutions, it will undermine efforts to address more serious drug problems, like the opioid crisis, an actual public-health emergency that kills tens of thousands of people a year.

The full impact of the Sessions memo isn’t immediately clear. Federal prosecutors are overstretched, and only bring a small number of marijuana prosecutions as it is. But the memo has already created legal uncertainty in states that have partly or fully legalized marijuana, leaving users, growers and sellers to wonder whether their actions will be ignored or will land them behind bars.

Whatever its ultimate impact, the memo is yet another example of how the Justice Department under Jeff Sessions is turning back the clock on smart, evidence-based justice policy. His unwelcome revival of the war on drugs will last at least as long as the attorney general does. It is one of the reasons he has endured the continuing humiliations of working for Donald Trump.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/07/opinion/jeff-sessionss-war-marijuana.html
 

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#49
Questions remain after Attorney General Jeff Sessions' shift on marijuana
By Mitch Ryals
January 11, 2018
  • What does Attorney General Jeff Sessions' recent shift on marijuana policy mean for Washington's weed industry?
Last week, U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions withdrew a set of Obama-era guidelines outlining how states that have legalized medicinal and recreational marijuana can avoid federal interference. Those guidelines essentially told weed farmers, sellers, users and patients that as long as they follow state laws, the feds will leave them alone.

Sessions, whose anti-marijuana views are well established, has now paved the way for federal prosecutors to pursue criminal charges in states where weed is legalized. Exactly what the new policy means for Washington state, other states that have legalized and those that are considering legalization, is unknown.

"He let the dogs off the leash," says Douglas Hiatt, a Seattle-based lawyer who handles federal drug crimes. "If you're a U.S. Attorney in a state where marijuana is legal, and you don't want it, you're now authorized to go after it."

Will the pot shops in Washington start to close their doors?

It doesn't appear like that will be the case, at least not immediately.

"I suppose there are people who might panic, but I wouldn't recommend that," says Sam Calvert, owner of the retail shop Green Star Cannabis. "I think it's unlikely they're going to start going after people. They don't have the budget in the DOJ to shut everybody down."

Will banks change how they interact with marijuana businesses?

This is the biggest area of concern for retailers and lawyers who spoke to the Inlander.

Carol Ehrhart, co-owner of 4:20 Friendly, says her bank has already contacted her to say "we're not closing you down just yet."

But if the time comes, "will we have to go back to strictly cash?" she asks. "That really boils down to a security issue for us."

Along with memos that address farming, sale and use of marijuana, Sessions also rescinded memos that guide prosecutors considering going after banks who take money from marijuana businesses.

"He repealed the memos on banking issues and referred to the money laundering statutes [in his memo]," Hiatt says. "That may be pointing toward the direction they're going. They start in on that, and I think they'll have a good chance of shutting things down."

What's Washington state doing to push back?

There's not much they can do at this point.

But Washington State Attorney General Bob Ferguson addressed reporters last week, saying that his office has been preparing for this moment since voters approved marijuana for recreational use.

"We work with other AGs and have a structured organizations of states ... who've legalized marijuana," Ferguson said. "We are very well positioned from a legal standpoint. Our legal arguments have been crafted. We are prepared. We're not messing around in defending the will of the voters."

Beyond that, Ferguson and Gov. Jay Inslee say they've requested to meet with Sessions, as they did with then-AG Eric Holder during the Obama administration. So far, Sessions has not agreed to a discussion.

Is Sessions' move in line with American voters?

Nope.

A Gallup poll from October 2017 found that 64 percent of Americans believe marijuana should be legal, the highest level of support in almost five decades.

The only two demographic groups in a Pew Research Center survey, also from last October, whose majorities do not support legalization are Republicans and white evangelical Protestants.

Beyond that, 29 states have legalized medical marijuana, and eight, plus Washington, D.C., have legalized the drug for recreational use.

Is Sessions' move in line with Trump's campaign promises?

Nope.

Asked by a reporter in Colorado about marijuana legalization, candidate Trump said: "I think it's up to the states, yeah. I'm a states person. I think it should be up to the states, absolutely."

What do we know about the interim U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Washington, Joseph Harrington?

In a prepared statement following Sessions' policy shift, Harrington emphasized that "public safety is always at the fore" when his office considers criminal charges "including those that may relate to marijuana."

"This United States Attorney's Office will continue to ensure, consistent with the most recent guidance from the Department of Justice, that its enforcement efforts with our federal, state, local and tribal law enforcement partners focus on those who pose the greatest safety risk to the communities in Eastern Washington, by disrupting criminal organizations, tackling the growing drug crisis, thwarting violent crime and corralling white-collar fraudsters in this District," the statement says.

Reached by phone, Harrington declined to elaborate.

Some of the more high-profile cases that have come out of that office recently involve heroin, meth and cocaine distribution, child sex crimes and child pornography and violent criminals.

However, it was also this office that prosecuted the family now known as the Kettle Falls Five for growing medical marijuana in 2012. That case was brought under then-U.S. Attorney Michael Ormsby, an Obama-appointee. Convictions in that case were eventually overturned, and the case was dismissed earlier this year.

"That office over there, I have no idea what the hell is going to happen," Hiatt, the Seattle lawyer says. "Who knows? At that point, the whole thing could blow up again." ♦

mitchr@inlander.com

https://www.inlander.com/spokane/qu...-on-marijuana-enforcement/Content?oid=7619378
 

andial

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#52
Everytime i see you post a new article on this thread searcher my hope is a story about Jeff Sessions being caught having sexual relations with someone his size and that can only mean he is being charged with having sex with a child.
 

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#55
'DISGRACEFUL!': Trump goes after Sessions again for having independent watchdog he calls 'Obama guy' probe charges of FISA warrant abuse – saying he wants to put Justice Department lawyers on the case
  • President Donald Trump published a tweet attacking his own attorney general for his handling of alleged FISA abuse
  • Sessions said the Justice Department's Inspector General will probe how surveillance courts responded to the Russia probe
  • Trump called IG Michael Horowitz an 'Obama guy'
  • A GOP intelligence memo charges DOJ officials relied on the 'golden showers' dossier to get court-approved surveillance of a Trump advisor
  • A Democratic rebuttal memo says the dossier wasn't the only source for surveillance of Carter Page, and that possible biases were disclosed
  • The IG is already probing the FBI's handling of the Clinton email scandal
  • Trump vented: 'Will take forever, has no prosecutorial power and already late with reports on Comey etc.'


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5445727/Trump-blasts-Sessions-independent-watchdog-probe.html#ixzz58QE8eCCw
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andial

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#57
Hope Hicks having to go through the Mueller grilling might have been the last straw. No way Trump wants the little coward Session to remain in his cabinet.
 

spinalcracker

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#58
The only way that I would give ole Jeff a pass is if we find out later that he was busy signing off on the arrest warrants of Klintons and all their minions , all the pedophiles in Government on down , and he was busy rescheduling cannabis from Sch1 to Sch40.......
Only then would I take back all the slanderous and hurtful remarks I've thrown at the AG......
 

searcher

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#59
Sessions Defends Integrity After Trump Attack Over FISA Probe

Bloomberg

Chris Strohm and Margaret Talev
3 hrs ago



(Bloomberg) -- Jeff Sessions defended his work as U.S. attorney general after President Donald Trump assailed him for not ordering the Justice Department to investigate the agency’s use of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act in its Russia probe.


Trump accused the attorney general Wednesday of fumbling the investigation by leaving it to an independent inspector general. Sessions, who has been the subject of periodic attacks by Trump and repeated rumors that he’s on the verge of dismissal, responded with a statement defending himself and the Justice Department.

“We have initiated the appropriate process that will ensure complaints against this department will be fully and fairly acted upon if necessary,” the former Republican senator said. “As long as I am the attorney general, I will continue to discharge my duties with integrity and honor.”

Hours earlier Trump had unleashed his latest assault on the nation’s top law enforcement official.

“Why is A.G. Jeff Sessions asking the Inspector General to investigate potentially massive FISA abuse?” the U.S. president wrote in a tweet that was also critical of the IG, Michael Horowitz. “Will take forever, has no prosecutorial power and already late with reports on Comey etc. Isn’t the I.G. an Obama guy? Why not use Justice Department lawyers? DISGRACEFUL!”


Horowitz is investigating the FBI and Justice Department’s handling of its 2016 probe into former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s email arrangements. Trump fired FBI director James Comey last year in part, he said, because of that investigation.

Attacked, Mocked
Trump has repeatedly attacked and mocked Sessions and has said he wouldn’t have nominated him as attorney general if he’d known Sessions would later recuse himself from overseeing the investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 campaign.

Sessions’s recusal was followed by Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein’s decision to name Robert Mueller as special counsel. Sessions has offered at least once to resign.

In a tweet last July, Trump taunted, “Attorney General Jeff Sessions has taken a VERY weak position on Hillary Clinton crimes (where are E-mails & DNC server) & Intel leakers!”

For Sessions, the public criticism by the president is offset by a job that gives him a chance to pursue his career-long agenda of conservative positions on law enforcement issues, from restrictions on immigration to enforcement of federal laws against marijuana.

‘Fair, Fact Centric’
Trump’s criticism of the inspector general was rebutted by the chairman of the House Oversight Committee, Trey Gowdy. The Republican lawmaker, who regularly clashed with the Obama administration and Clinton, defended Horowitz as an impartial investigator.

“I have had a number of interactions with Inspector General Horowitz, including as recently as earlier this month,” Gowdy said in a statement. “He has been fair, fact centric, and appropriately confidential with his work.”

“He was confirmed by the U.S. Senate without a single dissent,” Gowdy said. “I have complete confidence in him and hope he is given the time, the resources and the independence to complete his work.”

The Office of Inspector General says on its website that it’s “a statutorily created independent entity whose mission is to detect and deter waste, fraud, abuse, and misconduct in DOJ programs and personnel, and to promote economy and efficiency in those programs.”

Fact-Checking Dueling Claims on Alleged Bias in the Russia Probe

Sessions told reporters on Tuesday that the inspector general would look into Republican claims that FISA standards were abused in the early stages of the FBI investigation into Trump campaign associates and ties to Russians. Trump’s decision to weigh in adds new fuel to concerns about presidential interference that could undermine the Justice Department’s independence.

“The inspector general will take that as one of the matters they’ll deal with,” Sessions said on Tuesday, concluding that it is “just the appropriate thing.”

Republican members of the House Intelligence Committee, led by Chairman Devin Nunes, have alleged that the FBI and Justice Department were biased against Trump in their handling of the probe into Russia’s interference in the 2016 presidential campaign.

A memo that the Republican lawmakers released on Feb. 2 asserts that officials relied primarily on an unverified dossier prepared by former British spy Christopher Steele to obtain a surveillance warrant on Carter Page, a foreign policy adviser on Trump’s campaign. The dossier was largely funded by Clinton’s campaign and Democrats.

Democratic members of the House Intelligence Committee, led by their top-ranking member, Adam Schiff, disputed the claims in their own memo, released in redacted form on Saturday.

Democrats say the Steele dossier wasn’t part of the FBI’s decision to open its counterintelligence investigation, which began in July 2016, well before the bureau received the dossier in September of that the year. While the dossier was cited in the FBI’s initial FISA warrant application in October 2016, the bureau “cited multiple sources to support the case for surveilling Page” and made only “narrow use” of information from Steele’s sources, according to the Democratic memo.

Page had been on the FBI’s radar for many years and a Russian intelligence officer targeted him for recruitment, according to the Democratic memo. The Page warrant was also renewed three times -- in January 2017, April 2017 and June 2017 -- which requires evidence that the surveillance was bearing fruit.

(Adds past Trump criticism of Sessions starting in seventh paragraph.)

--With assistance from Toluse Olorunnipa and Billy House

To contact the reporters on this story: Chris Strohm in Washington at cstrohm1@bloomberg.net, Margaret Talev in Washington at mtalev@bloomberg.net.

To contact the editors responsible for this story: Alex Wayne at awayne3@bloomberg.net, Mike Dorning, Larry Liebert

©2018 Bloomberg L.P.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/poli...-attack-over-fisa-probe/ar-BBJHxE0?li=BBnb7Kz
 

Irons

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#61
'DISGRACEFUL!': Trump goes after Sessions again for having independent watchdog he calls 'Obama guy' probe charges of FISA warrant abuse – saying he wants to put Justice Department lawyers on the case
  • President Donald Trump published a tweet attacking his own attorney general for his handling of alleged FISA abuse
  • Sessions said the Justice Department's Inspector General will probe how surveillance courts responded to the Russia probe
  • Trump called IG Michael Horowitz an 'Obama guy'
  • A GOP intelligence memo charges DOJ officials relied on the 'golden showers' dossier to get court-approved surveillance of a Trump advisor
  • A Democratic rebuttal memo says the dossier wasn't the only source for surveillance of Carter Page, and that possible biases were disclosed
  • The IG is already probing the FBI's handling of the Clinton email scandal
  • Trump vented: 'Will take forever, has no prosecutorial power and already late with reports on Comey etc.'


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5445727/Trump-blasts-Sessions-independent-watchdog-probe.html#ixzz58QE8eCCw
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
Mad Voter in MN CD 2 (@MadVoterInMN) says:
February 28, 2018 at 3:48 pm
Figure it is also another signal between Trump/Sessions that they are on the same page, but everyone else thinks there is friction. When Horowitz report drops, people can’t say Trump/Sessions were going after political opponents. Horowitz is the shield.

'Pretend to be weak, that he may grow arrogant.' Sun Tzu

'Hold out baits to entice the enemy. Feign disorder, and crush him' - Sun Tzu

aaapopcorn.gif


trupmpooh.jpg
 

searcher

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#62
Robert Mueller 'investigating Trump's attempt to force Jeff Sessions to resign' as it's learned the president mocks the attorney general by calling him 'Mr. Magoo' behind his back
  • Robert Mueller 'has been investigating President Donald Trump for allegedly obstructing justice' by trying to force AG Jeff Sessions from his job
  • Mueller is investigating alleged collusion between Trump’s campaign and Russia during the 2016 presidential campaign
  • The special counsel has reportedly been interviewing witnesses in recent months over tweets and statements made by Trump last summer about Sessions
  • Meanwhile, officials say that the relationship between Trump and Sessions, the former Alabama senator, continues to be frayed
  • Associates say that Trump has belittled Sessions by calling him ‘Mr Magoo’ – the famous cartoon character who is known for his nearsightedness
  • On Wednesday, Trump renewed his attacks on Sessions, calling his handling of GOP complaints of FBI bias 'disgraceful'
  • In an extraordinary response, Sessions stood up to Trump by defending his ‘integrity and honor’


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5447979/Mueller-probing-Trumps-attempt-force-Sessions-out.html#ixzz58Uk22Pii
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searcher

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#63
Trump has no plan to fire Jeff Sessions 'that I know of' says White House spokeswoman after Trump called his approach to probing surveillance abuses 'disgraceful'
  • President Donald Trump attakced his own attorney general for his handling of alleged FISA abuse earlier this week
  • Sessions said in response that the the Justice Department's Inspector General will probe how surveillance courts responded to the Russia probe
  • AG shot back: '‘As long as I am the attorney general, I will continue to discharge my duties with integrity and honor'
  • The IG is already probing the FBI's handling of the Clinton email scandal
  • Trump vented: 'Will take forever, has no prosecutorial power and already late with reports on Comey etc'
  • Despite the renewed tension, the president did not seem ready to cut him loose on Thursday afternoon, giving him a shout out at a White House opioid summit
  • Trump spokeswoman said that Sessions isn't on the chopping block as far - as she knows


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5451857/Trump-no-plan-fire-Jeff-Sessions-White-House-says.html#ixzz58XchQSC5
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andial

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#64
Trump should kick the little shit in the face.
 

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#65
Robert Mueller 'investigating Trump's attempt to force Jeff Sessions to resign' as it's learned the president mocks the attorney general by calling him 'Mr. Magoo' behind his back
  • Robert Mueller 'has been investigating President Donald Trump for allegedly obstructing justice' by trying to force AG Jeff Sessions from his job
  • Mueller is investigating alleged collusion between Trump’s campaign and Russia during the 2016 presidential campaign
  • The special counsel has reportedly been interviewing witnesses in recent months over tweets and statements made by Trump last summer about Sessions
  • Meanwhile, officials say that the relationship between Trump and Sessions, the former Alabama senator, continues to be frayed
  • Associates say that Trump has belittled Sessions by calling him ‘Mr Magoo’ – the famous cartoon character who is known for his nearsightedness
  • On Wednesday, Trump renewed his attacks on Sessions, calling his handling of GOP complaints of FBI bias 'disgraceful'
  • In an extraordinary response, Sessions stood up to Trump by defending his ‘integrity and honor’


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5447979/Mueller-probing-Trumps-attempt-force-Sessions-out.html#ixzz58Uk22Pii
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
This is a news article? DM sure knows how to spin. People love it though evidently.
 

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#67
Don't let Jeff Sessions strangle criminal-justice reform in its crib

By The Times Editorial Board
Mar 02, 2018 | 11:45 AM



Despite the partisanship that has paralyzed Washington on so many issues, some Democrats and Republicans in the U.S. Senate have come together around the proposition that America imprisons too many people for too long and that the burden of incarceration disproportionately falls on racial minorities. Ominously, however, the enlightened legislation they have produced is opposed by the Trump Justice Department.

The Sentencing Reform and Corrections Act approved by a bipartisan vote in the Judiciary Committee would reduce some mandatory minimum sentences, create a new "safety valve" that would allow judges to sentence some low-level drug offenders to less time than required by existing mandatory minimums and reduce a "three-strike" penalty for some repeat offenders from life imprisonment to 25 years. It also would make retroactive a 2010 law that reduced the disparity in sentencing between crack and powder cocaine, a distinction that disproportionately punished African Americans.

The Senate bill isn't perfect. It doesn't go far enough in reforming mandatory minimum sentences, which are often enacted by Congress in response to panic about perceived "waves" of particular sorts of crimes and which tie judges' hands. In fact, the legislation creates new mandatory minimums for interstate domestic violence and exporting weapons.

Still, the legislation would represent a significant shift away from policies that have devastated poor and minority communities without achieving a commensurate increase in public safety.

In addition to changes in sentencing, the bill would allow some federal prisoners to earn time off their prison sentences for successful participation in "recidivism reduction" programs, including education and job training. This represents a welcome recognition that the length of a prisoner's time behind bars should reflect not only the seriousness of his crime but also his efforts to change his behavior.

The Senate Judiciary Committee approved the bill despite a warning from Atty. Gen. Jeff Sessions that its enactment would be a "grave error" and would reduce sentences for a "highly dangerous cohort of criminals including repeat dangerous drug traffickers and those who use firearms." Sessions also claimed that it would be wrong to reduce drug sentences "in the midst of the worst drug crisis in our nation's history." (The opioid crisis is not primarily a problem of lax law enforcement.)

Sessions' view of criminal justice is a throwback to the "tough on crime" policies that created the crisis of over-incarceration the Senate bill aims to address. Unfortunately, his views could carry weight with other members of Congress and with President Trump, who promised in his inaugural address to end what he called "this American carnage." Supporters of the Senate need to drive home the truth that excessively long sentences and prison terms do not make the country safer.

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http://www.latimes.com/opinion/editorials/la-ed-criminal-reform-20180302-story.html
 

arminius

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#69
I seriously believe the great majority of these politicians aren't capable of writing the bills, they're just hired to pass em, without reading em, without understanding em, according to whoever's paying them more.

Most politicians are a facade, a good front, a good smile, upright. I like the word bloviate here.
 
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Irons

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#71
AG Jeff Sessions Announces Lawsuits Against California Over Interference With Immigration Enforcement…
Posted on March 7, 2018 by sundance

Attorney General Jeff Sessions and the U.S. Department of Justice is filing an injunction to block enforcement of three California immigration laws, each enacted within the past year.



Summary of California Laws Being Challenged:

(Encapsulated from Fox News coverage) ♦ One law offers additional worker protections against federal immigration enforcement actions. Senior Justice Department officials have said it’s prevented companies from voluntarily cooperating with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officials.

Employers are mandated under the law to demand ICE agents present a warrant or subpoena before entering certain areas of the premises, or when accessing some employee records. Some companies have complained they’ve felt torn between trying to comply with seemingly contradictory state and federal statutes, since penalties for non-compliance can be steep from both entities.




♦ The second law also known as “the sanctuary state bill” protects immigrants without legal residency by limiting state and municipal cooperation with the feds, including what information can be shared about illegal-immigrant inmates.

♦ A third law gives state officials the power to monitor and inspect immigrant detention facilities either run directly by, or contracted through, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.


https://theconservativetreehouse.co...igration-enforcement/comment-page-1/#comments
 

Irons

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#73
Says The Times Editorial Board:

Oddly, we (sort of) welcome the Trump administration’s legal challenge in hopes that it will clarify not just for state officials, but for the federal government where the lines of responsibility and culpability might lie.
Good start.

.
 

DodgebyDave

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#74
Citizens have 4th amendment rights. The government, does not.
 

searcher

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#76
Jeff Sessions risks the wrath of Trump by ruling out a SECOND special counsel to probe FBI misconduct - and for appearing on the cover of Time

  • Attorney General Jeff Sessions decided Thursday he wasn't going to appoint a second special counsel who would have the responsibility of probing the FBI
  • President Trump's attorneys and other Republicans want an investigation into how the FBI came to use the so-called 'dirty dossier,' funded by Democrats
  • Sessions decided the Department of Justice's inspector general, along with an internal department review, would be enough
  • He likely further irritated Trump by appearing on Time magazine's cover, where he defends his decision to recuse himself from the Russia probe
  • Trump has been annoyed at Sessions for the past year over his decision to leave Russian-related decisions up to his deputy, Rod Rosenstein


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5560167/Sessions-risks-wrath-Trump-ruling-SECOND-special-counsel-appearing-Time-cover.html#ixzz5BBjIyoE9
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
 

andial

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#78
Wow things should be moving at greatneck speed now, my ass.
 

andial

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#80
Yeah i know what to watch thanks anyhow.