• "Spreading the ideas of freedom loving people on matters regarding high finance, politics, constructionist Constitution, and mental masturbation of all types"

Marijuana Prohibition Going Up in Smoke? High Hopes for a Drug War Peace Dividend

Goldhedge

Moderator
Site Mgr
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 28, 2010
Messages
37,828
Likes
55,646
Location
Rocky Mountains
#1
Marijuana Prohibition Going Up in Smoke? High Hopes for a Drug War Peace Dividend

What was the most important outcome of yesterday’s election? Surprisingly, it probably wasn’t Barack Obama’s reelection. The most important things happened in Colorado and Washington. Voters in both states dramatically scaled back marijuana prohibition. While they did not embrace wholesale legalization for production and sale of any amount of marijuana, voters in these states nonetheless chose to make it legal to possess and grow marijuana. This was a critical blow to the already-crumbling foundations of drug prohibition.

As I have written before, drug prohibition is (literally) “a textbook example of a policy with negative unintended consequences” most visible in the extensive criminal underground and widespread violence associated with prohibition. What can we expect from legalization, and what could we expect from further liberalization of drug laws?
  1. Less Crime. Moving drug cultivation and commerce out of the shadows and into the legitimate marketplace will mean that participants in the market can resolve their disputes without resorting to violence. This will also deal a blow to international drug gangs by raising the supply of marijuana from competitors and by lowering its price. Since the demand curve for drugs is fairly inelastic—and I see no reason to think marijuana is an exception—this will reduce drug dealer revenue.
  2. Lower Demand for Hard Drugs Like Crack and Crystal Meth. At the margin, marijuana is a substitute for drugs like crack and meth. With lower prices and a much lower probability of prosecution associated with its use, I expect some drug users will switch to marijuana. Over the long run, I expect marijuana legalization to reduce the demand for harder drugs.
  3. A “Peace Dividend” From Scaling Back the Drug War. Scaling back the drug war frees up resources for more productive pursuits. Instead of busting pot smokers, Colorado and Washington cops can spend their time and energy fighting violent crime and fraud. Washington and Colorado residents who otherwise would have rotted in jail for a few years can go about their productive lives. Resources invested in avoiding detection can be redeployed toward more productive pursuits. You might finally be able to use the towel under your door for its intended purpose. The ball is in President Obama’s court on this one: I hope he respects the wishes of Colorado and Washington voters.
Yesterday’s results are historic because, as a Facebook friend pointed out, the results in Colorado and Washington show that ending prohibition can win at the ballot box, and this might encourage politicians to embrace prohibition repeal. If we’re lucky, our children will inherit a world in which the disastrous effects of drug prohibition are nothing but a sad chapter in a history book.

Some of the facts in this article were gathered from NORML.org.


http://www.forbes.com/sites/artcard...s-for-a-drug-war-peace-dividend/#3cca8de860ba
 

Mujahideen

Black Member
Midas Member
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
10,528
Likes
18,692
Location
Wakanda
#2
Prohibition rarely stopped me from buying weed. The amount of weed that I have smoked personally or seen being sold leads me to the conclusion that besides the war on drugs being immoral, it is utterly ineffective. It's a waste of money.

Literally all pot dealers I know of are regular people just trying to hustle a dollar. There is no reason to put them in jail.
 

newmisty

Splodey-Headed
Midas Member
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
24,313
Likes
33,889
Location
Qmerica
#3
Just looking for somewhere to stick this.

THAILAND’S LEGISLATURE JUST VOTED TO LEGALIZE MEDICINAL MARIJUANA

Thailand’s legislature has become the first in Southeast Asia to pass an amendment to legalize medicinal cannabis.

The kingdom’s National Legislative Assembly approved the change on Tuesday, amending the narcotics law to approve the production, possession, use, import and export of marijuana and kratom (an indigenous plant used in traditional practices) for medicinal purposes, The Bangkok Post reported. Individuals who obtain prescriptions from medical, dental and alternative medicine professionals will be allowed to legally possess and use the plants after the amendment is published in the Government Gazette.

Additionally, the law change allows for research and development of cannabis, as well as for agriculture, commerce, science and industry. However, violators who use, grow or sell marijuana illegally will face significant penalties of five to 15 years in prison and/or a fine of up to 1 million baht ($30,692).

lly use kratom and marijuana for medicinal or recreational purposes,” according to the Associated Press.

Some in Thailand had raised concerns about the change, fearing that the legislative move would not adequately benefit the local population. But Deputy Prime Minister and Justice Minister Prajin Juntong attempted to alleviate those worries prior to the vote, insisting that the government would ensure the primary benefits would go to Thai citizens.

“Don't be worried,” he said, according to local reports. Prajin explained that legalization would be carried out and managed under direct government control.

Thailand’s decision comes after a windfall year for marijuana that saw Canada become the first G6 nation to legalize recreational cannabis and as several other countries adjust their laws to decriminalize the plant and/or legalize it for medicinal purposes.

The United Kingdom decided to allow medicinal weed in July, while South Africa and Georgia allowed for all private marijuana use this year. Mexico’s Supreme Court also ruled for the fifth time that the country’s marijuana prohibition was unconstitutional.

In the United States, several more states legalized medicinal and/or recreational pot in 2018. In Asia, Sri Lanka announced this summer that it would begin cultivating cannabis for medicinal export, while also legalizing the plant for use in Ayurveda, an alternative healing practice.

Martin Jelsma, director of the drug policy program at Transnational Institute, an Amsterdam-based think tank, told South China Morning Post in November that Bhutan, Nepal, India and China are interested in medical cannabis as they see “how much money the rest of the world’s companies and countries are getting out of it.”

A report from Grandview Research released in April projected that the worldwide legal cannabis market could be worth nearly $150 billion by 2025, with more than one-third of that total coming from medical marijuana.



sauce: https://www.newsweek.com/thailand-legislature-voted-legalize-medicinal-weed-1271128 sauce everywhere btw
 

pitw

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Jun 25, 2013
Messages
3,180
Likes
3,442
Location
Eastern Alberta.
#4
There is a lot of backward country's and some think they lead.
 

newmisty

Splodey-Headed
Midas Member
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
24,313
Likes
33,889
Location
Qmerica
#7
Ha, I wrote "Come back Thai sticks!" before seeing your post.