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Meanwhile in Chicongo

engineear

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Send all those teen halfricans to the gun range to learn precision shooting...
All their "maimed victims" are costing the taxpayers $$$ for life...
Send them to africa where they can steal the local fruit and put bags of rice on their heads and walk miles to steal water all the while pooping on the side of the road...wait, I didn't mean San Francisco!
 

BigJim#1-8

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Buck

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imagine keeping some of these folks in the 11th grade until they're proficient enough to actually graduate to the Senior Class

at that point in time, it'd be like beating a dead horse, soon some would begin to ask for housing to be included
 

Casey Jones

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imagine keeping some of these folks in the 11th grade until they're proficient enough to actually graduate to the Senior Class

at that point in time, it'd be like beating a dead horse, soon some would begin to ask for housing to be included
We used to have a place for such persons.

It was called, "work."

If they didn't have any skills, they would be apprenticed. Which is like school, except there's a bit more freedom. Same pay, though.

It worked. What we have now, isn't working.
 

Buck

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what we have now, is from a design that doesn't include any success at all

they have to fundamentally tear down what we have in order to rebuild it in a manner more pleasing to themselves, we're just in the way
 

edsl48

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Chicongo...the land of the free (stuff)


A more bizarre and destructive mismatch of economic circumstances and policy direction would be hard to imagine.

The country is now strangled by an unprecedented, acute deficit of workers, which is partly responsible for growing product shortages and logistical logjams. Desperate companies are offering higher wages, flexible schedules free college tuition and even doing away with drug testing, yet Americans are quitting their jobs in record numbers. Fifty percent of all small business owners reported job openings they could not fill, more than double the 48-year historical average of 22%, according to the National Federation of Independent Businesses.

Chicago, however, is about to launch what the Washington Post calls one of the nation’s largest guarantied basic income programs – a cash handout with no strings attached aside from an income test.

Chicago will join some 40 other big American cities with similar pilot programs. Cook County, too, recently enacted a budget that includes $80 million for such a program, which we criticized here.

A huge amount of money is not initially at issue — $31 million is slated for the pilot program as part of Mayor Lori Lightfoot’s 2022 budget, which the city council will vote on Wednesday. But the plan is to make it permanent and bigger. Its supporters are betting that, like so many other assistance programs financed by the federal government under the guise of COVID relief, voters won’t let go once they start receiving the cash.

money-cash-scaled.jpg
Chicago’s program will give 5,000 low-income households $500 per month. Recipients will be chosen randomly, the only apparent requirement being that they must be adults and make less than $35,000 a year.

Keep in mind that this is not a program for those unable to work or attend training for any of the millions of jobs currently open. We have multiple programs for the disabled, which hopefully nobody objects to. If those programs are inadequate, fix them. Instead of doing that, progressives apparently prefer to hand out cash regardless of ability to work, by lottery.

How will Chicago pay for it? That’s another fundamental flaw. It’s coming out of the $2 billion Chicago received from the Biden administration’s American Rescue Plan, which is part of the $10 trillion doled out nationally by the federal government as supposed COVID relief. The federal cash spigot almost certainly will close.

Among the reasons you can expect the federal spigot to close for programs like this is that, except among progressives, the public doesn’t like the programs. From that Washington Post article:

Polling over many years has largely showed the American public does not support universal basic income. In April, the Pew Research Center survey found a third of Americans say it is “very important” for the United States to provide universal basic income while a fifth said it was “somewhat important.” Forty-five percent said they were against.
Chicago’s program was earlier opposed by the Black Caucus in the city council. They wanted the money reallocated to violence prevention through intensive case management, training and employment, according to the Chicago Sun-Times. Sensible as that seems, the caucus apparently is backing off or didn’t have the votes, and the program is now expected to pass along with the rest of Lightfoot’s budget.

Remember when politicians of all stripes were focused on stimulating employment and would say the best welfare program is a good job? That’s old school for today’s progressives. It’s now “Here, have some money.”

 

WillA2

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Chicongo...the land of the free (stuff)


A more bizarre and destructive mismatch of economic circumstances and policy direction would be hard to imagine.

The country is now strangled by an unprecedented, acute deficit of workers, which is partly responsible for growing product shortages and logistical logjams. Desperate companies are offering higher wages, flexible schedules free college tuition and even doing away with drug testing, yet Americans are quitting their jobs in record numbers. Fifty percent of all small business owners reported job openings they could not fill, more than double the 48-year historical average of 22%, according to the National Federation of Independent Businesses.

Chicago, however, is about to launch what the Washington Post calls one of the nation’s largest guarantied basic income programs – a cash handout with no strings attached aside from an income test.

Chicago will join some 40 other big American cities with similar pilot programs. Cook County, too, recently enacted a budget that includes $80 million for such a program, which we criticized here.

A huge amount of money is not initially at issue — $31 million is slated for the pilot program as part of Mayor Lori Lightfoot’s 2022 budget, which the city council will vote on Wednesday. But the plan is to make it permanent and bigger. Its supporters are betting that, like so many other assistance programs financed by the federal government under the guise of COVID relief, voters won’t let go once they start receiving the cash.

money-cash-scaled.jpg
Chicago’s program will give 5,000 low-income households $500 per month. Recipients will be chosen randomly, the only apparent requirement being that they must be adults and make less than $35,000 a year.

Keep in mind that this is not a program for those unable to work or attend training for any of the millions of jobs currently open. We have multiple programs for the disabled, which hopefully nobody objects to. If those programs are inadequate, fix them. Instead of doing that, progressives apparently prefer to hand out cash regardless of ability to work, by lottery.

How will Chicago pay for it? That’s another fundamental flaw. It’s coming out of the $2 billion Chicago received from the Biden administration’s American Rescue Plan, which is part of the $10 trillion doled out nationally by the federal government as supposed COVID relief. The federal cash spigot almost certainly will close.

Among the reasons you can expect the federal spigot to close for programs like this is that, except among progressives, the public doesn’t like the programs. From that Washington Post article:

Polling over many years has largely showed the American public does not support universal basic income. In April, the Pew Research Center survey found a third of Americans say it is “very important” for the United States to provide universal basic income while a fifth said it was “somewhat important.” Forty-five percent said they were against.
Chicago’s program was earlier opposed by the Black Caucus in the city council. They wanted the money reallocated to violence prevention through intensive case management, training and employment, according to the Chicago Sun-Times. Sensible as that seems, the caucus apparently is backing off or didn’t have the votes, and the program is now expected to pass along with the rest of Lightfoot’s budget.

Remember when politicians of all stripes were focused on stimulating employment and would say the best welfare program is a good job? That’s old school for today’s progressives. It’s now “Here, have some money.”


Instead of this garbage, the folks receiving SS should be given an increase to a reasonable wage. Since they paid into the ponzi scheme their whole life.
 

dacrunch

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Instead of this garbage, the folks receiving SS should be given an increase to a reasonable wage. Since they paid into the ponzi scheme their whole life.
Yeah, I get $1k/month, my wife $600 from SS...
Thank goodness I get another $1k from my Union Pension...
And carry NO DEBT and OWN MY HOUSE and vehicles outright.
... and we're very thrifty, and manage to help out relatives in WORSE conditions...
 

Densus

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Move the few dozen or so good people there and nuke it.
 

Uglytruth

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Yeah, I get $1k/month, my wife $600 from SS...
Thank goodness I get another $1k from my Union Pension...
And carry NO DEBT and OWN MY HOUSE and vehicles outright.
... and we're very thrifty, and manage to help out relatives in WORSE conditions...
My sister wants me to get my French citizenship going (have dual US / French citizenship) so she can use me to buy property in the EU. I told here I don't think it's such a hot idea.
 

Unca Walt

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My sister wants me to get my French citizenship going (have dual US / French citizenship) so she can use me to buy property in the EU. I told here I don't think it's such a hot idea.
Jeez.

I wouldn't touch that with a ten-foot Belgian.
 

edsl48

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A view from the gimme sum o dat types that the Washington Post supports...yet one wonders if any of them buy a paper.

The Washington Post
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Chicago poised to create one of the nation’s largest ‘guaranteed basic income’ programs​





511


1635376249463.png

The Chicago City Council is poised to vote this week on what would be one of the nation’s largest basic income programs, giving 5,000 low-income households $500 per month each using federal funding from the pandemic stimulus package enacted this year.

A public service message “Stay Home Saves Lives” is displayed against the Chicago skyline in March 2020.
© Charles Rex Arbogast/AP A public service message “Stay Home Saves Lives” is displayed against the Chicago skyline in March 2020.
Mayor Lori Lightfoot (D) has proposed the more than $31 million program as part of her 2022 budget, which the city council is scheduled to consider on Wednesday. The one-year pilot program, funded by the nearly $2 billion Chicago received from the Biden administration’s American Rescue Plan, is supported by most of city’s 50 aldermen. But it has received pushback from the 20-member Black Caucus, which has urged Lightfoot to redirect the money to violence prevention programs.

Lightfoot has said the pilot program is motivated by her own childhood memories of hardship while growing up in Ohio. “I knew what it felt like to live check to check. When you’re in need, every bit of income helps,” she wrote in a tweet announcing the plan earlier this month.

Basic income programs have been spreading across the country since Stockton, Calif., started providing monthly stipends with no strings attached to 125 of its residents in 2019. Those stipends resulted in more full-time employment and improved mental and emotional well-being among recipients, according to preliminary findings reported earlier this year by researchers who helped design the program.

Michael Tubbs, who implemented the program as then-mayor of Stockton, noted that recipients’ largest expenditure was food, making up at least a third of spending each month, according to the report. “I had no idea so many people in my area were hungry,” Tubbs said.

Study finds that giving people basic income in this city paid off
Since Stockton’s program launched, about 40 other cities have considered or started on similar efforts to target economic insecurity within their boundaries, according to Mayors for a Guaranteed Income, including Denver, Newark, Pittsburgh, San Francisco, New Orleans and Compton, Calif. A program in Los Angeles will provide 2,000 residents with a guaranteed income of $1,000 a month for a year.

The surge of interest in basic income has been fueled in part by the influx of money that cities have received from the coronavirus stimulus package and the formation of Mayors for a Guaranteed Income, an advocacy coalition that Tubbs founded last year.

Critics worry that guaranteed income programs will discourage people from finding jobs and drain the labor force, a particular concern amid the record job openings in the country this year, said Michael Faulkender, who served as an assistant treasury secretary for economic policy during the Trump administration. Last week, the National Federation of Independent Business reported that 51 percent of small business owners have jobs they cannot fill, more than double the historical average of 22 percent.

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“There are still millions of low-skilled jobs out there, and you have small business owners who can’t find workers to join their companies,” said Faulkender, who teaches finance at the University of Maryland. Proposals like the one in Chicago feed the “process of reducing the willingness of people to participate in the workforce,” he said.

Opposition to federal entitlement programs, such as rent vouchers and food stamps, has been waged for decades, but advocates like Tubbs say that today, “the climate has changed.” Economic blows struck by recent natural disasters and the pandemic have proven that “the economy doesn’t work for a vast number of Americans,” he said.

FILE — In this Friday, March 20, 2020, file photo, Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot listens to a question after Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker announced a shelter-in-place order to combat the spread of the covid-19 virus, during a news conference in Chicago. A protest and march against Lightfoot is scheduled for Thursday, May 20, 2021. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast, File)
© Charles Rex Arbogast/AP FILE — In this Friday, March 20, 2020, file photo, Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot listens to a question after Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker announced a shelter-in-place order to combat the spread of the covid-19 virus, during a news conference in Chicago. A protest and march against Lightfoot is scheduled for Thursday, May 20, 2021. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast, File)
The inequalities in Chicago are particularly stark. A 2019 report by an economic inequality task force created by the mayor’s office found that 500,000 Chicagoans — about 18 percent of the population — are living below or at the poverty level. Nearly half the city’s households do not have a basic safety net to help in emergencies or to prepare for future needs. A quarter of households have more debt than income.

Lightfoot says the effects of the despair can be seen in recent drops in life expectancy among the poorest and the current spike in street violence throughout the city. Harish Patel, executive director of Economic Security For Illinois, an advocacy group that helped coordinate the report, says the pandemic has made the disparities worse.

The 5,000 recipients, who must be adults and make less than $35,000 a year, will be chosen randomly for the program. Chicago Alderman Gilbert Villegas said the city plans to track the recipients’ expenditures during the first six months and then provide more targeted assistance, such as help with paying heating bills or for food. The costs of supporting the program, he said, “is well worth the investment” when weighed against daily costs of poverty in Chicago, such as gun violence and incarceration.

The Chicago basic income proposal dates back two years when a small group of aldermen led by Villegas proposed a resolution that would have established a $50 million basic income program. The subject is particularly important to Villegas, who considers himself “a product” of similar fiscal assistance. Following the death of his father when Villegas was 8 years old, his mother received $800 in monthly survivor benefits from Social Security until he and his younger brother turned 18. The funds supported child-care costs and gave her the freedom to work just one job, rather than two, so she could be with her sons more often.

“It allowed my mom to work with dignity and gave her the flexibility to work to better the neighborhood,” he said. The siblings later served in the Marines, which Villegas says they considered as payback for the assistance from the federal government. “These are the types of human infrastructure investments we need to take a look at when we talk about investing in infrastructure,” he said of basic income programs.

Polling over many years has largely showed the American public does not support universal basic income. In April, the Pew Research Center survey found a third of Americans say it is “very important” for the United States to provide universal basic income while a fifth said it was “somewhat important.” Forty-five percent said they were against.

But supporters say it is a matter of exposure. Brett Watson, an economics professor at the University of Alaska Institute for Social and Economic Research in Anchorage, noted that in his state, receiving a regular income from the government is already seen as “a birthright.”

Alaska has a nearly 40-year-old Permanent Fund Dividend that guarantees its residents an average of $1,600 in an annual lump payment. The fund consists of offshore oil lease royalties paid to the state.

Unlike many of the new basic income programs, it doesn’t target specific households and requires fewer conditions. The money, Watson said, is not seen as paternalistic or demeaning, unlike how social service benefits like food stamps or rent vouchers are traditionally perceived.

“There’s something appealing to people about the idea that it’s the people, more than the government, who should decide how best to spend the money they are given,” he said of the Alaska basic income model. “For that reason alone, it is attractive on the national scale.”

A previous version of this story incorrectly named the group that Tubbs started last year. It is Mayors for a Guaranteed Income.
 

edsl48

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A new bond court judge debuts with a fresh mindset that restrains victims and frees violent men on recognizance bonds​

November 1, 2021 CWBChicago Citywide
This week, Cook County Chief Judge Timothy Evans is expected to officially announce changes to the roster of judges who set bail conditions for defendants in the city. As CWBChicago reported, three new judges began handling the city’s bond court sessions last week in advance of Evans’ formal announcement.
And one of those judges, Kelly McCarthy, gave an eye-popping performance in felony bond court Friday.
McCarthy set bail for 27 defendants during the session. She gave 22 of them recognizance bonds — including two charged with felony robbery. She refused to grant prosecutors’ requests to have several defendants held without bail, including one charged with attempted murder for allegedly beating, stomping, and choking his pregnant girlfriend for 20 minutes.
But that’s not all. In one case, even though nobody asked for it, McCarthy took the unprecedented step of ordering a robbery victim to show up in court to be served with an order to protect the man who allegedly robbed her at gunpoint.
Judge-Kelly-McCarthy.jpg
Judge Kelly McCarthy | Facebook
In another case, prosecutors said a convicted felon admitted that a gun police found inside a purse in a car he was driving was his. Despite the alleged admission, McCarthy ruled there was no probable cause for the man to be detained because “obviously it’s not his purse.”
And when prosecutors made routine requests for her to hold defendants without bail for violating the bond terms in pending felony cases, McCarthy refused. Twice.
McCarthy is no stranger to the courts. Before being elected to the bench last year, she was a lawyer and supervisor in the public defender’s office. And, as strange as her decisions may seem, her Friday bond court session may provide Chicagoans with a glimpse of what lies ahead when Illinois outlaws cash bail in 2023.
Here are the details of some of the cases McCarthy heard Friday.

“Concerning”​

In one case, a man who has a felony gun case pending in “restorative justice court” appeared before McCarthy to face a new gun charge. Cops last week saw him stuff a gun down his pants and run away, prosecutors said. The officers caught him and recovered the weapon, they said.
Prosecutors made a routine request of McCarthy: To have the man held without bail for violating the terms of bond in his pending case. Judges almost always grant such requests in felony cases. But not McCarthy.
“It is concerning to the court that he has a pending gun case and then picked up this matter,” McCarthy said. She then refused to hold him without bail for the violation and said he could go home on electronic monitoring by posting $2,000.

“Maximum conditions recommended”​

Darien Green appeared in a CWBChicago report last November after he and other members of a shoplifting team allegedly entered the Macy’s store at Water Tower Place with baseball bats that they used to ward off security officers. Green was charged with armed robbery, but prosecutors allowed him to plead that down to retail theft for a probation sentence.
Friday, Green was charged with robbery and attempted robbery for two hold-ups at a Subway restaurant on the South Side.
A court worker who provides judges with suggested bail parameters told McCarthy that “maximum conditions” were recommended if she decided to release Green.
Instead, McCarthy gave him a recognizance bond and put him on electronic monitoring.
When Assistant State’s Attorney John Gnilka asked her to hold him without bail for violating the terms of his probation in the Macy’s case, McCarthy refused.

“It’s to protect everybody”​

In a truly bizarre moment on Friday, McCarthy took it upon herself to order an armed robbery victim not to contact the man who allegedly robbed her. There were no allegations that the victim contacted the man, and none of the parties asked McCarthy to restrain a crime victim. But she did it anyway “to protect everybody.”
Prosecutors said the man and two others robbed the woman at gunpoint, and she managed to track them down by sifting through Facebook profiles and friends lists of people who live in her neighborhood. She found one of the other robbers’ profile pages and contacted them via Facebook. He agreed to return some of the money they took, prosecutors said.
She also learned the defendant’s name through Facebook research and provided it to the police.
Prosecutors asked McCarthy to hold the man without bail and, once again, the court worker told the judge, “maximum conditions recommended if released.” Not only did McCarthy refuse to hold the man without bail, she released him on his own recognizance with electronic monitoring.
But then things got really weird when a prosecutor made a routine request for McCarthy to enter a no-contact order to keep the alleged robber away from the victim and the victim’s home.
McCarthy agreed to do that and, with absolutely nobody asking her to do so, she instructed prosecutors to draft another order for the victim to stay away from the armed robber, too.
Gnilka, one of the prosecutors in court Friday, seemed puzzled by McCarthy’s desire to restrain a violent crime victim.
“The state has no authority to impose any orders or conditions on the victim,” Gnilka told McCarthy. “The victim is not on bond … I, as a state’s attorney, cannot serve this victim with any paperwork or order them to do anything.”
He reminded the judge that there were no indications that the woman harassed, intimidated, or did anything against the alleged armed robber. If she should ever do something like that, Gnilka said, then the man should file a police report, and the state might have grounds to take action.
That wasn’t good enough for McCarthy. She ordered the victim to appear in court this week to be served with a no-contact order.
“It’s to protect everybody,” she said.

“There’s still a heartbeat, so that’s good.”​

In another case, it took Gnilka three minutes to explain everything an 18-year-old man allegedly did to his pregnant 17-year-old girlfriend during a physical attack that the victim said lasted 20 to 30 minutes.
The man became angry when the girl’s cat knocked something over in his apartment, Gnilka said. He hit the teen, who is in the sixth month of carrying his baby. When she screamed for him to stop suffocating her, the man put a pillow over her mouth, shoved her face into a couch, and even shoved his fingers down her throat to make her stop, according to the allegations.
That was just the beginning.
He pushed her into the TV and broke it. He dragged her into a bedroom closet, where he beat her and suffocated her until she urinated on herself. He rubbed her in the waste, dragged her into a bathroom, and kicked her as she lay on the floor, unable to move, Gnilka said. While she was incapacitated, she could hear the man choking her cats.
He returned to the bathroom with a mop, which he used to hit her before he placed a hammer around her neck and used it to lift her off the ground, Gnilka alleged. The man allegedly put her down after she started to black out from a lack of oxygen.
Next, he dragged her back to the bedroom closet, threw the mop at her, and told her to clean up her “mess,” Gnilka alleged. Another suffocation attempt followed, he said.
When the woman was finally able to get up, the man punched and kicked her to the ground, then stepped on her stomach and stomped on her chest, Gnilka continued.
Eventually, the woman was able to slip out of the apartment when the man took a break to look at his phone. She ran door-to-door looking for help until a woman let her use a phone to call her mom.
The girl’s mother took her to a hospital for treatment. Police said they could see cuts and bruises on the victim’s face and body.
Prosecutors charged the boyfriend with attempted murder, aggravated battery, and aggravated battery of a pregnant woman. Gnilka asked McCarthy to hold him without bail.
She said no.
The state’s allegations “sounded like a pretty lengthy beating occurred for little or no reason,” McCarthy said. Referring to the baby, the judge noted, “there is still a heartbeat, so that is good.”
But McCarthy said the man had “no other indicators of violence” and set his bail at $100,000. He’ll need to post 10% of that to get out of jail on electronic monitoring with a GPS device.

30.7%​

McCarthy was elected to the bench last year by winning the Democratic primary with 30.7% of the vote. She then ran unopposed to win a seat on the bench.
 

dacrunch

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That judge is going to bankrupt the Babylon Bee and the Onion...
 

Casey Jones

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That judge is suffering from the Insanity of the Elites.

The same insanity that keeps up with this mass-poisoning; even as evidence mounts that the quack-vaxx is hundreds of times more deadly than the failed bio-weapon.

They are just MAD. INSANE.
 

dacrunch

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Yeah.

Ten-foot Poles are pretty common. They can be big.

Not so much the Belgians...they don't get enough sunshine and eat too much crap...
Belgians are getting shorter every year...
Latest statistics show about 1/3 are foreign born, the majority arab Muslims from north Africa...

The number one first name given to male babies is just as in the UK = a version of Mohammed, Mohammad, Muhammad, Muhammed etc...

The country long known for its breweries is becoming better known for its Islamic terror attacks, random knifings of passersby to the chant of "All who ack bar", women getting beaten, raped and harassed, no-go neighborhoods.

And they have their own "squad" in government...

Another "oppressed minority" claiming "superior rights" over the original taxpayers who granted them asylum only to get overrun...
 

Son of Gloin

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... Another "oppressed minority" claiming "superior rights" over the original taxpayers who granted them asylum only to get overrun...
Gotta love it. All these oppressed oppressors. Stabbing you in the back or slicing at your throat, while they screech about being held down.
 

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"McCarthy ruled there was no probable cause for the man to be detained because “obviously it’s not his purse.”

The judge is obviously not woke.
Of course it could have been his purse.
 

the_shootist

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G

A new bond court judge debuts with a fresh mindset that restrains victims and frees violent men on recognizance bonds​

November 1, 2021 CWBChicago Citywide
This week, Cook County Chief Judge Timothy Evans is expected to officially announce changes to the roster of judges who set bail conditions for defendants in the city. As CWBChicago reported, three new judges began handling the city’s bond court sessions last week in advance of Evans’ formal announcement.
And one of those judges, Kelly McCarthy, gave an eye-popping performance in felony bond court Friday.
McCarthy set bail for 27 defendants during the session. She gave 22 of them recognizance bonds — including two charged with felony robbery. She refused to grant prosecutors’ requests to have several defendants held without bail, including one charged with attempted murder for allegedly beating, stomping, and choking his pregnant girlfriend for 20 minutes.
But that’s not all. In one case, even though nobody asked for it, McCarthy took the unprecedented step of ordering a robbery victim to show up in court to be served with an order to protect the man who allegedly robbed her at gunpoint.
Judge-Kelly-McCarthy.jpg
Judge Kelly McCarthy | Facebook
In another case, prosecutors said a convicted felon admitted that a gun police found inside a purse in a car he was driving was his. Despite the alleged admission, McCarthy ruled there was no probable cause for the man to be detained because “obviously it’s not his purse.”
And when prosecutors made routine requests for her to hold defendants without bail for violating the bond terms in pending felony cases, McCarthy refused. Twice.
McCarthy is no stranger to the courts. Before being elected to the bench last year, she was a lawyer and supervisor in the public defender’s office. And, as strange as her decisions may seem, her Friday bond court session may provide Chicagoans with a glimpse of what lies ahead when Illinois outlaws cash bail in 2023.
Here are the details of some of the cases McCarthy heard Friday.

“Concerning”​

In one case, a man who has a felony gun case pending in “restorative justice court” appeared before McCarthy to face a new gun charge. Cops last week saw him stuff a gun down his pants and run away, prosecutors said. The officers caught him and recovered the weapon, they said.
Prosecutors made a routine request of McCarthy: To have the man held without bail for violating the terms of bond in his pending case. Judges almost always grant such requests in felony cases. But not McCarthy.
“It is concerning to the court that he has a pending gun case and then picked up this matter,” McCarthy said. She then refused to hold him without bail for the violation and said he could go home on electronic monitoring by posting $2,000.

“Maximum conditions recommended”​

Darien Green appeared in a CWBChicago report last November after he and other members of a shoplifting team allegedly entered the Macy’s store at Water Tower Place with baseball bats that they used to ward off security officers. Green was charged with armed robbery, but prosecutors allowed him to plead that down to retail theft for a probation sentence.
Friday, Green was charged with robbery and attempted robbery for two hold-ups at a Subway restaurant on the South Side.
A court worker who provides judges with suggested bail parameters told McCarthy that “maximum conditions” were recommended if she decided to release Green.
Instead, McCarthy gave him a recognizance bond and put him on electronic monitoring.
When Assistant State’s Attorney John Gnilka asked her to hold him without bail for violating the terms of his probation in the Macy’s case, McCarthy refused.

“It’s to protect everybody”​

In a truly bizarre moment on Friday, McCarthy took it upon herself to order an armed robbery victim not to contact the man who allegedly robbed her. There were no allegations that the victim contacted the man, and none of the parties asked McCarthy to restrain a crime victim. But she did it anyway “to protect everybody.”
Prosecutors said the man and two others robbed the woman at gunpoint, and she managed to track them down by sifting through Facebook profiles and friends lists of people who live in her neighborhood. She found one of the other robbers’ profile pages and contacted them via Facebook. He agreed to return some of the money they took, prosecutors said.
She also learned the defendant’s name through Facebook research and provided it to the police.
Prosecutors asked McCarthy to hold the man without bail and, once again, the court worker told the judge, “maximum conditions recommended if released.” Not only did McCarthy refuse to hold the man without bail, she released him on his own recognizance with electronic monitoring.
But then things got really weird when a prosecutor made a routine request for McCarthy to enter a no-contact order to keep the alleged robber away from the victim and the victim’s home.
McCarthy agreed to do that and, with absolutely nobody asking her to do so, she instructed prosecutors to draft another order for the victim to stay away from the armed robber, too.
Gnilka, one of the prosecutors in court Friday, seemed puzzled by McCarthy’s desire to restrain a violent crime victim.
“The state has no authority to impose any orders or conditions on the victim,” Gnilka told McCarthy. “The victim is not on bond … I, as a state’s attorney, cannot serve this victim with any paperwork or order them to do anything.”
He reminded the judge that there were no indications that the woman harassed, intimidated, or did anything against the alleged armed robber. If she should ever do something like that, Gnilka said, then the man should file a police report, and the state might have grounds to take action.
That wasn’t good enough for McCarthy. She ordered the victim to appear in court this week to be served with a no-contact order.
“It’s to protect everybody,” she said.

“There’s still a heartbeat, so that’s good.”​

In another case, it took Gnilka three minutes to explain everything an 18-year-old man allegedly did to his pregnant 17-year-old girlfriend during a physical attack that the victim said lasted 20 to 30 minutes.
The man became angry when the girl’s cat knocked something over in his apartment, Gnilka said. He hit the teen, who is in the sixth month of carrying his baby. When she screamed for him to stop suffocating her, the man put a pillow over her mouth, shoved her face into a couch, and even shoved his fingers down her throat to make her stop, according to the allegations.
That was just the beginning.
He pushed her into the TV and broke it. He dragged her into a bedroom closet, where he beat her and suffocated her until she urinated on herself. He rubbed her in the waste, dragged her into a bathroom, and kicked her as she lay on the floor, unable to move, Gnilka said. While she was incapacitated, she could hear the man choking her cats.
He returned to the bathroom with a mop, which he used to hit her before he placed a hammer around her neck and used it to lift her off the ground, Gnilka alleged. The man allegedly put her down after she started to black out from a lack of oxygen.
Next, he dragged her back to the bedroom closet, threw the mop at her, and told her to clean up her “mess,” Gnilka alleged. Another suffocation attempt followed, he said.
When the woman was finally able to get up, the man punched and kicked her to the ground, then stepped on her stomach and stomped on her chest, Gnilka continued.
Eventually, the woman was able to slip out of the apartment when the man took a break to look at his phone. She ran door-to-door looking for help until a woman let her use a phone to call her mom.
The girl’s mother took her to a hospital for treatment. Police said they could see cuts and bruises on the victim’s face and body.
Prosecutors charged the boyfriend with attempted murder, aggravated battery, and aggravated battery of a pregnant woman. Gnilka asked McCarthy to hold him without bail.
She said no.
The state’s allegations “sounded like a pretty lengthy beating occurred for little or no reason,” McCarthy said. Referring to the baby, the judge noted, “there is still a heartbeat, so that is good.”
But McCarthy said the man had “no other indicators of violence” and set his bail at $100,000. He’ll need to post 10% of that to get out of jail on electronic monitoring with a GPS device.

30.7%​

McCarthy was elected to the bench last year by winning the Democratic primary with 30.7% of the vote. She then ran unopposed to win a seat on the bench.
GOOD!
 

Unca Walt

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What I see is a lurch toward an -- in general -- armed society.

Not at a slow grass-growing rate, but more like what happens if you keep on poking somebody and anybody: You get a chair busted across your teeth. At least.
 

the_shootist

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What I see is a lurch toward an -- in general -- armed society.

Not at a slow grass-growing rate, but more like what happens if you keep on poking somebody and anybody: You get a chair busted across your teeth. At least.
An armed society is a respectful society
 

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Well folks the Mayor has a plan to fix things...


November 4, 2021

Mayor Lightfoot Announces Historic Investment in Tree Equity in Recently Passed Budget​

$46 million out of the $188 million in environmental justice and climate action budget will go to planting and maintaining 75,000 trees over 5 years​

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CHICAGO - Mayor Lori E. Lightfoot highlighted a historic expansion and reorientation of the city’s tree-planting operations, funded by $46 million in city funding. As part of the Mayor’s new tree equity strategy, the city will plant 75,000 trees across the city over the next 5 years. This represents a doubling in tree planting over the previous year. The tree equity strategy will prioritize the planting of trees in historically marginalized and underserved communities, equitably conveying ecosystem benefits to communities disproportionately impacted by the climate crisis. This effort will help meet the City’s commitment to the Paris Climate Agreement, environmental justice, and equity.
“Our new tree planting strategy is part of our effort to fight the climate crisis,” said Mayor Lightfoot. “Delivering on bold, equitable climate goals is critical for our city to continue to thrive. These investments will directly benefit our residents in neighborhoods disproportionately impacted by the effects of climate change and help address decades of disinvestment.”
While the citywide tree canopy coverage in Chicago is 16%, this can vary greatly between neighborhoods, ranging from under 10% to 46%. Tree canopy coverage can have a direct impact on neighborhood air quality, temperature, flooding, and public health. Central to the city’s new approach will be planting trees where they are most needed for health and equity outcomes.
“We expect this historic investment to reap historic outcomes. Taking an equity-centered and data-driven approach, we can identify where trees can have the greatest impact and work directly with residents and community groups in those areas to plant and maintain trees,” said Angela Tovar, Chief Sustainability Officer for the City of Chicago. “We are committed to building a safer, stronger, and more just Chicago for all.” \
The Chicago Department of Public Health led the creation of a new ‘community site selection tool’ that brings together data on tree canopy, air quality, land surface temperatures, economic hardship, and other factors, with support from the Bloomberg Philanthropies Partnership for Healthy Cities. The city will use the tool to work with local nonprofits and community groups to identify priority communities and locations to plant trees. This, combined with the increase in funding for tree planting over the next five years, will help increase the number of trees in neighborhoods throughout the city and reduce the impacts of climate change on these communities. Bloomberg Associates, a pro bono municipal consulting service, has provided strategic advice on the development and rollout of the tree equity strategy.
“Mayor Lightfoot’s investment will make a significant positive impact on the health of Chicago’s urban forest,” said Lydia Scott, director of the Chicago Region Trees Initiative. “We look forward to continuing our partnership with the city to provide an increased and more equitably distributed tree canopy for its neighborhoods.”
The tree equity investment is one key component of Mayor Lightfoot’s “all-in” approach to fighting the climate crisis and part of $188 million in new funding to build resilience in neighborhoods disproportionately impacted by the effects of the climate crisis. The neighborhood-specific climate interventions will build a safer, stronger, and more just City for all and covers a broad range of environmental issues, from land remediation to tree planting. Each climate and environmental initiative was developed through a lens of racial equity, centering historically marginalized and underserved environmental justice communities.
“Cities are on the front lines of climate change, experiencing the direct impacts of extreme weather but also able to deploy the solutions needed to reduce carbon emissions and protect residents,” said Adam Freed, Principal for Sustainability at Bloomberg Associates. “Mayor Lightfoot’s historic investment in climate solutions, core commitment to equity, and use of data to target investments make it a national model for smart, impact-driven climate action.”
Other key investments include:
  • $25.75 million to create 20 new green and resilient schoolyards at public schools in the City’s most flood-prone areas. This initiative builds upon the highly successful green alley program and allocates resources to communities experiencing disproportionate amounts of flooding related to climate change.
  • $41 million to retrofit 500 low-income homes and units, create neighborhood resilience hubs, install solar power on 5 public libraries, and utilize existing roofs on industrial facilities to install community solar. These energy projects build climate resilience, lower utility bills for low-income residents, create high-paying jobs, and accelerate our just transition to a renewable energy economy.
  • $75 million in a holistic package of community-level climate projects that target some of the highest priority and most challenging environmental issues. These projects will improve organics diversion, remediate large swathes of contaminated land, decarbonize City fleets and buildings, clean our waterways, fund strategic neighborhood climate resilience projects, and invest in a historic trail network.
 

the_shootist

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Tree Equity?

I shudder to think what it will cost to have Chicongo dims touch trees..................
You can't have a jungle without the trees to swing from! Oooba gooba!
 
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the_shootist

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We do live in a cartoon. 188 million for what?........
Relax, its all Monopoly money. When the music stops the lenders will be left holding an empty bag of paper
 

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Quoted...

A young black kid asks Lori , what is Socialism and what is Racism?"

"Well, child . . . Socialism is when white folks work harder every day so we can get all our stuff free like cell phones for each family member, rent subsidy, food stamps, EBT, WIC, school lunch, healthcare, dental care, utility subsidies, free internet and cable, and on and on . . . you know. That's Socialism ".

"But Lori , don't the white people get mad about that?"

"Sure they do child……….... that's called Racism."
 

dacrunch

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Coconut trees...
- can eat the coconuts
- falling ones can help clean some garbage off the streets
Ah, darn, wrong climate...
 

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bet he don't rob no mo...

77-year-old man with a concealed carry license shoots and kills robber in Chicago, police say​

By FOX 32 Digital Staff
Published November 6, 2021

FIREFIGHTER-ATTEMPTED-ROBBERY-110621.jpg

article

CHICAGO - An elderly man with a concealed carry license shot and killed a robber in Chicago on Saturday afternoon, police said.

The 77-year-old was in a garage on East 89th near MLK in West Chesterfield around 12:30 p.m. when the robber drove up.

The robber pulled out a gun and demanded the elderly man's stuff, police said.

Instead of handing his things over, the elderly man pulled out a gun and shot the robber in the head and chest, police said. He was pronounced dead at the scene. On Sunday, he was identified as Bernard Peterson.

Chicago Police said that the elderly man has a valid Firearms Owner Identification Card and a Concealed Carry License. The Chicago Fire Department confirmed that he is a retired firefighter.

 

edsl48

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50th Person In Chicago Charged With Murder Or Attempted Murder While Out On Felony Bond​

Edmond Harris became the 50th person in Chicago arrested this year for allegedly murdering, attempting to murder, or shooting someone while out on felony bond.

CWB Chicago reported that Harris was arrested on February 12 “after he allegedly crashed a hijacked SUV in Lawndale.” For some reason, Harris was not charged for any crime related to the carjacking or crash and was instead charged “with failure to register as a sex offender in an unrelated matter.”



Still, failing to register is a felony, but Harris was released a few days after his arrest after posting a $1,000 deposit for his felony bond.

“As it turns out, Harris was a member of a prolific and extremely violent armed robbery and carjacking team that had been creating havoc throughout the city and suburbs for weeks, prosecutors now say,” CWB Chicago reported. “And five weeks after he posted that $1,000 bail bond, he killed an Uber driver in yet another carjacking, according to federal prosecutors.”

The armed robbery crew of which Harris was a member allegedly killed a 31-year-old Lyft driver on January 20 after pulling up next to him while he waited for a passenger. The crew carjacked the Lyft driver at gunpoint and then drove a couple of blocks, where they robbed a man walking down the sidewalk. The day after the attacks, Chicago police posted a community alert that connected the carjackers to other crimes, including shootings and armed robberies throughout Chicago and its suburbs.
 

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^^^ Seems more and more the place to start cleaning this mess up with the prosecutors, then the judges. How many swim with da fishes before things turn?
 

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50th Person In Chicago Charged With Murder Or Attempted Murder While Out On Felony Bond​

Edmond Harris became the 50th person in Chicago arrested this year for allegedly murdering, attempting to murder, or shooting someone while out on felony bond.

CWB Chicago reported that Harris was arrested on February 12 “after he allegedly crashed a hijacked SUV in Lawndale.” For some reason, Harris was not charged for any crime related to the carjacking or crash and was instead charged “with failure to register as a sex offender in an unrelated matter.”



Still, failing to register is a felony, but Harris was released a few days after his arrest after posting a $1,000 deposit for his felony bond.

“As it turns out, Harris was a member of a prolific and extremely violent armed robbery and carjacking team that had been creating havoc throughout the city and suburbs for weeks, prosecutors now say,” CWB Chicago reported. “And five weeks after he posted that $1,000 bail bond, he killed an Uber driver in yet another carjacking, according to federal prosecutors.”

The armed robbery crew of which Harris was a member allegedly killed a 31-year-old Lyft driver on January 20 after pulling up next to him while he waited for a passenger. The crew carjacked the Lyft driver at gunpoint and then drove a couple of blocks, where they robbed a man walking down the sidewalk. The day after the attacks, Chicago police posted a community alert that connected the carjackers to other crimes, including shootings and armed robberies throughout Chicago and its suburbs.
Good!!
 

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