• "Spreading the ideas of freedom loving people on matters regarding high finance, politics, constructionist Constitution, and mental masturbation of all types"

Mexico Wants to Decriminalize All Drugs and Negotiate With the U.S. to Do the Same

ErrosionOfAccord

#1 Global Warmer
Gold Chaser
Midas Supporter
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
3,802
Likes
4,444
Location
Coal Country
#1
World
Mexico Wants to Decriminalize All Drugs and Negotiate With the U.S. to Do the Same
By Jason Lemon On 5/9/19 at 4:10 PM EDT




US States That Could Legalize Marijuana In 2019
Share

World Drugs
Mexico’s president released a new plan last week that called for radical reform to the nation’s drug laws and negotiating with the United States to take similar steps.
The plan put forward by the administration of President Andrés Manuel López Obrador, often referred to by his initials as AMLO, calls for decriminalizing illegal drugs and transferring funding for combating the illicit substances to pay for treatment programs instead. It points to the failure of the decades-long international war on drugs, and calls for negotiating with the international community, and specifically the U.S., to ensure the new strategy’s success.
“The ‘war on drugs’ has escalated the public health problem posed by currently banned substances to a public safety crisis,” the policy proposal, which came as part of AMLO’s National Development Plan for 2019-2024, read. Mexico’s current “prohibitionist strategy is unsustainable,” it argued.
Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador delivers a speech at the Santa Lucia Air Force Base in Zumpango, near Mexico City, on April 29. The plan put forward by the president’s administration calls for decriminalizing illegal drugs and transferring funding for combating the illicit substances to pay for treatment programs instead. PEDRO PARDO/AFP/Getty Images
The document says that ending prohibition is “the only real possibility” to address the problem. “This should be pursued in a negotiated manner, both in the bilateral relationship with the United States and in the multilateral sphere, within the [United Nations] U.N.,” it explained.
Drug reform advocates have welcomed AMLO’s plan. Steve Hawkins, executive director of the Marijuana Policy Project, told Newsweek that the Mexican president’s plan “reflects a shift in thinking on drug policy that is taking place around the world, including here in the U.S.”
“The war on drugs has been extremely costly, not just in terms of government resources, but also human lives, and it has failed to accomplish its objective,” he explained. “Prohibition policies have, by and large, caused more harm to people and communities than the drugs they were intended to eliminate, and they haven’t come anywhere close to eliminating the supply or the demand.”
Last October, the International Drug Policy Consortium (IDPC), a global coalition of 170 nongovernmental organizations working on drug policy issues, released a report that highlighted the “spectacular” failure and global increase in violence that has been caused by the war on drugs. Instead of curbing the problem, “consumption and illegal trafficking of drugs have reached record levels,” Helen Clark, former prime minister of New Zealand and a member of the Global Commission on Drug Policy, wrote in the document’s foreword.
A couple attends a rally in support of the legalization of marijuana at the Alameda Central Park in Mexico City, on May 4. One in five prisoners globally are incarcerated due to drug-related crimes, often for simply possessing cannabis or other illicit substances. PEDRO PARDO/AFP/Getty Images
The IDPC report found that there had been a 145 percent increase in drug-related deaths over the previous 10 years. The number of deaths reached an estimated 450,000 in 2015 alone. Drug overdose deaths have also skyrocketed, with 71,000 overdose deaths in the U.S. alone in 2017. Additionally, one in five prisoners globally are incarcerated due to drug-related crimes, often for simply possessing cannabis or other illicit substances.
“Mexico’s president is rightly identifying one of the major drivers of violence and corruption in his country: the prohibition of drugs,” Maria McFarland Sánchez-Moreno, the executive director of the Drug Policy Alliance, a nonprofit that advocates for ending the war on drugs, said in an emailed statement to Newsweek. “The next step is to translate words into action, by pursuing both a domestic and international agenda of drug policy reform, grounded in respect for human rights.”

AMLO’s policy plan shouldn’t have come as a surprise to Mexican voters. During his campaign and after winning election, he has consistently called for major reforms to his country’s prohibition on drugs. Mexico’s Supreme Court also issued its fifth ruling on cannabis prohibition at the end of last October, determining that punishing people for using the drug violated the constitution. Mexican lawmakers have since worked to push forward legislation to regulate the use of recreational mairijuana.
“More and more countries are developing programs for regulating cannabis for medical and adult use, and there is a growing sentiment that drug use should be treated more like a public health matter than a criminal justice issue,” Hawkins told Newsweek .
A woman waves a flag with a marijuana leaf to celebrate National Marijuana Day in Ottawa, Ontario, on April 20, 2016. With Canada’s decision to legalize and Mexico pushing to decriminalize all drugs, the U.S. may soon find itself isolated by its neighbors when it comes to drug policy. CHRIS ROUSSAKIS/AFP/Getty Images
Canada became the first major major economic power to legalize and regulate the sale of recreational cannabis last year. With Canada’s decision to legalize and Mexico pushing to decriminalize all drugs, the U.S. may soon find itself isolated by its neighbors when it comes to drug policy. Although 10 states and Washington, D.C., have legalized recreational marijuana, and more than 30 have legalized some form of cannabis for medicinal use, it remains classified as a Schedule 1 illegal drug by the federal government.
Polls have shown that legalizing marijuana nationwide enjoys bipartisan support. Republicans and Democrats have come together in Congress to support legalization as well as protecting states that have already legalized at the local level. President Donald Trump has previously suggested he is supportive of easing laws surrounding marijuana, although his administration has given mixed messages.
Attorney General William Barr said last month during testimony before a Senate Appropriations subcommittee that he would "still favor one uniform federal rule against marijuana." However, he added that he thought the "way to go is to permit a more federal approach so states can, you know, make their own decisions within the framework of the federal law."
Decriminalizing all drugs is not a perspective that is widely advocated or discussed in Washington. This week though, Denver became the first city in the country to pass a ballot measure to fully decriminalize psilocybin mushrooms, commonly known as magic mushrooms or simply shrooms.
“The vote [in Denver] shows again that the public is ahead of politicians on drug law reform—and shows the power and potential of public action in demanding it!,” the drug policy foundation Transform said in an email to supporters.
Posters in support of Ordinance 301, which decriminalized psilocybin mushrooms, adorn an election night watch party, in Denver, on May 7. Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images
Related Stories
How the U.S. would respond to AMLO’s plan remains to be seen. Globally, however, it’s clear the conversation around drugs has shifted. Countries from Uruguay to South Africa to Georgia to Thailand have been reforming their drug laws, specifically when it comes to cannabis. Meanwhile, momentum has increased in the past few years within the U.S. as state after state has pushed through medical or recreational marijuana legalization.
Congressman Earl Blumenauer, a Democrat from Oregon, who co-founded the bipartisan Congressional Cannabis Caucus in 2017, told Newsweek last summer that he envisions marijuana will soon be traded across North American borders. “In the course of the next decade, I think there will be a North American cannabis market,” he said. If AMLO’s plan succeeds, that cross-border cannabis market could more likely come to fruition.
“Governments are increasingly finding they can neither justify nor afford maintaining the war on drugs,” Hawkins pointed out. “Leaders are looking for exit strategies, as we are now seeing in Mexico."

https://www.newsweek.com/mexico-decriminalize-drugs-negotiate-us-1421395
 

skychief

enthusiastic stacker
Silver Miner
Joined
Sep 25, 2014
Messages
907
Likes
1,260
Location
California Coast
#2
It's about damn time.

Government has no business in outlawing or regulating naturally occurring substances like cannabis or Psilocybin mushrooms.

God gave us these things. . . . We have a natural right to use them however we please provided that others are not harmed by us using them.
 

newmisty

Splodey-Headed
Midas Member
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
25,294
Likes
35,827
Location
Qmerica
#3
Curious timing now that the boarder is finally being protected.
 

ZZZZZ

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Site Supporter
Joined
Dec 23, 2017
Messages
3,468
Likes
7,365
Location
Northern Arizona
#4
It took a while, but the insanity of the War on Drugs and Prohibition is finally sinking in.
.
.
 

Goldhedge

Moderator
Site Mgr
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 28, 2010
Messages
41,777
Likes
65,929
Location
Rocky Mountains
#5
Decriminalizing drugs would do a lot toward stopping gangs...

If the State sold drugs one would be assured of a quality product at a reasonable (below black market) price.

The State could also offer recovery programs for those who wanted to get off drugs.

It would be a win, win, win.

Would you lose some folks from overdose? Sure, but you got that now.

You also have prisons and all the related stigma with that situation.

Quit penalizing folks for living.
 

Silver

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
5,153
Likes
7,929
#6
Some drugs are asymmetrical warfare, like fentanyl (maybe heroin also). 70,000 people died from overdoses of opioids last year, that's just crazy.

I'm all for drug legalization (even though I don't personally approve of hard drug use), but there's no way you can make drugs legal and the problems go away. What they call the 'homeless crisis' on the west coast is really a drug crisis.
 

newmisty

Splodey-Headed
Midas Member
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
25,294
Likes
35,827
Location
Qmerica
#7
Some drugs are asymmetrical warfare, like fentanyl (maybe heroin also). 70,000 people died from overdoses of opioids last year, that's just crazy.

I'm all for drug legalization (even though I don't personally approve of hard drug use), but there's no way you can make drugs legal and the problems go away. What they call the 'homeless crisis' on the west coast is really a drug crisis.
Yeah, if they have "shoot up rooms" and free syringes now in Commiefornia, just imagine the "utopia" it would be after legalization. Drive through crack dens, all you can shoot pharmacies...and they'll have to dig troughs in the streets for all the vomit and excretions.
 

TomD

It blowed up, y'all
Site Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
4,154
Likes
5,495
Location
Florida Panhandle
#8
Some drugs, discovered and not-yet-discovered, are extraordinarily dangerous, rapidly and horribly addictive, incredibly destructive and lethal. Even given that, decriminalizing the whole mess would be the lesser evil.
 

TomD

It blowed up, y'all
Site Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
4,154
Likes
5,495
Location
Florida Panhandle
#9
Yeah, if they have "shoot up rooms" and free syringes now in Commiefornia, just imagine the "utopia" it would be after legalization. Drive through crack dens, all you can shoot pharmacies...and they'll have to dig troughs in the streets for all the vomit and excretions.
Consider it to be a large scale experiment in Darwiniasm.
 

Someone_else

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
2,578
Likes
3,458
#10
Some drugs, discovered and not-yet-discovered, are extraordinarily dangerous, rapidly and horribly addictive, incredibly destructive and lethal.
Yes, I remember the stories about PCP. And in recent years there have been stories about some synthetics that make people do unbelievably crazy things.

How about we start with a simple "If it is a plant not chemically modified..." rule?
 

Mujahideen

Black Member
Midas Member
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
11,014
Likes
20,014
Location
Wakanda
#11
Yes, I remember the stories about PCP. And in recent years there have been stories about some synthetics that make people do unbelievably crazy things.

How about we start with a simple "If it is a plant not chemically modified..." rule?
That’s pretty much what I go by.

I always wanted to try some coca leafs, but I’ll never do coke.
 

Buck

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Site Supporter
Joined
Apr 13, 2011
Messages
6,592
Likes
6,216
#12
Seriously?

Seems to me el-Presidente doesn't have the courage to go after the cartels

To Capitulate is to be a Coward but if you don't tell anyone, you can rearrange the letters in the word coward to spell out 'hero'
in spanish

Legalized Drugs in Mexico?
that don't take a new mexican law anymore than illegal weapons take a permit to obtain

Mexican Law means NOTHING and a Mexican Politicians Words mean even less
 

Strawboss

Home Improvement Sales Trainee...
Gold Chaser
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
5,186
Likes
9,053
#13
That’s pretty much what I go by.

I always wanted to try some coca leafs, but I’ll never do coke.
Item #1 on my bucket list is to go skydiving.
Item #2 is to smoke crack on my 70th birthday. (I figure if I live that long - its a good time to do it...risk/reward skew)

Maybe I will combine them and smoke crack in the plane just before jumping...
 

ErrosionOfAccord

#1 Global Warmer
Gold Chaser
Midas Supporter
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
3,802
Likes
4,444
Location
Coal Country
#14
I’ve known people who have done crack once and never again. I guess it takes a special kind of stupid to get into and addicted to it. The people I knew said it just wasn’t all that great.
 

Uncle

Midas Member
Midas Member
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Apr 13, 2010
Messages
1,500
Likes
1,725
Location
SA
#15
That’s pretty much what I go by.

I always wanted to try some coca leafs, but I’ll never do coke.
Get some 99% cocao dark chocolate, no sugar.

Three blocks or so will provide a decent hit.

Slow and smooth. And you'll do more than a days work.

Golden Regards
Uncle
 

FunnyMoney

Silver Member
Silver Miner
Joined
Apr 1, 2010
Messages
2,727
Likes
2,436
#18
Curious timing now that the boarder is finally being protected.
2 lies in one?

First of all the border is no more protected that it was before because now it's even easier for the mafias to traffic into our country via the tunnels and cargo routes - what I have explained here many times, those routes are 85% of that traffic. Only 15% comes by way of the desert.

So whatever small improvements MAY have been made along the desert, over the above land routes, it has been overwhelmed by the increases coming in the other routes which are NEVER talked about. Wonder why nobody talks about the 85% of the problem and only look at the 15%? Propaganda, that is why. Lies and deceptions..

Second, The prez of that country is taking an political strategy which is opposite of all those that came before him - and with nearly all agenda items, it's not just this one issue about drugs.
 

Joseph

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Jul 27, 2011
Messages
4,597
Likes
8,484
Location
south east
#19
Decriminalizing drugs would do a lot toward stopping gangs...

If the State sold drugs one would be assured of a quality product at a reasonable (below black market) price.

The State could also offer recovery programs for those who wanted to get off drugs.

It would be a win, win, win.

Would you lose some folks from overdose? Sure, but you got that now.

You also have prisons and all the related stigma with that situation.

Quit penalizing folks for living.
My cynical self says " more govt control and TAX REVENUE". Beyond that, think of the unbelievable economy the hemp industry would create - which ... is .... why .... it ... will ... never .... happen.
 

ErrosionOfAccord

#1 Global Warmer
Gold Chaser
Midas Supporter
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
3,802
Likes
4,444
Location
Coal Country
#20
Gotta agree with Funny on this one. The concept has already been proven.
 

Mujahideen

Black Member
Midas Member
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
11,014
Likes
20,014
Location
Wakanda
#21
Get some 99% cocao dark chocolate, no sugar.

Three blocks or so will provide a decent hit.

Slow and smooth. And you'll do more than a days work.

Golden Regards
Uncle
I just don’t wanna fail a drug test.

I’ve had to resort to drinking a coffee only twice a week just to feel a buzz.
 

newmisty

Splodey-Headed
Midas Member
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
25,294
Likes
35,827
Location
Qmerica
#22
I was in a headshop a few years ago and hey were selling some kind of concentrated cacao for $30! I prefer 85% bars from Aldi. AA quarter bar will get you feeling a buzz. Occasionally I'll buy a bag af 100% raw cacao from the health food store and add it to smoothies or make super concentrated coco.

 

Buck

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Site Supporter
Joined
Apr 13, 2011
Messages
6,592
Likes
6,216
#23
now it's even easier for the mafias to traffic into our country via the tunnels and cargo routes
of course it is, because You say so or someone else you read says so...85%?

85% still come through port of entries, that would be through 'legal asylum' issues and through holes in the ground, so, let's say 40%, not even half of the 85% you say

I mean, if we're tossing around numbers, how about previous legal bills that have put us in the predicament we're in today

pffftttt, numbers, you and your statistical numbers

Funny you are

and i'm going back to my beer
 

bb28

Silver Member
Silver Miner
Joined
Nov 5, 2011
Messages
1,560
Likes
1,388
Location
People's Republic of USSA
#24
God gave us these things. . . . We have a natural right to use them however we please provided that others are not harmed by us using them.
God gave us these things, yet he also commanded that we remain sober. They are not meant for recreational use.

I have a nuanced viewpoint on this. I think the government war on drugs is a failure, but I also believe whatever they come up with right now has the potential to be even worse. I think if .gov allows people to suffer the natural consequences of their drug use and take personal responsibility for it without burdening their neighbors, this could be a good thing. But, what are the chances that will happen? What good thing has come from government in the last few decades?

If you have free needles, shootup rooms, doctors and medication on demand to keep people from overdosing, that is government-subsidization of druggies and the level of drug use and degeneration of society will be unprecedented and unstoppable.

This is one of those things I look for in prophecy. In order to bind the world in a single currency with a single leader, all of the black-market activity has to be legalized. This includes illegal aliens that do business in cash outside of the banking system, prostitution, gambling, and drugs. The black market is huge and by legitimizing all of these activities, it also provides a lifeline for the official economy not to collapse and for the big banks and techno-monopolies to gain even more control of everyone's life.

bb
 

TomD

It blowed up, y'all
Site Supporter
Platinum Bling
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
4,154
Likes
5,495
Location
Florida Panhandle
#25
The lesser evil?

Give me a break. That's some really nifty spin there. Make it sound like it's almost a toss up but in the end you'll go with the honest, humane, workable, non-counter-productive solution.
Just pretty sure that a full legalization of drugs would have some world class unintended consequences attached to it. Surely you admit that there would be an "adjustment" period as heroin, morphine, cocaine, meth, etc. was easily and legally available to the average citizen. Pretty sure that this "adjustment" period would be chaotic enough to make a lot of people question the basic premise.
 

Mujahideen

Black Member
Midas Member
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
11,014
Likes
20,014
Location
Wakanda
#26
Just pretty sure that a full legalization of drugs would have some world class unintended consequences attached to it. Surely you admit that there would be an "adjustment" period as heroin, morphine, cocaine, meth, etc. was easily and legally available to the average citizen.
It already is.
 

Buck

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Site Supporter
Joined
Apr 13, 2011
Messages
6,592
Likes
6,216
#27
This is one of those things I look for in prophecy. In order to bind the world in a single currency with a single leader, all of the black-market activity has to be legalized. This includes illegal aliens that do business in cash outside of the banking system, prostitution, gambling, and drugs. The black market is huge and by legitimizing all of these activities, it also provides a lifeline for the official economy not to collapse and for the big banks and techno-monopolies to gain even more control of everyone's life.
agreed with you

for some it'll be the morning they wake up, discover the box that was built around them over the years, surprisingly, they discover, it was built by themselves, as if, like, by magic, 'overnight even', and yet, today, it is real, it is very real, but the reason they built that box was not everlasting, it didn't properly reflect where they are now nor could they predict the future when some "change in societal norms" suddenly makes them and their 'old legal behavior' somehow, now, guilty, and the past proves that guilt, in 'the new way', and you can't change the evidence of the past, it's proof, etc...oh no.......

but, I can predict tomorrow, and that is:
There really can be no going back to yesterday, and the paradigm we were all living 'then', is not sustainable today, within the current ideologies of Climate stuff, Carbon crap, mumbo-jumbo, First Amendment, DOJ, CIA, FBI, etc, so, really, the decision is:

Where Are We Going To Go Next? (to be so lucky we survive this entire Coup)

Is this part of the Plan? Mexico becoming a legal society for the sale and purchase of drugs?

seriously: won't that eventually lead to new rules / laws to stem the outrageous number of OD's from 'bad brews'? if only because the profit gets to be 'spread around'?

Quality Goes Down at the street level while prices go up at the government level...huh, interesting indeed

tricky indeed

how about Mexico just close it's borders, it's southern borders, let's just start there

we'll talk later because i don't think all the cartel will satisfied with this new idea

idk

idk
:ponder:
 

oldgaranddad

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Midas Supporter
Joined
Feb 21, 2012
Messages
4,790
Likes
8,219
Location
On the top shelf.
#28
Decriminalization of drugs is fine with me as long as I and my fellow taxpayers do not have to pick up the tab for your rehabilitation or your poor life choices. It will go along way to diminish the cartels but one has to think through the secondary and tertiary effects and costs. We barely keep the after effects of alcohol in check -- and politicians make criminals out of the occasional imbiber yet how many politicians and connected individuals skirt the DWI/DUI laws in regards to the same?
 

Buck

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Site Supporter
Joined
Apr 13, 2011
Messages
6,592
Likes
6,216
#29
:witch:
 

ErrosionOfAccord

#1 Global Warmer
Gold Chaser
Midas Supporter
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
3,802
Likes
4,444
Location
Coal Country
#30

hammerhead

Morphing
Gold Chaser
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Feb 22, 2012
Messages
7,431
Likes
8,657
Location
On a speck of dust
#32
I’ve known people who have done crack once and never again. I guess it takes a special kind of stupid to get into and addicted to it. The people I knew said it just wasn’t all that great.
The first time I got stoned, it was like being on a spiritual journey. Never got the same feeling since although I chased it for many years.
 

Joe King

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
9,046
Likes
9,978
Location
Instant Gratification Land
#33
Decriminalizing drugs would do a lot toward stopping gangs...

If the State sold drugs one would be assured of a quality product at a reasonable (below black market) price.
Those are two different things. Decrim simply means it's no longer a criminal offense. That's not the same as full-on legalization with gov providing the goodies.




So your solution is?
Making it easy for them to shoot up isn't the answer. Do we also have to provide shot glasses and beer steins and gov-operated bars for alcoholics? I doubt that anyone thinks the gov should do that, so why does the equivalent of that need to be done for drug addicts?

Why can't they buy their own needles? Why can't they shoot up in the privacy of their own homes or apartments? Oh wait, they can't because those types of drugs cause people to not be able to provide for their own basic needs. So we as society somehow have the obligation to help them further their descent into oblivion? That we need to help them avoid hitting rock bottom?

News flash! hitting rock bottom is the only way those people might ever begin to help themselves. If all their basic needs are met, everything right down to the 50 cent needle they need to maintain their "lifestyle", why should they ever want to fix their situation?
....and at that point, all that happens is that their numbers begin to grow ever larger.

Edited to add: I agree that it needs to be treated as a health issue instead of as a criminal issue, but helping people to maintain their addiction is not and cannot be part of the answer.




If you have free needles, shootup rooms, doctors and medication on demand to keep people from overdosing, that is government-subsidization of druggies and the level of drug use and degeneration of society will be unprecedented and unstoppable.
Imagine how stupid it would sound to suggest making similar accommodations for those who drink alcohol.
 
Last edited:

Joseph

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Jul 27, 2011
Messages
4,597
Likes
8,484
Location
south east
#34
I think if .gov allows people to suffer the natural consequences of their drug use and take personal responsibility for it without burdening their neighbors, this could be a good thing. But, what are the chances that will happen? What good thing has come from government in the last few decades?
The guvmmint needs to be out - period. They've proven themselves to be a collection of absolute f*ckups any time time they get involved with ANYTHING.


 

nickndfl

Midas Member
Midas Member
Midas Supporter
Joined
Jan 7, 2011
Messages
13,344
Likes
12,344
Location
Florida
#35
Coca leaves are easily obtained in South America. You can even buy a box of commercially made tea bags. BTW, it doesn't taste very well. It made me nauseous and there was no buzz, not even close to doing a line.
 

Uglytruth

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Site Supporter
Joined
Apr 6, 2011
Messages
6,917
Likes
10,714
#36
Simply another wedge topic brought up by the elite. What are they REALLY doing that we are not seeing?
 

DodgebyDave

Metal Messiah
Midas Member
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
11,103
Likes
12,220
#37
The evil weed. And etc.

No
 

Rollie Free

Midas Member
Midas Member
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
5,278
Likes
5,329
Location
Nebraska
#38
Decriminalization of everything. All of it. Think of the money we'll save. Close down the prison system. No more cops, judges, lawyers etc. Drunk drivers, murderers, speeders, drug addicts, petty thieves.... let God sort it out.
 

Uglytruth

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Site Supporter
Joined
Apr 6, 2011
Messages
6,917
Likes
10,714
#39
Decriminalization of everything. All of it. Think of the money we'll save. Close down the prison system. No more cops, judges, lawyers etc. Drunk drivers, murderers, speeders, drug addicts, petty thieves.... let God sort it out.
Um....... guns? Seems a way to get fed / state approval for drugs so you loose your right to have firearms because you chose weed over personal responsibility. The end game is never the topic at hand. It might take them another generation or two but they will get there.......
 

EO 11110

CENSORSHIP KILLS
Site Supporter
Mother Lode
Joined
Jul 31, 2010
Messages
14,500
Likes
11,265
Location
clown world
#40
this is about social engineering, not freedom to catch a buzz

seattle, san fran, other ghettos are shining examples of their goal of keeping more criminals in our society

this topic serves that master