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Uglytruth

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Since I am not God, I cannot even guess when Stage Two will hit.

But it will.

And it will be the sum of:

1. vaxx-reaction deaths as heart and other problems cascade due to brand new overload of human response system

2. vaxx introduction of AIDS to every single vaxxed human

3. New viruses such as have already been announced and those actively in development

4 . Disastrous reduction in fertility, live births

5. Next generation of survivor births will all have VAIDS because the altered genes are passed on

6. Destruction of economy and weakening of infrastructure due to VAIDS and dollar collapse

Doubtless, not being God, I am certain that I missed a whole lot of other horrific things coming. I did not mention war. <-- That too has potential.

But I would bet all my lost Krugerrands that Stage 2 is most ricky-tick in the short-term bullpen.
That leads to a few questions
1. Between the UNSTABLE economy & health related issues will people even try to have children? We saw the baby boom after WWII. Is this the anti baby boom?
2. Is vaids transmittable by sex with someone that is jabbed giving it to yourself? (very aids like....fauci)
3. How will purebloods identify themselves & why bring a child into serfdom / slavery?
4. What % of world population took the jab that it mattered for reproduction? Generally any pureblood woman newborn to 45 is considered birthing age and male pureblood partner? (we now know why they exempted themselves)

WOW after thinking about it. Slaves had to work but everything else was provided by the "owner", when freed they had to provide everything for themselves. Underpaid and over stimulated with desire for things they could not afford created debt slaves. Now we are back to "you will own nothing and be happy"...... and that sounds like slavery with a twist. Maybe communism or at least corporatism.

Think of the rate of population decline when you are killing off both ends of the people. Killing off old & weak and the young can't have kids.

My sister complaining about her kids not having any opportunities in the world makes me thinkof #1.
 

the_shootist

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Nope.

I have seen some shit. I will describe reality:

There three distinct and definable stages, and we are in the very, very first stage of the three stages I have seen:

Stage One: Someone young dies unexpectedly, and the body is autopsied. <-- We Are Here

Stage Two: Great state of emergency as dozens die in the street. Alternative vehicles used to take the bodies away. Hospitals totally full.

Stage Three: Dead people in the street amount to somewhat more than half the population. They rot where they lay. Denizens of the city forage.

In a way, even you have glimpsed actual Stage Three in historical videos about Berlin, Warsaw and Stalingrad. Survivors (temporary) walking by corpses in the street, an old lady licking the screw-opening on an empty drum...
Walt, you're very experienced ( I can only imagine the shit you've been through and seen), you're very wise and you're very intelligent.

In this case, I hope you're very wrong sir! We all have family/friends who have gone all in on the jabs and the horror you describe invokes unimaginable thoughts when applied to all our loved ones and the people we care about.

Someone is going to pay a steep price for this pushing and promoting this evil should even a fraction of what you've stated here goes down. I can promise you that!!
 

the_shootist

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1654348758762.png
 

engineear

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the_shootist

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Must have slipped and hit his noggin on a rock...
I'm sure his family is thankful he was double jabbed and fully boosted otherwise it could have been much worse

He was an obgyn. Was Hillary one of his patients per chance? That might explain a lot.

 
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Joe King

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Think of the rate of population decline when you are killing off both ends of the people. Killing off old & weak and the young can't have kids.
(we now know why they exempted themselves)
Have you looked into recent developments in areas of stopping and even reversing aging?

Might help explain and add context to your observations.
 

vichris

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Brad Johnson has died of Covid. He was a former Marlboro Man and "Melrose Place" & "Always" actor.

I have an old Marlboro Man metal sign done in his image that decorates one of my walls. Sad to hear he has passed.



.
IMG_20220604_151156262.jpg
 

the_shootist

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Johnson died Feb. 18 of complications from COVID-19 in Fort Worth, Texas, his rep, Linda McAlister, told The Hollywood Reporter. THR was recently alerted about his death.

He probably got hit by a bus but you know....COVID!
 

Uglytruth

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SUICIDE TWIST — Investigation Into Death Of Clinton Advisor Linked To Epstein Reopened



The bizarre suicide death of Bill Clinton’s former advisor linked to billionaire perv Jeffrey Epstein is now an“OPEN” investigation, Radar can exclusively report.



The stunning turn of events comes after a series of explosive RadarOnline.com stories questioning the suicide death of Clinton moneyman, Mark Middleton, who was found May 7 hanging from a tree with a shotgun blast through his chest and an extension cord around his neck.



RadarOnline.com learned about the surprise twist after it filed a Freedom of Information request with the Perry County Sheriff’s Department demanding copies of the police report and crime scene photos of grisly death in a 1,100-acre farm linked to the former president just outside Perryville, Arkansas.



In an email reply,Sheriff Scott Montgomery tells Radar he cannot release the police report because the once open-and-shut case is an active investigation.



https://radaronline.com/p/bill-clinton-jeffrey-epstein-death-advisor-investigation-reopened/
 

Goldhedge

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The stunning turn of events comes after a series of explosive RadarOnline.com stories questioning the suicide death of Clinton moneyman, Mark Middleton, who was found May 7 hanging from a tree with a shotgun blast through his chest and an extension cord around his neck.
That seems to be a clear cut case of suicide to me!
 

Uglytruth

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Ensoniq

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Epstein lives!

I'd bet money on it. Maybe he's got a basement apartment at Chappaqua...
Maybe he’s living in an RV park like that dude in the pedocrats thread.
 

Casey Jones

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Maybe he’s living in an RV park like that dude in the pedocrats thread.
"Drag a hundred-dollar bill through a trailer park, and you never know what you'll find."

I suppose a fair number of catches will be under the legal age to keep...
 

TAEZZAR

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Nope.

I have seen some shit. I will describe reality:

There three distinct and definable stages, and we are in the very, very first stage of the three stages I have seen:

Stage One: Someone young dies unexpectedly, and the body is autopsied. <-- We Are Here

Stage Two: Great state of emergency as dozens die in the street. Alternative vehicles used to take the bodies away. Hospitals totally full.

Stage Three: Dead people in the street amount to somewhat more than half the population. They rot where they lay. Denizens of the city forage.

In a way, even you have glimpsed actual Stage Three in historical videos about Berlin, Warsaw and Stalingrad. Survivors (temporary) walking by corpses in the street, an old lady licking the screw-opening on an empty drum...

Unca, being the picky person that I am, I FIFY !
Other than that, I think you on it like "a hobo on a hotdog!" :2 thumbs up::rotf:

Stage Two: Great state of emergency as dozens die in the street. Alternative vehicles used to take the bodies away. Hospitals Morgues totally full.
 

TAEZZAR

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That seems to be a clear cut case of suicide to me!
AKA Arkancide.
Has anyone had the courage (suicidal or not) yet, to call it Hillary-cide ?:don't    know2::don't    know2::shit happens::gracious:
 

the_shootist

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SUICIDE TWIST — Investigation Into Death Of Clinton Advisor Linked To Epstein Reopened



The bizarre suicide death of Bill Clinton’s former advisor linked to billionaire perv Jeffrey Epstein is now an“OPEN” investigation, Radar can exclusively report.



The stunning turn of events comes after a series of explosive RadarOnline.com stories questioning the suicide death of Clinton moneyman, Mark Middleton, who was found May 7 hanging from a tree with a shotgun blast through his chest and an extension cord around his neck.



RadarOnline.com learned about the surprise twist after it filed a Freedom of Information request with the Perry County Sheriff’s Department demanding copies of the police report and crime scene photos of grisly death in a 1,100-acre farm linked to the former president just outside Perryville, Arkansas.



In an email reply,Sheriff Scott Montgomery tells Radar he cannot release the police report because the once open-and-shut case is an active investigation.



https://radaronline.com/p/bill-clinton-jeffrey-epstein-death-advisor-investigation-reopened/
Is this a parody article?
 

chieftain

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Nope.

I have seen some shit. I will describe reality:

There three distinct and definable stages, and we are in the very, very first stage of the three stages I have seen:

Stage One: Someone young dies unexpectedly, and the body is autopsied. <-- We Are Here

Stage Two: Great state of emergency as dozens die in the street. Alternative vehicles used to take the bodies away. Hospitals totally full.

Stage Three: Dead people in the street amount to somewhat more than half the population. They rot where they lay. Denizens of the city forage.

In a way, even you have glimpsed actual Stage Three in historical videos about Berlin, Warsaw and Stalingrad. Survivors (temporary) walking by corpses in the street, an old lady licking the screw-opening on an empty drum...

We're somewhere between stage one and two Walt. Morgues are overflowing here, brand new cold storage facilities that were on long term leases to produce growers and wholesalers have been repurposed to store the dead. Hospitals are creaking at the seams with the sheer number of vaccine injuries.
 

Uglytruth

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Alec John Such, bassist and founding member of Bon Jovi, dead at 70

Alec John Such, the bassist and a founding member of Bon Jovi, has died. He was 70.

Jon Bon Jovi on Sunday announced the death of John Such, the New Jersey rock band’s bassist from 1983 to 1994. No details on when or how John Such died were immediately available. A publicist for Bon Jovi didn’t immediately respond to messages.

“He was an original,” Bon Jovi wrote in a post on Twitter. “As a founding member of Bon Jovi, Alec was integral to the formation of the band.”

Bon Jovi credited John Such for bringing the band together, noting that he was a childhood friend of drummer Tico Torres and brought guitarist and songwriter Richie Sambora to see the band perform. John Such had played in a band called the Message with Sambora.

The Yonkers, New York-born John Such was a veteran figure in the thriving New Jersey music scene that helped spawn Bon Jovi. As manager of the Hunka Bunka Ballroom in Sayreville, New Jersey, John Such booked Jon Bon Jovi & The Wild Ones before joining the singer-songwriter’s band. He played with Bon Jovi through the group’s heyday in the ’80s.

John Such departed the band in 1994, when he was replaced by bassist Hugh McDonald. He later rejoined the band for its induction into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 2018.

“When Jon Bon Jovi called me up and asked me to be in his band many years ago, I soon realized how serious he was and he had a vision that he wanted to bring us to,” said John Such at the Hall of Fame induction. “And I am only too happy to have been a part of that vision.”

https://nypost.com/2022/06/05/alec-john-such-founding-member-of-bon-jovi-dead-at-70/
 

Ensoniq

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We're somewhere between stage one and two Walt. Morgues are overflowing here, brand new cold storage facilities that were on long term leases to produce growers and wholesalers have been repurposed to store the dead. Hospitals are creaking at the seams with the sheer number of vaccine injuries.
Wow chieftain

i assume I’m not missing the sarcasm and this is true

you're there and I’m not but could you elaborate some more? which area of Oz, or all areas?

is this a media blackout
 

chieftain

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Wow chieftain

i assume I’m not missing the sarcasm and this is true

you're there and I’m not but could you elaborate some more? which area of Oz, or all areas?

is this a media blackout

I wish I was taking the piss Ensoniq. In the article linked by Uco, one of the commenters who says they're a lawyer are saying the exact same thing I'm being told by many others. The reason I know about the makeshift morgues is because my business was supposed to run the wifi network through one of these new cold stores.
 
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Ensoniq

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scary stuff…

hard for them to call it Covid when everyone had the vaccine and very few had actual covid

its the crime of the century
 

chieftain

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scary stuff…

hard for them to call it Covid when everyone had the vaccine and very few had actual covid

its the crime of the century

You're not thinking big enough. This will be the crime of the past two millenia.
 

Casey Jones

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You're not thinking big enough. This will be the crime of the past two millenia.
It is not a crime.

It's a genocide; it's societal suicide; and yes, we'll be a thousand years recovering.

But "crime" is a legal term. The governmental structure, if this goes as it appears, will simply fall apart.
 

chieftain

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It is not a crime.

It's a genocide; it's societal suicide; and yes, we'll be a thousand years recovering.

But "crime" is a legal term. The governmental structure, if this goes as it appears, will simply fall apart.

Genocide is a legal term as well, just a matter of which term more accurately reflects the nature and severity of their actions.
 

Casey Jones

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Genocide is a legal term as well, just a matter of which term more accurately reflects the nature and severity of their actions.
But in this case it's just descriptive.

For there to be "crime" there has to be government. Otherwise it's just events.
 

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Jim Seals of Seals and Crofts, Duo That Ruled ’70s Soft-Rock With Hits Like ‘Summer Breeze,’ Dies at 80​


Chris Willman
Tue, June 7, 2022, 12:41 PM


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Jim Seals, who as part of the duo Seals and Crofts crafted memorably wistful 1970s hits like “Summer Breeze” and “Diamond Girl,” died Monday at age 80. No cause of death was immediately given.

Several friends and relatives confirmed the death. “I just learned that James ‘Jimmy’ Seals has passed,” announced his cousin, Brady Seals, a former member of the country band Little Texas, Monday night. “My heart just breaks for his wife Ruby and their children. Please keep them in your prayers. What an incredible legacy he leaves behind.”

Wrote John Ford Coley, “This is a hard one on so many levels as this is a musical era passing for me. And it will never pass this way again, as his song said,” he added, referring to the Seals and Croft hit “We May Never Pass This Way (Again).” Coley was a member of another hit duo of the era, England Dan and John Ford Coley, with Jim Seals’ younger brother, the late Dan Seals.

“You and Dan finally get reunited again,” Coley wrote. “Tell him and your sweet momma hi for me.”

With Jim Seals as the primary lead vocalist of the harmonizing duo, Seals and Crofts came to be the very emblem of “soft rock” with a run of hits that lasted for only about six years. Although none of the pair’s hits ever reached No. 1 on the Hot 100, their biggest songs were for a time as ubiquitous as any that did top the chart. “Summer Breeze” in 1972 and “Diamond Girl” in 1973 both reached No. 6, as did a more upbeat song in 1976, “Get Closer,” sung with Carolyn Willis.

Besides those three songs that reached the top 10 on the Hot 100, four more made it to the adult contemporary chart’s top 10: “We May Never Pass This Way (Again)” in ’73, “I’ll Play for You” in ’75, “Goodbye Old Buddies” in ’77 and “You’re the Love” in ’78.

Critic Robert Christgau called the duo “folk-schlock,” but Seals and Crofts had the last laugh — or would have, if crowing with vindication was part of the Baha’i way. Both members of the duo were deeply embedded in that peace-loving faith from the late ’60s forward.

The duo broke up in 1980, followed by a couple of very fleeting reunions in the early ’90s and early 2000s, which generated only one album after their original run, the little-noticed “Traces” in 2004, They never reembarked together on the kind of nostalgia-stoking package tours that would have seemed a natural for an act with so many well-remembered hits. But neither member showed a particularly heavy interest in chasing the limelight after the 1970s.

John Ford Coley shared his thoughts at length in a Facebook post. “I spent a large portion of my musical life with this man,” he wrote. “He was Dan’s older brother, (and) it was Jimmy that gave Dan and me our stage name. He taught me how to juggle, made me laugh, pissed me off, encouraged me, showed me amazing worlds and different understandings on life, especially on a philosophical level; showed me how expensive golf was and how to never hit a golf ball because next came the total annihilation of a perfectly good golf club, and the list goes on and on. We didn’t always see eye to eye, especially as musicians, but we always got along and I thought he was a bona fide, dyed-in the-wool musical genius and a very deep and contemplative man. He was an enigma and I always had regard for his opinion.

“I listened to him and I learned from him,” Coley continued. “We didn’t always agree and it wasn’t always easy and it wasn’t always fun but it definitely was always entertaining for sure. Dan adored his older brother and it was because of Jimmy opening doors for us that we came to Los Angeles to record and meet the right people. … He belonged to a group that was one of a kind. I am very sad over this but I have some of the best memories of all of us together.”

For several years in the late ’50s and early ’60s, both Seals and Dash Crofts — who survives his partner — were members of a group that bore little stylistic similarity to their later act: the Champs, although they joined after that band had recorded its signature hit, “Tequila.” Seals played sax in that group and Crofts was on drums.

James Eugene Seals was born in 1942 to an oilman, Wayland Seals, and his wife Cora. ““There were oil rigs as far as you could see,” Seals told an interviewer of his upbringing in Iraan, Texas. “And the stench was so bad you couldn’t breathe.” Jim became transfixed by a visiting fiddler and his father ordered him an instrument from the Sears catalog when he was 5 or 6. In a 1952 contest in west Texas, Jim won the fiddle division while his father triumphed in the guitar category. His little brother, Dan, later to be a pop star himself, took up the stand-up bass.

Jim took up sax at age 13 and began playing with a local band, the Crew Cats, when rock ‘n’ roll broke out in 1955. The shy musician joined up with the more outgoing Darrell “Dash” Crofts, who was two years older and grew up the son of a Texas cattle rancher, inviting his friend to join the Crew Cats as well. In 1958, the offer came to join the Champs, who’d recently had a No. 1 smash with “Tequila.” They stayed with that band till quitting in 1965.

The pair moved to L.A. and joined a group called the Dawnbreakers, also playing for a time behind Glen Campbell, just before he broke out as a major star. Their manager, Marcia Day, was a member of the Baha’i faith, and the house they shared on Sunset Blvd. was full of adherents as well as secular members of the local rock scene; in 1967, five years before having their first hit, both Seals and Crofts converted.

“She and her family were Bahai, and they’d have these fireside gatherings at their house on Friday night,” Seals recalled in a 1991 interview with the Los Angeles Times. “There were street people, doctors, university teachers and everybody there. And the things they talked about, I couldn’t even ask the question let alone give the answer: the difference between soul, mind and spirit, life after death. We’d discuss things sometimes until 3 in the morning.

“It was the only thing I’d heard that made sense to me, so I responded to it,” he continued. “That began to spawn some ideas to write songs that might help people to understand, or help ones who maybe couldn’t feel anything or were cynical or cold. Lyrically, I think music can convey things that are hard sometimes for people to say to each other. But through a song, through someone else’s eyes, they can see it and it’s not so much a confrontation.”

Abandoning their former instruments for something more folk-rock-friendly, Seals took up the guitar and Crofts learned the mandolin. Their first three albums as a duo, between 1969-71, had a sweet sound but went little-noticed. They tried cutting “Summer Breeze” earlier but didn’t come up with a version they liked until their third album in 1972, which they named after the track. It caught on at radio, region by region. Seals was quoted in Texas Monthly as having noted the sudden shift when they arrived for a gig in Ohio: “There were kids waiting for us at the airport. That night we had a record crowd, maybe 40,000 people. And I remember people throwing their hats and coats in the air as far as you could see, against the moon. Prettiest thing you’ve ever seen.”

After several more major and minor hits followed, including “Diamond Girl,” wrote Texas Monthly, the duo had their own private jet yet “would come out and sit at the edge of the stage and hold firesides about the Baha’i faith with curious fans. In 1974 they played the California jam, along with Deep Purple and the Eagles, in front of hundreds of thousands. When Jim pulled out his fiddle for a hoedown on ‘Fiddle in the Sky,’ throngs of sunbaked hippies clapped along.”

The duo stirred controversy in 1974 by recording an anti-abortion song, “Unborn Child,” as their album’s track in 1974 in the wake of the Roe v. Wade decision. The belief that abortion was wrong came out of their shared Baha’i beliefs, and they released it over the objections of their label, Warner Bros.

The divisive song “was really just asking a question: What about the child?” Seals told the L.A. Times years later. “We were trying to say, ‘This is an important issue,’ that life is precious and that we don’t know enough about these things yet to make a judgment. It was our ignorance that we didn’t know that kind of thing was seething and boiling as a social issue. On one hand we had people sending us thousands of roses, but on the other people were literally throwing rocks at us. If we’d known it was going to cause such disunity, we might have thought twice about doing it. At the time it overshadowed all the other things we were trying to say in our music.”

In 1977, the duo contributed to the soundtrack for a basketball-based film, “One on One,” starring Robbie Benson. They didn’t write the songs — Paul Williams and Charles Fox did — but were prominently billed on the soundtrack album as the song score’s performers.

By the time they broke up in 1980, their brand of music was finding far less of a place in disco-fied top 40 stations. Seals moved to Costa Rica with his wife, Ruby, where they were reported to have run a coffee farm as they raised their three children, and Crofts and his family moved to Mexico and eventually Australia.

In 1991, when Seals and Crofts made a stab at a reunion, they talked about their breakup with the L.A. Times. “Around 1980,” Seals told the newspaper, “we were still drawing 10,000 to 12,000 people at concerts. But we could see, with this change coming where everybody wanted dance music, that those days were numbered. We just decided that it was a good time, after a long run at it, to lie back and not totally commit ourselves to that kind of thing because we were like (fish) out of water.”

Seals, who later moved to Nashville, was considered to have been retired from a music career even before he suffered a stroke in 2017 that put a halt to his playing.

But he did occasionally return to music in the intervening years, as when he toured with his brother Dan (aka England Dan) as Seals and Seals.

The Seals name has a legacy in music that goes beyond just Jim’s, as multiple generations in the family tree have taken up performing or songwriting. Besides Dan’s tenure with England Dan and John Ford Coley and cousin Brady Seals’ success with Little Texas, another cousin, Troy Seals, is a Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame member responsible for such hits as “Seven Spanish Angels,” and in the ’50s his uncle Charles “Chuck” Seals co-wrote the Ray Price classic “Crazy Arms.”

Seals is survived by Ruby and by their children Joshua, Juliette and Sutherland.
 

Son of Gloin

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Jim Seals of Seals and Crofts, Duo That Ruled ’70s Soft-Rock With Hits Like ‘Summer Breeze,’ Dies at 80​


Chris Willman
Tue, June 7, 2022, 12:41 PM


7bf8c716cb1dac7f1a3fb900dd03083c

Jim Seals, who as part of the duo Seals and Crofts crafted memorably wistful 1970s hits like “Summer Breeze” and “Diamond Girl,” died Monday at age 80. No cause of death was immediately given.
Several friends and relatives confirmed the death. “I just learned that James ‘Jimmy’ Seals has passed,” announced his cousin, Brady Seals, a former member of the country band Little Texas, Monday night. “My heart just breaks for his wife Ruby and their children. Please keep them in your prayers. What an incredible legacy he leaves behind.”
Wrote John Ford Coley, “This is a hard one on so many levels as this is a musical era passing for me. And it will never pass this way again, as his song said,” he added, referring to the Seals and Croft hit “We May Never Pass This Way (Again).” Coley was a member of another hit duo of the era, England Dan and John Ford Coley, with Jim Seals’ younger brother, the late Dan Seals.
“You and Dan finally get reunited again,” Coley wrote. “Tell him and your sweet momma hi for me.”
With Jim Seals as the primary lead vocalist of the harmonizing duo, Seals and Crofts came to be the very emblem of “soft rock” with a run of hits that lasted for only about six years. Although none of the pair’s hits ever reached No. 1 on the Hot 100, their biggest songs were for a time as ubiquitous as any that did top the chart. “Summer Breeze” in 1972 and “Diamond Girl” in 1973 both reached No. 6, as did a more upbeat song in 1976, “Get Closer,” sung with Carolyn Willis.
Besides those three songs that reached the top 10 on the Hot 100, four more made it to the adult contemporary chart’s top 10: “We May Never Pass This Way (Again)” in ’73, “I’ll Play for You” in ’75, “Goodbye Old Buddies” in ’77 and “You’re the Love” in ’78.
Critic Robert Christgau called the duo “folk-schlock,” but Seals and Crofts had the last laugh — or would have, if crowing with vindication was part of the Baha’i way. Both members of the duo were deeply embedded in that peace-loving faith from the late ’60s forward.
The duo broke up in 1980, followed by a couple of very fleeting reunions in the early ’90s and early 2000s, which generated only one album after their original run, the little-noticed “Traces” in 2004, They never reembarked together on the kind of nostalgia-stoking package tours that would have seemed a natural for an act with so many well-remembered hits. But neither member showed a particularly heavy interest in chasing the limelight after the 1970s.
John Ford Coley shared his thoughts at length in a Facebook post. “I spent a large portion of my musical life with this man,” he wrote. “He was Dan’s older brother, (and) it was Jimmy that gave Dan and me our stage name. He taught me how to juggle, made me laugh, pissed me off, encouraged me, showed me amazing worlds and different understandings on life, especially on a philosophical level; showed me how expensive golf was and how to never hit a golf ball because next came the total annihilation of a perfectly good golf club, and the list goes on and on. We didn’t always see eye to eye, especially as musicians, but we always got along and I thought he was a bona fide, dyed-in the-wool musical genius and a very deep and contemplative man. He was an enigma and I always had regard for his opinion.
“I listened to him and I learned from him,” Coley continued. “We didn’t always agree and it wasn’t always easy and it wasn’t always fun but it definitely was always entertaining for sure. Dan adored his older brother and it was because of Jimmy opening doors for us that we came to Los Angeles to record and meet the right people. … He belonged to a group that was one of a kind. I am very sad over this but I have some of the best memories of all of us together.”
For several years in the late ’50s and early ’60s, both Seals and Dash Crofts — who survives his partner — were members of a group that bore little stylistic similarity to their later act: the Champs, although they joined after that band had recorded its signature hit, “Tequila.” Seals played sax in that group and Crofts was on drums.
James Eugene Seals was born in 1942 to an oilman, Wayland Seals, and his wife Cora. ““There were oil rigs as far as you could see,” Seals told an interviewer of his upbringing in Iraan, Texas. “And the stench was so bad you couldn’t breathe.” Jim became transfixed by a visiting fiddler and his father ordered him an instrument from the Sears catalog when he was 5 or 6. In a 1952 contest in west Texas, Jim won the fiddle division while his father triumphed in the guitar category. His little brother, Dan, later to be a pop star himself, took up the stand-up bass.
Jim took up sax at age 13 and began playing with a local band, the Crew Cats, when rock ‘n’ roll broke out in 1955. The shy musician joined up with the more outgoing Darrell “Dash” Crofts, who was two years older and grew up the son of a Texas cattle rancher, inviting his friend to join the Crew Cats as well. In 1958, the offer came to join the Champs, who’d recently had a No. 1 smash with “Tequila.” They stayed with that band till quitting in 1965.
The pair moved to L.A. and joined a group called the Dawnbreakers, also playing for a time behind Glen Campbell, just before he broke out as a major star. Their manager, Marcia Day, was a member of the Baha’i faith, and the house they shared on Sunset Blvd. was full of adherents as well as secular members of the local rock scene; in 1967, five years before having their first hit, both Seals and Crofts converted.
“She and her family were Bahai, and they’d have these fireside gatherings at their house on Friday night,” Seals recalled in a 1991 interview with the Los Angeles Times. “There were street people, doctors, university teachers and everybody there. And the things they talked about, I couldn’t even ask the question let alone give the answer: the difference between soul, mind and spirit, life after death. We’d discuss things sometimes until 3 in the morning.
“It was the only thing I’d heard that made sense to me, so I responded to it,” he continued. “That began to spawn some ideas to write songs that might help people to understand, or help ones who maybe couldn’t feel anything or were cynical or cold. Lyrically, I think music can convey things that are hard sometimes for people to say to each other. But through a song, through someone else’s eyes, they can see it and it’s not so much a confrontation.”
Abandoning their former instruments for something more folk-rock-friendly, Seals took up the guitar and Crofts learned the mandolin. Their first three albums as a duo, between 1969-71, had a sweet sound but went little-noticed. They tried cutting “Summer Breeze” earlier but didn’t come up with a version they liked until their third album in 1972, which they named after the track. It caught on at radio, region by region. Seals was quoted in Texas Monthly as having noted the sudden shift when they arrived for a gig in Ohio: “There were kids waiting for us at the airport. That night we had a record crowd, maybe 40,000 people. And I remember people throwing their hats and coats in the air as far as you could see, against the moon. Prettiest thing you’ve ever seen.”
After several more major and minor hits followed, including “Diamond Girl,” wrote Texas Monthly, the duo had their own private jet yet “would come out and sit at the edge of the stage and hold firesides about the Baha’i faith with curious fans. In 1974 they played the California jam, along with Deep Purple and the Eagles, in front of hundreds of thousands. When Jim pulled out his fiddle for a hoedown on ‘Fiddle in the Sky,’ throngs of sunbaked hippies clapped along.”
The duo stirred controversy in 1974 by recording an anti-abortion song, “Unborn Child,” as their album’s track in 1974 in the wake of the Roe v. Wade decision. The belief that abortion was wrong came out of their shared Baha’i beliefs, and they released it over the objections of their label, Warner Bros.
The divisive song “was really just asking a question: What about the child?” Seals told the L.A. Times years later. “We were trying to say, ‘This is an important issue,’ that life is precious and that we don’t know enough about these things yet to make a judgment. It was our ignorance that we didn’t know that kind of thing was seething and boiling as a social issue. On one hand we had people sending us thousands of roses, but on the other people were literally throwing rocks at us. If we’d known it was going to cause such disunity, we might have thought twice about doing it. At the time it overshadowed all the other things we were trying to say in our music.”
In 1977, the duo contributed to the soundtrack for a basketball-based film, “One on One,” starring Robbie Benson. They didn’t write the songs — Paul Williams and Charles Fox did — but were prominently billed on the soundtrack album as the song score’s performers.
By the time they broke up in 1980, their brand of music was finding far less of a place in disco-fied top 40 stations. Seals moved to Costa Rica with his wife, Ruby, where they were reported to have run a coffee farm as they raised their three children, and Crofts and his family moved to Mexico and eventually Australia.
In 1991, when Seals and Crofts made a stab at a reunion, they talked about their breakup with the L.A. Times. “Around 1980,” Seals told the newspaper, “we were still drawing 10,000 to 12,000 people at concerts. But we could see, with this change coming where everybody wanted dance music, that those days were numbered. We just decided that it was a good time, after a long run at it, to lie back and not totally commit ourselves to that kind of thing because we were like (fish) out of water.”
Seals, who later moved to Nashville, was considered to have been retired from a music career even before he suffered a stroke in 2017 that put a halt to his playing.
But he did occasionally return to music in the intervening years, as when he toured with his brother Dan (aka England Dan) as Seals and Seals.
The Seals name has a legacy in music that goes beyond just Jim’s, as multiple generations in the family tree have taken up performing or songwriting. Besides Dan’s tenure with England Dan and John Ford Coley and cousin Brady Seals’ success with Little Texas, another cousin, Troy Seals, is a Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame member responsible for such hits as “Seven Spanish Angels,” and in the ’50s his uncle Charles “Chuck” Seals co-wrote the Ray Price classic “Crazy Arms.”
Seals is survived by Ruby and by their children Joshua, Juliette and Sutherland.

Very sad, I liked those boys, back in the day. “Folk schlock” my a**! They produced a lot of great music. There’s nothing like it, today.
 

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Like S@C or not they sold some records and had their choice of ladies
 

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S@C will always be music icons for me growing up

RIP Jim and thanks for the great music!
 

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General Hospital Stars Jack and Kristina Wagner's Son Harrison, 27, Found Dead​


Olivia Jakiel
Tue, June 7, 2022, 7:00 PM


General Hospital's Jack and Kristina Wagner's Son Dead at 27 primary: https://www.instagram.com/p/B5jrgr0JZVf/

General Hospital's Jack and Kristina Wagner's Son Dead at 27 primary: https://www.instagram.com/p/B5jrgr0JZVf/
jack wagner/instagram
Harrison Wagner, the son of soap stars Jack and Kristina Wagner, has died. He was 27 years old.
According to a report obtained by PEOPLE from the Los Angeles Medical Examiner's Office, Harrison was found in a parking lot on Monday in Los Angeles.
His autopsy is still pending and no cause or manner of death has been released.
A representative for Jack did not immediately respond to PEOPLE's request for comment. A representative for Kristina could not be reached.
RELATED: As the World Turns and One Life to Live Actress Marnie Schulenburg Dead at 37
Jack and Kristina tied the knot in 1993 and split in 2006, and have remained friendly throughout the years. ack went on to star in Melrose Place, The Bold and the Beautiful and When Calls the Heart.
In addition to Harrison, the former couple also shares 31-year-old son Peter. Jack also has a daughter, Kerry, from a previous relationship.
RELATED: Empire Actress Lindsey Pearlman Found Dead After Going Missing for Days, LAPD Confirms
Shortly before Harrison's last Instagram post on May 22, in which he captioned a selfie, "Focus. YOU are left with YOU and your thoughts," mom Kristina wrote about spending time with her sons on the family's ranch for the last time before they moved out.
RELATED VIDEO: As the World Turns and One Life to Live Actress Marnie Schulenburg Dead at 37
"A bittersweet farewell to the place we called Wagner Ranch for 25 years. The prickly beauty of the high desert and a landscape surrounded by national forests always reminded us that there is peace when you are willing to look for it," she wrote alongside a photo of herself, Harrison, and Peter.
Never miss a story — sign up for PEOPLE's free daily newsletter to stay up-to-date on the best of what PEOPLE has to offer, from juicy celebrity news to compelling human interest stories.
Continued Kristina: "Oh Ranch, it's time to part. We'll miss you so much with our heartwarming memories. We know that there are many opportunities for joy ahead.
 

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Jim Seals of Seals and Crofts, Duo That Ruled ’70s Soft-Rock With Hits Like ‘Summer Breeze,’ Dies at 80​


Chris Willman
Tue, June 7, 2022, 12:41 PM


7bf8c716cb1dac7f1a3fb900dd03083c

Jim Seals, who as part of the duo Seals and Crofts crafted memorably wistful 1970s hits like “Summer Breeze” and “Diamond Girl,” died Monday at age 80. No cause of death was immediately given.

Several friends and relatives confirmed the death. “I just learned that James ‘Jimmy’ Seals has passed,” announced his cousin, Brady Seals, a former member of the country band Little Texas, Monday night. “My heart just breaks for his wife Ruby and their children. Please keep them in your prayers. What an incredible legacy he leaves behind.”

Wrote John Ford Coley, “This is a hard one on so many levels as this is a musical era passing for me. And it will never pass this way again, as his song said,” he added, referring to the Seals and Croft hit “We May Never Pass This Way (Again).” Coley was a member of another hit duo of the era, England Dan and John Ford Coley, with Jim Seals’ younger brother, the late Dan Seals.

“You and Dan finally get reunited again,” Coley wrote. “Tell him and your sweet momma hi for me.”

With Jim Seals as the primary lead vocalist of the harmonizing duo, Seals and Crofts came to be the very emblem of “soft rock” with a run of hits that lasted for only about six years. Although none of the pair’s hits ever reached No. 1 on the Hot 100, their biggest songs were for a time as ubiquitous as any that did top the chart. “Summer Breeze” in 1972 and “Diamond Girl” in 1973 both reached No. 6, as did a more upbeat song in 1976, “Get Closer,” sung with Carolyn Willis.

Besides those three songs that reached the top 10 on the Hot 100, four more made it to the adult contemporary chart’s top 10: “We May Never Pass This Way (Again)” in ’73, “I’ll Play for You” in ’75, “Goodbye Old Buddies” in ’77 and “You’re the Love” in ’78.

Critic Robert Christgau called the duo “folk-schlock,” but Seals and Crofts had the last laugh — or would have, if crowing with vindication was part of the Baha’i way. Both members of the duo were deeply embedded in that peace-loving faith from the late ’60s forward.

The duo broke up in 1980, followed by a couple of very fleeting reunions in the early ’90s and early 2000s, which generated only one album after their original run, the little-noticed “Traces” in 2004, They never reembarked together on the kind of nostalgia-stoking package tours that would have seemed a natural for an act with so many well-remembered hits. But neither member showed a particularly heavy interest in chasing the limelight after the 1970s.

John Ford Coley shared his thoughts at length in a Facebook post. “I spent a large portion of my musical life with this man,” he wrote. “He was Dan’s older brother, (and) it was Jimmy that gave Dan and me our stage name. He taught me how to juggle, made me laugh, pissed me off, encouraged me, showed me amazing worlds and different understandings on life, especially on a philosophical level; showed me how expensive golf was and how to never hit a golf ball because next came the total annihilation of a perfectly good golf club, and the list goes on and on. We didn’t always see eye to eye, especially as musicians, but we always got along and I thought he was a bona fide, dyed-in the-wool musical genius and a very deep and contemplative man. He was an enigma and I always had regard for his opinion.

“I listened to him and I learned from him,” Coley continued. “We didn’t always agree and it wasn’t always easy and it wasn’t always fun but it definitely was always entertaining for sure. Dan adored his older brother and it was because of Jimmy opening doors for us that we came to Los Angeles to record and meet the right people. … He belonged to a group that was one of a kind. I am very sad over this but I have some of the best memories of all of us together.”

For several years in the late ’50s and early ’60s, both Seals and Dash Crofts — who survives his partner — were members of a group that bore little stylistic similarity to their later act: the Champs, although they joined after that band had recorded its signature hit, “Tequila.” Seals played sax in that group and Crofts was on drums.

James Eugene Seals was born in 1942 to an oilman, Wayland Seals, and his wife Cora. ““There were oil rigs as far as you could see,” Seals told an interviewer of his upbringing in Iraan, Texas. “And the stench was so bad you couldn’t breathe.” Jim became transfixed by a visiting fiddler and his father ordered him an instrument from the Sears catalog when he was 5 or 6. In a 1952 contest in west Texas, Jim won the fiddle division while his father triumphed in the guitar category. His little brother, Dan, later to be a pop star himself, took up the stand-up bass.

Jim took up sax at age 13 and began playing with a local band, the Crew Cats, when rock ‘n’ roll broke out in 1955. The shy musician joined up with the more outgoing Darrell “Dash” Crofts, who was two years older and grew up the son of a Texas cattle rancher, inviting his friend to join the Crew Cats as well. In 1958, the offer came to join the Champs, who’d recently had a No. 1 smash with “Tequila.” They stayed with that band till quitting in 1965.

The pair moved to L.A. and joined a group called the Dawnbreakers, also playing for a time behind Glen Campbell, just before he broke out as a major star. Their manager, Marcia Day, was a member of the Baha’i faith, and the house they shared on Sunset Blvd. was full of adherents as well as secular members of the local rock scene; in 1967, five years before having their first hit, both Seals and Crofts converted.

“She and her family were Bahai, and they’d have these fireside gatherings at their house on Friday night,” Seals recalled in a 1991 interview with the Los Angeles Times. “There were street people, doctors, university teachers and everybody there. And the things they talked about, I couldn’t even ask the question let alone give the answer: the difference between soul, mind and spirit, life after death. We’d discuss things sometimes until 3 in the morning.

“It was the only thing I’d heard that made sense to me, so I responded to it,” he continued. “That began to spawn some ideas to write songs that might help people to understand, or help ones who maybe couldn’t feel anything or were cynical or cold. Lyrically, I think music can convey things that are hard sometimes for people to say to each other. But through a song, through someone else’s eyes, they can see it and it’s not so much a confrontation.”

Abandoning their former instruments for something more folk-rock-friendly, Seals took up the guitar and Crofts learned the mandolin. Their first three albums as a duo, between 1969-71, had a sweet sound but went little-noticed. They tried cutting “Summer Breeze” earlier but didn’t come up with a version they liked until their third album in 1972, which they named after the track. It caught on at radio, region by region. Seals was quoted in Texas Monthly as having noted the sudden shift when they arrived for a gig in Ohio: “There were kids waiting for us at the airport. That night we had a record crowd, maybe 40,000 people. And I remember people throwing their hats and coats in the air as far as you could see, against the moon. Prettiest thing you’ve ever seen.”

After several more major and minor hits followed, including “Diamond Girl,” wrote Texas Monthly, the duo had their own private jet yet “would come out and sit at the edge of the stage and hold firesides about the Baha’i faith with curious fans. In 1974 they played the California jam, along with Deep Purple and the Eagles, in front of hundreds of thousands. When Jim pulled out his fiddle for a hoedown on ‘Fiddle in the Sky,’ throngs of sunbaked hippies clapped along.”

The duo stirred controversy in 1974 by recording an anti-abortion song, “Unborn Child,” as their album’s track in 1974 in the wake of the Roe v. Wade decision. The belief that abortion was wrong came out of their shared Baha’i beliefs, and they released it over the objections of their label, Warner Bros.

The divisive song “was really just asking a question: What about the child?” Seals told the L.A. Times years later. “We were trying to say, ‘This is an important issue,’ that life is precious and that we don’t know enough about these things yet to make a judgment. It was our ignorance that we didn’t know that kind of thing was seething and boiling as a social issue. On one hand we had people sending us thousands of roses, but on the other people were literally throwing rocks at us. If we’d known it was going to cause such disunity, we might have thought twice about doing it. At the time it overshadowed all the other things we were trying to say in our music.”

In 1977, the duo contributed to the soundtrack for a basketball-based film, “One on One,” starring Robbie Benson. They didn’t write the songs — Paul Williams and Charles Fox did — but were prominently billed on the soundtrack album as the song score’s performers.

By the time they broke up in 1980, their brand of music was finding far less of a place in disco-fied top 40 stations. Seals moved to Costa Rica with his wife, Ruby, where they were reported to have run a coffee farm as they raised their three children, and Crofts and his family moved to Mexico and eventually Australia.

In 1991, when Seals and Crofts made a stab at a reunion, they talked about their breakup with the L.A. Times. “Around 1980,” Seals told the newspaper, “we were still drawing 10,000 to 12,000 people at concerts. But we could see, with this change coming where everybody wanted dance music, that those days were numbered. We just decided that it was a good time, after a long run at it, to lie back and not totally commit ourselves to that kind of thing because we were like (fish) out of water.”

Seals, who later moved to Nashville, was considered to have been retired from a music career even before he suffered a stroke in 2017 that put a halt to his playing.

But he did occasionally return to music in the intervening years, as when he toured with his brother Dan (aka England Dan) as Seals and Seals.

The Seals name has a legacy in music that goes beyond just Jim’s, as multiple generations in the family tree have taken up performing or songwriting. Besides Dan’s tenure with England Dan and John Ford Coley and cousin Brady Seals’ success with Little Texas, another cousin, Troy Seals, is a Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame member responsible for such hits as “Seven Spanish Angels,” and in the ’50s his uncle Charles “Chuck” Seals co-wrote the Ray Price classic “Crazy Arms.”

Seals is survived by Ruby and by their children Joshua, Juliette and Sutherland.
I was a big fan and saw them live in the 70s at a outdoor concert in Dayton, Ohio's "Hydrobowl" park. After their concert they offered aa get together to introduce folks to their Ba Hai' faith, an off-shoot of the Muslim Religion. More tolerant and inclusive ( God , Jesus, Muhammad, and others) and are persecuted in Muslim controlled countries.
At the time (70s) it was seen as a "Hippy" version the Muslim faith.
"...Baháʼí beliefs are sometimes described as syncretic combinations of earlier religious beliefs.[29] Baháʼís, however, assert that their religion is a distinct tradition with its own scriptures, teachings, laws, and history.[22][30] The religion was initially seen as a sect of Islam because of its belief in the prophethood of Muhammad and in the authenticity and veracity of the Qur’an.[31] Most religious specialists now see it as an independent religion, with its religious background in Shiʻa Islam being seen as analogous to the Jewish context in which Christianity was established.[32] Muslim institutions and clergy, both Sunni and Shi'a, consider formerly-Muslim Baháʼís to be deserters or apostates from Islam, which has led to Baháʼís being persecuted.[33][34] Baháʼís describe their faith as an independent world religion, differing from the other traditions in its relative age and in the appropriateness of Baháʼu'lláh's teachings to the modern context.[35] Baháʼu'lláh is believed to have fulfilled the messianic expectations of these precursor faiths.[36]".
.....

RIP "Hummingbird" Jimmy Seals
 

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Aamir Liaquat Hussain: Pakistan's shock televangelist dies at 50​


Simon Fraser - BBC News
Thu, June 9, 2022

2c8eb27596520d28f3826c78cd1f7d16.jpg

Aamir Liaquat Hussain, seen here in Karachi during the 2018 election campaign, was just 50

One of Pakistan's most prominent and contentious TV hosts, Aamir Liaquat Hussain, has died aged 50 after being found unconscious at home in Karachi.

The anchor was taken to hospital but pronounced dead on arrival. A post mortem exam is being carried out.

Aamir Liaquat Hussain switched from televangelism to politics, becoming an MP for Imran Khan's PTI party.

His career was dogged by controversy - he gave babies to childless couples on TV and was banned for hate speech.

The outspoken anchor's personal life was public fodder too, often fuelled by his activities on social media.

In the last chapter of his life, he married for a third time but it ended publicly and acrimoniously within months. His 18-year-old bride Dania Shah filed for divorce in May, accusing him of domestic abuse and being a drug addict.

Hussain released a video calling the marriage a "fiasco" and dismissing the allegations as fake news - but he also referred to being depressed by the things said about him on social media after all he had done for Pakistan and vowed to leave the country.

 

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Aamir Liaquat Hussain: Pakistan's shock televangelist dies at 50​


Simon Fraser - BBC News
Thu, June 9, 2022

View attachment 263139
Aamir Liaquat Hussain, seen here in Karachi during the 2018 election campaign, was just 50

One of Pakistan's most prominent and contentious TV hosts, Aamir Liaquat Hussain, has died aged 50 after being found unconscious at home in Karachi.

The anchor was taken to hospital but pronounced dead on arrival. A post mortem exam is being carried out.

Aamir Liaquat Hussain switched from televangelism to politics, becoming an MP for Imran Khan's PTI party.

His career was dogged by controversy - he gave babies to childless couples on TV and was banned for hate speech.

The outspoken anchor's personal life was public fodder too, often fuelled by his activities on social media.

In the last chapter of his life, he married for a third time but it ended publicly and acrimoniously within months. His 18-year-old bride Dania Shah filed for divorce in May, accusing him of domestic abuse and being a drug addict.

Hussain released a video calling the marriage a "fiasco" and dismissing the allegations as fake news - but he also referred to being depressed by the things said about him on social media after all he had done for Pakistan and vowed to leave the country.

TeeVee viewers in Pakistan must be devastated
 

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Only those who can afford one.