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Motorcycle Mania

Where is your favorite State to Ride??

  • South Dakota???? Black Hills

    Votes: 2 16.7%
  • Tennessee??? LBL or the Mountains

    Votes: 4 33.3%
  • California??

    Votes: 4 33.3%
  • Arizona??

    Votes: 1 8.3%
  • Florida??

    Votes: 2 16.7%
  • Texas??

    Votes: 1 8.3%
  • Alabama??

    Votes: 1 8.3%
  • North Georgia??

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • The Carolinas??

    Votes: 2 16.7%
  • New Mexico??

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    12

dacrunch

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If only it was warm enough. Some days nothing gets done until I've taken a ride.
In my old age, I've lost the muscle tone & adrenaline & cojones to ride my Yamaha XT 600 that way... Ready for trade-in.
Therefore looking at a Vespa 125 scooter, haha!
Anyways, the smaller bikes give you the same "feel", but within the speed limits!
 

dacrunch

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My brother - in his 60's too, asked me the other night "What's up with new bikes? I'd like a Boss Hoss V8." - I replied, "yeah, and the 5 guys along with it to pick it up from your crushed leg..."
 

90%RealMoney

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In my old age, I've lost the muscle tone & adrenaline & cojones to ride my Yamaha XT 600 that way... Ready for trade-in.
Therefore looking at a Vespa 125 scooter, haha!
Anyways, the smaller bikes give you the same "feel", but within the speed limits!
Check into those Honda "GROM's" (125cc) . I don't know what the deal is, but it seems they are quite popular. Being used as pit bikes alot, seen them at NHRA drag racing events. There are similar type bikes from other manufacturers too.

2014-Honda-Grom-125-action-1-1024x682.jpg
 

dacrunch

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Check into those Honda "GROM's" (125cc) . I don't know what the deal is, but it seems they are quite popular. Being used as pit bikes alot, seen them at NHRA drag racing events. There are similar type bikes from other manufacturers too.

View attachment 96400
uh... an extension for my wife? ;)
 

90%RealMoney

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Dude was just riding back and forth on that road, waiting for his first greenhorn victim. Guy on the crotch rocket knew how to gas it on the straights, and that's about it. Is that a Vespa scooter? Sounded like he gave it a new set of lungs, and tapped into that two stroke power.
 

Lt Dan

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I would really like to have something in this picture. Not what you're thinking, see that Mototote on the back of the SUV, yeah, there is an SUV in the picture. I'd like to have some way to carry a motorcycle on the back of my van, pickup or motor home, just because. Even if the bike was little more than a scooter.

74bbf0e798860eecc9d4e0a640e37524.jpg
 

dacrunch

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I would really like to have something in this picture. Not what you're thinking, see that Mototote on the back of the SUV, yeah, there is an SUV in the picture. I'd like to have some way to carry a motorcycle on the back of my van, pickup or motor home, just because. Even if the bike was little more than a scooter.

View attachment 99525
Pick up my camper in March... with a similar (but with more lighting I think) cross-wise scooter carrier (up to 170kg) mounted on rear. Listed @ over 2k euros, dealer "throwing it in"... Pictures in a month...
 

Lt Dan

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Pick up my camper in March... with a similar (but with more lighting I think) cross-wise scooter carrier (up to 170kg) mounted on rear. Listed @ over 2k euros, dealer "throwing it in"... Pictures in a month...
I actually just found a link to that by doing a search. Link - http://www.mototote.com/
My road bike is a bit to heavy for even the larger model, 600# limit, I think my bike is around 650# dry, would not want to haul that around on a receiver carrier. Wife's scooter would easily work if it was worth hauling something like that around. I may look for bike or scooter in the 250 plus or minus, but Yamaha does make a 200cc that is kind of a duel sport, might be the ticket.

I did buy an older '89 motorhome, it's in the shop, had some work needed I didn't quite feel comfortable doing myself. Should be getting it back in a week or two. I have to call and check on it sometime this week if they don't call me first. The camper part of it needs several repairs as well, I'll be doing most of that. Wife and I may use it a lot or a little, depending. May only use it here in Ohio during the summer. Pics - maybe later.
 

DodgebyDave

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SR 39 from Monrovia to 67.

@3:25 on the right is my cousin's house

 
Last edited:

dacrunch

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Pick up my camper in March... with a similar (but with more lighting I think) cross-wise scooter carrier (up to 170kg) mounted on rear. Listed @ over 2k euros, dealer "throwing it in"... Pictures in a month...
Got my camper 2 weeks ago. Been touring Barcelona area and Mediterranean coastal areas of France. 2-3 towns a day. Museums and churches (wife). Roman and medieval sites 4 me... and the Antiquities Museum in Arles. H
On my phone so can't upload the pics of gold coins and jewellery.
Oh, I removed the scooter carrier from the van before the trip since I don't have a scooter yet. Makes for easier city parking. 6 meters is already more than a meter longer than most spaces.
Pics when I log in with my 'puter.
Be well friends!
 

dacrunch

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Got my camper 2 weeks ago. Been touring Barcelona area and Mediterranean coastal areas of France. 2-3 towns a day. Museums and churches (wife). Roman and medieval sites 4 me... and the Antiquities Museum in Arles. H
On my phone so can't upload the pics of gold coins and jewellery.
Oh, I removed the scooter carrier from the van before the trip since I don't have a scooter yet. Makes for easier city parking. 6 meters is already more than a meter longer than most spaces.
Pics when I log in with my 'puter.
Be well friends!
Btw I am going to buy a side-saddle scooter passenger kit for wifey before buying the scooter to make sure it will adapt... Old folks we be... haha!
 

Irons

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Be interesting to see what they replace it with. A few friends of mine who did the BMW, Husqvarna and KTM thing all went back to KLR's in the past couple years.
I'll be keeping my 2009 KLR it only has 29,000 miles on it. Barely broke in.
And I still need to bring it in and get a 685 kit bored into it and the carb and airbox mods done!

KAWASAKI KLR650



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Kawasaki’s KLR650 is the crocodile of the motorcycle world. It survived motorcycling’s mass extinction of the ’80s, endured the icy economy of the ’90s and withstood financial upheaval in the 2000s. It was bullied by serious dirt bike riders, ignored by street guys and abused by commuters. And it’s still here. What’s more amazing, it’s having its own little renaissance. The KLR650’s day has finally come, and it’s getting more respect and more attention than ever. It is today’s best-selling dual-sport bike, and it’s about time.

AMENDS
We’re as guilty as anyone. Up until about 2006, we ignored the bike like everyone else. It wasn’t a dirt bike and had been around so long it was like wallpaper in the Kawasaki line. Two things happened in ’06: The KLR changed for the first time in decades. And then we changed.
The arrival of big adventure bikes from BMW and KTM suddenly made us look at the Kawasaki in a different light. It really was a dirt bike by those standards. The redesign in 2008 was certainly important, but the KLR’s place in the market was much more significant.

In its soul the KLR is the same thing it’s always been—it’s a mildly tuned, liquid-cooled, DOHC 650 with technology from the early ’80s. It was built on a budget with inexpensive bars, brakes and wheels. There’s fuel injection, no electronic suspension control, no anti-lock braking and no traction control. But, it has four key features that make it irresistible.

First, there’s a frame-mount fairing that came along in 2008. Prior to that it had a much smaller fairing that wasn’t half bad, either. Next, it has a 6.1-gallon fuel tank that can carry you as far as 300 miles. Then there’s a big luggage rack that provides a sturdy platform for luggage and accessories. And, most important of all, it has a $6499 price tag—still. You can buy three KLRs and a used grand piano for the price of a well-equipped BMW R1200GS Adventure.

WHAT YOU GET, WHAT YOU DON’T GET

It almost goes without saying that the KLR is the best value in the adventure bike world. But we’ll say it anyway. The price makes it hard to ignore. Anyone who is about to spend $20,000 on a premium machine like the BMW GS or a KTM 1190 must hate that the KLR even exists. It makes you come face to face with the impracticality of virtually any other motorcycle. If it makes you feel better, the KLR has its limitations. It’s not especially fast. Even by the standards of 650cc singles, the KLR is a little sleepy. It goes freeway speed comfortably, but there’s no rush of acceleration available if you’re doing 65 and you need to make a quick pass. It lumbers forward, but doesn’t like it.

After transitioning to a fuel-injected world, it’s interesting to go back to a carburetor. The startup procedure takes a little more effort. You usually have to use the handlebar-mounted choke, and then you have to remember to turn it off. There’s a fuel petcock with a reserve position. Learn where it is and how to reach it in a hurry. There’s no fuel gauge, so you don’t know how much range you have until you run the main tank dry. You’ll have a few frantic seconds to fumble the petcock into the reserve position. Fuel mileage is also a little disappointing. The KLR gets around 50 mpg, which isn’t that much better than a 125-horsepower BMW. Fuel-injected singles do much better. The next change that Kawasaki makes to the KLR will doubtlessly be EFI.

This year Kawasaki addressed two long-standing complaints: the suspension is stiffer and the seat has been upgraded. Both are welcome changes. The suspension used to bottom and wallow even on the street. KLR riders just accepted the fact that the shock and fork had to be upgraded. With stiffer springs, the bike is now usable in the dirt without modification. That isn’t to say it’s great, but the main complaint of it being overly soft is no longer valid. Same goes for the seat. It has new foam and a different contour. Now you can get through almost a full tank before you have comfort issues; it used to be only 60 miles or so. The overall comfort rating is decent.

HOW GOOD IS IT?
In most ways, the KLR is better than it should be. The fairing keeps wind off your upper body, the handguards are huge, and its overall off-road capability is comparatively good. It’s more agile than any of the twin-cylinder adventure bikes, but don’t get carried away. The Suzuki DR650 and the Honda XR650L are both more off-road-worthy, especially the Honda. It is, however, more of a dirt bike than the heavier-but-faster BMW Sertao 650.

Bottom line: if the adventure bike market were driven by pure Vulcan logic, no one would buy anything else. In terms of value, the KLR is a hands-down winner. Passion, status and pride are different issues. In those categories, the KLR’s price might be a deterrent. A 30-year-old bike that costs less than most scooters doesn’t turn many heads. Kawasaki offers the bike in a special edition this year, called the New Edition. The name is probably an internal translation that made it to the public by accident, but it offers a little more bling for $100 more. Then you can build up the bike with a world of high-end accessories like bags and guards, effectively doubling the price of the bike.

The KLR can be anything you want. Just understand that there’s still a pre-Cambrian reptile under it all.

To read about riding the great divide on a KLR, click here.