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Nancy Pelosi Believes she is CAESAR - Symbolism of her Lapel Pin

GOLDBRIX

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#1
 

skychief

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In today's WH press conference, dingbat Pelosi hinted that someday in the future, a democrat President could declare a "National Emergency" on gun violence, and revoke our right to keep and bear arms.

MSM talking heads in the studios cheered.
 

GOLDBRIX

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I think the politicians that call for that will be the ones in an Emergency Nationwide ( Manhunt).
 

engineear

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Beware the Ides of March...

Wasn't there something in a Q post regarding a time on a watch...3:15?
 

newmisty

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Why is it that the democrats chose mentally ill monsters as their leaders, and republicans choose democrats as their leaders?
Their brains have a defect where they reject reality and substitute a warped, morally depraved cartoon version of reality instead.

 

pidge414

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I got bad news for all of you. That pin is not Ceasar's Scepter. It is the Mace of the United States House of Representatives. It is the official symbol of the House of Reps, adopted over 200 years ago. The only symbols of the United States older than it are a few of the first flags, like the "Betsy Ross" flag, and none of them are still in use. The actual mace WAS NEXT TO THE PRESIDENT WHILE HE GAVE HIS SPEECH. So he's a Ceasar too?

"Their brains have a defect where they reject reality and substitute a warped, morally depraved cartoon version of reality instead".

LOL. Irony much?

180130234404-donald-trump-state-of-the-union-012-large-169.jpg
 

GOLDBRIX

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#10
POTUS Donald J. Trump is not wearing it. That is a piece of furniture. Along with the two fasces, one on each side of the podium on the wall.
 
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searcher

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I got bad news for all of you. That pin is not Ceasar's Scepter. It is the Mace of the United States House of Representatives. It is the official symbol of the House of Reps, adopted over 200 years ago. The only symbols of the United States older than it are a few of the first flags, like the "Betsy Ross" flag, and none of them are still in use. The actual mace WAS NEXT TO THE PRESIDENT WHILE HE GAVE HIS SPEECH. So he's a Ceasar too?

"Their brains have a defect where they reject reality and substitute a warped, morally depraved cartoon version of reality instead".

LOL. Irony much?

View attachment 124802

Interesting 1st post. Welcome.

The 'Mace' has an interesting history:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mace_of_the_United_States_House_of_Representatives

As for the vid...……….some crazy shit there: harvesting peeps, information warriors, RBG's brain on a machine, impeachment, shadow government, etc. LOL

It's worth a laugh.
 

Unca Walt

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IMO, everybody is sorta right in this pin thing.

Pelosi has ridden the gravy train since most here were still pooping yellow. My bud, nickinfl gots it wrong. When she goes down, it will be from old age after ripping all of us off for hundreds of millions of dollars. Not a failure.

Well, not a POLITICAL failure. There, she is of the First Bench of the House of Lords.

So if we all consider that she wears that Roman-cum-House pin because she considers it her lavaliere <-- her badge of office. In medieval times, it would have been a golden neckpiece.

In her mind, and in the minds of many others... it does instill the same reaction the definitive neckpieces of super big shots at court got from hoi polloi.

She is comfortable in her continued reign.
 

Alton

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#14
Their symbols will betray them...

Sheela-na-gigs: The naked women adorning Britain's churches



Sarah Jones
BBC
Tue, 19 Feb 2019 21:49 UTC






© Sheela Na Gig project
This sheela-na-gig at Oaksey in Wiltshire boasts "pendulous breasts" and a vulva "extended almost to her ankles"
For hundreds of years carvings of naked women have sat provocatively on churches across Britain. But who created them - and why?
Look at these, my child-bearing hips

Look at these, my ruby red ruby lips...

Sheela-na-gig, Sheela-na-gig

You exhibitionist​
The year is 1992 and the singer-songwriter PJ Harvey is performing Sheela-Na-Gig, the most successful single from her critically acclaimed album Dry.

But unless you're a fan of late 20th Century indie music, or an expert in Norman church architecture, there's every chance you've not been exposed to the sheela-na-gig - or have walked past one without even realising it.

[This article contains some graphic imagery]

Hidden in plain sight, these sculptures of squatting women pulling back their labia have for nearly a millennium sparked intrigue, shame and even anger.

Often overlooked, or perhaps ignored, by vicars and congregations, the figures can be seen in dozens of British churches.

© Sheela Na Gig project
The UK's "poster girl for sheela-na-gigs" can be found at the Church of St Mary and St David in Kilpeck, Herefordshire
For the past 20 years John Harding, from the Sheela Na Gig Project, has covered thousands of miles tracking down sightings of them across the country.

His obsession began following a visit to a church in Shropshire in 1998.

After finding very little information online, he decided to post something himself and was inundated with possible sightings.

"They are not quite as rare as the yeti but they're not common," he says.

"You get pockets of them. In Shropshire they are all within about 10 miles of each other and they're all different - but they're all naked women, basically."

Ireland has the largest concentration of sheela-na-gigs, while in the UK there are about 60 known figures with "more popping up all the time", according to Mr Harding.

"Sheela is the Irish form of the Norman name Cecile, and 'gig' is actually English slang and it means a woman's bits," he explains.


Comment: According to Wiktionary, the name Cecile comes from the French form of Latin Caecilia, meaning blind.



© Sheela Na Gig project
A sheela-na-gig was found face down in a Llandrindod Wells church's coal pile
But why these stone carvings were displayed in Norman churches across Britain, Ireland, France and Spain has divided opinion.

Some suggest the figures depict a pre-Christian deity, others that they are a fertility symbol or a protection against evil.

Dr Barbara Freitag, author of Sheela-na-gigs: Unravelling an Enigma, believes they were made by local carvers for country churches to promote a successful birth.

"Generally sheelas are carved in the birthing position and are presented with their vulva in the desired physiological state before, during or after birth," she says.

"The emaciated upper half of these figures was meant to appease the dead mothers or grandmothers who were thought to bear a grudge against the newborn."

For Georgia Rhoades, author of Decoding the Sheela-na-gig, the "nude and bald" women represent the Crone or Earth Goddess.

"They were pagan goddess figures, emblematic of the Earth Goddess who births us and takes us back into her at death," she explains.

"In some places, brides were required to look at and perhaps touch the sheela before weddings, which seems to suggest their role in fertility rites."

Mr Harding, however, thinks the explicit church sculptures were meant to warn people against the sin of lust.

"Sheelas in this country are cartoonish and not very attractive generally, but in Ireland some are downright monstrous and scare the willies out of you."

He adds: "There's one in Haverfordwest [in Pembrokeshire] in the cloisters, holding its dress up.

"The only people who would have seen it would have been clerics and monks, so it's obviously to do with sin."


Comment: This last explanation is certainly a possibility because there are various depictions of religious perceptions of sin and its consequences on churches in Europe. Here's another likely example from France:



Wood engraving of demon grasping a woman from the west front of Saint-Pierre Abbey, Moissac. 14th century.


© Sheela Na Gig project
The sheela at St Mary's in Easthorpe, Colchester, was deemed too obscene to remain at the church and was given to a museum
In the UK the "poster girl for sheela-na-gigs" can be found on Kilpeck Church near Hereford, according to Mr Harding.

However, it is the sheela at the parish church in the Wiltshire village of Oaksey, with her "pendulous breasts" and "hugely exaggerated vulva", which is his favourite.

"When you see the Oaksey sheela, most people's reaction is 'good God'," he says.

"It's the most kind of in-your-face and it's the breasts as well - the Kilpeck sheela just has nipples, but here you've got all the womanly attributes."

Positioned next to the main door of the church, a small lead roof has been installed above the carving to protect it.

But not all congregations have been keen to embrace these X-rated sculptures.

In the Essex village of Easthorpe, a sheela was deemed too obscene to keep and so was given to a museum after serving time in the vicarage garden rockery.

Some have been found in rivers with "marks of burning on them", Mr Harding says, while others were removed, hidden or destroyed by red-faced clergyman and shocked churchgoers.

In 2004, a topless figure which had been in a chapel in Buncton in West Sussex since the early 1100s was attacked, despite having "no obvious genitals on display".

"It wasn't a very well known one, it was an inoffensive thing," says Mr Harding.

"I put it up on the website and somebody went in at night and chiselled it off the wall."



A common reaction to seeing the sheela-na-gig at Oaksey in Wiltshire is "good God", according to Mr Harding
And it's not just the full-frontal brashness of the sheela that has outraged sensibilities.

Phallic figures found on the corbels [wall brackets] in churches are thought to have come under attack by the Victorians.

"In Kilpeck there are a number of corbels missing, and there's a story that an old chap said he was ordered by the vicar's wife to chop some of the corbels off," Mr Harding says.

A male in a "state of arousal" can even be found alongside a female figure at one Wiltshire church, as Mr Harding explains.

"At St John in Devizes they're on the same piece of stone - a female exhibitionist showing her bits and a male figure which appears to be masturbating."

At the church of St Mary and St Andrew in Cambridgeshire, a sheela can be seen next to a naked male figure.

"You've got this animalistic man with this massive erection and this sheela na gig which is quite plump and fecund with her legs held apart and he's crawling towards her," he says.

© Sheela Na Gig project
This pair, she with a "clearly visible" vulva and he clutching his damaged penis, were discovered at the church of St John in Devizes in 2006

© Sheela Na Gig project
In the roof of Avening Church in Gloucestershire an "acrobatic type" can be seen with his head between his legs and a penis in his mouth
In Bristol, graphic artwork can be spotted in the 1,200 roof bosses [carved decorations] at St Mary Redcliffe.

Among a number of exhibitionist figures there is a contortionist "showing their bottom with all their other bits", a naked couple, and a man with "his trousers down - having a poo".

And if that wasn't enough to make a choirmaster blush, high in the roof beams of Avening Church in Gloucestershire an "acrobatic type" can be seen jutting out from the wall with his head between his legs and a penis in his mouth.

"Penis swallowers are basically a monstrous head swallowing their own penises," explains Mr Harding.

"Sometimes they're playing instruments and it looks very suggestive, but in Avening Church if it is bagpipes, he's not holding it. So it's fairly self-supporting, shall we say."

For the Church of England, the presence of stone genitalia in places of worship is all part of the "rich tradition of church decoration" over the centuries.

© Sheela Na Gig project
A sheela can be seen next to a naked male figure in Whittlesford, Cambridgeshire
"As with other gargoyles and grotesques, it is sometimes surprising to modern eyes to encounter them in a religious context," a spokesman says.

"But they reflect the diversity of architectural ornament found on churches up and down the country."

And even though the experts might not think alike as to what purpose sheela-na-gigs served, many do agree on one thing.

"In this country a lot of them seem to be smiling and are quite cheerful-looking," says Mr Harding.

Ms Rhoades agrees that many sheelas "are clearly enjoying themselves".

"My favourite is at Oaksey, where the sheela's vulva is extended almost to her ankles," she says.

"We don't know exactly what her message is, but she's joyous and it's clear where the message is coming from."


R. G. Collingwood's book Speculum Mentis may be able to provide some insight into what kind of people produced these gargoyles, grotesques and Sheela-na-gigs:
The men of the middle ages, as we look back on them, appear to us half children and half giants. In the narrowness of their outlook, the smallness of the problems they faced, their fanciful and innocent superstition, their combination of qualities and activities which a reflective or critical society would find intolerably contradictory, they are children, and it is difficult for us to believe that human beings could be so simple. But in the solid magnitude of their achievements, their systems of law and philosophy, their creation and organization of huge nation-states, their incredible cathedrals, and above all their gradual forging of a civilized world out of a chaos of barbarism, they seem possessed by a tenacity and a vastness of purpose that we can only call gigantic. They seem to be tiny people doing colossal things.

[...]

The medieval mind feels itself surrounded, beyond the sphere of trial and danger, by a great peace, an infinite happiness. This feeling, so clear in the poets, is equally clear, to those who have eyes to see, in the illuminations of a missals and the detail of stonework, in the towers of Durham and the Vine window at Wells. But this happiness, characteristically present in the medieval modern. mind, is characteristically absent from the modern. And if our art, our religion, our philosophy, are dark with foreboding and comfortless in their message, this is not altogether unconnected with the fact that the medieval man could be happy because his church or guild told him what to do and could give him work that he liked; while the modern man is unhappy because he does not know what to do.