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New-Vehicle Sales Fall to 1999 Levels:

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#1
New-Vehicle Sales Fall to 1999 Levels: How to Grow Revenues After 20 Years of Stagnation (Yup, You Guessed It)
by Wolf Richter • Jul 3, 2019 • 67 Comments • Email to a friend

Carmageddon for cars. But big equipment is hot and gets pricier.
Ford waited until today to report its second-quarter new-vehicle deliveries in the US. So now we know what happened to total US auto sales in the second quarter and in the first half this year, and it wasn’t pretty. New-vehicle deliveries, fleet and retail combined, fell 1.5% in Q2 compared to Q2 last year, to 4.5 million vehicles; and in the first half fell by 2.4% to 8.4 million vehicles.
This puts new vehicle sales on track to fall below 17 million units for the year. This would be the worst level since 2014. According to my own estimates, new vehicle sales in 2019 will decline to 16.95 million units, roughly on par with 1999, in a horribly mature market, whose two-decade stagnation was interrupted by the excitement of a collapse and recovery back to stagnation levels:

Ford sales fell 4.1% in Q2.
Ford [F], like GM, stopped reporting monthly vehicle sales, and now only reports on a quarterly basis. In the second quarter, reported this morning, sales fell 4.1% to 650,336 units. This put Ford into third place, behind GM and Toyota.

Carmageddon: This is the big shift where Americans refuse to buy new “cars” and instead are buying new pickups, SUVs, compact SUVs, and vans. And they have far higher price tags and profit margins than cars. Ford’s car sales plunged another 21.4% to just 110,195 units in Q2, continuing their multi-year collapse.
Trucks (not including SUVs) are hot: Sales rose 7.5% to 324,243 units. But within that category, F-series pickups fell 1.3% to 233,787 units, getting cannibalized by Ford’s mid-size pickup, the Ranger, that it had brought back from the dead for the 2019 model year.
But Ford’s SUV sales are cold, disconcertingly falling 8.6% to 215,898 units.
Ford – along with other automakers – brags about how it is able to raise prices. It even explains its strategy in its report, meant for Wall Street, not consumers. It reported proudly that the average transaction price (ATP), which includes all incentives, for the 2019 Lincoln Nautilus SUV rose by $3,700, or 9%, to $44,300 in Q2, compared to the 2018 Lincoln MKX in Q2 last year.
These are the same vehicles, with a new name, a 9% higher ATP, a couple of updates, and about the same cost of manufacturing. Wall Street loves this strategy because Ford just increased its revenues and profit margins at the expense of the consumer – and consumers love getting jacked around like this, obviously, because deliveries jumped 13%.
Ford also brags about the price increases of its flagship product, F-series pickups, whose sales declined. The ATP for the F-series, which range from a base work truck to fully decked out crew cabs and beyond, rose by $1,200, to $47,500.
But Ford’s cheapest vehicle – a car! – had a huge gain in sales: Fiesta deliveries jumped 70% in the quarter to 22,173 vehicles, and are up 50% so far this year. This is now Ford’s second-bestselling car, after the Fusion (+11% year-to-date). All other car models are dying, with the Mustang (-9% year-to-date) dying more slowly than the Focus (-83%) and the Taurus (-47%).
The fact that Fiesta sales are hot shows that there is demand for decent entry-level cars, despite Carmageddon. But with a base sticker price of $14,200, there is very little profit margin for Ford, and it has no incentive to market them other than meeting Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) Standards.
GM sales fell 1.5% in Q2.
GM [GM] slows the decline. Sales had plunged 7% in Q1 compared to a year earlier. In Q2, sales fell only 1.5% to 746,659 units, GM reported yesterday. Its report is all about trucks, SUVs, and crossovers, with lots of details on trucks.
But the word “car” is mentioned only once, in passing, and without a number, in this phrase: “The company estimates that its retail market share was even with a year ago, with truck and crossover deliveries offsetting lower passenger car sales.” And that was it. Carmageddon.
Expensive crew cab pickups are hot: Sales of the Chevrolet Silverado 1500 crew cab and GMC Sierra 1500 crew cab jumped 12%.
And GM, like Ford, brags about price increases. The ATP of all its sales rose by $1,575, or 4.4%, to $37,126.
FCA sales fell 0.5% in Q2.
Fiat Chrysler Automobile [FCAU] still reported deliveries on a monthly basis. But it announced yesterday that it will abandon the practice and switch to quarterly sales reporting going forward, following in GM’s and Ford’s footsteps.
In Q2, FCA’s sales declined 0.5% from a year ago, to 600,460 units, after having fallen 3.1% in Q1. For the first half, sales fell 1.7% to 1.1 million units, putting FCA in fourth place, behind GM, Ford, and Toyota.
Its Ram pickups are hot, with sales jumping 56% in the month of June, to bring Q2 sales to 179,454 vehicles. That’s about 30% of FCA’s total sales!
Toyota sales fell 0.9% in Q2.
Toyota reported June sales yesterday, which fell 3.5% from a year ago. This brought sales in Q2 to 675,183 units, down 4.1% from a year ago, which put Toyota in second place ahead of Ford. For the first half, sales fell 3.1% to 1.15 million, which put it in third place, behind Ford.
Carmageddon at Toyota too: Car sales (Toyota and Lexus) fell 7.7% in the first half to 431,804 vehicles. But truck sales aren’t hot either, ticking down 0.2% in the first half to 720,304 vehicles.
Those are the Big Four automakers in the US. The rest are lagging far behind.
The table below shows deliveries by automaker, in the order of year-to-date volume. I used the data for GM, Ford, Toyota, and FCA as reported by those automakers. The remaining data is via Automotive News, whose estimates don’t always match those reported by automakers, for example Ford’s numbers. These are sales by dealers to their customers and include leases (dealer sells the vehicle to a leasing company which leases it to the customer) and fleet sales either by dealers or by the automakers directly to their large fleet customers, such as rental car companies.

Tesla’s guessing game
Tesla [TSLA] is near the bottom of the list, just above Volvo. But Tesla doesn’t report US deliveries at all and leaves them to our imagination. It only reports global deliveries on a quarterly basis, which it did yesterday. To get a feel for its US deliveries, I used the estimates by Automotive News, according to which US deliveries rose 30% in Q2 to about 30,000 units. Tesla could easily avoid the guessing game by reporting accurate quarterly US deliveries, but refuses to do so.
How to raise prices and revenues in this environment?
Sticker prices are largely irrelevant, given the importance of incentives by manufacturers and discounts by dealers. For example, GM said that it paid 12% of the Average Transaction Price in incentives. So the industry uses ATP to measure actual price levels. For the industry as a whole, the ATP in Q2 was $33,681, according to J.D. Power PIN estimates, cited by GM. This was up about 4% from a year ago.
The industry is trying to push up this ATP, and the place to start is by pushing up the sticker price, and then go from there by throwing in incentives when needed. Some vehicles are hot and don’t need incentives. Others are stuck, and dealers have trouble moving them, and incentives are needed. This changes constantly.
And the industry has figured out that Americans are tightwads when it comes to buying lower to mid-range cars – in part because people in this end of the market are often strung out financially.
On the other hand, there are plenty of Americans that like “big,” the bigger the better, and they love paying extra for it, and have the money to do so, or can easily borrow it, and are proud of paying these big-fat prices. And automakers love them for it. That’s what this industry, after two decades of stagnation has come down to, where every new entrant, such as Tesla, takes a slice from everyone else in this zero-sum market, and where revenue growth is only possible through price increases and by pushing consumers into bigger, more expensive models with fat profit margins.
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https://wolfstreet.com/2019/07/03/n...to-drop-to-1999-level-20-years-of-stagnation/
 

newmisty

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#2
Who want's to buy expensive(over priced) crap that falls apart? Maybe the country is finally getting smarter.
 

gliddenralston

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New pickup prices are from another planet...if it wasn't for the gov forcing purchase or paying taxes up the azz, they wouldn't sell any except for the very well off!!!
 

newmisty

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New pickup prices are from another planet...if it wasn't for the gov forcing purchase or paying taxes up the azz, they wouldn't sell any except for the very well off!!!
You ain't see nothing yet!



Chevy is working on a new Silverado that could be the first pickup to sell for $100,000

Paul A. Eisenstein, CNBCPublished 7:55 a.m. ET June 27, 2019 | Updated 8:20 a.m. ET June 27, 2019






At a time when U.S. automotive sales have begun to decline for only the second time since the Great Recession, demand for pickups — and the prices some die-hard fans will pay for them — has defied gravity.

Manufacturers like General Motors are updating their lineups more frequently than ever, increasing the number of trim packages, powertrain options and creature features, like Apple CarPlay, projected displays and infotainment systems.

That’s kept pickup prices rising at a rapid rate, especially for full-size models like the Chevrolet Silverado. Prices for full-size pickups have increased from an industry average of $32,557 in 2010 to $44,181 in 2018, according to data compiled by research firm J.D. Power and Associates. That rose, again, to $45,260 for the first five months of 2019.

And they’re about to rise again, if Chevy has anything to do with it.

Chevy is just rolling out an all-new version of its heavy-duty Silverado with the new High Country trim package that could become the first U.S. pickup to top $100,000, Chevy truck marketing chief Sandor Piszar said in an interview.

Silverado 1500 with a new for ’20 diesel (Photo: CNBC, (c) 2019 Paul A. Eisenstein, TheDetroitBureau.com)

“People want to trade up,” Piszar said in an interview following a press preview of the 2020 Chevy Silverado HD line last week in Bend, Oregon. “If customers want a more expensive truck” than what the brand already offers, “We’ll deliver it.”
Pickup trucks are the workhorses of the automotive land. Historically populating construction zones, oil rigs, farms and the ranches of the Midwest, the first crew cab made hauling a family of five just as easy when the four-door pickup was introduced in the 1950s. Pickup, SUV and crossover sales have soared in recent year, supplanting to sedan and caravan as the family car of choice.

Top 10 states profiting most from sin: Nevada isn't at the top
Pickups have carved out a particularly strong niche in the industry. Strong demand for the trucks have helped offset an overall 3% drop in new vehicle sales in the U.S. during the first five months of 2019. That would have been more severe were it not for truck sales, according to a report by tracking firm LMC Automotive.

The profit margins for pickups are also fatter, about $10,000 per truck, which can be several times the amount of a typical sedan, analysts said. Chevy’s Silverado, along with the GMC brand’s Sierra truck family are a “major contributor” to GM’s bottom line, said Piszar. And while he wouldn’t offer specific details, analyst Phillippi estimated the average Silverado provides “over $10,000 variable gross profit (while) at the high end, a Silverado High Country or a GMC Sierra Denali can get over $20,000.”

Silverado HD High Country with the Duramax diesel. (Photo: CNBC, (c) 2019 Paul A. Eisenstein, TheDetroitBureau.com)

That provides good reason why, at a time when GM is closing three North American assembly plants and cutting thousands of jobs it has been investing heavily in its pickup operations. In May, it announced it will invest $24 million to boost pickup capacity at its Fort Wayne plant.

“Sales have been very strong, and we are expanding customer choice with new models, more cab choices and innovative new powertrains,” GM CEO Mary Barra said during a visit to the factory on May 30 to announce the move. Less than two weeks later, Barra committed another $150 million to add 40,000 units of annual capacity to the Flint, Michigan plant producing the Chevy and GMC HD models. That was on top of previous investments totaling $1.5 billion at the Michigan factory.


The Silverado has traditionally been the U.S. market’s second best-selling full-size pickup, behind only the Ford F-Series. Ford actually saw demand for its popular trucks jump last year, selling 909,330 pickups, up from 896,764 in 2017. Chevy saw a slight dip in sales, moving 585,582 pickups last year from 585,864 the year before. And sales for the Silverado dropped 15.7% during the first quarter of the year.

Chevy officials downplay the decline, noting that production was hurt by the staggered roll-out of the new light-duty 1500, as well as mid- and heavy-duty versions of the Silverado. The factory in Flint, Michigan, which is building the brawniest version of the truck, only came back online after a major retooling, in February.

The Silverado has faced some tough new competition from the latest version of Fiat Chrysler’s Ram 1500 – which was named North American Truck of the Year this past January, but IHS auto analyst Stephanie Brinley agrees with Chevy. Chevy’s slip “is a changeover issue,” she said. “This is not where their sales will be in 18 months.”

Pushing into six-figure territory would be a significant jump for Chevy, which will top out just under $90,000 with the newly added High Country version of the 2020 Silverado HD just rolling into U.S. dealer showrooms now. But arch-rival Ford has come even closer with the Limited edition of its own F-Series Super Duty truck. A fully loaded one can run around $95,000 before factoring in taxes, delivery charges and other fees, as well as the many available aftermarket options.

“There’s not a lot of risk for them” to break the $100,000 mark, said Brinley, adding it is more likely a question of when. “There’d be no harm if it doesn’t work but, if it succeeds, it would earn a tidy profit.”

Chevrolet traditionally lagged behind the overall segment, according to Power, because it didn’t have the sort of high-line models, such as the Ford F-250 Limited. The arrival of the new Silverado High Country – as well as a production led shortage of some other models – helped drive up the Silverado ATP by $4,000 in April, versus the year before, at $41,700. During the same period, Ford’s average transaction price rose just $300, according to PIN data collected from thousands of U.S. dealers.

Buyers tend to cluster into two groups, those who need a serious truck for work and those who want a heavy hauler to match their lifestyle needs, such as hauling a boat or RV, or just to carry mulch and shrubs from the local big box store, said Chevy’s Piszar.
For lifestyle buyers, more and more see their pickups as the go-anywhere, do-anything alternative to a classic luxury car, according to industry research.

But even among those who use a truck for work, the demand for well-equipped vehicles is rising. That includes features that enhance functionality, such as the new Silverado HD’s diesel which helps boost towing capacity by 52% for 2020, to an industry-leading 35,500 pounds. The automaker has also introduced a multi-camera system that offers someone towing a trailer 14 different views, including “Transparent Trailer” mode, which appears to see right through the trailer to show traffic coming up from behind.

Customers for the Silverado — like those for competing Ford and Ram trucks — also can order plenty of creature comforts, such as heated and cooled seats, heated steering wheels and the latest infotainment technology.

“For people who make their living spending all their time in one of these trucks, they’re not afraid to spend the money to get the best truck they can buy,” said analyst Joe Phillippi, of AutoTrends Consulting, adding that he’d also be surprised if Chevrolet doesn’t add a model that will nudge over $100,000.
Lifestyle buyers are even more willing to spend the money, especially those who buy a truck to haul boats, RVs or horse trailers, said Brinley. “When people are towing things that can cost several times more than the truck, they’re willing to spend the money.”

https://www.usatoday.com/story/mone...lverado-pickup-truck-sell-100-000/1581451001/
 

Rusty Shackelford

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I saw a new Ford Ranger on our local lot....I bought one new in 1995 for a little over $9000...nothing special...just a good solid driver....the one I just saw was $45,000......sitting next to a $78,000 Raptor.....crazy pricing.
 

Uncle

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And bi-turbo points of failure additions on the Raptor.

Locally only an affordable $57 378.00 (Sales man speak.)

Locally, $41 214 for a Toyota RAV 4. Nope.

Golden Regards
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Now that the diesels require DEF and have common rail injection and all the electronic nightmares that go with it, people are keeping their older vehicles. Everything new has too much electronics, low profile tires and junk buyers don't want.
 

gliddenralston

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A brilliant investment strategy, $100k depreciating truck, taxes, licenses, insurance, fuel ect, in 5yrs its worth 50k and cost 35k to own and operate, now ur 135k investment worth 50k, only stupid people make these choices...same 100k invested conservatively at 5% simple interest is is now at 125k, if compounding even more.
 
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southfork

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They have lowered the bar to sell to the worst credit risks, no sales are left to be had, I drive a 99 Mercury Grand Marquis, if they were to give a 10k tax credit I might be inclined to buy something, wife has a 2008 Xl7 bought it as a leftover demo in 09, sticker was 25k paid 15 k. People today think nothing about paying 40/50k for cars, my first house was 32.5k
 

TAEZZAR

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I have an '07 Dodge Ram, diesel & I don't have to piss in my fuel to keep it running. I'll keep it, thank you !
 

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2010 Silverado, 5.3, 4x4, crew cab, 67000 miles. New one like it, about $55K.
Car dealers aren't selling vehicles anymore, they're selling debt, not about purchase price, about, "how much can you pay a month for the next 8-10 years?"
 

pitw

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#17
These chinese pieces of electronic crap won't last 10 years, much less 30.


.
I've been afraid of that. Probably why I have 14 old Fords[and looking for more] setting around as a parts department. But then I do that with my sprayers too[going to an auction today to look at buying another 22 year old machine]. I can make the old ones run and can't afford to get some stealership make the new ones run.
 

Irons

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I've been afraid of that. Probably why I have 14 old Fords[and looking for more] setting around as a parts department. But then I do that with my sprayers too[going to an auction today to look at buying another 22 year old machine]. I can make the old ones run and can't afford to get some stealership make the new ones run.
My 2000 S10 4x4 is done being rebuilt and is going to the shop to be painted Thursday. I am excited to see it finished it's been a long process.
When the frame finally rots out beyond repair I will road trip to the rust free states in the south west and get another one to rebuild.

.
 

the_shootist

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#19
I'm looking at retirement next year and have a 10+ year plan to provide for solid, long term and dependable vehicles for me and Mrs Shootist in retirement:
Vehicle # 1
I bought an off the lot Tacoma brand new in 2013. It's a rare 5spd extended cab model. I have 2 payments left (~$700 total) on that truck and I'm tempted to just pay it off now. It has under 50K on the clock and is holding up quite well and still looks and runs like new. This will be my ride for the next 10+ years and will do anything I need it to do.

Vehicle # 2
Back in 2016 I also leased a brand new Toyota RAV4 for 3 years for the wife. It currently has 26K on the clock and the last lease payment was made last week. It's due back to the dealer by the end of the this month. The buyout is $16.5K so I'm going to pay a large chunk of it in cash and carry a small loan for the rest. The car is solid and in mint condition. Plus I know it's had all its service done on time and know it was well taken care of. Purchasing this car as Toyota certified used would cost over $20K so given all the financial points it makes the most sense to buy it now while I'm making excellent money and have it for the next 10+ years as the wife's ride. (for those who say the certified preowned comes with a warranty I say this is a Toyota RAV 4. I've owned Toyos for many many years and pretty much know what to expect with regard to maintaining them and life expectancy. Moreover; there's a reason car dealership owners are millionaires. Selling extended warranties on rock solid cars is a huge cash cow for those maggots! If this were a Chevy or a Ford I might reconsider the option of purchasing a dealer offered extended warranty on American manufactured using Chinese parts crap. I'll take my chances, not opt for the wildly expensive 'insurance' and keep the up front, extended warranty costs in my pocket. This final small loan is intended to be of short term (3 years) and will be my last car payment eva, if all goes as planned.
 
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the_shootist

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#20
2010 Silverado, 5.3, 4x4, crew cab, 67000 miles. New one like it, about $55K.
Car dealers aren't selling vehicles anymore, they're selling debt, not about purchase price, about, "how much can you pay a month for the next 8-10 years?"
I have no words! That's more than what my first house cost back in 1981($47K)
 

Silver

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I don't really like any of the new vehicles, and my daily drivers are getting up there in the miles. Turned over 100k on a 2013 MB - the spark plugs have never been changed, the dealer wanted 1k and I thought I could do it myself. Bought the plugs and new seals for the air intake thing that you have to remove to get to the plugs. Still haven't dealt with it. The previous year was a simple spark plug change, mine is a PITA. Still runs good and the gas mileage has not gotten worse. Manana.

I'm going to hold out for an electric in a couple of years.
 

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My pickups are 1980 and 2006, my SUV is a 1998, my dozer is a 1966, my tractor is a 1955, my gas welder is a 1971, excavator is 1992, skid steer is 2001. My ATV's are 1999 and 2000, UTV is 2006. All well used and running fine, none pretty. I could scrape up enough to buy a fancy new truck, but I just don't see the value in them unless they spot me a 70% discount. Same scenario with ATV's and machinery. Too electronic and not enough durability, serviceability or longevity.
 

Irons

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My pickups are 1980 and 2006, my SUV is a 1998, my dozer is a 1966, my tractor is a 1955, my gas welder is a 1971, excavator is 1992, skid steer is 2001. My ATV's are 1999 and 2000, UTV is 2006. All well used and running fine, none pretty. I could scrape up enough to buy a fancy new truck, but I just don't see the value in them unless they spot me a 70% discount. Same scenario with ATV's and machinery. Too electronic and not enough durability, serviceability or longevity.
Besides the "interactive" dashboards that all look like a smartphone and absolute piece of crap automatic transmissions the other thing the great brains in china are doing is taking little 4 and 6 cylinder engines and putting twin turbochargers on them to bring the horsepower up.
Then they drop them in full size trucks. Then, of course, they blow up. This is fucking brilliant.

I guess to be a successful automotive designer in this modern world the first thing you have to do is not learn one fucking thing from past successes and failures. Automatic transmissions in 2019 are the weakest link in an already weak design and manual transmissions are not even an option in almost every car or truck you can go out and buy. Imagine that, automatic transmission technology has gone backwards.

I'm sure all this is by plan, to make crap you'll never pay off and will constantly need to be replaced. But I ain't impressed with anything I see.
I would pay for a frame off restoration on a 20 year old truck before I would pay 60k for the shit out there now.

.
AAsmoke.gif
 

Thecrensh

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Besides the "interactive" dashboards that all look like a smartphone and absolute piece of crap automatic transmissions the other thing the great brains in china are doing is taking little 4 and 6 cylinder engines and putting twin turbochargers on them to bring the horsepower up.
Then they drop them in full size trucks. Then, of course, they blow up. This is fucking brilliant.

I guess to be a successful automotive designer in this modern world the first thing you have to do is not learn one fucking thing from past successes and failures. Automatic transmissions in 2019 are the weakest link in an already weak design and manual transmissions are not even an option in almost every car or truck you can go out and buy. Imagine that, automatic transmission technology has gone backwards.

I'm sure all this is by plan, to make crap you'll never pay off and will constantly need to be replaced. But I ain't impressed with anything I see.
I would pay for a frame off restoration on a 20 year old truck before I would pay 60k for the shit out there now.

. View attachment 135844
If they made dependable vehicles, nobody would need to buy a new one!
 

TomD

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Might be interesting to make a graph of the income of a working class "wage earner" compared to the cost of a "work truck". That's really the only comparison that make a difference. A current $70K truck might be called a truck and they might have a "bed" but that's where the resemblance with any truck that I bought from Ford or Toyota in the 80's and 90's ends.

Work trucks are still made, my company buys a bunch of them for hauling trailers with a Bobcat, mini-excavator or a paving roller and a crew of four to a job site. But I have no understanding of these swollen, useless and decadent barges unless they are meant to act as some public supposed representation of penis size.
 

hoarder

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This thread is good enough proof that automakers are not making what the public wants. Law of supply and demand be damned, they make what THEY want us to drive. If vehicles are unservicable and designed to fail when it's paid off, the bankers are the principal beneficiaries of this plan.
 

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This thread is good enough proof that automakers are not making what the public wants. Law of supply and demand be damned, they make what THEY want us to drive. If vehicles are unservicable and designed to fail when it's paid off, the bankers are the principal beneficiaries of this plan.
But logically that makes no sense...they then end up with a fleet of used cars that nobody wants or can afford....
 

hoarder

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But logically that makes no sense...they then end up with a fleet of used cars that nobody wants or can afford....
If they fail when loan is paid off, how do bankers end up with a fleet? It's a win win for banksters. Principal payments end and cars are crunched into a cube and sent back to China. New car arrives from China and bankers issue another loan out of thin air to the unsuspecting sucker who pays.
 

the_shootist

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#31
If they fail when loan is paid off, how do bankers end up with a fleet? It's a win win for banksters. Principal payments end and cars are crunched into a cube and sent back to China. New car arrives from China and bankers issue another loan out of thin air to the unsuspecting sucker who pays.
The leasing business is keeping the new vehicle business afloat! They rent you a 2/3/4 year slice of the car, then turn it into a 'certified preowned' (=$$) resell if you don't buy it outright after the lease is over. They win either way so, as a leaser/buyer, you need to total up your options and minimize your losses over the long haul!
 

wallew

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#32
back in either 05 or 06 I responded to a similar complaint about expensive trucks that you couldn't work on...

1563139744089.png



My current deuce is a 1970 Kaiser Jeep M35A2 which I have owned for more than two years and finally decided to have it transported from Co to Tx. Here it is on the trailer in Co, getting ready to leave and come to Texas.

Deuce  successfully loaded.PNG


btw CONG stands for COlorado National Guard
 

DodgebyDave

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#33
Go in and ask for a base model work truck.........
 

nickndfl

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#34
I buy a new car every 2 to 2.5 years for my business because of the 1k+ miles I drive every week. My last Mazda CX-5 was best in its class and I agree. It's better than a Honda CRV.

I currently drive a 2018 Hyundai Kona I bought in February. Good little skate that gets 33+ mpg and turns on a dime. Hyundai is coming out with a pickup at the end of the year that looks like a Honda Ridgeline. I would consider it for transportation as long as it did not involve commercial duty.