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Older, Odd, Offbeat And Forgotten Guns & Ammo

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The Allen & Thurber Pepperbox Pistol
TFB TV


Published on Feb 15, 2018
At the Institute of Military Technology, TFBTV's Corey Wardrop discusses the Allen & Thurber Pepperbox Pistol.

We first look at a timeline of similar firearms, and discuss some of the reasons the firearms were used more for civilian than military purposes. We discuss what pepperbox pistols (commonly also called pepperbox revolvers) are by definition, and discuss the timeline and ignition systems used.

Thanks to Rock Island Auction company for the use of their matchlock pepperbox image, with the previously-sold item also found here: https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

We discuss a little trivia (is the Gatling a Pepperbox?), and then dive into the Allen & Thurber, and its the namesake Ethan Allen. We discuss the timeline of the Allen company, advantages and disadvantages of the pepperbox, its use, and ultimately its demise.
 

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M70 Zastava 32 ACP Surplus Pistol
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Published on Feb 20, 2018
M70 Zastava 32 ACP Surplus Pistol Review. Based on the M57 Tokarev Pistol, the M70 is still a favorite with Police units in Serbia.

Big thanks to AIM Surplus for sending the M70 for the Review!
 

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Sheet Metal and Wood: The Polish Sudayev PPS 43/52
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Feb 17, 2018
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Poland was one of the states which manufactured the Soviet PPS-43 submachine gun under license, but they decided to make a change to is in 1952. Where the original PPS-43 used a top-folding metal stock, the Poles decided to instead add a fixed wooden buttstock. This made the gun substantially more comfortable to shoot, and also less compact to transport. Was the tradeoff worthwhile? Let's see how it shoots...

Thanks to Marstar for letting me examine and shoot their PPS-43/52! Visit them at: http://marstar.ca

If you enjoy Forgotten Weapons, check out its sister channel, InRangeTV! http://www.youtube.com/InRangeTVShow
 

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Walther Olympia: Germany's Interwar Target Pistol
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Feb 18, 2018
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The Colt Woodsman, introduced in 1915, was the premier - and really the only serious - option for the competitive target shooter into the 1920s when the Walther company decided to introduce a competitor. Walther needed a product to bring business, of course, and the Versailles treaty prohibited it from manufacturing military arms. So, with the flexibility and responsiveness that the company often exhibited, it decided to enter the competition pistol market in 1925 with the Olympia.

This was a semiautomatic, .22 Long Rifle caliber pistol with a 10-round magazine. It was a simple blowback action, with large precise sights and a quite nice feel to the grip. It was not quite the equal of the Woodsman in international competition, but still a strong second-place contender on the market.

Always looking to improve and respond to customer desires, Walther began to experiment with changes to the Olympia in the early 1930s, and in 1936 introduced a brand new version. This new Olympia offered, among other improvements, the option to add barrel weights, and it became an even more serious competitor for the Woodsman.

Today we will be looking at a large selection of Olympias, showing you all the different variations of both the 1925 and 1936 models as well as some transitional guns from Walther's experimental period.
 

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Swiss Prototype von Steiger Auto-Ejecting Revolvers
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Feb 19, 2018
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In the 1870s, Switzerland was looking for a new military revolver, and they were particularly interested in finding a system which would allow faster reloading than the standard loading gate and manual ejection rod. A military veteran and gunsmith by the name of von Steiger in Thun submitted a design which automatically ejected an empty case each time the gun was fired. This did dramatically increase the rate of fire (one Swiss officer in the trials managed 10 rounds in 20 seconds), but at the price of complexity and durability.

The first series of von Steiger revolvers were in 9mm, followed a few years later by a redesign to the 10.4mm cartridge which would ultimately be adopted in 1878. We have six examples to look at today, form prototype #2 through one of the trials pistols in 10.4mm. Ultimately the Abadie system was chosen in favor of von Steiger's guns. Abadie's gun was not as fast as von Steiger's to reload, but it was still faster than the traditional system and did not sacrifice as much cost or durability. It would prove to be quite successful, and was adopted by many European militaries in the late 1800s.

Thanks to Kessler Auktionen AG for letting me film some of their guns! If you are looking for interesting and unusual arms in Europe, make sure to check them out: http://www.kesslerauktionen.ch
 

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Who is Springfield Armory? A Tale of Two Entities
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Feb 20, 2018
Today we will take a look at the history of Springfield Armory - both the American national arsenal founded in the 1770s and the commercial entity founded in the 1970s.
 

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Affordable Combat Collectibles - Mauser C96 Broom Handle
Military Arms Channel


Published on Feb 20, 2018
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The classic Mauser C96 Broom Handle in 7.63z25, or .30 Mauser, if a very powerful, well made and reliable handgun for being one of the earliest successful auto-loading handguns. The C96 Broom Handle saw action is most military conflicts from the early 1900's until WII. While somewhat exotic and ever increasing in value, affordable collectibles like this can still be found. We talk about this C96 30 Mauser Broom Handle I discovered in a local gun store.
 

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Military SIG P-49 Variations
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Feb 23, 2018
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When looking at P-49 (aka SIG 210) pistols used by the Swiss military, there are five distinct groups, with different characteristics. Today we will be showing you these differences, as well as a few features of the Swiss military holster for the P49. For reference:

Type 1: 100001-103200
High polish blue, checkered slide release, wood grips, smooth safety lever, no halfcock notch (most retrofitted), mag body in the white. First batch delivered to Army.

Type 2: 103201 - 107210
Blued magazines, no halfcock (most retrofitted) . Otherwise same as Type 1. Second batch delivered to Army.

Type 3: 107211-109710
All with halfcock notch, otherwise same as Type 1. Third batch delivered to Army.

Type 4 (aka Transitional): 109711-120500
Black plastic grips, matte blue finish (different tone between slide and frame), checked slide stop, serrated safety, separate grip escutcheons, matte blue or high polish blue magazine.

Type 5: 120501-213110
All matte blue magazine, serrated slide stop, integral grip escutcheons, otherwise same as Type 4.

If you enjoy Forgotten Weapons, check out its sister channel, InRangeTV! http://www.youtube.com/InRangeTVShow
 

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A Light Machine Gun for Independence: The Israeli Dror
TFB TV



Published on Feb 28, 2018
The Israeli Dror Light Machine Gun was born during a time of necessity. What would later become the state of Israel was fighting off numerous enemies all around it and needed every weapon system possible. Through this endeavor, a sympathetic employer who formerly worked at Johnson Automatics helped supporters in the United States form a working copy of the M1944 Johnson LMG, fabricated in Canada, and then covertly shipped over to Israel where production was completed.

Unfortunately the Dror had a number of issues in being an LMG design. It tended to be very inaccurate in fully automatic and extremely uncomfortable to shoot. It was very good as a single shot weapon but this wasn't at all the design intention. In addition, it was only employed in 1951, years after the crucial fight of 1948 had occurred. Even then, only 3,000-4,000 production guns were actually produced and issued to the IDF.
 

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Too Little Too Late: Japanese Type 100 Submachine Gun
TFB TV



Published on Feb 21, 2018
Japan was perhaps the least prepared of all the powers during the Second World War to have an issued submachine gun in use by combat troops. Indeed the Japanese Type 100 only saw a production run of at maximum 30,000 weapons. A small fraction of the total amount of the Japanese Imperial Forces throughout the entire war.

Actually designed through the Nambu corporation of Nambu pistol and cartridge fame, the Type 100 wasn't anything spectacular (although other Japanese subgun prototype designs were quite interesting) for being an open bolt, magazine fed, fully automatic only submachine gun. Some of forces that really made use of it were the Japanese paratroopers who were issued versions with a folding stock that could be easily stowed away on a combat jump.
 

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Valmet M71 - How Does it Shoot in Full Auto?
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Feb 24, 2018
https://jamesdjulia.com/item/52939-30...

The Valmet M71 was introduced as a commercial export rifle in 1971, and was the first AK available on the commercial market in the United States and Europe. It was offered in both .223 and 7.62x39mm calibers, because the 7.62x39mm cartridge was rare and expensive at the time outside of Finland and the Soviet bloc. As a result, the majority of sales were for .223 rifles. The vast majority were sold as semiautomatic rifles, but this one has been legally converted into a fully automatic machine gun, per the NFA.

To make the M71 appear more "AK-like", Valmet opted to revert to the Soviet style of sights, with a notch on the front of the receiver and a post mounted at the muzzle (as opposed to the Valmet military pattern, which used an aperture mounted at the rear of the top cover and a front post on the gas block). They also appear to have maintained the Soviet gas port size, as the rifle recoils more than one might expect for its caliber. This was done intentionally, to ensure that it would continue to function reliably in very cold weather, when ambient temperature causes chamber pressure to be reduced.
 

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King Louis XV's Magnificent Engraved Lorenzoni Rifle
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Feb 25, 2018
https://jamesdjulia.com/item/53211-1-...

This Lorenzoni-pattern rifle was presented to King Louis XV of France in the mid 1700s, and is an exquisite example of firearms deemed suitable for royalty at the height of the European kings. It is .38 caliber and rifled, with remarkably usable sights and a repeating mechanism with the ball and powder magazines accessible through a trapdoor in the back of the stock. The barrel is made of a gorgeous damascus steel, with the whole of the gun adorned with silver inlay, engravings, and deep wood carvings.

The gun was noted in the 1775 inventory of the French royal arms collection, but that collection was broken up in 1789 with the French Revolution. This rifle was rediscovered by an American officer in Europe in 1945, who noticed it in a pile on confiscated arms slated to be destroyed. He saved it from that fate and brought it home, where is stayed in his family until being put up for auction at James D Julia this year.
 

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Custom Transferrable 7mm BAR
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Feb 27, 2018
https://jamesdjulia.com/item/52924-2-...

Want to play He-Man shooting a BAR from the shoulder? This one has been built for just that purpose. It’s chambered in 7x57mm for reduced recoil, has a 21” barrel to improve handling, a custom lengthened pistol grip, safe-semi-full trigger group, good early M1918 pattern sights, and Bren Gun tripod mounting brackets for when you get tired. A neat example of a customized beast of an automatic rifle!
 

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A Rare World War One Sniper's Rifle: Model 1916 Lebel
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Feb 28, 2018
https://jamesdjulia.com/item/53160-6-...

Unlike Great Britain and Germany, the French military never developed a formal sniper doctrine during World War One - they had no dedicated schools or instruction manuals for that specialty. The three major arsenals did produce scoped sniping rifles, however, with models of 1915, 1916, and 1917 (and a post-war 1921 pattern). We have a model 1916 example here today.

The rifles were completely ordinary off-the-rack Lebels, modified simply to add scope mounts. The 1916 pattern mount used a round peg on the side of the rear sight and a bracket wrapped around the front of the receiver, which allowed the scope to be quickly and easily detached for carry in a separate pouch (similar to what other nations did, to protect the optic from damage when not in use). The rifles were issued only in small numbers (2 per company, or even 2 per battalion) and it was left to the unit commander to decide how to employ them.

This particular scope has some neat provenance of being brought home by a US soldier after the war - it came back wrapped in a period copy of Stars and Stripes magazine. The rifle is of the appropriate type, but the “N” marks on the barrel and receiver indicated French overhaul in the 1930s, precluding it from being the original rifle this scope was mounted on.
 

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Norton DP-75: Titanium Plus German Police Pistol
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Mar 1, 2018
https://jamesdjulia.com/item/53190-3-...

This pistol is something of a mystery - its design comes from the experimental Mauser HsP of the mid 1970s. It uses a short recoil system with a pivoting locking block vaguely like a P38, and was an unsuccessful competitor to the H&K P7 in German police trials. The design was dropped by Mauser by 1983, and only a small number were ever made. However, this aluminum and titanium DP-75 version was produced for some reason by the Norton Armament company of Michigan. Norton is best known for being the American company affiliated with Edgar Budischowsky, designer of the high-end Korriphila pistols. I was unable to find any connection between Budischowsky and Walter Ludwig (designer of the HsP) or the Mauser company, however.

In an neat twist, this pistol was used by the ridiculously talented machinist Raymond Hutchens to create a fully functional perfect half-scale miniature, which is being sold as a package with the full size gun.
 

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Argentine Ballester Molina 45 ACP
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Published on Mar 3, 2018
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In this video Eric tests out his recently acquired Ballester Molina at the range and gives a little history lesson on this very interesting Argentine handgun. Stay tuned,much more on the way.

Disclaimer: Our videos are strictly for educational and entertainment purposes only, imitation or the use of any instruction shown in the videos is solely AT YOUR OWN RISK. Iraqveteran8888 will not be held liable for any injury to yourself or damage to your firearms resulting from attempting anything shown in any our videos.

Copyright 2018, 88 Industries, LLC
 

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Colt R75A: The Last Commercial BAR (With Shooting)
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Mar 2, 2018
https://jamesdjulia.com/item/53153-1-...

The R75A was the last version of Colt’s commercial BAR, with 832 made between August and December of 1942 for the Netherlands Purchasing Commission. It was a derivative of the commercial R75 BAR, with a pistol grip, magazine well cover, and ejection port cover. The R75A added on a folding bipod and a detachable barrel functionality, albeit not of the most elegant sort. To remove the barrel, one first used the lever under the muzzle to detach the gas block from the barrel by sliding it rearwards. Then a tool or cartridge tip was used to pry open the barrel locking lever at the front of the receiver, which then allowed the barrel to be rotated about 60 degrees to unlock its interrupted threads and remove it.
 

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Nock's Volley Gun: Clearing the Decks in the 1700s
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Mar 3, 2018
https://jamesdjulia.com/item/53182-2-...

The Nock Volley Gun was actually invented by an Englishman named James Wilson in 1789, and presented to the British military as a potential infantry weapons. This was declined as impractical, but the Royal Navy found the concept interesting for shipboard use. In 1790 the Navy ordered two prototypes made by the British gunsmith Henry Nock, and finding them suitable, proceeded to oder a total of 500 of the guns (thus forever associating Nock’s name with the gun instead of Wilson’s). A further 100 or so were ordered in 1787, and the guns were in fact issued out to various ships - although accounts of their use in combat are difficult to find.

Unfortunately for Nock, the guns presented a couple substantial problems in use. One was simply the recoil of firing. A single 32-bore (approximately .55 caliber) round ball over 40 grains of black powder is not a very impressive load, but seven of them firing simultaneously add up to a recoil comparable to 4- or 6-bore rifles, and in a volley gun weighing just 13 pounds (5.9kg). In addition, the guns did not always reliably fire all barrels, especially when dirty. This produced a conundrum: how to determine which barrels had fired and which had not? The practical result was double-loaded barrels, which could be liable to bulge or burst. For these reasons, the weapon was declared obsolete in 1805, and never appeared to play any significant military role.

The gun did receive a new wave of popular awareness in 1960, when the character of Jim Bowie was outfitted with one in the movie “The Alamo” (against all historical evidence). His easy handling of the weapon and the waves of men he was able to mow down with it brought the gun back into the popular consciousness.
 

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ATI MilSport Pistol
God family and guns



Published on Mar 2, 2018
This video takes a look at the very affordable AR-15 Pistol the American Tactical Import Mil-Sport AR Pistol .

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SC Robinson Confederate Sharps Carbine
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Mar 4, 2018
https://jamesdjulia.com/item/52863-5-...

During the Civil War, the Confederacy was perpetually in serious need of armaments, as the South did not have the amount of industrial infrastructure that the North did. This led to many attempts at arms production by various entrepreneurs, of quite varied result. One of the more successful enterprises was the Robinson Arms Manufactory, founded in Richmond VA in December of 1862. Samuel Robinson was a transplanted Connecticut industrialist who proved himself capable and reliable for the CSA government with a series of contracts to convert flintlock muskets to percussion ignition. Probably because of this, it was he that the CSA’s Colonel Burton turned to to set up production of a copy of the Sharps carbine for Confederate cavalry use.

Robinson produced about 1900 of these carbines between December 1862 and March of 1863. His work was impressive enough that in March of 1863 the Confederate government decided to buy out his operation and make it into a government run arsenal. They continued to make Sharps carbines there until the end of the war, producing an additional 3500 or so. These later Confederate production guns have serial numbers between about 1900 and about 5500, along with unmarked lock plates - Robinson’s guns have his company name and the date 1862 marked on the lock plates, along with serial numbers up to about 1900.
 

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The Uzi Submachine Gun: Excellent or Overrated?
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Mar 5, 2018
https://jamesdjulia.com/auction/sprin...

The Israeli Uzi has become a truly iconic submachine gun through both its military use and its Hollywood stunts - but how effective is it really?

I found this fully automatic Uzi Model A to be actually rather better than I had expected. Despite the uncomfortable sharp metal stock, the rate of fire and large sights make this a relatively easy gun to shoot. Not one of the absolute best, but certainly above average.
 

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Fulton Armory M1 Carbine - the best in class
Military Arms Channel



Published on Mar 4, 2018
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Original M1 Carbines in really good condition are expensive and collectible. Even the "shooter" grade rifle are getting expensive and many have worn or broken parts. They're not ideal shooters. Worse, there are companies making reproductions of military M1 Carbines that are known to be of low quality. Enter the Fulton Armory M1 Carbine. Fulton Armory has made a name for themselves in building high quality, high end M14 and M1 Garand rifles. This is why I avoided the lower cost options and decided to try the Fulton Armory M1 Carbine. I take you along for our first range session and show it side by side with a original military Inland (not a newly made knock-off) to see how the Fulton Armory M1 Carbine stacks up.
 

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Parallel-Bore Side by Side Shotgun - Look Ma, No Rib!
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Mar 6, 2018
https://jamesdjulia.com/item/53198-3-...

Virtually all side by side shotguns are not actually made with the barrels parallel - they are made pointing just slightly together, so that the shot patterns will converge and meet up at a particular range. Today, we have an Ellis Brothers (of Birmingham) sporting shotgun that was actually made with bores that are entirely parallel - and it looks quite unusual when one is used to the traditional configuration!
 

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Porter Turret Rifle (2nd Variation) - Unsafe in Any Direction
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Mar 7, 2018
https://jamesdjulia.com/item/53088-1-...

The Porter Turret Rifle was patented in 1851 by Perry W. Porter, and is a vertical turret design - meaning that it has a revolving cylinder in which the chambers are aligned pointing outward radially from the center axis (instead of all being parallel to the center axis as in a traditional revolver). There were a few turret rifle and pistol designs in this period (another well known one being the Cochran) before mainstream revolvers really solidified their dominance on the market, but they were never very successful. In addition to being complex and expensive, the risk of a chain fire causing a round to his the shooter or a bystander was worrisome to many potential buyers.

Porter made three variations of his turret rifle, and this is an example of the 2nd variation. Where the first pattern guns were made in Taunton Massachusetts, the second and third patterns were made in New York. In this pattern, Porter added a grip safety under the action lever, a pair of flash hole guards, a serpentine loading lever attached to the top of the barrel, and an improved primer feeding system, now designed to use standard percussion caps. About 350-400 of this pattern were made, of the roughly 1250 total Porter turret rifles produced.
 

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Stoner Didn't Like the SAW: Stoner 86/ARES LMG-1
TFB TV


Published on Mar 7, 2018
The Stoner 86/ ARES LMG-1 unfortunately never received much fanfare in the time that it was produced. Originally intended as Eugene Stoner's concept idea for the SAW trials in what would later become the FN Herstal M249, it never reached full production potential. Truly a shame considering the well thought out features of the weapon system. Essentially Stoner was really updating his Stoner 63 LMG from the Vietnam era, bringing it into the 1980s. Whereas the Stoner 63 was conceived as a modular small arm with the ability to be converted from rifle to carbine, or even to an LMG, the Stoner 86/ARES LMG-1 was produced with the sole intent of being a lightweight LMG that could either be belt fed or magazine fed.

Some of the forward-looking features of the LMG was the Weaver rail that was a part of the receiver, the ability for the buttstock to be completely taken off, a number of interchangeable parts with the M16A2 then in service, and a transparent drum where a soldier could see exactly how many rounds were left in the box.

Today the design lives on as the Knight's Armament LAMG through almost two decades of improvements and modifications done at the facility in Florida. There is also a 7.62x51mm NATO version as well.
↯༚↯༚GUNS IN THIS VIDEO↯༚↯༚

Stoner 86
ARES LMG-1
Stoner 63
M16A2
 

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Shooting the M3A1 Grease Gun
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Mar 9, 2018
https://jamesdjulia.com/item/53165-7-...

The M3 (and its followup improved M3A1 model) was the United States' answer to the high cost and manufacturing complexity of the Thompson submachine gun. The M3 "Grease Gun" (because really, that is what it looks like) was a very inexpensive weapon with a stamped and welded receiver and only a few milled parts. It also had the slowest rate of fire of any World War 2 submachine gun at about 450 rounds/minute. Its weight, compactness, and controllability made it almost universally preferred over the Thompson, at least by soldiers who had to carry and fight with either of them.

The Grease Gun is reputedly extremely controllable because of its low rate of fire, but this is my first time to actually try shooting one. Will it live up to that reputation?
 

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Darne "Canardière Portatif" Shoulder-Fired Punt Gun
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Mar 10, 2018
https://jamesdjulia.com/item/53151-1-...

In the days when market hunting was a normal practice, hunters would use pretty huge shotguns to harvest large numbers of waterfowl. These were called punt guns, named after the small shallow-draft boats which they were used on - punts. The largest punt guns had bores of up to 50mm (2 inches) and cannon-type breech mechanisms, and could only be fired from their boat mounts. However, smaller punt guns were also made which could be fired from the shoulder, and this is one of those.

This is a French Darne “Canardière Portatif”, or mobile fowling gun. It is a nominal 4-bore (1 inch) shotgun (although its .920 inch bore actually makes it closer to a 6-bore) with a 1.2m (48 inch) barrel and a rolling block action. It could be fired form the shoulder or mounted to a rope breeching rig on a boat to help absorb recoil. This type was manufactured form 1905 until the 1930s, when market hunting fell out of common practice.
 

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George Hyde's First Submachine Gun: The Hyde Model 33
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Mar 11, 2018
https://jamesdjulia.com/item/52883-1-...

George Hyde was a gun designer who is due substantial credit, but whose name is rarely heard, because he did not end up with his name on an iconic firearm. Hyde was a German immigrant to the United States in 1927 who formed the Hyde Arms Company and started designing submachine guns. His first was the Model 33, which we have here today. This quickly evolved into the Model 35, which was tested by Aberdeen Proving Grounds in the summer of 1939. It was found to have a number of significant advantages over the Thompson, but also some durability problems. The problems could probably have been addressed, but Hyde (who had gone from working as shop foreman at Griffin & Howe to later becoming chief designer for GM’s Inland division during WWII) had already moved on to a better iteration. His next design was actually adopted as the M2 to replace the Thompson, but production problems caused it to be cancelled. The M3 Grease Gun was chosen instead, and Hyde had designed that as well. He was also responsible for the design of the clandestine .45 caliber Liberator pistol.

The Hyde Model 33 is a blowback submachine gun which obviously took significant influence from the Thompson - just look at the front grip, barrel ribs, controls, magazine well, and stock design. However, it was simpler, lighter, and less expensive than the Thompson. It fared better than the Thompson in military mud and dust tests, probably in part because of its unusual charging handle, a long rod mounted in the rear cap of the receiver. This was pulled rearward to cycle the bolt, a bit like the AR15 charging handle. Like the AR15, this setup eliminated the need for an open slot in the receiver. Apparently, however, the handle had a disconcerting habit of bouncing back into the face of the shooter when firing.
 

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First Variation Flatside Winchester 1895 Musket
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Mar 12, 2018
https://jamesdjulia.com/item/53091-22...

When Winchester first began producing Model 1895 rifles, they made a model that only lasted a short time. Between serial numbers 5000 and 6000, the first pattern 95s were replaced by a second pattern of the design, which changed several elements. The most notable was the receiver profile, which went from a flat sided slab to one with a scalloped relief cut. Most substantially, the safety mechanism which prevented out of battery firing was substantially improved in the second model, with the distinctive spring loaded lower element of the action lever. First pattern Winchester 1895s are quite rare, especially in a condition as nice as this one!
 

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Japanese Contract Steyr-Solothurn S1-100 (aka MP34)
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Mar 13, 2018
https://jamesdjulia.com/item/53239-2-...

In order to circumvent Versailles Treaty restrictions on arms manufacture, the German Rheinmetall firm purchased a small Swiss company called Solothurn Waffenfabrik in 1929, allowing it to route its business through Switzerland instead of Germany. One of its first products was the S1-100 submachine gun, designed by Louis Stange. This was an excellent example of a first generation submachine gun, made to very high standards with an elaborately milled receiver. They were expensive, premium guns in the 1930s, and were sold worldwide, including contracts to Bolivia, El Salvador, Japan, Thailand, Uruguay, Portugal, Austria, and more. To accommodate these different client militaries, the gun was offered in 9mm Steyr, 7.63mm Mauser, 7.65 Parabellum, and .45 ACP.

This particular example appears to be a Japanese one, purchase in the mid 1930s to equip some elite Japanese units like the Special Naval Landing Force. It is in 7.62mm Mauser and shows the D/E selector markings one would expect from that contract (other contracts used markings with Spanish or Portuguese abbreviations). This gun would have been captured by an American serviceman during World War II and brought back, to be registered later in the 1968 amnesty. It is all original, with the exception of what appears to be a replaced barrel.
 

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Browning M1917: America's World War One Heavy Machine Gun
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Mar 14, 2018
Sorry, this gun has been pushed to Julia's next auction. They do have three other 1917 machine guns in this one, though: https://jamesdjulia.com/auction/sprin...

When the United States entered World War One, its military has a relatively tiny handful of machine guns, and they were divided between four different types, as the military budget was small and machine guns were not given much priority. However, since the failure of his gas-operated 1895 machine gun design to become a popular military item, John Browning had been working on a recoil-operated machine gun to replace it. This work became serious in 1910, and by 1915 Browning had met with Colt and agreed to give them exclusive license to his new design - and they began to work with him to refine and perfect it.

When the United States realized that it would be fighting in Europe and would need machine guns in 1917, it held an open trial for designs which Colt and Browning entered. The Browning gun was the undisputed star of the show, firing 40,000 rounds with only one parts breakage and no malfunctions that were not the fault of ammunition or belts. The gun was almost immediately adopted and pushed into production. Ultimately, Colt would allow the manufacture of its guns by Remington and New England Westinghouse, and Browning himself would accept a lump-sum royalty payment from the government for its use, which was about 3.5 million dollars less than he was contractually entitled to - out of patriotism and a desire not to profit too much from the war.

Browning 1917 machine guns would see only brief combat use in World War One, first tasting action in September of 1918. They would remain a staple of US military armament through World War Two, however, improved after the Armistice to the M1917A1 pattern. The gun we are looking at today is an original WW1 M1917, mounted on an equally rare M1917 original tripod.
 

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Scoped Sharps 1874 Buffalo Rifle
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Published on Mar 15, 2018
https://jamesdjulia.com/item/53073-5-...

This 1874 Sharps rifle is a great example of a been-there, done-that authentic western buffalo rifle. It was shipped from Sharps in 1879 with double set triggers, open sights, and a medium-weight .45 caliber barrel, but rebuilt by a Cheyenne gunsmith with a much heavier barrel in .40-100 caliber, and fitted with a Rice telescopic sight in a free-floating mount. While this was built just too late to have been used in the heyday of the slaughter of the wild buffalo, it is a fine example of the rifle configuration used by serious hunters and target shooters alike at that time.
 

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Italy's Sleeper Submachine Gun: The Beretta 38A
Forgotten Weapons




Published on Mar 16, 2018
https://jamesdjulia.com/item/52924-4-...

The Beretta 38A is not a gun that comes to mind for many people today when discussing World War Two submachine guns, but at the time it was one of the most desirable guns of its type. So - does it live up to that reputation?
 

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Steyr GB - The First Glock Victim
Military Arms Channel


Published on Mar 16, 2018
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The Steyr GB was an interesting pistol born in the late 70's and was shelved in the late 80's. The Steyr GB is a 9mm gas delayed blowback pistol that went up against the Glock 17 in the Austrian military trials and lost. Little did the world know just how influential the Glock 17 would become in the decades that followed.
 

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Stoner 63A Automatic Rifle - The Original Modular Weapon
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Mar 17, 2018
https://jamesdjulia.com/item/53234-3-...

The Stoner 63 was a remarkably advanced and clever modular firearm designed by Eugene Stoner (along with Bob Fremont and Jim Sullivan) after he left Armalite. The was tested by DARPA and the uS Marine Corps in 1963, and showed significant potential - enough that the US Navy SEALs adopted it and kept it in service into the 1980s. It was a fantastic balance of weight and controllability, offering a belt-fed 5.56mm platform at less than half the weight of the M60. The other fundamental characteristic of the Stoner 63 was modularity. It was built around a single universal receiver component which could be configured into a multitude of different configurations, from carbine to medium machine gun. Today we have one of the rarer configurations, and Automatic Rifle type. In addition, today’s rifle is actually a Stoner 63A, the improved version introduced in 1966 to resolve some of the problems that had been found in the original.

Ultimately, the Stoner system was able to achieve its remarkably light weight be sacrificing durability. The weapon was engineered extremely well and was not a danger to itself (like, for example, the FG-42), but it was prone to damage when mishandled by the average grunt. This would limit its application to elite units like the SEALs, who were willing to devote the necessary care to the maintenance and operation of the guns in exchange for the excellent handling characteristics it offered.
 

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Lancaster Four-Barrel Shotgun With Double-Action Trigger
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Mar 18, 2018
https://jamesdjulia.com/item/53184-7-...

Charles Lancaster started his unmaking business in London in 1826, and it would survive more than one hundred years, being run after Charles’ death by his sons and then by an apprentice who bought out the firm in 1878. The company had an excellent reputation for quality, and did some pioneering work on developing the modern breechloading shotgun, as well as interesting technological developments like Lancaster’s oval-bore rifling. One of their most notable products was a series of 2-barrel and 4-barrel handguns, and they expanded the mechanism from those into a small number of 4-barrel shotguns (and an even smaller number of 4-barrel rifles).

This particular four-barrel shotgun is in 20 gauge, and exhibits a unique trigger mechanism derived from the pistols. It has two triggers, with the bottom one acting as a cocking lever and the top as a firing trigger. This allows the shooter to either cock the gun and then make a careful shot with the light upper trigger, or to pull all the way through with the upper trigger, much like a double action revolver. The reason for the system was that the firing mechanism had four firing pins but only one striker, which rotated to fire each barrel in sequence. The “cocking” action of the trigger was in fact the process of retracting the striker and rotating it to the next barrel.
 

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Shooting a Suppressed Sten Gun
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Mar 19, 2018
https://jamesdjulia.com/item/52939-46...

During World War Two, the British spent several years developing a silenced version of the Sten gun for special operations commandos and for dropping to mainland European resistance units. This is a recreation of one of the experimental types, based on a MkII Sten with the receiver lengthened into an integral suppressor. So - how does it shoot?
 

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Cook and Brother of New Orleans - A Confederate Rifle Factory
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Mar 20, 2018
Rifle: https://jamesdjulia.com/item/52863-7-...
Carbine: https://jamesdjulia.com/item/52863-6-...

Cook and Brother was one of the largest and most successful of the private ordnance factories in the South during the Civil War. It was formed by two British brothers who had moved to New Orleans, Frederick and Francis Cook. They opened a rifle factory at the intersection of Common and Canal streets, and began making Enfield pattern rifles. A contract was soon procured for sale of a thousand rifles to the state of Alabama, and in total they produced about 1100 rifles in New Orleans before the city fell to the Union. When that happened, they managed a hectic evacuation, and the armory was reestablished in Athens Georgia by early 1863. Production there took some time to ramp back up due to labor shortages, and they produced only about another thousand rifles in 1863. By this time they had a large contract with the CSA government, and managed an impressive 4500 more guns in 1864, before the entire enterprise collapsed as the CSA became unable to make payments.

What we have today are a very early New Orleans production rifle and an early Athens production cavalry carbine, the latter engraved with its owner’s name and unit (the 3rd Virginia Cavalry).
 

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UK vz.59 Czech Universal Machine Gun: History and Mechanics
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Mar 21, 2018
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In 1952, Czechoslovakia adopted a whole new family of small arms, including the vz.52 pistol, vz.52 rifle, and vz.52 light machine gun. The rifle and LMG were both chambered in the Czech 7.62x45mm cartridge, and both would be adapted to the Soviet standard 7.62x39mm a few years later, in 1957. Very shortly thereafter, the Czechs would also introduce a heavier universal machine gun version in 7.62x54mmR under the designation UK vz.59 (universal machine gun model 59).

The UK 59 was basically a scaled up sibling of the vz.52 and vz.52/57 machine guns, although it fed from a belt only, where its smaller predecessors had allowed either belt or magazine feed. It used a pivoting locking block system much like the Walther P38 and Beretta pistols, in conjunction with a long stroke gas piston much like that of the vz.26 light machine gun.

The weapon did not see much interest outside of Czechoslovakia, although it does remain in service in that region in the modernized 7.62x51mm iteration.

Thanks to Marstar for letting me examine and shoot their UK vz.59! Visit them at: http://marstar.ca

If you enjoy Forgotten Weapons, check out its sister channel, InRangeTV! http://www.youtube.com/InRangeTVShow
 

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UK vz.59 Czech Universal Machine Gun: Shooting
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Mar 22, 2018
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Cool Forgotten Weapons merch! http://shop.bbtv.com/collections/forg...

In 1952, Czechoslovakia adopted a whole new family of small arms, including the vz.52 pistol, vz.52 rifle, and vz.52 light machine gun. The rifle and LMG were both chambered in the Czech 7.62x45mm cartridge, and both would be adapted to the Soviet standard 7.62x39mm a few years later, in 1957. Very shortly thereafter, the Czechs would also introduce a heavier universal machine gun version in 7.62x54mmR under the designation UK vz.59 (universal machine gun model 59).

The UK 59 was basically a scaled up sibling of the vz.52 and vz.52/57 machine guns, although it fed from a belt only, where its smaller predecessors had allowed either belt or magazine feed. It used a pivoting locking block system much like the Walther P38 and Beretta pistols, in conjunction with a long stroke gas piston much like that of the vz.26 light machine gun.

The weapon did not see much interest outside of Czechoslovakia, although it does remain in service in that region in the modernized 7.62x51mm iteration.

Thanks to Marstar for letting me examine and shoot their UK vz.59! Visit them at: http://marstar.ca

If you enjoy Forgotten Weapons, check out its sister channel, InRangeTV! http://www.youtube.com/InRangeTVShow