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Older, Odd, Offbeat And Forgotten Guns & Ammo

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Semiauto Portuguese AR-10 on a Sendra Receiver
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Mar 23, 2018
https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

So, you would like to get an original AR-10 rifle to shoot? Well, the original Armalite AR10 rifles were almost all manufactured by Artillerie-Inrichtingen in the Netherlands, and they were virtually all machine guns. They were made circa 1960-1961, and only a few contracts were made -Cuba, Guatelmala, Suban, and most notable, Portugal. The Portuguese really liked the AR10 and were planning to adopt it for their whole military, but international pressure for their activity in Angola led to the Netherlands cutting off arms sales, and Portugal only had enough AR10 rifles for its airborne units.

After many years of hard use, these were ultimately replaced by newer weapons, and the surplus guns were found by American importers. In the 1980s, these came into the US as parts kits, which led to a hunt for compatible lower receivers on which to build them. Several small companies made receivers of varying quality before Jerry Drasen and the Sendra company (note the anagram) invested the money to produce a high quality forged and milled 7075 aluminum AR10 receiver, compatible with both Guatemalan and Portuguese pattern rifles. These became the most common and the best regarded AR10 receivers, and that’s what was used to build this particular rifle. This one also has replacement wood furniture, as the original brown Bakelite was relatively fragile.
 

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Top 10 Things You Didn't Know About The STEN Gun
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Published on Mar 23, 2018
This video takes a look at 10 things you probably didn't know about the STEN Gun.

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Japanese Type 10 Light Grenade Projector (aka Knee Mortar)
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Mar 24, 2018
https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

In the aftermath of World War One, the Japanese military saw the utility of infantry-portable light grenade launchers instead of rifle grenades, and adopted the Type 10 in 1921 (Taisho 10). It went into production in 1923 at the Tokyo Army Arsenal, although the great Tokyo earthquake led to production being moved to Nagoya, where about 11,000 were made between 1925 and 1937. The Type 10 was a remarkably light and handy weapon, weighing just 5.5lb (2.5kg) and disassembling into a transport configuration the size of a wine bottle.

The larger Type 89 grenade launcher was adopted in 1929, which led to the older Type 10s being relegated to use for illumination and signaling, which they did through the end of World War Two.
 

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Forgotten Weapons and YouTube's New Firearms Policy
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Mar 25, 2018
The people that keep Forgotten Weapons going are the folks who support the channel on Patreon. Thanks very much to them! Want to join? Here's the link: http://www.patreon.com/ForgottenWeapons

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If you enjoy Forgotten Weapons, check out its sister channel, InRangeTV! http://www.youtube.com/InRangeTVShow
 

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Swiss 1897 Schmidt-Rubin Kadettengewehr Training Rifle
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Mar 25, 2018
https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

The Swiss replaced their Vetterli rifles in the late 1880s with the new Schmidt-Rubin pattern, and this eventually trickled down to the cadet corps. These youth programs had been using short single-shot 1870 Vetterli carbines, but as those became obsolete and in need of replacement, the 1897 Kadettengewehr was adopted. This was a single-shot short version of the Schmidt-Rubin 1889/96 action. Just under 8,000 were made between 1898 and 1927, and they would see use at least into the 1950s. The most interesting detail on the rifle is the rear sight, which is graduated for two different rounds - the standard Army GP90, and a reduced cadet load. The reduced load was calibrated to that its muzzle velocity matched the velocity of the GP90 at 100m, thus meaning that the trajectory of the two rounds matched, with a 100 meter different in range. Therefore, the rear sight to have identical graduations for both rounds, with the 200/300/400 meter settings for the cadet load being equal to the 300/400/500 meter settings for the GP90. Clever!
 

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The Svelte Jenks Navy Carbine of the Mexican-American War
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Mar 26, 2018
https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

The Jenks carbine was a remarkably svelte and elegant breechloading system patented by South Carolinian William Jenks in 1838. It was tested by the US Navy in 1841, and found to be quite successful. The Navy would proceed to adopt it, and order 1,000 rifles and 5,250 carbines from N.P. Ames in the early and mid 1840s. The last 1,000 carbines were a separate contract which included the use of the Maynard tape primer system, and this contract was purchased from Ames by the Remington company, which manufactured those carbines. The Army also tested the Jenks system, but found it completely unsuccessful - perhaps due to a misunderstanding of the appropriate powder charge and projectile.

Mechanically, the Jenks uses a bolt which slides forward and rear connected to a larger action lever on the top of the receiver. Opening the lever retracts the bolt, opening a round port through which a ball and powder charge may be dropped into the breech. Shortly before the Civil War, most of the guns in Navy inventory were modified to extend this round loading port into an elongated oval, to allow the use of paper or linen cartridges instead of loose powder.
 

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Czech vz.27 "sanitized" for covert operations?
Military Arms Channel



Published on Mar 26, 2018
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After WWII the world became a very unstable place with the Cold War following on the heels of the last great war. Conflicts, or proxy wars, were waged globally and some guns were produced and used that were "sanitized" or scrubbed of their manufacturers markings. This CZ produced, post WWII vz.27 gun is likely one of those "spook" guns made for clandestine operations somewhere in the Cold War world.
 

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Top 5 Milsurps to Invest in Right Now
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Published on Mar 27, 2018
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DISCLAIMER: Our videos are strictly for documentary, educational, and entertainment purposes only. Imitation or the use of any acts depicted in these videos is solely AT YOUR OWN RISK. All work on firearms should be carried out by a licensed individual and all state and federal rules apply to such. We (including YouTube) will not be held liable for any injury to yourself or damage to your firearms resulting from attempting anything shown in any our videos. We do not endorse any specific product and this video is not an attempt to sell you a good or service. We are not a gun store and DO NOT sell or deal in firearms. Such a practice is heavily regulated and subject to applicable laws. We DO NOT sell parts, magazines, or firearms. These videos are free to watch and if anyone attempts to charge for this video notify us immediately. By viewing or flagging this video you are acknowledging the above.

Fair Use: In the rare instance we include someone else’s footage it is covered in Fair Use for Documentary and Educational purposes with intention of driving commentary and allowing freedom of speech.

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Merrill-Jenks Navy Carbine Conversion
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Mar 27, 2018
https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

James Merrill was a Baltimore inventor and businessman who patented an improvement to the Jenks pattern carbine in 1858. His idea was for an improved locking lever for the gun, which would also allow the use on paper or linen cartridges instead of loose ball and powder. He demonstrated the improvement at the Washington Navy Yard in 1858, and received a contract to convert 300 of the Navy Jenks carbines to his new system.

He did so, and had his guns almost immediately returned to him, as the springs in the lever latch were apparently too weak. He fixed this problem, but only submitted 240 carbines back to the Navy (the reason for the 60-gun loss is unknown). He received no further orders, but he did produce a new-manufacture carbine using the same patent which he sold to the Army during the Civil War.
 

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Israeli M1919 Brownings and the US Semiauto Market
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Mar 28, 2018
https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

In the world of converted semiautomatic “machine guns,” the Browning 1919 is a happy example of one of the most iconic and historically important US machine guns and also one of the cheapest semiautomatic belt fed guns available. This stems from two factors, primarily. One is that the Browning 1919, being developed form the water-cooled M1917 Browning, is a closed bolt system. Open bolt semiautomatic designs are not allowed by ATF, and so most semiauto machine gun conversions require substantial alteration to convert from open bolt to closed bolt - which the M1919 does not need. Second, the IDF used the Browning M1919 for many years and in large numbers, and surplussed many of them in the late 1990s. These guns came into the United States as parts kits in large numbers. This meant a glut of cheap guns, easily built as semi autos, and in an easily shootable caliber - 7.62mm NATO (as converted by Israel from their original .30-06 chambering).

Today, we are looking at an example of a semiautomatic converted M1919, and specifically at the various changes made by Israel to both improve the design and convert it successfully to the NATO cartridge.
 

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Detroit's Short-Lived Kimball .30 Carbine Pistol
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Mar 29, 2018
Target Model: https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...
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The J. Kimball Arms Company of Detroit introduced a semiauto pistol in 1955, chambered for the .30 Carbine cartridge - what better companion for the tactical uber weapon of the day, the M1 Carbine? Kimball’s pistol was styled heavily after the High Standard, and it looks good and handles well. The .30 Carbine cartridge is too powerful for a blowback pistol, however, and so Kimball needed some type of locked breech or delaying mechanism. He chose to cut an annular ring in the front of the chamber - the mouth of the brass would expand into this ring upon firing, and the force required to press it back down to the diameter of the chamber body would force the slide to remain closed long enough for pressure to drop to a safe level.

However, the system was not adequate for the cartridge. The slide velocity was high enough that the guns very quickly battered the slide stop block. The would peen and deform at first, then crack, and eventually either bend to the point that the gun would not cycle, or break off and allow the slide to come right off the back of the frame. I can’t find any documentation of anyone actually injured in this way, but that was obviously the concern. Only between 250 and 300 of the pistols were made before the company went bankrupt and closed. There had been plans to expand the line to include gun in .38 Special, .357 Magnum, and .22 Hornet, but none of those went any farther than prototypes.
 

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The least ergonomic handgun ever made? The CZ38/39
Military Arms Channel



Published on Mar 29, 2018
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The CZ 39 was a 1930's era design that wasn't much of a success. Once into production, Germany occupied Czechoslovakia during WWII and took over production. The Czech's called it the vz.38 and the Germans called it the P-39 or model 39. The Germans really didn't care much for the design so it went out of production fairly quickly.
 

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Hall's Patent Clock Gun: A Shot Every Hour, On The Hour
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Mar 30, 2018
https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

Patented by one John Hall of Cumberland, England in 1902, this is a device intended to scare birds out of a field at regular intervals. It has twelve chambers for 12-gauge pinfire shotgun shells, which are fired by falling steel weights. Those weights are held up by thin cotton strings which are connected to the face of a clock dial inside the box. The hour hand on the clock has a small razor edge on it, which will cut the strings when the hand reaches them. Once the string is cut, the weight falls and fires a shell. The clock face has slots at 15-minute intervals, so one can select exactly when one wants each shell fired, up to the maximum capacity of 12 shells and the maximum time period of 12 hours. Neat!

You can see Hall's patent here: https://worldwide.espacenet.com/publi...
 

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Remington Split Breech - Before It Was Famous
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Apr 1, 2018
First Pattern: https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...
Second Pattern: https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

The Remington Rolling Block was one of the most widely successful and popular military rifles of the late 1800s, and its development began with the Remington Split Breech carbine during the American Civil War. The concept was independently conceived by two different engineers - one was Leonard Geiger, and the other was Joseph Rider - an engineer working for the Remington firm. When the guns went into production, Remington agreed to a royalty deal with Geiger (and his partner, Charles Alger) to avoid any potential patent lawsuits.

The system is a clever and compact design in which the hammer acts as a lock to hold the rotating breechblock in place when fired, and it would prove capable of use not just with black powder cartridges but also after the widespread adoption of high powered smokeless power ammunition. However, when Remington first demonstrated it to the US Ordnance Department during the war, they did not have the production capacity to actually make a large number. Instead, the gave that authority to a Mr. Samuel Norris, who was able to obtain contracts for 20,000 of the guns (5,000 in .44 Rimfire and 15,000 in .56-50 Spencer rimfire), and contract their manufacture to the Savage Revolving Fire Arms Company. These guns would all be delivered to the Federal government, but not in time to see any use during the war.

Instead, they were put into storage, and soon sold off as surplus. Virtually all of them were repurchased by Remington and a few other surplus brokers and resold to France in 1870, when the French were desperate for arms to replace their huge losses in the Franco-Prussian War.
 

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The Diamond of Collector FALs: The G-Series
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Apr 2, 2018
https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

When the Browning Arms Company first began importing semiautomatic FAL rifles from FN in 1959, the submitted an example for evaluation, and ATF determined that it was not a machine gun. The rifle was made with a selector that could not be moved to the fully automatic position, and did not have the automatic sear required for full auto firing. This was acceptable at the time, and Browning would import 1,836 of these rifles (mostly standard configuration, but some heavy barrel and paratrooper patterns) by January 10,1963. On that date, ATF changed its standard, and ruled the FAL as currently being imported now *would* be considered a machine gun subject to the NFA. In order to be acceptable now, the rifle must not be able to accept an automatic sear at all, not merely be made without one. However, ATF ruled that the previously imported guns would be grandfathered in, and remain legally owned as semiautomatic rifles. They were listed by serial number (an additional 12 guns were added in 1974 which were imported by “administrative error”), and remain exempted from the NFA to this day. For the FAL collector, these G-series rifles are desirable because they are completely authentic and original early FN production guns, without any of the design changes that would be required later for importation.

Exempt serial number list: http://www.gseriesfal.com/docpages/91...
 

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Colt's Prototype Post-War Pocket Hammerless Model M
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Apr 3, 2018
https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

Production of the Colt Pocket Hammerless (aka the Model M) pretty much died at the end of World War Two. Military contracts ended, and the civilian market was quite weak - Colt shipped just 132 of the .32 caliber guns between 1946 and 1953, and only a handful of .380s at the same time. Several problems faced Colt in restarting production; for one thing, their tooling was pretty worn out after nearly 50 years of use, and was really in need of a substantial (and expensive) overhaul. In addition, many of the long-term experienced workers who know the gun inside and out had retired at the end of the war.

Colt did attempt to design a new model of the gun to reinvigorate commercial interest, and this is one of the three prototypes of that new model that were made. It retained the core mechanical elements of the Pocket Hammerless (fixed barrel, simple blowback), but added many external elements from the 1911, such as a short grip safety, larger thumb safety, separate slide release, magazine release button, and substantially larger sights. Ultimately the project never reached production status, and Colt’s next commercial .380 would be the Pony, a rebranded Star Model DK (which was also not particularly successful).
 

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The Japanese Arisaka rifle that blows up!
Military Arms Channel



Published on Apr 5, 2018
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There are a lot of people who think Japanese rifles from WWII will literally blow-up in your face if you shoot one... and there is one. We show the Arisaka Type 38 training rifle that if you put a live round in it, there's a very good likelihood it will blow up in your face.
 

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Danish Gevaer m/50 - An American Gun Made in Italy
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Apr 4, 2018
https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

Dozens of countries around the world received M1 Garand rifles from the United States in the decades after World War Two, and Denmark was one of those that not only got some rifle but went so far as to formally adopt the M1 as its post-war standard. The US and Denmark signed a mutual defense agreement in 1950 which coincided with Danish adoption of the M1 as the 7.62mm Gevaer M/50. They receiver 20,000 rifles on load, and by 1964 would purchase another 49,000 from the US (including 1,000 M1D snipers). They also purchased 20,000 rifles from Italy, who had been chosen to be the official NATO supplier of new M1s. These were made by Beretta and Breda, and have an interesting set of Danish markings on the receivers, unlike the surplus American rifles. Unlike some other countries, Denmark opted not to convert its M1s to 7.62mm NATO, and eventually replaced them in 1975 with the G3 (although is would take more than 20 years before the M1s would be sold as surplus).
 

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Incompetence, Corruption, and a Rioting Mob: The Gibbs Carbine
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Apr 5, 2018
https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

The Gibbs carbine is fantastic illustration of just how difficult it can be to actually manufacture a new firearm. The gun itself is a breechloading, percussion fired cavalry carbine designed to use paper cartridges. It was patented in 1856 by Lucien Gibbs, and he was joined by financier William Brooks and gunsmith WW Marston to create a company to produce them. Marston made 20 examples by hand in 1857, and one of these was used in a successful demonstration at West Point in 1858. This led to a contract for 10,000 carbines from General Ripley in December of 1861.

Marston had a property in New York (called the Phoenix Armory) that they planned to use as their factory, but assembling the necessary machines and workers in the wartime economy of 1861 proved much more difficult than they expected. With not even a sample produced by the spring of 1862, a new contract was written in June, for the same 10,000 carbines but with delivery to begin in August of 1862. This deadline was also missed completely, and there had still been no deliveries by December of 1862. At that point, the outfit was bought out by New York Mayor George Opdyke, who was surely convinced he could easily make money from this seemingly simple deal. Opdyke was able to put in place a team more experienced in getting things done, and on May 30, 1863 the first 550 carbines were delivered to the Federal government and accepted.

Now things were rolling - another 502 guns were delivered on June 24, and another 500 were at the factory complete and awaiting deliver on July 13, when the introduction of Union military conscription sparked a massive riot in New York. The Phoenix Armory was defended by a group of police officers (armed with Gibbs carbines right off the racks), and when rioters attempted to break down the factory front entrance, the officers fired through the door. They killed the lead man, wounded two others, and the mob quickly decided to move elsewhere. The police stuck around for two hours after that, and then decided all was quiet and left.

Later that afternoon, the riot found its way back to the Armory, and burned it to the ground. The machinery, parts for some 6000 more carbines, and the 500 completed guns were a complete loss. The Phoenix did not, in fact, ever rise from the ashes, and 1052 carbines is the grand total that were ever made and delivered to the Cavalry. All was not a loss for Opdyke, however, as he was fortunately able to leverage his position as Mayor to ensure that the City of New York paid out a claim for $190,000 to cover the losses because of its negligence in removing the police protection.
 

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McCarty's Peculiar Revolver
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Apr 6, 2018
https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

William McCarty patented this turret revolver design in 1909 (submitted in 1908, approved in 1909), with the idea of making a high capacity revolver. His gun held 18 rounds of .22 rimfire ammunition - double the typical .22 revolver capacity. He did that by making a vertical turret system with a large ring to hold the 18 rounds, which in turn made the gun pretty bulky. I had a reader send me a copy of his patent back in 2013, and at the time I didn’t know that one had ever been actually made. Well, there was one - it’s here and also documented in Louis Winant’s book “Firearms Curiosa”. Not surprisingly, the design never made it into mass production…
 

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OSS Flying Dragon: A Silent Poisoned Dart Gun
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Apr 7, 2018
https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

The OSS experimented with a lot of…unorthodox weapons during World War Two, and one of their overarching goals was a weapon with a 100 yard lethal range but without flash or noise. To this end they experimented with a number of suppressed firearms as well as weird stuff like various crossbow designs, silenced dart gun pistol conversions, and in this case a CO2 powered dart gun. It was code aimed the Flying Dragon, and first mentioned in documents in 1943. In the summer of 1945, 15 were manufactured, and 12 of these remained in OSS stocks at the end of the war.

In July 1945 testing, the Flying Dragon was found the be the second-quietest option (the William Tell crossbow was quieter, at 66 decibels to the Dragon’s 69 decibels). However, the testing board noted that a simple suppressed .22 pistol was pretty much just as good, and quite a lot cheaper (and more reliable, I would expect). The problem with a dart gun like this one is that if it is not reliably lethal, the whole point of its silenced is lost. Anyone shot by that big dart and not killed by it (which would require a pretty significant muzzle velocity) will immediately start making a heck of a lot of noise. OSS investigated options for poison on the darts to give the weapon the necessary lethality, but was unable to find a suitable solution. This led to discussion of using a small hypodermic syringe as a projectile, an even less practical idea - but this was the freewheeling OSS, where such things were not uncommon to consider.
 

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Russian PPSH-43
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Published on Apr 6, 2018
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DISCLAIMER: Our videos are strictly for documentary, educational, and entertainment purposes only. Imitation or the use of any acts depicted in these videos is solely AT YOUR OWN RISK. All work on firearms should be carried out by a licensed individual and all state and federal rules apply to such. We (including YouTube) will not be held liable for any injury to yourself or damage to your firearms resulting from attempting anything shown in any our videos. We do not endorse any specific product and this video is not an attempt to sell you a good or service. We are not a gun store and DO NOT sell or deal in firearms. Such a practice is heavily regulated and subject to applicable laws. We DO NOT sell parts, magazines, or firearms. These videos are free to watch and if anyone attempts to charge for this video notify us immediately. By viewing or flagging this video you are acknowledging the above.

Fair Use: In the rare instance we include someone else’s footage it is covered in Fair Use for Documentary and Educational purposes with intention of driving commentary and allowing freedom of speech.

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The Finnish Maxim
InRangeTV


Published on Apr 5, 2018
The Finns have quite the history of improving on existing weapon designs, and the Maxim is no different.

In this video we discuss and fire the Finnish Maxim.

InRangeTV is entirely viewer supported, please consider it:
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Colt Tries To Make a Service Pistol: The Model 1971
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Apr 10, 2018
https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

In the early 1970s, Colt wanted to develop a new military pistol so that it could offer a modern replacement for the venerable 1911. Colt Engineer Robert Roy designed the new gun in 1971, and was granted patents on it in 1972. It was made entirely of stainless steel, had a 15 round capacity (in 9mm; 12 rounds of .45 ACP in that version), and a DA/SA trigger along with a manual safety mounted on the slide. In fact, the gun shares many elements with Charles Petter’s pistols, the French 1935A and the SIG 44/16 family (which became the SIG P210). It has full length frame rails, and a modular removable fire control mechanism, along with a barrel ramp to lock and unlock in place of Browning’s swinging link.

The Colt 1971 prototypes became the Colt SSP (Stainless Steel Pistol), and were entered in the US military XM9 trials in the 1980s, where it ultimately lost to the Beretta 92. The SSP (and the 1971, for that matter) was never offered on the commercial market, although it certainly would have had potential there in the 1970s.
 

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H&K Quality Meets the Thumbhole Stock: The SR-9
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Apr 8, 2018
https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

The H&K SR9 was a the version of the H&K G3/91 designed to comply with (or avoid, if you prefer) the Bush Sr. 1989 import ban on “assault weapons”. About 4,000 of these were imported between 1990 and 1998, and they featured a bare muzzle and plastic thumbhole stock and handguard. The first 1000 or so had a faux wood grain finish on the furniture, but it was rather delicate and was dropped fairly shortly. A small number were fitted with PSG-1 grip and trigger assemblies and either MSG-90 or PSG-1 buttstocks and sold as the SR9T and SR9TC models. These changes were possible because the 1989 ban was an administrative one, not legislative, and was not applied to rifles with a specific target-shooting design intent.
 

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The Schulhof 1884, Type IIa Manual Repeating Pistol
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Apr 9, 2018
https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

Josef Schulhof was an Austrian who decided to leave his farm and work in firearms design. He moved to Vienna and received his first firearms patent in 1882. He would go on to design and manufacture a small line of manual repeating handguns through the mid and late 1880s, until his death in 1890. This particular example is an 1884 model, type IIa. It uses a toggle lock much like the Winchester series of rifles, and a tubular magazine which runs down into the grip and is loaded via a gate under the chamber. The “II” refers to Schulhof's design improvement of making the actual trigger a separate part from the ring trigger (on the type I they were integrated together). This allowed for a more controlled trigger press, and better practical accuracy. About 50 of these 1884 pattern guns were made, and they include several different type of magazine, including a rotary magazine on at least one example and an en bloc clip on at least one other.

Needless to say, these pistols failed to spark any serious military interest, and were also never produced in series for the commercial market. Still, they remain an important link in the development of self-loading handguns.
 

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The Original Retro AR-10: Armalite's AR10B
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Apr 11, 2018
https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

In 1994, a man named Mark Westrom, owner of Eagle Arms, purchased the husk of the Armalite corporation, and acquired its trademarks. Westrom wanted to create a new commercial .308 AR pattern rifle, and did so under the Armalite AR-10 name. He developed an AR-10 which borrowed some elements from the AR-15, and introduced it in 1996 with pretty reasonable success. In addition to versions with Picatinny rails and AR-15 style charging handles, he also had a retro version with the top-mounted charging handle so iconic form the original AR-10s.

One substantial change to the pattern was the use of modified M14 magazines in the new Armalite AR-10B rifles. This was done because of the Assault Weapon Ban that had gone into effect in 1994, which prohibited manufacture of magazines holding more than 10 rounds. There were no cheap .308 AR magazines available at that time (no MagPul yet…), and modifying ubiquitous M14 magazines was the best option available - so that’s what was done.
 

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SIG's World War Two Semiauto Rifle: The Model U
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Apr 12, 2018
https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

The SIG company of Neuhausen Switzerland spent the 1920s, 30s, and 40s working on developmental semiauto rifles to sell both to the Swiss military and abroad. One of the experimental models in the succession of designs was the Model U, of which 16 were made in caliber 7.5x55mm Swiss. It was a gas-tappet operated action with a tilting bolt, and included a permanently mounted 1.8x optical sight on the left side of the receiver (the same type as used in the K31/42 marksman’s rifle). The Model U was made in 1942 and 1943, to typical Swiss levels of quality and precision. Like the designs both before and after, it was a valuable iterative step for SIG but not a rifle which would find any military or commercial sales.
 

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WWII U.S. and Commonwealth Victory Revolvers
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Published on Apr 9, 2018
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While the revolver was on its way out as a primary handgun by WWII, there were a large number of them used by all sides during the war. The US and its key allies used the S&W Victory Revolvers, among others. This was due mostly to a shortage of modern arms, countries simply couldn't make firearms fast enough so they resorted to using revolvers to supplement more modern fighting pistols like the 1911 or even the German P38. The S&W Victory revolver was based on an 1899 design which would later become the Model 10. We also take a brief look at a Webley Mk IV, Enfield No, 2 and Colt M1917.
 

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Americas' Mauser the 1903 Springfield
Military Arms Channel


Published on Apr 12, 2018
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J&G Sales 1903 Discount Code: 1903MAC50 ($50 off price)

The 1903 Springfield rifle is Americas' Mauser. Based on the famous German action, the 1903 and its variants like the 1903A3 and 1903A4 all share the same German Mauser heritage. The 1903 Springfield is easily one of America's best service rifles and is still loved today by shooters.
 

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M16, XM16E1 and M16A1 Development in Vietnam
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Published on Apr 6, 2018
This is a historical overview of the developmental changes of the M16 and M16A1 platform beginning after the Korean War and ending towards the end of the Vietnam War. I will discuss developmental design changes discussing the differences between the 601, 602, 603 XM16E1, 604 and M16A1. Enjoy!

Small Arms Solutions Video on M16: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lLYLk...

*Note: The link above goes no where. YouTube shut the channel down.
 

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Pritchard's 19th Century Precharged Air Gun
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Apr 13, 2018
William Pritchard was a Birmingham gunsmith in the mid 1800s who offered both firearms and air guns, and this particular ball-reservoir air gun is a fine example of the latter. Air guns have existed in Europe nearly as long as firearms, although they have never had the popularity of their powder-burning cousins. Air guns offered a cleaner, quieter, and more rapid firing option than firearms (and also one that would work in the rain), but at the cost of power and cost. That is not to say that early air guns were weak; they were not. A large-bore air gun like this one would have held 700 or 800 psi in its tank, and produced a muzzle velocity probably around 550-600 feet per second (170-180 m/s). A round ball of .50 caliber at that speed was certainly lethal with a well-placed shot, and these weapons were just fine for hunting as well as sport shooting.
 

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LugerMan Reproduction of the 1907 .45 Test Trials Luger
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Apr 14, 2018
http://www.lugerman.com/Pages/MainPag...

Eugene Golubtsov, aka LugerMan, is manufacturing reproduction .45ACP caliber Luger pistols, based on the original blueprints of the 1907 pattern US Army trials guns. When he offered to send me one to try out, how could I say no?

I have had some rather unimpressive experiences trying to shoot similar reproductions made by other people, and my expectations for this one were pretty low. Well, I have no problem saying that I was entirely wrong. This pistol is magnificent - it ran great, shot dead on point of aim, and was everything I could have asked, right down to the correct 55.5 degree grip angle found only on the US trials Lugers.

In addition to the trials pattern, Eugene is also making a wide variety of other patterns, include .45ACP "baby" Lugers, long barreled target models, stocked carbines, 10mm Auto versions, and more. They are not cheap, but in my opinion they are worth the cost if you can afford them.
 

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Turkish "Enfauser" - Mauser/Enfield Hybrid Rifle
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Apr 16, 2018
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In the mid 1930s, Turkey updated and overhauled the bolt action rifles in its inventory, to bring them all up to that same standard for sights, ammunition, sling configuration, etc. Most of the rifles overhauled were Mausers of various vintages, but some were other designs, like Gewehr 88s...and British Lee Enfields. Yep, the Turks converted Lee Enfield rifles (mostly Magazine Lee Enfields and Charger-Loading Lee Enfields, but also some SMLEs) to have Mauser sights and furniture and fire 8mm Mauser ammunition.

These hybrid rifles have no formal designation, and are usually called "Enfausers" or "Mausenfields" by people in the collecting community. Only a few hundred were brought into the US, apparently by accident among vast imports of Turkish Mauser rifles over the last few decades. They are made from rifles captured in the siege of Kut and the Gallipoli campaign - this particular one came from the 103rd Mahratta Light Infantry, which surrendered at Kut in April 1916.

Thanks to viewer Wyatt for providing the rifle for me to film!

If you enjoy Forgotten Weapons, check out its sister channel, InRangeTV! http://www.youtube.com/InRangeTVShow
 

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Final Prices: James D Julia Spring 2018 Auction
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Apr 17, 2018
As usual, I have a recap today of the final prices of the guns I filmed from the most recent Julia auction (spring of 2018). Once again, I focussed on machine guns, as well as high end sporting arms and Civil War rifles.

This was the last auction being held in Maine by James Julia, as the company has been merged with the Morphy auction company. I will be continuing my working relationship with Morphy, so you will see me filming firearms there in a few months. My thanks to everyone at Julia for so many wonderful years!
 

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Walther Toggle-Locked Semiauto Shotgun (ouch!)
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Apr 18, 2018
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Between the world wars, the Walther company designed and marketed a short recoil, toggle-locked 12 gauge shotgun for sporting use. It was patented by the Walther brothers, but actually manufactured by the Deutsche-Werke consortium, which was organized by the German government to employ German workers and export guns for much-needed foreign hard currency (they also made the Ortgies pistols).

The Walther shotgun was not particularly successful though, with only about 5700 made over about a 10-year period in the 1920s. I suspect the problem was as simple as the excessive recoil generated by the action. As I discovered shooting this example, it kicks substantially more than other comparable semiauto shotguns, and was really quite unpleasant to shoot. I cannot blame potential customers for choosing different guns (like, for example, the Browning Auto-5) that would have been available at the time.

Thanks to H. in Sweden for letting me shoot this quite uncommon shotgun!

If you enjoy Forgotten Weapons, check out its sister channel, InRangeTV! http://www.youtube.com/InRangeTVShow
 

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Retro XM177E2 Comparison: Brownells vs. Troy
Military Arms Channel



Published on Apr 18, 2018
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Retro AR's are en vogue and one of my all time favorites seems to be getting a lot of attention; the XM177 and it's variants the XM177E1 and XM177E2. Troy and Brownells both have comparatively priced models on the market. I take these two top contenders and break their features down side-by-side so you can decide which is right for you. Make no mistake though, both seem to be solid contenders for the famous CAR-15, Colt Commando or better known as the XM177 series of rifles.
 

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Forgotten Weapons, Maven, YouTube, and the Future of the Internet
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Apr 19, 2018
I am humbled and excited to have been invited to join The Maven, a confederation of independent bloggers, journalists, activists, and subject matter experts spanning across the spectrum of topics. It is a group assembled as a bloc to help ensure and support open free speech on the internet, and to attempt to bring back alternatives to the walled gardens of social media that have formed online in recent years. The assault on open speech comes not from political prejudice, but rather from a corporate infantilization of media; an attempt to force all content to be so bland and non-threatening as to not possible perturb anyone. From firearms to social commentary to political activism to health, The Maven hosts independent publishers who have poured their lives into subjects they are truly passionate about.

For most of its members, Maven's greatest value is offering a way to gain advertising income by offering access to audiences who are engaged with truly high quality content - and this can overcome the potential controversy that content may entail. Thanks to Patreon, Forgotten Weapons is not in this group - I am able to exist through your direct support. However, Maven also offers technical support and hosting which bring a couple huge benefits to Forgotten Weapons.

First and foremost, Maven has an independent video streaming and hosting system, which will house a complete archive of my video work, both back to the first video and going forward. This means that the work is not at risk of destruction should YouTube decide to prohibit firearms related material on its system. Maven's video system has the stability that comes from serving a coalition of many video producers much larger than me, and has the best combination of stability and, accessibility of any video hosting platform outside YouTube. That said, I will continue to upload on YouTube as long as they allow me to, and I will also continue to post on Full30.com, for those of you who prefer to view my work there.

Second, Maven's technical support and hosting will allow me to make the actual ForgottenWeapons.com site bigger and better than ever. When I started this site (back before I did any video work at all), I envisioned it being a repository of not just stories and history, but also of primary source documents and information. The challenges of maintaining databases, together with the popularity of the video format, have led to me leaving that original vision behind...until now. Over the next several months, I hope to be able to start bringing that back as an ongoing element of Forgotten Weapons.

So what changes will you see as a result of all this? Not many on the surface. The process of moving the web site and video archive onto Maven's system will take a couple weeks, although it should be progressing by the time you see this video. As I am able to work with Maven techs to add features to the web site, I will begin that building process. If you are interested in more depth of information, I encourage you to go visit the site and see what is there - it might be more than you think!

http://www.forgottenweapons.com

Thank you all for your support, and here's to many more great years!