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Older, Odd, Offbeat And Forgotten Guns & Ammo

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The Crazy Story Behind the First Springfield Rifle ever Produced
TFB TV



Published on Jul 18, 2018
What usually happens to numerically significant firearms is that they get put in a museum and carefully guarded. Not the first Springfield M1903, Serial Number One though! Crazy enough, this particular rifle actually rolled right off the production line and into Army service when it was produced before the war. Originally a rod bayonet version and in .30-03, it was later reconfigured into a non-rod bayonet variant and barrel changed to .30-06, having been made in 1909. But this is actually completely typical of many low serial number M1903 rifles during that era when these changes occurred. In fact what makes Serial Number One so much more significant is that for its service life, it wasn't at all and was treated like any other Springfield out there in the Army's service.

We also know a little bit about the story of how it came to the Armory. Issued to a soldier deploying to the Western Front during the First World War, it was taken away from him before he got to the front lines as some higher echelon leadership realized the importance of the serial number that the rifle had. The soldier was given an M1917 Enfield in exchange, of which apparently he didn't like too much!



««« GUNS IN THIS VIDEO »»»

Springfield M1903, Serial Number One
 

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Small Arms of WWI Primer 080: German MG08
C&Rsenal


Published on Jul 16, 2018
Othais and Mae delve into the story of this WWI classic. Complete with history, function, and live fire demonstration.

C&Rsenal presents its WWI Primer series; covering the firearms of this historic conflict one at a time in honor of the centennial anniversary. Join us every other Tuesday!

Visit 3D Arsenal's website in progress: https://www.3darsenals.com/

Thank the South Carolina Military Museum: https://www.scmilitarymuseum.net/

Additional reading:

The Devil's Paintbrush (Sir Hiram Maxim's Gun)
Dolf L. Goldsmith & R. Blake Stevens

The Machine Gun Volume I
George M. Chinn

Safe range space thanks to Triana Protection

Additional photos thanks to Rock Island Auction

Ammunition data thanks to DrakeGmbH
https://www.youtube.com/user/DrakeGmbH/

Visit us at http://candrsenal.com

Or go further and support our channel at https://www.patreon.com/CandRsenal
Current funding level: $7,858

I would like to happily remind everyone this number represents the public demand for in depth firearm history. I'm proud to see it grow.
 

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Cobray Terminator at the Range: The Worst Shotgun Ever
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Jul 21, 2018
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Most of the guns made by Cobray are pretty awful, but one can at least understand the market they were made for. The Terminator is different, because it really is rather incomprehensible who would have actually thought that a single shot, open bolt 12 gauge shotgun with a terrible stock would be a good thing to spend money on. Really the only explanation I can come up with is that it looks industrial and mean, and I suppose some people would have bought it just for that.

Having taken one to the range now, my suspicions of its terribleness have been fully confirmed. It actually is painful to shoot, and the open bolt slamfire mechanism does a greta job of magnifying the inevitable flinch it will give you. It's clunky and annoying to reload, and also to unload after firing. I never did figure out why it was failing to fire so much for me, unless it was simply a short firing pin with deep-set primers. To be honest, I don't really care. I'm just happy to be able to send it back to the generous (if perhaps sadistic) viewer who loaned it to me.

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Argentina's Open-Bolt Pocket .22s: the Hafdasa HA and the Zonda
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Jul 23, 2018
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Originally made by Hafdasa (Hispano-Argentina Fábrica de Automóviles S.A.), the HA pistol is a .22 Long Rifle caliber, semiauto only, open bolt pocket pistol. It was produced in the 1950s, right at the end of Hafdasa's existence (coincidence?). When the firm shut its doors, a group of employees took the basic design, improved it in a few ways, and creased a new company called Armotiv SA to produce it under the name Zonda.

The Zonda has a floating firing pin instead of the HA's fixed one, and a creative safety machinist which simply cams the magazine down when engaged. As an open-bolt gun, if the magazine is too low for the bolt to pick up a cartridge, it cannot fire.

Both the HA and Zonda are quite rare today, as not many were originally made or sold.

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Forgotten History: The Underground Hell of Fort Vaux
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Jul 24, 2018
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With the surprise capture of Fort Douaumont in February 1916, the French reinforced all the remaining forts around the city of Verdun, and would hold them all successfully for many months. In fact, the only other fort in the area to fall would be Fort Vaux, in June of 1916.

In the chaos of the early battle, orders had actually gone out to evacuate Vaux and destroy it, but these were countermanded, and the fort remained a major lynchpin of French defenses in the sector. Critically, before they could be removed, demolition charges set in the fort's main gun turret were detonated by a massive German shell, destroying the weapon.

In May, German advances seriously threatened the fort, and a new commander was assigned - Major Sylvain Eugene Raynal. Upon arrival, he found the fort in a terrible condition - heavily damaged by German bombardments and hugely overcrowded with as many as 500 soldiers, most of them wounded and sheltering in the fort (it had been designed to garrison 150 men). Shelling had broken through the fort's walls in several places, and unbeknownst to Raynal or his men, the water cistern had been damaged and was nearly empty despite its gauge reading substantial levels of water.

The climactic German assault began on June 1st 1916, and by the end of the day only 71 French soldiers remained in unwounded inside. On June 2nd, the cistern damage was discovered - at that point it held just 8 gallons of putrid dregs. Intense fighting would continue for nearly another week, without any relief forces or supplies able to reach the fort. On the 5th, a bit of water was collected from rain, but not much. A relief force attempted to reinforce the fort, but was virtually obliterated, with only 37 men reaching its walls.

The Germans would storm the fort on June 5th, and the most horrific of combat would rage for two days inside its tunnels and galleries. Raynal ordered barricades erected inside the fort, and the French forces fought from one to the next, with only a few dozen men remaining. The battle would include machine gun and hand grenades in these tight passageways, and eventually a German attempt to burn out the defenders with flamethrowers.

Finally on the morning of June 7th, the combination of casualties and a complete lack of water meant the end of the resistance. Raynal and his surviving men surrendered, and Germans soldiers finally occupied the fort they had spent months attempting to conquer. In recognition of his valiant defense, Raynal's sword was returned to him by German Crown Prince Wilhelm.

The German occupation of the fort would last only a few months - by late October it was abandoned quietly, and a French scouting force would find it empty and retake it on November 2nd, 1916.

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South African Galils: The R4, R5, R6, and LM Series
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Jul 25, 2018
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When South Africa decided to replace the R1 rifle (a metric FAL), they chose to adopt the Israeli Galil. Both nations had similar environmental issues with blowing sand (in northwestern South Africa particularly), and Israel was one of the few nations willing to trade arms with South Africa in the 1970s. The Galil ARM was adopted as the R4 rifle, with the initial batch of guns purchased directly from IMI, and a licensing agreement put in place to follow those up with domestic South African production.

These would be followed later by the R5 carbine, and the abortive attempt at the R6 carbine. In addition, semiautomatic copies of these rifles were also available on the civilian market at the LM-4, LM-5, and LM-6. Today we will look at the differences between the South African and Israeli guns, the changes made through production, and the variation in the different types. Everything you wanted to know about the South African Galils!

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FNH SFS Hi-Power - Strange but Good
Military Arms Channel



Published on Jul 25, 2018
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The Browning Hi-Power is a classic handgun. One of its shortcomings is the method of carry used by most who use it. The gun really isn't ideal for cocked and locked carry. The Cylinder and Slide SFS (Safety Fast Shooting) trigger sought to improve on the utility of the pistol. We take a look at the FN SFS factory installed trigger on a Browning Hipower and we also look at the DP51 that many compare it to.
 

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Q&A 20 - With Special Guest Bob Bigando
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Jul 26, 2018
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On to our questions...

0:50 - Berthier type iron sights on military rifles
2:15 - Books covering all US military small arms
3:25 - 4.85mm British compared to its contemporaries
4:19 - Alternative history: PMC armament in the 20s and 30s
8:19 - What gun do I dislike the most?
8:40 - How to find rate or fire and bullet velocity pre-computer?
11:21 - Why is rimfire priming only used on weak cartridges?
13:28 - Infantry rifles as PDWs instead of primary arms
14:52 - Winchester 1917 Model D
17:21 - Underappreciated development of the 21st century?
18:20 - Who are the team behind Forgotten Weapons?
19:44 - How to calculate iron sight design on old rifles?
21:00 - What is the worst part of my job?
23:11 - What collection would I really like to visit?
24:06 - Would the Davis Gun be suitable for Forgotten Weapons?
25:19 - Plans to do Browning High Power videos?
26:50 - Clip logistics in WW1 and WW2
28:38 - Most beautiful and ugliest rifles?
29:35 - Do 3-round clips work in the RSC-1918?
31:55 - Thoughts on the .224 Valkyrie
33:01 - Is the belt-fed squad machine gun obsolete?
33:59 - Why were semiauto pistols around so much earlier than semiauto rifles?
36:24 - "Dream guns"
39:14 - How did US small arms rank in WW2 compared to other nations?
41:12 - Matching numbers and headspace in milsurp rifles
43:26 - Weapon that is not so great but is enjoyable anyway?
44:56 - Why did smokeless rounds all end up 7-8mm?
46:56 - Why did box magazines not predate tube magazines?
48:54 - Semiauto AA-12 shotguns
51:08 - What does Ian's average day look like?

53:47 - How did artillery pieces get onto the US civilian market? Featuring guest answer from Bob Bigando of Hamilton Firearms.

58:10 - Library book list on the web site
59:02 - Would early adoption of better small arms have changed WW2?
59:53 - How long will modern guns last?
1:01:04 - Why did the .41 Action Express not become popular?
1:03:41 - Gun with magazines behind the action?
 

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Hafdasa's Ballester Campeon Competition .22LR Pistol
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Jul 27, 2018
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Made after World War Two until 1957, the Ballester Campeon was a .22 rimfire competition pistol built on the frame of the Argentine Ballester-Molina .45 ACP service pistol. Two versions were made, a standard 5 inch (127mm) barrel with normal sights and the longer 7.5 inch (190mm) Campeon model with larger adjustable sights. Both use the floating chamber system to function, allowing them to run reliably regardless of barrel length. A few thousand of the standard .22s were made, and only a few hundred of the Campeons.

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Mythbusting with the .30-06 American Chauchat: Reliability Test
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Jul 28, 2018
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Everyone knows, of course, that the Chauchat is the worst gun ever, and can't normally get through an entire magazine without malfunctioning. Well, let's try that out...and with an ever worse culprit; an M1918 Chauchat made for the AEF in .30-06.

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Winchester 1897 Shotgun
BigDaddyHoffman1911


Published on Jul 28, 2018
I found an old Winchester 1897 Takedown Shotgun at a local gun show. We take it for a test drive and attempt to Slam Fire it. A sweet little piece of history...that needs a good cleaning.


BigDaddyHoffman1911 Full30:
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Forgotten Weapons Behind the Scenes: Announcing Apocrypha
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Jul 29, 2018
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I am adding a private series of video tidbits from behind the scenes at Forgotten Weapons for my Patreon supporters. They will be things I find interesting or noteworthy, but generally unrelated to guns. A couple times a week, especially when traveling. So if you want to see more about what goes on here beyond the formal video content, head over to Patreon and become one of the people who makes this all possible!
 

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Sunngård Automatic Pistol: 50 Rounds in 1909
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Jul 30, 2018
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Harald Sunngård was Norwegian inventor in the early years of the 20th century who noticed a common perceived weakness of automatic pistols: reloads under stress were often bungled by shooters, leaving them vulnerable to return fire without being able to shoot back. Doing the classic inventor thing, Sunngård figured out a solution to the problem – a two-part solution, in fact. The first part of his solution was to use a big magazine and a small cartridge, to maximize magazine capacity. The second part of his solution was to store a spare magazine right in the magazine well of the pistol for immediate use.

The grip of the pistol is long enough front-to-back to store two identical magazines. The front magazine sits higher than the rear one, and the boltface on the slide feeds rounds from the front magazine into the chamber. Once the front magazine is empty, the shooter ejects it, and need only slide the rear magazine into the front position (and rack the slide) to continue shooting. There is a misconception that the pistol will fire automatically from both magazines in succession, but this is not true.

In addition to having the handy spare available, Sunngard designed the magazines to hold no fewer than 25 cartridges each (in the more common 6.5mm chambering). This gave the pistol a total of 50 rounds stored on-board, which was a major point in Sunngard’s marketing.

The 6.5mm cartridge designed for the pistol had a 23mm overall length, and used a 19mm case. The projectile was a scant 28.5 grains (1.85 gram), and Sunngard claimed a muzzle velocity of just under 2000 ft/s (600 m/s) – which is almost certainly an exaggeration. There was also an 8mm version of the pistol made in much smaller numbers, which fired an equally light projectile (29gr / 1.88g), and may have gotten closer to the claimed velocity (magazines for the 8mm version held 18 rounds each).

The main magazine catch is basically a heel release on the front edge of the magazine well, and it is pushed back in the typical manner to allow the primary magazine to be removed. Then the rear magazine is pulled slightly forward and down as if to remove it from the gun. The rear magazine is then slid forward into the front position and pushed back up to lock into place on the magazine catch. A pair of small guides at the top of the magazine well prevent the magazine from being pushed backwards into the now-empty space for the spare magazine, and these guides are the reason the spare mag must be pulled down and then pushed back up. When initially loading the pistol, the spare magazine is inserted first, and locked back into its compartment. Then the primary magazine is inserted just like in any other pistol.

Sunngard apparently tried hard to market the pistol to a variety of military forces, but found no takers. He was able to get the gun entered into the 1914 Norwegian military trials, where it was bested by the Colt 1911 (we don’t have a testing report from the trials, which would be very interesting to read). If I had to guess based on the general attitudes of the day, I would suspect that Ordnance officers found the reloading process awkward, the cartridge underpowered, and the need for a very high capacity pistol unconvincing.

Mechanically, the Sunngard is pretty simple. It uses a plain blowback action, as no locking system is necessary for its small cartridge. The barrel is fixed to the receiver, and a recoil spring is located around the barrel and inside the barrel shroud/slide.

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Forgotten History: Vercors - the Climactic Battle of the French Resistance
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Jul 31, 2018
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The imposing heights of the Vercors Massif form a very impressive natural defensive position in the southeastern corner of France. It was here that the French Resistance had its largest set piece battle against German occupation forces, in the summer of 1944.

Plan Montagnards originally called for several thousand Allied paratroops to be dropped into Vercors when the landings in Normandy and Provence took place. The Provence landings were pushed back many weeks, however, and the Resistance forces streaming onto the plateau were left almost entirely on their own. One large airdrop of supplies and a single American OSS combat team were all the reinforcement they received.

French Maquisards repelled German probing attacks for about 6 weeks until in late July the final German offensive against the plateau came. It would see nearly 20,000 troops, units of tanks, glider-borne paratroops, and reserve mountain troops in a well coordinated assault that soundly defeated the lightly-armed resistance fighters.

Today we are on the plateau itself, and we will follow the battle across several specific sites, including the glider landings at Vassieux, the last stand of Section Chavant, the destroyed village of Valchevrière, and the hospital at Le Grotte de la Luire.

Want to see some original footage of these fighters taken in the weeks before the battle? It actually exists, and you can see it here: https://youtu.be/zoq7QREIgB8

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SIG's Pump Action 550 Rifle: the 550 VRB
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Aug 1, 2018
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In many countries, manually operated rifles are substantially easier for civilians to own than semiautomatic ones - and this was not lost on firearms manufacturers. In an effort to potentially open a new market, SIG experimented with manufacturing a pump action version of their very successful 550 military rifle. The effort was quickly dropped, however, and only 12 were manufactured. These were made in both .223 Remington and also .222 Remington caliber, to accommodate countries where .223 was considered a restricted military caliber.

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Rhodesian Cobra SMG/Carbine
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Aug 3, 2018
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The Cobra was one of a variety of semiautomatic compact carbines designed and manufactured in Rhodesia in the latter half of the 1970s for sale as civilian self-defense weapons (primarily for rural farming families). Unlike most of these guns, the Cobra was designed as a hammer-fired, closed bolt action. It is chambered for 9x19mm Parabellum, and uses standard Uzi magazines. The action is blowback, with the hammer intended to provide additional delay to the bolt opening. In our experience with the example, however, the delay was insufficient, and empty cases showed signed of dangerously high pressure during extraction (bulges and pierced primers).

The Cobra was designed by two men, Tommy Steele and Bruce Whyte. They formed a company called Stellyte, which suffered from delays in getting production started and subsequently went bankrupt a month after the guns became available in the spring of 1977. Production was picked up by Bulawayo Armoury, and a total of about 2500 examples were ultimately produced. The vast majority have a horizontal front grip, while this very early example has a vertical front grip instead.

Many thanks to the anonymous collector who generously allowed me access to bring this one to you - and who risked his face shooting it!

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Star Z-70B: Spain's Improved SMG
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Aug 4, 2018
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The Star Z-70B was an incremental improvement on the earlier Z-62 and Z-63 submachine guns adopted by the Spanish military and security services. It remains an open bolt, selective fire design, with an underfolding stock. The trigger has changed from a progressive type to a standard trigger with a 3-position safety/selector lever (safe, semi, full). In addition, the Z-70B was chambered for 9x19mm instead of the more antiquated 9x23mm Largo cartridge.

While the stock geometry lends itself to the gun climbing in fully automatic, I was pleasantly surprised by how nice it was to shoot. Not the world's best 9mm SMG, but far from the worst! These are still in service with Spanish armed forces in some roles, and one can certainly understand why.

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Musgrave Ambidex: Straight Pull Rimfire Rifle for Lefties or Righties
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Aug 6, 2018
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The Ambidex was a rifle developed by the Musgrave company in South Africa in the late 1980s. It was a straight-pull bolt action rifle inspired by the Browning T-Bolt, but with the ability to have the bolt swapped to either the left or right side for ambidextrous use. They were chambered for the .22 LR rimfire cartridge, and offered in three different grades. However, in light of high cost and plenty of competition from CZ rimfire rifles, the Ambidex was a commercial flop. Only about 400 were made, and by 1991 it was discontinued.

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Malta's Hand-Hewn Bomb Shelter Tunnels
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Aug 7, 2018
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During World War Two, the Grand Harbor in Malta was the most-bombed place in the world, under aerial bombardment for two full years because of its position as a central Mediterranean base for British air and sea forces. While these attacks were focused on the harbor facilities, most of the island's population lived right in the same area, and civilian casualties during the war were substantial. In an effort to safeguard the population, a vast number of underground bomb shelter tunnels were dug.

The island of Malta is mostly relatively soft limestone, and the Maltese are quite experienced in working it, after millenia of quarrying limestone to build structures and digging it out to make cisterns and wells. This allowed an otherwise enormous project to be successful - using mostly hand tools, enough shelters were dug to safely house the entire at-risk population. Many of these shelters and shelter complexes are open to the public today, including the system under the Malta At War Museum, which we are visiting today...

I am grateful for the Malta Tourism Authority's assistance in helping to make this visit and video possible!

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Project Ultra: Germany Wants a Stronger Compact Pistol
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Aug 8, 2018
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This pistol is one of just a couple surviving from a development project run by Walther in the mid to late 1930s. The goal was to produce a compact sidearm for pilots and officers using a more potent cartridge than the .32ACP or .380. To do this, Walther split the dimensional difference on case length and developed the 9x18mm cartridge, which would later be known as 9mm Police or 9mm Ultra. It used a standard .355 inch bullet, but split the ballistic difference between 9x17 Browning and 9x19 Parabellum.

The early developmental testing was done by simply chambering a PP for the new cartridge, but it proved a bit too powerful for the simple blowback action of the PP. So this was followed by the development of the pistol we have today, which integrated a short recoil, rotating barrel locking system to meet the demands of the new cartridge. By this time, however, it was 1939, and the importance of the project was dwarfed by the rapidly accumulating wartime production needs of the German military. The gun was dropped, although the cartridge would be reintroduced after the war.

For more information on the project, and all of Walther's other work, see "Walther: A German Legend" at Amazon:
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Simpson Ltd's Import/Export Concierge Service
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Aug 9, 2018
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Simpson Ltd has been a friend of Forgotten Weapons for many years now, but I only recently realized how much import/export work they do - including a really neat concierge service that might be interesting to some of our overseas audience...

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Maltese Flintlocks: Girard Mle 1733 Pistols of the Order of St. John
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Aug 10, 2018
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The Order of St John - the Knights of Malta - began as an order to protect Christian pilgrims on the road to Jerusalem, but transformed into an organization dedicated to corsairing in the Mediterranean Sea. Basically, legally justified pirates. For about 300 years they were based on the island of Malta, and while they produced their own cannons there, they purchased small arms from mainland Europe.

Today, we are looking at guns from the last major order placed by the...Order. In addition to muskets, it included 2000 flintlock handguns of the French Modele 1733 pattern. Part of the order was for long barreled (300mm) individual pistols, and part was for pairs of shorter barreled (240mm) ones. These were for both naval and cavalry forces, although it remains unclear which service received which type. However, the two different models have distinctly different acceptance marks.

In 1798, Napoleon's fleet captured Malta, and these pistols (along with many other arms) fell into French hands, where they were easily absorbed into the armed forces, being identical to a French standard pattern. The fleet was very shortly thereafter defeated by the British, and control of Malta and these arms went to Great Britain. The long barreled type of Maltese 1733 pistol is particularly rare today, with probably only about 5 surviving. The short barreled ones are more common by a factor of 10 or so, but still very rare all things considered.

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Holy Mother of Muzzle Flash, the Rico Special
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Aug 11, 2018
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Rico is a gunsmith at SIG Neuhausen who likes to tinker. He put together this SIG 510 (aka Stgw 57), with a modern collapsing stock, quad rail foreend, Aimpoint red dot, heavy barrel, and massive muzzle brake. And we just happen to have some 7.5 Swiss and a full-auto grip assembly. How hard can it be?

Thanks, Rico!

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M3 Grease Gun
Vickers Tactical


Published on Aug 10, 2018
Larry breaks down one of his favorite WW2 small arms, the M3 Grease Gun.
 

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Garand Primer-Activated 1924 Trials Rifle
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Aug 13, 2018
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The first successful iteration of John Garand’s rifle was developed in 1921 and refined through 1924. A small batch were made for US military testing in 1924, where it was compared to guns like the Bang, Hatcher-Bang, and most significantly the Colt/Thompson Autoloading Rifle. Garand’s rifle was primer-activated, with a downward-tilting locking lug at the rear of the bolt (like an 1886 Mannlicher). It was the clear willer of the trials, but was rendered useless in 1925 when the military adopted a new loading of .03-06 which used IMR powder (with a substantially different pressure curve than wha tGarand had been using for his design) and staked primers - which rendered it thoroughly unusable in the 1924 Garand.

In response, Garand would completely change his design, moving to a rotating bolt with two symmetrical locking lugs and a long stroke gas piston - which would eventually be adopted as the US Rifle M1. However, Garand’s skills as a rifle designer are clear in this 1924 prototype - it handled and balances wonderfully, and has excellent sights and trigger. It disassembles easily, and simply feels robust and svelte in a way that is quite unusual for early semiautomatic rifles.

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WWI Steyr M95 Sniper Carbine
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Aug 14, 2018
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During World War One, Austria-Hungary produced about 13,000 sniper rifles and carbines - and while the significant majority of these were full length rifles, the Empire was the only major power to produce a scoped sniper carbine during the war. These continued to be produced until about 1920 or 1921, to be used as war reparations to Italy. However, Italy never made use of them, and the vast majority were eventually scrapped. For this reason, they are very scarce rifles today.

Because the M95 loaded using a 5-round Mannlicher type en bloc clip, the scope on the M95 snipers had to be offset to the left of the action. Scopes from 5 different manufacturers were used, including many purchased form Germany in the early stages of the war. This particular one is a Reichert scope, but Kahles, Suss, Fuess, and Oigee were also used. Most, including this one, were of 3x magnification. The reticle is a German post type, with a dial adjustment on the scope for 100 to 600 meters, which moves the reticle vertically in the field of view.

Several numbers are stamped on the various parts of an M95 sniper. There will be an assembly number on the front scope base which should match the number on the right side of the rear scope ring. In addition to matching the scope to its base during assembly, this also indicates production number, as sniper rifles were numbered sequentially by AZF, where they were built. There will be another number on the left side of the rear scope ring, which should match the barrel serial number of the rifle or carbine.

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Germany's New Light Howitzer: the 7.5cm le.IG 18
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Aug 15, 2018
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In the aftermath of World War One, every military force immediately began to assess what they thought was most important to improve in their arsenals for the next war. For Germany, one thing they felt lacking was a light howitzer that could be organic to infantry units, mobile enough to remain with the front lines in an advance to provide easy and immediate supporting fire. The Rheinmetall company would develop just such a gun and the German military adopted it in 1932 under the designation 7.5cm leichtes Infanteriegeschutz 18.

The 7.5cm le.IG 18 fired a roughly 12 pound (5.5-6 kg) 75mm high explosive shell out to 4,000 meters, and was capable of both direct and indirect fire (elevation maxed out at 90 degrees). These guns would see service on all fronts with the German military in World War Two, remaining inservice throughout the entire war.

The mechanical operation of the gun is rather unusual for an artillery piece, with a fixed breech and a barrel which tips up from the muzzle for loading and ejection. This did not really convey any particular advantage, but it also did not have any particular weakness and was quite satisfactory in action.

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Colt Prototype Self-Ejecting Revolver
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Aug 16, 2018
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Robert Roy was a career Colt employee, who began his work as an engineer in 1963 (including work on the 1971/SSP pistols and the CMG machine gun series) and retired in 1993 as Director of International Sales. One of his side projects appears to have been experimentation into auto-ejecting revolvers. This proof of concept revolver has a gas port added to the barrel and a gas tube which vents gas directly in the 2 o’clock chamber each time the gun is fired. That gas blows right into the previously-fired cartridge case, ejecting it out the back of the cylinder through a spring-loaded aluminum deflector/cover.

In theory, the system seems like it should work just as intended, although I have no information about how successful it was for Roy. The practical problem with such a system, however,r is that it cannot eject the final round, as the cylinder is them empty and there is no additional cartridge to provide the gas to eject the last one. Thus the cylinder must be opened and the ejector rod used to eject the final case - and there is really no difference to the shooter between manually ejecting one case and manually ejecting all six. So the added complexity doesn’t really provide a practical benefit.

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Suomi m/31 - Finland's Excellent Submachine Gun
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Aug 17, 2018
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Designed by Aimo Lahti, the Suomi m/31 submachine gun is in my opinion one of the standout submachine guns of the World War Two era. Despite its hefty weight (10.4lb / 4.7kg) and lack of a good pistol grip stock, it still manages to be tremendously controllable and accurate, with a very high rate of fire (about 900 rpm).

For a detailed written description of the history and development of the weapon, I would refer you to the excellent article by Jaeger Platoon: http://www.jaegerplatoon.net/MACHINEP...

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The M9A1 Bazooka: Now With Optics and Quick Takedown
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Aug 18, 2018
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The Bazooka - or rather the Launcher, Rocket, 2.36”, M1 - was introduced by the United States in 1942, the result of a fast development by two Army officers, Captain Leslie Skinner and Lt. Edward Uhl. The US has no infantry antitank weapon at that point, and it had become quite clear that such a thing was needed. The Bazooka offered a theoretical effective range of 300 yards, throwing a 1 pound hollow-charge projectile capable of penetrating 4 inches of armor plate. The 2.36 inch bore measurement, incidentally, was chosen as the inch equivalent of 60mm, to match the common mortar size.

In October of 1943, an improved M9 version was introduced, using a magnet firing system instead of the unreliable batteries of the original. A followup M9A1 variant was adopted in June of 1944, which broke down into two parts for easier transportation, and the T90 optical sight was added in September of 1944. These were effective weapons against armor early in the war, but the heavier tanks introduced late in the war were too heavily armored for the Bazooka to be very effective - although it remained a valuable tool for attacking pillboxes and other fortified positions. It would continue to see extensive service in the Korean War, although its limited armor penetration was particularly acute in that conflict.

Note that the inert M6 rocket in the video is not being sold with the Bazooka.

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CZ 50 32 Auto Surplus Pistol Review
sootch00


Published on Aug 18, 2018
CZ 50 32 Auto Surplus Pistol Review! Thanks to Classic Firearms for Providing the Vz.58 for the review.

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Almost Revolutionary: Patrick Ferguson's Breechloading Rifle
TFB TV


Published on Aug 15, 2018
The Ferguson rifle has been seen by some as an extraordinary design that could have changed the course of history and by others as a mechanical complexity that never would have worked in the real world conditions that the British infantry would have found themselves in. When it comes to either perspective, we cannot deny that the utility of the Ferguson as a fighting weapon was not something to ignore, most likely being the first breechloading rifle to see combat, as standard issue to a unit in military history. The important point about this is that breechloading muskets and rifles had been around for almost as long as the manufacture of arms had been firmly established in Europe. But their practicality was essentially confined to hunting and their military use was almost nonexistent, especially in active combat. Ferguson certainly took his design from an earlier French designer called Isaac de la Chaumette, so he cannot be credited indegeniously coming up with it. But what he did do was perfect it, and he had the vision and the drive to convince elements within the British Army to allow him to prove the rifle in battle.

Since the 1770s, there has been some controversy about the rifles that currently exist. Much of this focuses on the types of Ferguson's out there. For example, the rifles that made history are the Ordnance contract rifles, of which there are only 100 that were ever made. There were commercial ones that Ferguson sold to civilians in addition to Officer's ones that were variants of the commercial ones that he armed his officers with. But when it comes to the significance in military history, the Ordnance rifles are the most coveted ones. Of these there are only two known ones that survived. One is at Morristown National Historic Site in Morristown, New Jersey. The other is at the Nunnemacker Collection in Wisconsin.

««« GUNS IN THIS VIDEO »»»

Ferguson Rifle

Brown Bess
 

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Classic Imperial British Revolvers: the Webley WG Army and Target
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Published on Aug 19, 2018
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The Webley company used the “WG” (Webley Government) nomenclature in its literature starting in 1883, but the first revolver actually market as such was the WG Model of 1889. These revolvers were made primarily for the military market, as officers were responsible for supplying their own sidearms in the British military until 1915. The WG was a full size service revolver in .455 caliber (accepting a wide variety of .45 inch British cartridges, including the .450, .455, .476, Enfield Mk II, and Enfield MkIII). A series of refinements would be made to the design culminating in the generally-accepted standard WG pattern in 1896. These would be produced until 1902, when they were replaced by the Webley WS (Webley Service).

The two main variation of the WG were the Army and the Target. The Army typically had a bird’s-head grip and a 6 inch barrel, where the Target had a longer 7.5 inch barrel and a flared square-butt grip, as well as adjustable sights. However, Webley was happy to supply and mix of features to a customer, and many branded patterns exist. The Target pattern proved very successful for shooters at the Dublin, Glasgow, and Wimbledon matches of the period. A total of about 22,000 WG pattern revolvers were made, with the “standard” 1896 model appearing around s/n 10,000.

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The Original CETME Mars Importation
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Aug 20, 2018
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The CETME Model C would be the basis for the wildly successful H&K 91 / G3 rifle, and a small batch of CETME rifles was brought into the United States as early as 1966. They were imported by the Mars Equipment Corporation of Chicago, and are completely Spanish-made examples of the original CETME. A few changes were made to the military pattern to made them semiautomatic only, and a total of 1254 were brought into the US between 1966 and 1971. They were imported in two models; the first batch had metal handguards and integral folding bipods, and the second batch had wooden handguards and no bipods. To increase their civilian appeal, they also came with a pair of scope mounting blocks on the receiver, which were not standard to Spanish military rifles.


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HK93 vs. C93 and Zenith Z43P
Military Arms Channel


Published on Aug 20, 2018
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The German made HK93 is no longer made or imported, so how do the current crop of semi-available rifles stack up to the original? We compare the HK93 to the Century Arms C93 and the Zenith Z43P.
 

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Colt's Camp Perry Model Target Single Shot
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Aug 21, 2018
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The Camp Perry Model was Colt’s top-end target pistol between the world wars. Based on the same frame and grip as the Officer’s Model revolver, it was designed to look like a revolver while actually being a single shot pistol with a monolithic barrel (no cylinder gap). It has a couple other differences from Colt’s other pistols, such as the use of a coil mainspring in place of the then-standard flat spring. Development began many years before the gun came onto the market, as this particular example is serial number 35 of a 63-gun preproduction batch made for national and Olympic targets shooters, and it was shipped out of the factory in 1920.

Commercial production began in 1926 and would run until 1941, when Colt’s wartime obligations superseded the production of competition pistols. In total, only about 2500 were actually made during that 15-year production run, all in .22LR. The Camp Perry Model was much less popular than the Colt Officer’s Model (which offered a 6-shot cylinder) and the Colt Woodsman semiauto .22 pistol. Two variations exist, as the early guns have 10 inch (254mm) barrels, and after 1933 the barrel was reduced to 8 inches (203mm) and the hammer travels was reduced to improve lock time.

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Homemade MG's of the Austro-Hungarian Army ( Relic's )
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Published on Aug 20, 2018
improvised Infanterie-Maschinengewehrs of the the Austro-Hungarian Army.
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Thompson's .30-06 1923 Autorifle: Blish Strikes Again
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Aug 22, 2018
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This is a Model 1923 Thompson Autoloading Rifle, one of a batch of 20 made by Colt for US military testing in 1924. The system is designed on the same basic Blish principle as the Thompsons submachine gun; the idea that two sliding surfaces will lock solidly together under enough pressure, and not begin to slide until the pressure drops below a certain level. In reality, both guns are simply delayed blowback, and the rifle (in .30-06) suffered from very high extraction pressures. So high, that ejected cases were reportedly sticking in a wood board at the 1924 trial.

Versions of the Thompson rifle would continue to receive military testing until 1929, and one broke a bolt in an endurance test and was pulled out for the final time. This particular rifle is a bit of an interesting anomaly in that it has a lightweight rifle barrel and a detachable magazine. In theory, the Model 1923 included a rifle version with a fixed internal magazine and a light machine gun versions with this rifle’s type of detachable magazine but also a heavy barrel and a folding bipod.


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