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Older, Odd, Offbeat And Forgotten Guns & Ammo

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Brownells BRN-10A: Unboxing and Live Fire Testing!
InRangeTV


Published on Sep 22, 2018
Companion shooting video on Forgotten Weapons:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V3m5e...

Brownells has just released their new AR10 retro rifle, the BRN10A. This rifle closely reproduces one of the earliest AR10s ever manufactured, and was mostly used by Cuban forces.

In this video we test its zero out of the box, accuracy, reliability, and discuss the general handling characteristics of this early style AR10 rifle.

YouTube does not allow links to firearms manufacturers in video descriptions, but I am sure you can figure out how to find Brownells.

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M1918 Chauchat: Testing a New Magazine
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Sep 23, 2018
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Today I am testing out a new .30-06 Chauchat magazine converted from a Johnson M1941 machine gun magazine. The workmanship on this new mag is excellent, and much more extensive than I had initially realized would be necessary. This had the side effect of also making is a very expensive magazine to have made properly.

Unfortunately, the cost of that project has become unjustifiable. I initially wanted to have 5 or 6 of these, to allow me to have about 100 rounds loaded into magazines for competition use. Instead, I will be using a French 8mm Chauchat for anything requiring more than 10-20 rounds of ammunition, and leave this gun for more historical uses. While 8mm Lebel ammunition is expensive as well, I have a substantial number of good military magazines for it, as well as a much more accessible market of spare parts should anything break.

I know a bunch of people will ask about 3D printing magazines. The reason that is not practical is because all of the clearances in the gun were designed around a magazine made of thin metal. In order for a 3D printed plastic to be strong enough to withstand the force of a stack of ammunition under sufficient pressure to feed reliably, the plastic would need to be substantially thicker than the original steel design. And there is not physical space inside the gun for that - the clearances between the bolt head, magazine feed lips, cartridge pusher, and barrel extension don't allow it.

If you enjoy Forgotten Weapons, check out its sister channel, InRangeTV! http://www.youtube.com/InRangeTVShow
 

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The American FAL: Harrington & Richardson T48 (w/ Larry Vickers)
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Sep 24, 2018
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Today I am joined by Larry Vickers to take a look at his original H&R T48 FAL. The Harrington & Richardson company was awarded a contract to produce a pre-production series of 500 of these rifles in the mid 1950s when the United States was conduction trials to choose a new combat rifle. The Belgian-designed FAL (built by H&R with technical assistance from Canada, who was the first to formally adopt the FAL) was designated the Rifle, T48. By this time, it's only competition was the Springfield-designed Rifle, T44 - which would eventually become the M14.

Both rifles were put through a wide array of testing and trials, and in the end they were so close in performance as to be both deemed acceptable by the testing officials. The decision went up the chain of command to almost the very top before a decision was made in favor of the M14, on the basis of it being slightly lighter in weight and capable of being produced on existing M1 Garand tooling. This would prove to be a mistaken expectation, and the process of developing the tooling and production lines for the M14 would be one of the major problems with its adoption. Interestingly, the Belgians at FN had offered the FAL design to the United States royalty-free, but this was not enough to sway US brass to adopt a non-American design.

Only a handful of T48 FAL rifles exist in private hands today, and this one actually came out of the H&R company museum. Thanks to Mr. Vickers for sharing this fantastic piece of Cold War rifle history with us!

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The Hovedarsenalets
jmantime


Published on Sep 24, 2018
Song : The Woods
 

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Small Arms of WWI Primer 084: French Contract Winchester 1907
C&Rsenal


Published on Sep 24, 2018
Othais and Mae delve into the story of this WWI classic. Complete with history, function, and live fire demonstration.

C&Rsenal presents its WWI Primer series; covering the firearms of this historic conflict one at a time in honor of the centennial anniversary. Join us every other Tuesday!




Armourer's Bench
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCgvK...

Winchester Collectors
https://winchestercollector.org/

The Cody Firearms Museum
https://centerofthewest.org/category/...


Additional reading:

“John Brownin’s Contemporaries: The Guns of T.C. Johnson”
TheFirearmBlog.com
Matthew Moss


“Model 1907 Rifle, “meeting Meerschaum””
The Winchester Collector, Spring 1989
Ed Brandhorst

Winchester Repeating Arms Company
Herbert G. Houze


“Deux Beaux Duels Aeriens”
La Guerre Aerienne Illustree
March 08, 1917


“Un Combat dans la Nuit”
La Guerre Aerienne Illustree
August 30, 1917

“Un ‘AS’ Allemand Abattu par une ‘Saucisse”
La Guerre Aerienne Illustree
January 03, 1918

“Les Cigognes”
La Vie Aerienne
February 06, 1919

Safe range space thanks to Triana Protection

Additional photos thanks to Rock Island Auction

Ammunition data thanks to DrakeGmbH
https://www.youtube.com/user/DrakeGmbH/

Visit us at http://candrsenal.com

Or go further and support our channel at https://www.patreon.com/CandRsenal
Current funding level: $8526

I would like to happily remind everyone this number represents the public demand for in depth firearm history. I'm proud to see it grow.
 

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Prototype 9mm Clement Military Pistol
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Sep 26, 2018
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Charles Clement is best known for a series of civilian pocket pistol made in the years before World War One, but today we are looking at a prototype Clement military pistol from 1914. This gun retains most of the same mechanical features of Clement's pocket guns, but is scaled up to the 9x20mm Browning cartridge for potential military use. It is a shrouded-hammer, simple blowback action, with a single stack magazine and a quite long barrel (probably to complement the shoulder stock which it is cut to fit). Only two examples of these are known to exist today, and probably only about 15 were originally made. They were trialled by the Belgian military, but not adopted - probably in part because of the outbreak of World War One.

For much more information on Clement and his guns, I recommend this excellent collaborative article by Ed Buffaloe, Bill Chase,
Dr. Stefan Klein, and Dr. Dirk Ziesing:

https://unblinkingeye.com/Guns/Clemen...

If you enjoy Forgotten Weapons, check out its sister channel, InRangeTV! http://www.youtube.com/InRangeTVShow
 

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The Rhodesia Mamba: Big Hype and a Big Flop
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Sep 28, 2018
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The Mamba was originally conceived in a 1970s Salisbury, Rhodesia barroom bull session about the best elements of semiauto pistols. The project would wind up being pushed by an American expat named Joe Hale, and production of parts was contracted out to a South African engineering firm.

The Mamba was hugely hyped at the time as being the best service handgun ever developed. It was an SA/DA system based on the Smith & Wesson Model 59, with ambidextrous safety, all stainless steel construction, and nary a single stamped part. Probably less than 100 were ever made (definitely not more than 200), as a result of massive technical problems. Many of these were ultimately because of an improper heat treating regimen insisted upon by Hale, but poor quality control in the manufacturing process didn't help anything. When the South African manufacturer bailed on the gun (having gotten a lucrative armored car contract from the South African government instead), the parts and IP were purchased by Navy Arms of the US. A small number of guns were assembled in New Jersey from South African parts, but there the project died.

Today, the Mamba is a vary scarce pistol, for all the obvious reasons. Many thanks to the South African collection who provided this one for filming!

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Canada Made Colt Law Enforcement Rifles
SmallArmsSolutions


Published on Sep 28, 2018
Beard Products - Coupon code SMALLARMS15 to save 15% ORDER HERE: http://bit.ly/2KS6nSI

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SAS Merchandise -https://teespring.com/stores/small-ar...

Mailing Address: PO Box 90353, Houston, Texas 77290

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BLOG - smallarmssolutions.com
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Webley Model 1911 Stocked .22 Single-Shot Target Pistol
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Sep 29, 2018
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The Webley Model 1911 is a single-shot, self-ejecting target pistol made only for a few years. It was fitted with a long barrel to increase sight radius and also a detachable shoulder stock for those who wanted a bit more stability when shooting. Mechanically, the piece must be loaded manually, and it will then open the slide and eject the empty case automatically when fired, leaving the slide open for the shooter to load the next round. These were manufactured until 1914, with the final batch of pistols sold in 1919 from remaining parts stocks.

I am at the range with this example on Malta, thanks to the Association of Maltese Arms Collectors and Shooters. I thought it would be interesting to compare shooting with and without the stock, although my biggest takeaway was that I need more practice time on the range!

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Ammunition Evaluation: Ethiopian 7.62x51mm NATO
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Sep 30, 2018
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Century International Arms has imported a quantity of Ethiopian ammunition, and asked me to do a video on it. So, I have a three-part evaluation here: appearance and packaging, live fire testing (including velocity and consistency), and teardown and bullet weight consistency. This ammunition was produced (as best I can tell) at the Emperor Haile Selassie Ammunition Factory, established with Czech technical aid in the late 1940s in Addis Ababa. This ammunition was produced between 1977 and 1985, for use in Ethiopian BM59 and M14 rifles, as well as machine guns.

Velocity:

I tested velocity using a 7.62x51mm Israeli K98k Mauser rifle (barrel length 23.6 inches). Measurements were take at 10 feet from the muzzle, with a sample size of 15 rounds fired. I found an average velocity of 2637 fps, extreme spread of 143 fps (max 2689, min 2546), and standard deviation of 33.29 fps. At least half of the rounds fired exhibited a very brief hangfire, although every round fired on the first primer strike.

Bullets:

I tested the weight of 10 bullets using a calibrated Lyman electronic scale. I found an average weight of 143.4 grains, extreme spread of 1.7 grains (max 144.4 gr, min 142.7 gr), and standard deviation of 0.52 grains. Bullet construction is boat tail with an open base, lead core, and gilding metal over steel jacket (these bullet do attract a magnet).

Century advertises this ammunition as using corrosive primers, and I took them at their word and did not test for corrosivity.

Raw data:

Velocities (fps): 2641, 2629, 2629, 2646, 2606, 2663, 2616, 2679, 2546, 2637, 2689, 2651, 2630, 2646, 2649

Bullet weights (grains): 143.3, 143.2, 142.7, 143.6, 143.9, 144.4, 142.9, 143.2, 142.9, 143.7

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Mauser C98: The System That Cost Paul Mauser an Eye
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Oct 1, 2018
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One of Paul Mauser's lifelong projects was the design of a semiautomatic rifle for the German military. He would go through a multitude of different designs searching for something that would be sufficiently reliable, durable, and simple - and ultimately he would never fulfill the goal. But his efforts left us a trail of very interesting prototypes!

In 1898 he conceived this sort of flapper-locked system, on a short recoil action. It is actually a pretty clever system mechanically, but apparently lacked sufficient protection against an out of battery detonation. In 1901, one of the C98 rifles of this pattern (but not this specific gun) suffered an out of battery detonation while Mauser was firing it, and the explosion broke his finger and took his left eye. After this experience, Mauser would not give up on his search for a military selfloader, but his subsequent designs (like the long-recoil C02 pattern) would have a much greater emphasis on mechanical safety.

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Varan PMX90: Ambidexterity in South Africa
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Oct 3, 2018
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The Varan pistol was developed by two Rhodesian designers, Tony Blackshaw and Stewart Beecham, and was originally designated the PMX-80. Development would take nearly a full decade, however, and mostly took place in South Africa. The goal was simply to create a good domestic service handgun, as such things were relatively difficult to obtain in these countries at that time. When it was finally completed in 1990, the Varan PMX-90 would fill this role reasonably well. It was not an exceptional handgun, but it was serviceable and reasonably high quality, and about 2,000 were produced before it become commercially unable to compete with the Vektor Z88 and SP1.

The PMX-90 offered substantial ambidextrous features, including a top-facing ejection port in the early models. These would also allow the safety lever, slide release, and magazine release to be swapped to either side to fit the shooter's preference. In time, several of these features were discarded, and the later versions had a right-side ejection port and fixed slide release lever.

The gun included several interesting features from a manufacturing point of view as well. The magazines were made of a transparent plastic, although it tended to turn to an opaque yellow with exposure to gun oil, and cracked easily. A later black plastic magazine partially solved the cracking problem. The frame was a hybrid milled and stamped assembly, presumably to reduce fabrication costs. Otherwise, it was mechanically a copy of the Browning High Power, including a single action only trigger mechanism.

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Q&A 22: Travel and More
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Oct 4, 2018
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Whew - this was a long one! As usual, I had far more questions submitted by you awesome Patrons than I could answer, so if yours didn't get in this time please submit it again next time.

0:00:52 - What have been my favorite or most enlightening trips abroad?
0:02:55 - Systems like Blish that work despite being based on faulty physics
0:05:30 - Gun stands and display blocks
0:08:18 - Window or aisle? Airline preferences?
0:11:54 - Specific future improvements in guns and ammunition
0:14:10 - 6mm Unified and the lack of modern SCHV military cartridges
0:16:06 - What is a "parts kit", anyway?
0:20:52 - Plans to cover the Savage 99?
0:21:42 - Plans to re-film any of the older videos?
0:23:25 - 1930s French plans for a 9x66 machine gun

Huon & Barreliers' book on French machine guns can be found here: https://www.crepin-leblond.fr/accueil...

0:25:12 - Which are the most interesting combloc surplus pistols?
0:27:36 - Modernized SKS, yea or nay?
0:29:17 - War or battle where difference in small arms was decisive?
0:30:24 - Makeup of my gun collection
0:32:06 - Best TSA/Customs story from my traveling
0:34:35 - Ideas for a pre-1898 collection?
0:37:48 - Why have European nations abandoned small arms manufacture?
0:40:38 - Why metallic feed strips instead of belts?
0:43:21 - Thoughts on writing firearms reference books today
0:48:41 - What can the American firearms community learn from our international colleagues?
0:50:15 - Market for modernized historical firearms?
0:52:48 - Thoughts on the Ohio Ordnance HCAR
0:54:47 - Quad-stack or drum?
0:56:45 - What modern military rifle feature is unnecessary but still used?
0:58:19 - Should the US have retained the 1903 Springfield or switched to the 1917 Enfield?
0:59:42 - How often do I have trips get cancelled?
1:00:52 - Why 9x19 in all the Rhodesian guns?
1:02:21 - Why is the Browning High Power not modernized like the 1911?
1:04:18 - Did the British consider the m/31 Suomi?
1:05:42 - Guns I am content to not own?
1:07:28 - Mauser 1945 Volkspistole and HK VP70 similarities
1:08:56 - Channel demographics (age, gender, geography)
1:11:19 - Favorite and least favorite belt-fed semiautos?
1:14:30 - Folding guns for CCW
1:14:50 - Why semi-rimmed pistol cartridges?

I recommend this video on the subject: https://youtu.be/oQq4qI8oMcc

1:15:18 - Gaseous propellents in place of gunpowder
1:15:52 - Collection military uniforms?
1:16:48 - Why the trend away from bullpup rifles?
 

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Full-Auto FG-42: An Original 2nd Pattern at the Range
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Oct 5, 2018
https://www.forgottenweapons.com/full...

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The FG-42 is a tremendously hyped rifle, but very few people have ever had a chance to actually shoot an original one (including me, until today). It was a rifle intended to take on the roles of both infantry rifle and light machine gun gun for the German Fallschirmjager. The M14 was supposed to do the same thing, and was neigh uncontrollable. So the question is, was the FG-42 a better design, or did its reputation simply come from the mystique of a very rare gun?

Well, in my opinion the praise is entirely justified. This was one of the most controllable and pleasant-shooting full power select-fire rifles I have ever shot. It is absolutely far better than the M14, and better than the AR-10 as well and also the G3 in its stock form. The FAL is a closer competitor, but in my opinion still outclassed by the Fallshirmjagergewehr. The FG was expensive and not as durable as its later competitors, but it truly is a very impressive piece of engineering. This particular one is going up for sale at the Morphy auction company (which acquired the James D Julia firearms auction a few months ago), and I hope the new owner enjoys it as much as I did!
 

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Fulton Armory M1A1 Paratrooper Carbine
Military Arms Channel


Published on Oct 5, 2018
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The M1 Carbine made ushered in the US's first intermediate caliber, self loading rifle. The M1A1 was an important variation over the original M1 Carbine in that it was intended to be a primary rifle for US Paratroopers operating in Europe. We take a look at this Fulton Armory replica of this historic rifle.
 

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Thompson 1921: The Original Chicago Typewriter
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Oct 6, 2018
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The first prototype Thompsons submachine guns (and it was Thompson who coined that term, by the way) were produced in 1919 and dubbed the "Annihilators". The gun was intended to be a military weapon to equip American soldiers in World War One, but by the time the gun was developed the war had ended. Still, Thompson and his Auto-Ordnance company contracted with Colt to manufacture 15,000 of the guns. These were the Model of 1921, and they were marketed to both the US military and as many European armies as Thompson and his salesmen could reach. They found few takers in the climate of the early 1920s, however, and sales were slow.

This is the first in a 5-part series about the development of the Thompson, concluding with a trip to the range to fire three different patterns side by side...
 

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Szecsei & Fuchs Double Barrel Bolt Action Dangerous Game Rifle
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Oct 7, 2018
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Normally in big game rifles, one has the choice of either a double barrel or a bolt action (semi autos being generally eschewed as not reliable enough). After the surely unnerving experience of being charged by three elephants simultaneously, however, Hungarian hunter Joseph Szecsei decided he wanted both the immediate followup shot of the double barrel and the capacity of the bolt action all in a single rifle. So working with Fuchs Fine Guns in Austria, he created just that - a double barrel bolt action rifle.

The system uses six locking lugs on the rear end of the bolt to lock two bolts and chambers, and a dual magazine which holds three extra rounds for each barrel. The guns are made to order for the very high end of the market, and are available in pretty much your choice of caliber - this particular example is in .416 Remington Magnum. Interestingly, Fuchs also makes an over/under pattern of this system as well as a miniaturized rimfire pattern. Neat!
 

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British Cabin Pressure Flare Pistols (Quite Unusual)
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Oct 8, 2018
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Signal flares were an important communications tool for aircraft during World War Two, and a multitude of flare pistol types exist with mounting brackets for aerial use. The introduction of pressurized fuselages made this a much more difficult proposition, however. These two flare pistols were designed by the British to maintain the pressurized seal of an aircraft body while still allowing firing and reloading through a pivoting mount and system of seals. I bet you haven’t seen something quite like these before!
 

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The Marines' First SMG: 1921/28 Thompson Gun
Forgotten Weapons



Published on Oct 9, 2018
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The USMC had acquired a few hundred early 1921 model Thompson submachine guns in 1926, and prompted the US Navy to formally test the guns. The Navy requested a reduction in the rate of fire, in order to improve controllability and reduce ammunition consumption (20 round magazines go quickly at 900rpm!). Auto-Ordnance happily complied, and Oscar Payne returned to the company on his spare time to modify the gun. He did this my adding a substantial amount of mass to the actuator, and was able to reduce the rate of fire substantially. The Navy subsequently ordered 500 guns, designated the Model of 1928.

Since most of the original 15,000 guns made by Colt were still in inventory, Auto-Ordnance simply overstamped the "1" at the end of "1921" with an "8" and put the new heavier bolt assemblies in the guns, leading to the collector term "21/28 overstamp" for these Thompsons. The lower rate of fire would become the new standard for the Thompson.

By late 1928, only about 6,000 Thompsons had been sold, and by the end of 1938 10,300 had been sold. Of these, about 1500 total had gone to the US government, about 4100 exported, and the remainder to American police and security agencies. Times were not good for the Thompson - it was an expensive military weapon without a war that needed it. Despite the gun's huge notoriety, it was actually not used in particularly large numbers by the motor bandits of the 20s and 30s, nor in great numbers by the police. While the FBI did purchase Thompsons, they only bought 115 in total, and not until 1935.

This is the second part in a 5-part series on the development of the Thompson...
 

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Swiss Infantry Rifles ( 1867 - 1945 ) Schweizer Infanterie Gewehre
jmantime


Published on Oct 10, 2018
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Bolt-Action Rifles of Switzerland:
Schmidt Rubin 1889 / 1889/90 - http://milpas.cc/rifles/ZFiles/Swiss%...
Schmidt Rubin 1896/11 / 1897 Kadet -
Schmidt Rubin 1905 Carbine -
Schmidt Rubin 1911 -
Schmidt Rubin K11 -
Schmidt Rubin K31 -
Schmidt Rubin K31-42 -
W+F 1940 Sniper -
Early Semi Automatic Rifles –
Raschein Model 1889 - http://theswissriflesdotcommessageboa...
Rychiger Model 1911 - http://theswissriflesdotcommessageboa...
Rheinmetall-Borsig Model 28 semi-auto rifle from 1928
http://forum.axishistory.com/viewtopi...
Hunneshagen Rifle - http://forum.axishistory.com/viewtopi...
http://modelarmour.com/index.php?opti...
Waffenfabrik Bern AK44 - http://www.forgottenweapons.com/rifle...
http://wunnspeed.wordpress.com/2013/1...
 

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Panzerschreck: Germany Makes a Bazooka
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Oct 10, 2018
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The German military first encountered American Bazookas in Tunisia in 1943, and quickly put in place a program to copy and improve on the design. At that point, the latest German antitank weapons was the Raketenwerfer 43 “Puppchen”, which was a locked-breech rocket launcher built on a carriage like a standard AT gun. It had a substantial range and a very effective 88mm shaped charge warhead, but lacked the one-man mobility offered by the Bazooka. So, the Raketenpanzerbuchse 43 - shortly thereafter renamed the Panzerschreck - was developed in late 1943.

The Panzerschreck kept the 88mm bore of the Puppchen, so that the warhead could be kept unchanged. The rear half of the munition was redesigned to fit an open tube type of launcher. The early Bazookas captured by German forces were at that time fitted with a battery-powered firing system, which the Germans opted to replace (as would the Americans, in later versions). The Panzerschreck trigger used a small generator, where a heavy spring pushed an iron core through a copper winding and magnet, this creating an electrical charge to fire the rocket.

One shortcoming of the Panzerschreck compared to the Bazooka was that the German rockets did not burn completely within the launch tube - the motors continued to fire for about the first 2 meters of flight. This meant that the shooter would receive substantial burns to the face and hands if protective gear was not worn when firing. Initially, troops were instructed to wear filter-less gas masks and winter gloves when shooting, but it was quickly recognized that this was an impractical burden. Soldiers in the field began to craft protective shields to mount on the tubes, and these were formalized in a windowed shield was introduced in 1944 as standard on new production launchers and as a kit to retrofit existing weapons in the field.

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World War Two Heats Up: The M1928A1 Thompson SMG
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Oct 11, 2018
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By 1939, Auto-Ordnance was thoroughly bankrupt, having about $400 in assets and a debt of more than $1.2 million to the estate of the late Thomas Ryan, it's original financier. Ryan had died in 1929, but the company shareholders had prevented his estate from forcing the sale of the company for a decade. In 1939 they could hold out no longer, and the company was sold to one Russell Maguire, a high profile corporate raider.

Maguire, however, saw the potential of a submachine gun company on the brink of a new world war, and negotiated a contract with the Savage Arms Company to begin new production of Thompsons (the original Colt guns from 1921 having finally all sold). Orders began to come in from Europe, and new Model of 1928 Thompsons were sold to France, Sweden, and most substantially, the United Kingdom. The US military would also start buying Thompsons in quantity (designated the M1928A1), but the UK orders (paid for in bullion) were a massive source of profits for the company.

Auto-Ordnance would roll some of these profits back into the company, buying an old automotive brake factory in Bridgeport Connecticut and tooling up their own production of receivers and trigger frames to supplement Savage's production. A number of changes were progressively made to the guns to simplify and speed up their manufacture, including smooth barrels, stamped ejectors, vastly simplified rear sights, and horizontal front grips. By the time the M1928A1 was replaced by the M1 Thompson, more than 1.1 million had been made by AO and Savage combined. The Thompson had at last found it's purpose!

This is the third of a 5-part series on the development of the Thompson...
 

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H&R's Experimental M14 Guerrilla Gun
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Published on Oct 12, 2018
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While Harrington & Richardson was making M14 rifles for the United States military, they were also experimenting with other variations on the design. Among these was the “Guerrilla Gun”, an shortened and lightened M14. The barrel was reduced in length by 4.5 inches and also reduced significantly in diameter, and a special conical flash hider fitted. The intention was to make a version more suitable to small-statured Asian soldiers, and several of these rifles were made in the X-40 range of serial numbers. This particular one was also fitted with a custom made underflowing stock which further lightened the gun as well as making it quite compact. One can only imagine how difficult this configuration would have been to shoot in fully automatic!

This rifle was registered and sold by H&R in the mid 1980s, and it is well provenance to the factory. A previous owner replaced the short barrel with a standard length one as well as a standard stock, and in that configuration it is a quite scarce fully transferrable M14. The short barrel and its fittings (less the flash hider) are still with it, however, and hopefully the next owner will return it to its original form.
 

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Shooting the M14: Full Auto Really Uncontrollable?
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Oct 13, 2018
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Today we are out shooting the H&R M14 "Guerrilla Gun" prototype, but fitted with a standard M14 stock and barrel. With these parts, it handles and fires exactly like a standard M14 - so I can answer the most pertinent question:

Is the M14 really so uncontrollable in full auto?
 

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The First Browning 1919: The Automatic Tank Machine Gun
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Oct 14, 2018
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In 1918 the United States began manufacturing tanks for the war effort in Europe, and these tanks naturally required armament. The British were mostly using the Hotchkiss Portative for they new tanks and the French were using the Hotchkiss 1914 heavy machine gun. The initial American weapon of choice for tanks was the Marlin 1917, as straight gas piston conversion of the Colt 1895 design - but the Marlin had substantial flaws and a better gun was desired.

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The Iconic American WW2 Thompson: the M1A1
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Oct 15, 2018
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While the US Army was satisfied with the Thompson as a fighting weapon in World War Two, it was most certainly not happy with the gun's exorbitant price tag. The Thompson was a very expensive gun, and the Army wanted to see that change. In March of 1942, engineers at the Savage factory submitted a simplified version for Army consideration, and it was accepted and adopted the very next month. Savage would transition from M1928A1 production to the new M1 pattern in June and July of 1942.

This new M1 Thompson had eliminated at last the unique and unnecessary Blish lock system in favor of a simple blowback action delayed only by bolt mass. In addition to greatly simplifying the production of bolt components, this also allowed the receiver internal shape to be much simplified. A further simplification would follow shortly, as the hammer and floating firing pin were replaced by a fixed firing pin milled into the bolt face in October of 1942 - this new type being designated the M1A1. Another 715,000 M1 and M1A1 Thompsons would be produced by Savage and Auto-Ordnance by February of 1944, when the Thompson was finally replaced by the yet cheaper M3 "Grease Gun".

This is the fourth in a 5-part series on the development of the Thompson...

Note: I refer to the M1A1 in this video as a transferrable gun; it is actually a pre-May dealer sample. Sorry!
 

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Strange History: A Remington Rolling Block From the USS Niagara
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Oct 16, 2018
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The story of the USS Niagara is quite an odd little corner of history. It was a ship built in 1877 and acquired by the US Navy in 1898, fitted out as a water distillery and supply ship. That fitting out was not actually done by the Navy, though, but rather by a group of wealth private citizens in New York, headed by William Randolph Hearst. As an outburst of (allegedly) grassroots support for the US war effort against Spain, these men outfitted and donated the Niagara to the Navy. And the fitted it out like a private yacht, with porcelain china and silver flatware for all the officers and sailors, and much more. The arms and accouterments purchased were all finely stamped or engraved with the name of the ship, including 35 brand new Remington Rolling Block rifles in 7mm Mauser, with “NIAGARA” engraved in bold letters across the top of the receiver.

Once the outfitting was complete and the ship was in Navy service, she sailed down to Cube, stayed on station for about two months without participating in any action of note, and then sailed back to New York to be decommissioned and sold for scrap. Francis Bannerman was on hand at the scrap auction, and bought most of the small items form the ship (including the rifles). Bannerman’s catalog would list Niagara items until 1927...
 

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Shooting the Thompsons: Comparing the 1921, 21/28, and M1A1
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Oct 17, 2018
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Having gone through the whole series of Thompson submachine guns, now it's time to take them out to the range! I was quite curious to see how the different variations would handle side by side, since they have several significant differences. The Cutt's Compensator and the changing rate of fire can both be expected to have a noticeable impact on the shootability of the guns.

I went in expecting to prefer the World War Two M1A1 pattern, and was rather surprised to find myself actually liking the 1921 model best. It's very high rate of fire actually worked very well, with less noticeable vibration and sight disruption than either of the other types. Its sights are close to useless, and it is both heavy and awkward to handle - but I can see why it developed the following it has!
 

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Solothurn 20mm S18-1000 Wheeled Carriage
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Oct 18, 2018
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Before they became obsolete, antitank rifles were a way to bring substantial firepower to small infantry teams - but they were never light weight. As with some of the early water cooled heavy machine guns, designers looked for ways to make the weapons more easily transported, and the solution arrived at for the Solothurn S18-1000 20mm cannon was a small wheeled mount. Complete with elevation adjustment to raise the gun just above the available cover and trail arms to secure it against recoil movement, the carriage allowed the gun to be early pulled by its crew or by a draft animal, bicycle, or light motorized vehicle. Most buyers of the guns did not opt to purchase these carriages, however, and they are quite scarce today.
 

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Smith & Wesson 76: American's Vietnam 9mm SMG
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Oct 19, 2018
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Early in the Vietnam War, the US Navy acquired a quantity of Swedish M/45B submachine guns (“Swedish K”) for special forces use. By 1966, however, the Swedish government would no longer authorize sales of arms to the United States because of involvement in the Vietnam War. So instead, the US turned to Smith & Wesson to design and produce a copy of the gun. In January of 1967 the first prototypes were presented of the S&W Model 76, which incorporated a number of changes form the Swedish original. The S&W gun had an ambidextrous selector lever allowing either semiauto or full auto fire, and a permanently fitted magazine well for use with a close copy of the Suomi 36 round double stack box magazine. Most interestingly, the inside of the receiver tube is cut with long rifling-like grooves to allow dirt and fouling to accumulate without impacting the gun’s reliability.

Only a relatively small number of 76s were procured by the Navy (under the designation Mk 24 Mod 0), as the availablity of AR15/M16 carbines proved more attractive option than 9mm submachine guns. The company would continue making them until 1974, with a total of 6,000 produced. This particular example is a T prefix serial, which I suspect (but cannot prove) was Navy purchase.

The reputation of the S&W 76 has been unfortunately tarnished by a succession of full auto and semiauto clones, none of which are as well made or as reliable in use as the original S&W production.
 

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Enfield No5 MkI Jungle Carbine
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Published on Oct 19, 2018
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In this video we take a look at the Enfield No5 MkI chambered in .303 British, better known as the "Jungle Carbine." We take this old girl out to 300 yards and give a few tips on accurately verifying a real No5 against the commercial variants produced over the years. Stay tuned, much more on the way.

DISCLAIMER: Our videos are strictly for documentary, educational, and entertainment purposes only. Imitation or the use of any acts depicted in these videos is solely AT YOUR OWN RISK. All work on firearms should be carried out by a licensed individual and all state and federal rules apply to such. We (including YouTube) will not be held liable for any injury to yourself or damage to your firearms resulting from attempting anything shown in any our videos. We do not endorse any specific product and this video is not an attempt to sell you a good or service. We are not a gun store and DO NOT sell or deal in firearms. Such a practice is heavily regulated and subject to applicable laws. We DO NOT sell parts, magazines, or firearms. These videos are free to watch and if anyone attempts to charge for this video notify us immediately. By viewing or flagging this video you are acknowledging the above.

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German World War Two Machine Guns in Action
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Published on Oct 17, 2018
What would it be like to try and attempt to shoot historical small arms in some of the ways that they were actually used in the past? We try and do that in this episode with German small arms in a small team setting, assaulting an objective across open terrain using a base of fire complimented by fire and maneuver. We were able to get access to fully automatic machine guns such as the MG42 and MG34, in addition to the MP40 submachine gun and landmark STG44 rifle. Of course we also had on hand Mauser K98s that complimented the historical firepower. There was a G43 that was on hand but the rifle suffered some malfunctions that didn't allow us to use it in the live fire.

What did we learn though? We found out that the K98s became extremely hot in a short period of time while rapid firing. We learned how to properly handle open bolt submachine guns and some of the intricacies that require a user to "Lock, Look, (Un)Load" before using them. Of course, the STG44 most likely carried the day with its historic contribution to the dawn of modern service rifles and was envied by all. The MG42 was indeed impressive but with the ammunition we were using, it was very difficult to get it running.

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