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Older, Odd, Offbeat And Forgotten Guns & Ammo

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The MG 08/15 Updated Between the Wars
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Oct 25, 2018
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In the aftermath of World War One, the Treaty of Versailles strictly limited the number of machine guns that the German military could keep in inventory. The main type that the Germans chose to keep was the MG08/15 (although a substantial number of MG08 guns were kept as well). Through the 1920s and 1930s, these Maxim guns were improved and updated in a variety of ways until finally replaced by the MG34 starting in 1936. Many of these updated 08/15s would be deployed in reserve areas during World War Two, but relatively few survive today. Today we are looking at one such gun, and noting the changes made to it compared to the 08/15 of World War One. Specifically:

* Anti-aircraft sights and mounting brackets
* Oiler bottle in the stock
* Bipod attachment at the muzzle
* New water drain and fill plugs
* Modified drum hanger bracket
* Feed block for both cloth Maxim belts and metal MG34 belts
* Leather pistol grip cover
* Top cover locking latch
 

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Ingram Model 6: Like A Thompson Without the Price Tag (Sort Of)
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Oct 26, 2018
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Before he made a big success with the M10 (MAC-10) submachine gun, Gordon Ingram designed a couple other guns. His initial M5 submachine gun and M20 light machine gun never went past prototype stage, but the M6 did prove to be successful, at least in a limited way. The M6 was a very simple blowback .45ACP submachine gun very deliberately made to look like the Thompson. It was introduced in 1948, and in 1949 Ingram and other investors created the Police Ordnance Company to market and sell it. A total of about 2,000 were made, including an order of 400 to the Peruvian government which was coupled with a licensing agreement which would see some 8,000 more produced in Peru on license.

The Model 6 was offered in three calibers, but only the .45 ACP saw any sales (the other options were 9x19mm and .38 Super). Three configurations were detailed in the company’s marketing literature, although in production guns some of the features were mixed. The official models were the Police (finned barrel and vertical front grip), Guard (smooth barrel and horizontal front grip), and Military (smooth barrel, fully hooded sight, sling swivels, and spike bayonet). Production on lasted for a few years, as Ingram left the company in 1953 and it dissolved in 1954. Today, Model 6 submachine guns are a neat and under recognized piece of Ingram history, completely overshadowed by the M9, M10, and M11 designs which Ingram would produce later.

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Durs Egg Ferguson - The Rifle That Didn't Shoot George Washington
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Published on Oct 27, 2018
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Captain Patrick Ferguson was a British officer who designed and patented a breechloading rifle in 1776, which would actually see service in the American Revolution at the Battle of Brandywine. Ferguson presented two rifles to the British military for consideration, one of them being this specific gun. In a shooting demonstration on a windy, rainy day he convinced the Board of Ordnance of the viability of his rifle, and a field trials was set in motion. One hundred Ferguson rifles were made for the Crown, and Ferguson was detached form his Regiment to be given command of a company of specially trained elite riflemen. His men were drilled in accurate shoot as well as use of the bayonet, they were organized in small groups to make use of cover and concealment, and they were fitted with green uniforms to blend into the terrain. This unit deployed to the American colonies in 1777, and saw action in the Battle of Brandywine.

Unfortunately for Ferguson and his ideas, the unit didn’t make any particularly notable impact on the battle, although not by any fault of their own. Worse, Ferguson was wounded, and because the unit was so heavily dependent on him it was disbanded while he recuperated. He did see service again at the Battle of King’s Mountain, where he was killed in action. This particular Ferguson rifle was made by the noted London gunsmith Durs Egg, and is one of the two guns presented to the Board of Ordnance that began the whole series of events.
 

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Schwarzlose HMG Converted to 8x57mm by Romania
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Published on Oct 28, 2018
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The Schwarzlose 07/12 was made through the wolf of World War One as the standard heavy machine gun of the Austro-Hungarian armed forces, and many of them remained after the war ended. With the breakup of the Austro-hungarian Empire, these guns were dispersed to a variety of nations, among them Romania. The Romanians contracted with FN between the world wars for new 8x57mm barrels and converted a substantial number of Schwarzlose machine guns to 8x57 to match the other arms in use by the Romanian military. These guns appear to have seen little (if any) use in World War Two, and were brought into the US a few decades ago. Being after 1968, they could not be imported as live machine gun, and were instead cut into parts kits. The parts, however, are an easy drop-in conversion on an original 8x50mm Schwarzlose, resulting in a far more easily shootable machine gun thanks to the availability of 8x57mm ammunition.

In addition to the caliber conversion, several other changes were made to the guns. The water jacket and barrel were lengthened by about 4 inches and the cartridge oiler was disabled. The rear sight was replaced with one calibrated for both light and heavy 8mm Mauser loadings, and a set of mounting brackets were added to the top cover - probably for anti-aircraft sights.

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Rare Weapon : The Kara SMG
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Published on Oct 28, 2018
 

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Swiss Tankbuchse 41 Semiauto Antitank Rifle
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Published on Oct 29, 2018
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Originally developed for use in light tanks purchased from Czechoslovakia, the Tankbuchse 41 was a 24x139mm semiautomatic rifle designed by Adolph Furrer of the Waffenfabrik Bern factory. Furrer was also responsible for the LMG-25 and MP41/44 used by the Swiss, and with the TB-41 he once again used the operating system he was most familiar with: a short recoil toggle locked action. The gun was ready and adopted in 1941, and a total of 3,581 were produced, used in light tanks, lake patrol boats, fortifications, and on wheeled carriages by the infantry.

High explosive and armor piecing projectiles were made, both weighing 3475 grains (225g) and with muzzle velocities between 2800 and 2950 fps (860-900 fps). The armor piercing round could perforate 30cm of perpendicular armor plate at 500m - more than most other contemporary antitank rifles. Designed specifically for rapid fire, the gun fed from 6 round magazines, and automatically ejected the magazine when the last round was chambered, so that the crew could reload it without having to run the chagrin crank handle. The guns never saw combat use, and by the end of World War Two were being pulled back out of inventory and relegated primarily to fortress use.
 

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August Coenders' 9x19mm Belt-Fed MG
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Published on Oct 31, 2018
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August Coenders was an independent arms designer in Germany. During the 1930s he spent several years working in England and at the French Puteaux Arsenal, which contributed to a general lack of trust and interest in his designs by the German high command (the man's generally adversarial nature didn't help either). He developed several different types of gun during World War Two, including a belt-fed 8mm machine gun, a last ditch Volkssturm bolt action rifle, and this 9x19mm Parabellum caliber belt fed machine gun.

This 9mm belt-fed was probably intended for use as a vehicle machine gun, where the range and power of the ammunition was not really a liability, and where the compact nature of the gun and its ammunition would be a real advantage. The German military was not interested in it, though, and this gun was captured by American troops at the end of the war, missing its barrel and feed cover. It was taken back to Aberdeen Proving Grounds for examination, where a new barrel and an MG42-type feed cover were fabricated for it.

Today it resides in a Maltese private collection, where I had the opportunity to film it thanks to the Association of Maltese Arms Collectors and Shooters.
 

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Hunting with the 1857 Kammerlader
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Published on Oct 29, 2018
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In this video Eric discusses and shows some recent whitetail deer hunts with the 1857 Norwegian Kammerlader recently restored to 100% shootable condition by Mark Novak and his crew at Anvil Gunsmithing. These rifles are exceeding rare in the United States and even more rare to be hunting with most likely, but boy she perform a number of medium size game. Stay tuned, much more on the way.

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DISCLAIMER: Our videos are strictly for documentary, educational, and entertainment purposes only. Imitation or the use of any acts depicted in these videos is solely AT YOUR OWN RISK. All work on firearms should be carried out by a licensed individual and all state and federal rules apply to such. We (including YouTube) will not be held liable for any injury to yourself or damage to your firearms resulting from attempting anything shown in any our videos. We do not endorse any specific product and this video is not an attempt to sell you a good or service. We are not a gun store and DO NOT sell or deal in firearms. Such a practice is heavily regulated and subject to applicable laws. We DO NOT sell parts, magazines, or firearms. These videos are free to watch and if anyone attempts to charge for this video notify us immediately. By viewing or flagging this video you are acknowledging the above.

Fair Use: In the rare instance we include someone else’s footage it is covered in Fair Use for Documentary and Educational purposes with intention of driving commentary and allowing freedom of speech.

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Tommy Steele's TS V: Integrally Suppressed 9mm Carbine
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Published on Nov 2, 2018
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Thanks to a friend in South Africa, we have a chance today to take a look at one of the five prototypes of Tommy Steele's TS V semiauto carbine. This thing is completely ambidextrous (including swappable ejection ports), has an abundance of safety mechanisms, and an integral suppressor complete with massive barrel venting to (in theory) reduce muzzle velocity on standard 115gr 9mm ammunition below the speed of sound.

Steele had begun his military career with the British Royal Marines, before moving to Rhodesia and joining the Rhodesian Army. In 1980 he left the country and emigrated to South Africa, where he joined the SADF, working as an armorer. He began work on this design in the mid 1980s, but the TS V guns were not actually produced until 1996 and 1997 in South Africa. He was unable to find a financial supporter for the design, and thus it never went into series production. All five existing prototypes vary in their details, and this the first of them.
 

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Sport Systeme Dittrich Semiauto BD-38 (MP-38)
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Published on Nov 3, 2018
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Sport Systeme Dittrich in Germany is a manufacturer of a remarkably wide range of reproduction German World War Two small arms (including the FG42, StG-44, G43, MP-3008, MP-35, and VG1-5 as well as the MP-38). They have a mixed reputation, as they are magnificently accurate looking reproductions, but the Sturmgewehr in particular suffered from a great deal of parts breakage and reliability problems (in the US, these were imported as the PTR-44 many years ago). For collectors and shooters in the United States, this is generally a moot point, because the Dittrich reproductions are too accurate mechanically to be allowable for import. The BD-38 semiauto copy of the MP-38, for instance, is an open-bolt carbine, which is deemed easily convertible to fully automatic under US law (a similar conclusion was reached by the RCMP in Canada).

At any rate, I had a chance to do some shooting with a BD-38 on Malta, where the open bolt mechanism is not a concern, since collectors are allowed to own fully automatic arms anyway. Aside form a faulty original magazine, it shot quite well, as one might expect. Recoil is basically nil, given the weight of the MP38 design.

The Dittrich reproduction guns are an excellent example of the conundrum faced by manufacturers of reproduction historical guns. The market demands a very accurate reproduction, but these sorts of guns are never popular in mass-market numbers, which means the prices must be quite high to cover the costs of tooling and development. The BD-38 costs 3000-4000 Euros where it is available - which further reduces the number of potential buyers.

Thanks to the Association of Maltese Arms Collectors and Shooters (http://www.amacs-malta.org) for providing this BD-38 for video!

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Romagne 14-18 Museum Tour
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Published on Nov 4, 2018
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Jean-Paul de Vries runs a very interesting private World War One museum in the village of Romagne-sous-Montfaucon in the Meuse region of northeastern France. It is the exact opposite of typical modern museums, as it has a massive number of artifacts on display with almost no printed explanation. It is also unusual in displaying almost exclusively recovered artifacts of the war, the majority of them have been left on the fields or buried for decades. You will not find new specimens here; you will find remnants of war and weather.

That may sound dreary to some, but to me it is a very interesting way to approach the war and its history. You know that every item in this museum was actually used on the field of battle, and that can provide some interesting insights. For example, the American .30-06 Chauchat automatic rifles here indicate, contrary to most printed sources, that those guns were actually used in combat actions by American soldiers and not just for training. Tired of museums that have great open rooms with a single item on a glass case in the center? Then this is one place you will really appreciate!

The museum is an entirely private operation, and includes a small restaurant for sandwiches and such, and a shop offering books, reproduction items, and original artifacts for sale. If it located near the huge American Meuse-Argonne Cemetery, and I would highly recommend it to anyone traveling in the area with an interest in the Great War.

You can see the museum's web site here:

https://romagne14-18.com/index.php/en/
 

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Vickers-Berthier 1919 US Trials Rifle (Second Type)
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Published on Nov 6, 2018
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After designing the bolt action rifle that bears his name, Andre Berthier went on to experiment with self-loading designs. He developed a light machine gun in the years before World War One, but was not able to interest the French government in it. He also submitted that gun for US military consideration in 1917, but was similarly rebuffed (in fairness to the militaries, the gun was not really ready for field service). Then the US issued a request for semiautomatic should rifles in 1920, Berthier and his partners at the Vickers company dated the machine gun design into a closed-bolt, semiauto shoulder rifle. After rejection at the May 1920 trials, they redesigned the gas system to be shorter, and resubmitted another rifle to the followup tests in November of 1921. That resubmitted rifle is what we are looking at today.

Internally, the rifle’s design is actually much better than its ungainly external appearance would suggest - but it was still not good enough to interest the US military. The locking system is a two-piece tilting bolt, very similar to the eventually successful Vickers-Berthier light machine gun of the mid 1920s. A firing pin is fixed to the operating rod, and the trigger releases the whole op rod to jump forward under residual mainspring pressure to fire - much like the Lewis and FG42 designs. Clever safety and manual bolt hold open levers double as takedown pins, and the whole system is really quite modern for 1920/21. Unfortunately, the rifle suffered parts breakage and its top-mounted magazine was a major mark against it in US eyes (unfortunately, the magazine itself appears to have been lost since almost immediately after the firing trials).
 

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Evolution of the Karabiner 98k, From Prewar to Kriegsmodell
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Published on Nov 7, 2018
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The Mauser Karabiner 98k began production as an excellent quality rifle, with every nuance of fine fit and finish one would have expected form the Mauser company. World War Two had barely begun by the time a few compromises began to be made to maintain production, however - and by the end of the war the K98k was a mere shadow or its former self. As with the similar deterioration in quality with Japanese Arisaka rifles, the critical mechanical elements of the K98k were just as safe and functional at the very end as the were at the beginning - but the ancillary aspects came crashing down. One might argue that these changes should have been made from the beginning; that issuing an infantry rifle made to the same finish as a fine commercial sporting arm is a silly waste of resources…
 

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Karabiner-S: The East German Unicorn SKS
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Nov 8, 2018
This rifle will be sold at Rock Island in their Spring 2019 Premiere auction - it was moved after this video was filmed. Sorry!

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One of the rarest patterns of the SKS is the East German type - the Karabiner-S. Total production quantity is not known, but their survival rate is quite low and most of the examples in the US are Vietnam War bring backs. At any rate, the Karabiner-S is not quite an exact copy of the standard SKS. While it does share all the same mechanical features, the East Germans opted to leave out the butt trap cleaning kit, the cleaning rod, and to cut a German style sling slot in the stock instead of using sling swivels. These differences make the gun relatively easy to spot. Markings are a bit cryptic, with a 2-digit year of production in from of the serial number, followed by a letter prefix and a 4-digit serial number. Not all letters were used as prefixes; in fact only 6 have been documented: A, E, F, L, N, and U. Whether these have specific meaning or if this was a scheme to make production look larger than it really was (akin to the Czech vz.52 pistols) is not clear.
 

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California Arms Co 20ga "Defiance" Pistol-Shotgun
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Nov 9, 2018
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Made to compete with guns like the Ithaca Auto & Burglar, the “Defiance” form the California Arms Company is a side by side double barreled 20 gauge pistol. Only about 300 were made in the late 1920s - note that this was before the NFA introduced regulation of shot barreled shotguns. Unlike the Ithaca and most other guns of this type, the Defiance is not simply a standard side-by-side shotgun cut down in length. Instead, it uses a cast aluminum grip assembly with two manually cocked strikers (and storage for two spare shells in the grip) and a barrel assembly with an integrated aluminum fore-end. The Defiance is nothing if note robust, despite perhaps being a bit slower to use than an Ithaca. Interestingly, the marketing for the Defiance also included a strong focus on the use of tear gas ammunition in addition to standard buckshot - the Lake Erie Chemical Company developed a 20ga tear gas cartridge in partnership with the California Arms Company. It was almost certainly too small to really be effective, though, and was not able to induce enough sales to keep the Defiance on the market long.
 

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The Mini-14: A Cost-Effective Scaled-Down M14
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Nov 10, 2018
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The Ruger Mini-14 is certainly not a “forgotten” weapon, but I think there are some valuable insights to be taken from it. As a company, Ruger has an outstanding track record of making not flashy and exciting guns, but rather guns that are economical and dependable. The Mini-14 is an excellent example of that, with hundreds of thousands sold since its introduction in 1972. So today we will take a look at how Jim Sullivan simplified the M14 design when he scaled it down to 5.56mm for Ruger, and how the company used its investment casting expertise to further reduce production costs.
 

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Egyptian Rasheed
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Published on Nov 12, 2018
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In this video we take an Egyptian Rasheed carbine to the range for a little fun and discuss some of the features and history of this rare rifle. Stay tuned, much more on the way.

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DISCLAIMER: Our videos are strictly for documentary, educational, and entertainment purposes only. Imitation or the use of any acts depicted in these videos is solely AT YOUR OWN RISK. All work on firearms should be carried out by a licensed individual and all state and federal rules apply to such. We (including YouTube) will not be held liable for any injury to yourself or damage to your firearms resulting from attempting anything shown in any our videos. We do not endorse any specific product and this video is not an attempt to sell you a good or service. We are not a gun store and DO NOT sell or deal in firearms. Such a practice is heavily regulated and subject to applicable laws. We DO NOT sell parts, magazines, or firearms. These videos are free to watch and if anyone attempts to charge for this video notify us immediately. By viewing or flagging this video you are acknowledging the above.

Fair Use: In the rare instance we include someone else’s footage it is covered in Fair Use for Documentary and Educational purposes with intention of driving commentary and allowing freedom of speech.

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Colombian 7.62mm NATO M1 Garand Conversion
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Published on Nov 11, 2018
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After World War Two, Colombia adopted the .30-06 cartridge as standard, purchasing a thousand .30-06 FN49 rifles and 19,000 surplus American M1 Garand rifles. With the subsequent development of the 7.62mm NATO cartridge, Colombia experimented briefly with converting their existing Garand rifles to the new NATO round. In 1990 a large batch of Colombian surplus arms was purchased by Springfield Sporters, and it included 12 Garand’s converted to 7.62mm. The conversion was done by cutting about a half inch off the chamber end of the barrel and cutting a new 7.62x51mm chamber. The handguards, stocks, and operating rods were cut down by the same amount, allowing the use of the existing gas port. In addition, the stock and hand guard were drilled with a pattern of quarter inch holes, to provide visual and tactile indications that the rifle was no longer in its original caliber. Clearly this conversion was not deemed efficient enough to adopt en masse, as only this small batch of test rifles has been seen.
 

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Fosbery's Paradox, by Holland and Holland
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Published on Nov 12, 2018
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Lt. Col. George Fosbery was a British Army officer who was awarded the Victoria Cross for actions in India in 1863 - and that was not the only thing he did while stationed there. He also realized that there was an unmet demand for a sporting gun capable of firing both birdshot and solid ball with equal ease, for British officers interested in hunting in places where one might be equally likely to encounter fur or feather. And so he created the Paradox - basically the world’s first rifled shotgun choke. A wide pattern of rifling was engraved in the last 1.5 inches or so of a shotgun bore; enough to give a spin to solid projectiles to improve their accuracy, but not enough to severely disrupt the pattern of a load of birdshot. The result was a gun quite sufficient for either use, and Fosbery licensed his patent to Holland & Holland of London, who made beautiful guns with his Paradox name from 28ga up to 8ga.
 

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MC58: A USMC Semiauto Trainer 22 for the M14
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Published on Nov 13, 2018
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When the USMC adopted the M1 Garand in 1942, they decided they would like to have a new semiautomatic training rifle in .22 rimfire to go along with it. Eugene Reising, working for Harrington & Richardson, promptly produced a semiauto .22 LR version of his military submachine gun to fulfill that role, designated the Model 65. This rifle had a stock and barrel sized to duplicate the handling of the M1, and a nice aperture sight as well. By 1945, between 6,000 and 10,000 had been sold to the military, and total sales would reach about 18,500. After the war, H&R attempted to make the rifle more popular on the commercial market as the Leatherneck, Model 150, and Model 151, but sales were tepid.

In 1958, the USMC contracted for another quantity of the rifles, as they were adopting the M14 at that time. Several minor changes were made to the rifle, and one significant one - the safety was changed from a Reising type lever to an M1/M14 type safety located in the front of the trigger guard. This new pattern was designated the MC-58, and about 3500 were purchased by the Corps in 1958 and 1959. Serial numbers on the MC-58 rifles began at 6,000 and went to about 9,500, suggesting that 6,000 Model 65 rifles were originally purchased by the Marines during World War Two.
 

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Evolution of the Russian Rifle Part 1: ( 1860 to 1945 )
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Published on Nov 6, 2018
Early Russian Cartridge Rifles:
Krnka Rifle –
Albini-Baranova – Caliber - 15.24x or 6 lines
Early Russian Repeating Rifles:
Early Russian Bolt-Action Rifles
Carle M1867 Needle Rifle - http://milpas.cc/rifles/ZFiles/Bolt%2...
http://coollib.com/b/251569/read
Berdan Rifles / Бердан №2 -
Berdan I - http://anzob.livejournal.com/
Berdan II – http://anzob.livejournal.com/
Russian Soldiers with Berdans – http://www.surplusrifleforum.com/view...
http://www.surplusrifleforum.com/view...
http://www.surplusrifleforum.com/view...
Mosin Nagant Prototypes
Rogovtsev (Russian officer) 1885
Cholok-Antic 1883 –
Berdan-Mosin 1884 - http://guns.allzip.org/topic/36/54270...
http://forum.guns.ru/forummessage/36/...
http://forum.guns.ru/forummessage/36/...
K.-C. Habsburg 1887 Semi-automatic rifle
Mosin-Hotchkiss 1885- http://guns.allzip.org/topic/164/4777...
http://forum.guns.ru/forummessage/36/...
http://www.topguns.ru/planiruetsa-och...
Semi-Automatic Rifles
Tokarev Rifles - http://www.telenir.net/transport_i_av...
- http://lib.rus.ec/b/447389/read
SKS Simonov -
Rare Soviet Carbines
Bulkin TKB-392 - http://lib.rus.ec/b/447390/read
Garanin M1944 - http://arsenal-info.ru/b/book/2240698...
SKS Model 1945 - http://arsenal-info.ru/b/book/2240698...
Light Pistol Carbines
Tokarev Model 1927 Carbine - http://forum.guns.ru/forum_light_mess...
AKPS-34 - http://guns.allzip.org/topic/36/10324...
Korovin TKB-270 –
Korovin 1941 - http://guns.allzip.org/topic/36/10324...
Mayn Carbine - http://forum.guns.ru/forum_light_mess...
ZIDovskom carbine or Hansa Carbine - - http://guns.allzip.org/topic/36/11604...
Fedorov Avtomat Variants - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dZ1Dh...
Avtomat Korovin from 1933 - http://www.tank-net.com/forums/index....
 

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Roth Haenel Model 1899 - The First Semiauto Sporting Rifle?
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Nov 14, 2018
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While Karel Krnka and Georg Roth were in the process of developing the M1907 pistol, they diverted slightly to apply their patents to a fancy sporting semiauto rifle - the Model 1899. Produced and marketed by Haenel, the 1899 was a long recoil, rotating bolt design chambered for the German 8x45mm cartridge (approximately a 150 grain bullet at 1800 fps). The rifle was very expensive, selling for $150 around 1900-1905, ad this was probably the largest single reason why it failed to be commercial successful. At the same time, a very nice bolt action sporting rifle could be bought for $40-$50, and a brand new Winchester 1897 shotgun for $27. There is a question of whether the 1899 was the first commercial sporting semiauto rifle available, and unfortunately I don’t have the data to conclusively say. The patent dates are 1899, but that does not mean it was actually in production in 1899. It was certainly contemporary to the earliest Remington and Winchester offerings, but was not necessarily the first among them.
 

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North China Type 19: The Improved Nambu Pistol
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Published on Nov 15, 2018
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The North China Type 19 pistol (not to be confused with the North China Type 19 rifle) is an improvement on the Type 14 Nambu pistol design which was manufactured in very small numbers in Japanese-occupied China late in World War Two. With shipping connections between Japanese troops in China and the Japanese home islands cut off by US naval activity, plans were put in place to expand Japanese-run arms manufacturing in China and the Type 19 pistol was part of those plans.

The two major improvements to the Nambu design that the Type 19 incorporates are a solid frame with a disassembly lever in place of the removable trigger guard, and a redesign of the manual safety to be much more ergonomic. The magazine retention spring was also wisely discarded. Two distinct types of these pistols are known; one very well made with a bullseye style of final acceptance mark and one of very poor machining quality with a Japanese “2” character as a final proof, presumably indicating second quality. Both types have independent serial number ranges, with recorded numbers from 4 to 55 on the high quality guns and 004 to 093 on the poor ones. The explanation for these two distinct types is not known.

The intention was to produce 5,000 Type 19 pistols, but judging from the known surviving examples no more than about 200 were actually made. This is one of the scarcest Japanese WW2 pistols, and very interesting as an improvement to the Nambu design.
 

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H&K's Light Machine Guns: Rare but Effective (HK21/23 & HK11)
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Published on Nov 16, 2018
In this episode of TFBTV, James looks at Heckler & Koch's light machine guns and general purpose machine guns. The story starts with the HK21, a selective fire roller-delayed blowback-operated firearm. The HK21 was a .308 belt fed machine gun introduced in 1961 and was based on the HK91 or the G3. Accordingly, the HK21 uses a modified G3 receiver. It even has 50% parts interchangeability with the popular HK91 series of rifles. HK subsequently designed several variants. Like other HK rifles, these variants used 2 digit model numbers, and the first digit determined the type of gun, while the second digit determined the caliber. H&K made variants that were belt fed, magazine fed, and in light to medium calibers. In spite of the fact that these were extremely lightweight, accurate, and reliable weapons, they never quite took off to a large degree in many larger NATO countries. James discusses this rare but effective series of light and general purposes machine guns which have found a new life in today's video games.

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FAL Paratrooper 50.63
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Published on Nov 16, 2018
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FN introduced the paratrooper folding-stock version of the FAL rifle in the early 1960s, and it became a very popular addition to their rifle line. Since the recoil spring on the standard pattern FAL runs down the length of the buttstock, fitting a side folding stock required a redesign to the internal parts, moving the recoil spring in front go the bolt, inside the top cover. For this reason, standard and paratrooper lower receivers, top covers, springs, and bolt carriers are not interchangeable. In addition to those changes, FN developed the folding charging handle for these rifles and shortened their barrels to approximately 17 3/8 inches. The standard muzzle brake was used, and the standard handguards and folding bipod also fitted. The rear sight was fixed, with just a single 250m aperture.

A batch of 1,375 of semiauto Para FAL rifles was imported into the US before the various bans on military style rifles were instituted, and this is one of them - an all-original FN made Para!
 

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British World War One SMLE Sniper Rifle
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Published on Nov 17, 2018
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The British started World War One without a sniper program, but were quick to develop one once faced with the threat of well-trained German snipers. The initial equipment used by the British was a motley collection of commercial hunting rifles, but by 1915 the government was issuing contract to mount mostly 3x and 4x telescopes on SMLE and Pattern 1914 rifles. About 10,000 scoped sniper rifles were issued in total during the war using a variety of scopes and mount types (a standardized pattern would not be adopted until 1918). The example we have here today is the most common type; an SMLE with an offset Periscopic Prism Company scope using a 5-screw mount assembled by the same company. Later in the war the offset mounts would slowly fall out of favor to the center-mounted scopes, which allowed better shooting at the cost of being able to use stripper clips.
 

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CZ 52
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Published on Nov 14, 2018
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In this video we check out a 1954 CZ 52 "hand cannon" chambered in 7.62x25 Tokarev. Stay tuned, much more on the way.

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DISCLAIMER: Our videos are strictly for documentary, educational, and entertainment purposes only. Imitation or the use of any acts depicted in these videos is solely AT YOUR OWN RISK. All work on firearms should be carried out by a licensed individual and all state and federal rules apply to such. We (including YouTube) will not be held liable for any injury to yourself or damage to your firearms resulting from attempting anything shown in any our videos. We do not endorse any specific product and this video is not an attempt to sell you a good or service. We are not a gun store and DO NOT sell or deal in firearms. Such a practice is heavily regulated and subject to applicable laws. We DO NOT sell parts, magazines, or firearms. These videos are free to watch and if anyone attempts to charge for this video notify us immediately. By viewing or flagging this video you are acknowledging the above.

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British 1942 Prototype Simplified...Enfield?
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Published on Nov 18, 2018
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In 1942, the British government instituted a development program to design a new simplified rifle to replace the No4 MkI Lee Enfield. The CSAD (Central Small Arms Department) came up with a design using a quite simple receiver machined form a small steel billet. It was a rifle wholly distinct form the Enfield, although both were chambered for the .303 British cartridge. The simplified rifle used a front-locking bolt, a simplified cocking piece, and had a magazine holding just 6 rounds. The sights were a simple 300/600 yard rear aperture, and a crude spike bayonet could be fitted either forward for use or rearward for storage.

The project never got as far as serial production, or even field trials as far as I can tell, and only a handful of prototypes were made.
 

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Yugoslavian M48 8mm Mauser
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Published on Nov 16, 2018
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The Yugo M48 8mm Mauser came about after WWII. The Yugoslavians manufactured and stored lots of these rifles which are very similar to the German K98 Mauser. I found this one at J&G Sales. These too will become collectible rifles soon.
 

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Wehrmannsgewehr - German Shooting Competition After WW1
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Nov 19, 2018
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Introduced by a Dutchman in 1897, the Wehrmannsgewehr was a type of 3-position shooting competition using military pattern rifles in a sporting caliber (the 8x46R, firing roughly a 150 grain lead bullet at 1800 fps). It was pretty limited in popularity in Germany until the end of World War One, when the Treaty of Versailles prohibited Germans from owning military arms. At that point, the sporting-caliber Wehrmannsgewehr became a very handy loophole in the law as a way for men to practice shooting skills with military style rifles. It would become quite widespread especially in northern Germany until the 1930s, when rimfire shooting began to eclipse it (the .22 rimfire ammunition was a lot cheaper, the guns were promoted by the government, and the 50m rimfire ranges were much more common than the 300m ranges required for Wehrmannsgewehr matches. Examples of these rifles were both made brand new and also converted from existing Gewehr 98s; this is an example of a conversion made by Haenel. As is typical, it is a single-shot rifle, with the magazine left filled with wood and a new stock covering the magazine area.
 

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Mosin-Nagant Factory Pressure Test Rifle
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Published on Nov 20, 2018
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How did people determine chamber pressure in the years before computers and fancy electronics? Well, by squishing a calibrated slug of copper. Factories would convert rifles specifically for pressure testing use by adding a pressure ring around the chamber, drilling a hole in it, and then threading in a gage to crush a block of copper. This Mosin Nagant is an excellent example of the system, complete with the all the testing apparatus!
 

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Ishapore No6 Jungle Carbine SMLE Prototype
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Published on Nov 21, 2018
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In 1943, the British government began a program to develop a shortened and lightened version of the No1 SMLE rifle, for production in India and Australia - where the national ordnance factories had not converted to production of the No4 rifle. This prototype is the first pattern produced by the Ishapore Arsenal for testing. Its barrel is cut down to 16.5 inches (plus a 2.8 inch long conical flash hider), it has a unique 3-position flag style of rear aperture sight, and has had its sling swivels repositioned. This rifle was tested in the UK, and some modifications were recommended. A second pattern from Ishapore was then provisionally approved as the No6 MkI on September 1st, 1944, but cancelled before production could begin. The Australian pattern of No6 was approved a year late in September 1945, but then declared obsolete before it could be put into production. With the end of World War Two and Indian independence in 1947, the funding and impetus for a new short rifle were lost, and instead Ishapore would end up converting its production to No1 pattern rifles in 7.62mm NATO a few years later.
 

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The RPD Light Machine Gun: A Belt Fed in an Intermediate Cartridge
TFB TV


Published on Nov 21, 2018
The RPD was the culmination of Soviet light machine gun designs that began with the DP-28 of pre-World War Two days, and ending with the RPD, or Ruchnoy Pulemyot Degtyaryova. It was a lightweight, belt-fed from a drum, gas operated machine gun chambered in the Soviet M43 7.62x39mm cartridge. Some call it one of the first true squad automatic weapons, being introduced at least a decade before the Minimi ever came on the scene. It was produced by the Soviet Union, Poland, Egypt, China, and North Korea under various designations. In China it has been asserted that it might have been part of a covert export line of light machine guns, being marked without Chinese markings and with the designation "M23".

One of the criticisms of the RPD was the fact that it didn't have a quick-change barrel as many later light and general purpose machine guns would incorporate into their designs. This forces the user to be somewhat conservative with their rate of fire out of fear of making the machine gun too hot to operate reliably. As we found out in the episode, shooting the entire drum at the cyclic rate of fire makes even the wooden handguards too warm to touch with bare hands.
 

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When M14 Meets M16: The Fort Ellis XR-86 Frankenrifle
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Published on Nov 22, 2018
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This rifle is the home shop creation of one Wilfred Ellis, a talented gunsmith form Pennsylvania. It is basically a combination of an M14 gas system with an AR15 bolt and locking system, plus an in-line tubular receiver, M60 flash hider, and side-mounted magazine. Not exactly the sort of thing that will replace the M4 in military service, but an example of the sort of fun gunsmithing projects that you can put together just because it seems interesting to try. Neat!
 

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The Israeli Galil
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Published on Nov 23, 2018
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The Galil was the result of a program to replace the FAL in Israeli service after its somewhat disappointing performance in the Six-Day War of 1967. Israel found that while the FAL had shown reliability problems in the desert, AK rifles ran just fine despite often being badly neglected. In an initial series of tests, captured AK rifles came out superior to M16 and Stoner 63 rifles. This led to a more extensive series of tests and developmental work in which Yisrael Balashnikov developed a number of prototype rifles based on AK actions modified to 5.56mm using Stoner barrels and magazines. This second trial would ultimately compare the M16, Stoner 63, HK33, AR18, Beretta and Steyr rifles, and domestic developments by both Balashnikov and Uziel Gal. The Balashnikov rifles would prove the ultimate winner of the competition.

Balashnikov - whose name being so similar to Kalashnikov through pure coincidence, and who was originally born Mishmar Hayarden in Russia - would change his name to the more Hebrew sounding Yisrael Galili, and the new rifle pattern would be named the Galil after him. While the prototypes had been built on captured Soviet-bloc AKs, the production version would be based on the Finnish Rk-62 Valmet receiver. The Galil featured a great many improvements and additions to the AKM, including much better rear-mounted aperture sights, night sights, integral bipod (on some models), folding stock, ambidextrous safety and bolt handle, folding carry handle, and of course, a bottle opener. The Galil was formally adopted in 1972, but never did completely equip the Israeli Army, as surplus M16 rifles form the US were available for little or no cost. It was phased out by about 2000 and replaced by the Tavor series.

Prior to 1989, semiauto Galil could be imported into the US for commercial sale, and between 7000 and 9000 were brought in by a succession of importers (Magnum Research, Action Arms, and Springfield Armory). A 7.62mm NATO version of the Galil was introduced in 1983, which was not used by the Israeli military but did see adoption by Colombia as well as limited commercial sale in the US. The standard 5.56mm Galil were purchased by an array of foreign militaries including Guatemala, Nicaragua, Estonia, Portugal, and South Africa (where it served as the basis for the domestic production R4 series).
 

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Germany's WW1 Zeiss Bifocal Scope: the Glasvisier 16
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Nov 24, 2018
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The Zeiss 2.5x Glasvizier 16 optic is one of the most unusual and interesting of the German sighting systems used on rifles during the First World War. It is a bifocal optic, working in the same way as today’s SeeAll optic. Basically, a section of magnifying lens sits in the bottom third of the field of view, which magnifies the huge white triangle that clips over the rifle’s front sight. By lining the tip of this triangle up on your target, you can get a parallax-free sight picture. The front and rear portions are both clip-on and can be removed in seconds, allowing the system to be fielded without needing to permanently convert rifles to a sniper configuration. The system is interesting and does work, but like its SeeAll descendent today, it is not really what someone expects to get from a 2.5s optical sight. I don’t have any data on the number produced or the extent to which they were fielded during the war (although this particular optic is serialized #4807), but I suspect that its unorthodox nature led to a poor reputation amongst troops and a fairly limited field use. Certainly these are one of the rarest f the German WW1 optics, and one would expect to see more surviving if they had been widely used.

Want to try out this sort of optics sight on a gun of your own, without paying the WW1 historical premium? The SeeAll works the same way, and you can find them here: https://seeallopensight.com

You can also check out today’s review of the SeeAll over on InRangeTV:
 

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Colt Checks out the Spanish Wondernine: the Star 30PK
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Published on Nov 25, 2018
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Star entered the Wondernine era in 1978 with their Model 28 pistol, a double action 9mm offering with 15-round magazines. It was one of the entrants in the first round of US military XM-9 trials, but unfortunately for Star was beat out by the Beretta 92. Star took feedback on its gun from the commercial market, and revised a number of small elements to create the Model 30, released in 1981. A few years later (in 1986), the Colt company purchased 20 Stars - 10 30Ms and 10 30PKs - for “internal review” to see if they might be interested in manufacturing the design. They decided not to, and sold the guns off to Colt employees not much later.

A quick designation guide to the Star 28/30/31 series; M indicated a military pattern with a full length slide, P indicates a Police pattern with a shorter slide, and K indicated an aluminum alloy frame instead of the standard steel frame.
 

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Type 13 Manchurian Mauser - A WW1 Legacy in China
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Nov 26, 2018
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The Liao Type 13 was produced at what would become known as the Mukden Arsenal in Manchuria starting in 1924, with production facilitated by the Steyr company of Austria. Late in World War One, Steyr developed an improved pattern of Mauser rifle, with a shrouded firing pin, shrouded striker, gas vent holes, detachable box magazines, and receiver dust cover. The rifle was not put into production because of cost and time constraints, and after the war Steyr was prohibited from building military arms by the Treaty of Versailles. However, they were able to license the design to Zhang Zuolin, the ruler of Manchuria. About 140,000 were made in total, know today as the Liao Type 13 or simply the Manchurian Mauser. The Manchurian version incorporated most of the Steyr design elements with the exception of the detachable magazines. Unfortunately, virtually all of these rifle today are missing their dust covers, which also served to prevent the rear of the bolt from rotating while being cycled. Owners today need to be careful of this, as we can see from the gouge in this particular one.
 

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4mm Zimmerstutzen Parlor Conversion for a Mauser 1914
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Published on Nov 27, 2018
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This 4mm “Zimmerstutzen” conversion kit was patented by one Karl Weiss in 1921, and produced by the RWS company in Germany. Versions were made for several different types of pistol, but the Mauser 1914 was a particularly suitable base thanks to its very easy removed barrel. The kit consists of a new 132mm long 4mm (rifled) barrel, four .32 ACP chamber adapters, a supply of 4mm zimmerstutzen cartridges, and a manual ejection rod for removing the fired cases from the cartridge adapters. The cartridge itself is basically a stretched centerfire primer with a 7 grain lead ball seated in the end. While just as accurate as .22 rimfire at short ranges, it is much less powerful, and can be safely fire with a simply pellet trap indoors without the noise and expense of shooting full size ammunition.