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Older, Odd, Offbeat And Forgotten Guns & Ammo

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ChauChat with C&Rsenal
Iraqveteran8888


Published on Nov 24, 2018
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In this video the kind folks from C&Rsenal join us along with Mark Novak from Anvil Gunsmithing to shoot and discuss the French Chauchat machine gun. The Chauchat is a very quirky LMG from the early 20th century that features a long recoil action resulting in a massive amount of felt recoil, uncomfortable offset sights, very delicate stamped steel magazines and fires the 8mm Lebel cartridge. All that aside these are highly collectible transferable machine guns and having a working example is very rare and indeed a special opportunity to shoot. Stay tuned, much more on the way.

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DISCLAIMER: Our videos are strictly for documentary, educational, and entertainment purposes only. Imitation or the use of any acts depicted in these videos is solely AT YOUR OWN RISK. All work on firearms should be carried out by a licensed individual and all state and federal rules apply to such. We (including YouTube) will not be held liable for any injury to yourself or damage to your firearms resulting from attempting anything shown in any our videos. We do not endorse any specific product and this video is not an attempt to sell you a good or service. We are not a gun store and DO NOT sell or deal in firearms. Such a practice is heavily regulated and subject to applicable laws. We DO NOT sell parts, magazines, or firearms. These videos are free to watch and if anyone attempts to charge for this video notify us immediately. By viewing or flagging this video you are acknowledging the above.
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age it is covered in Fair Use for Documentary and Educational purposes with intention of driving commentary and allowing freedom of speech.

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4mm Zimmerstutzen Parlor Conversion for a Mauser 1914
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Nov 27, 2018
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This 4mm “Zimmerstutzen” conversion kit was patented by one Karl Weiss in 1921, and produced by the RWS company in Germany. Versions were made for several different types of pistol, but the Mauser 1914 was a particularly suitable base thanks to its very easy removed barrel. The kit consists of a new 132mm long 4mm (rifled) barrel, four .32 ACP chamber adapters, a supply of 4mm zimmerstutzen cartridges, and a manual ejection rod for removing the fired cases from the cartridge adapters. The cartridge itself is basically a stretched centerfire primer with a 7 grain lead ball seated in the end. While just as accurate as .22 rimfire at short ranges, it is much less powerful, and can be safely fire with a simply pellet trap indoors without the noise and expense of shooting full size ammunition.
 

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Weird Slide Action Prototype Rifles
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Nov 28, 2018
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These two slide action rifles came form the same collection, and are pretty clearly related - one is a toolroom type of early prototype and the other is a refined pre-production sort of example. However, we have no idea who made them, or when or where. They look well made enough to have been the product of a legitimate firearms factory, but could also have been the work of a dedicated hobbyist. Without markings or provenance, we will probably never know. But they certainly are interesting to take a look at!
 

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A .50 Caliber 1911: Guncrafter Industries Model 1
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Nov 29, 2018
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Guncrafter Industries is a custom handgun company formed by one Alex Zimmerman in 2002 after many years working for Wilson Combat. Among other things, they make custom 1911 pistols chambered for the .50 GI (Guncrafter Industries) cartridge, also designed by Zimmerman. The idea of the cartridge is to have a larger bullet diameter without having the excessive power and recoil of a magnum type round like the .50 Action Express or .45 Winchester Magnum. The .50GI is loaded to .45 ACP pressure levels, and offers loadings ranging from 185gr @ 1200fps to 300gr @ 700 fps. The case head is rebated, and the same size as the .45ACP case head, allowing for easy conversion back to .45 ACP if one desires.

The basic conceit of this pistol and cartridge is that a larger bullet is more effective and thus worth the less of capacity (.50GI magazines hold 7 rounds). Whether that actually stands up to reality does not seem assured, especially considering the vast amount of development which has gone into smaller caliber expanding bullets compared to the few basic offerings for the .50 caliber.

Of course, it’s also possible that the gun is just simply based on the giggle factor of having a fifty caliber 1911.
 

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H&K VP-70M: Polymer Framed Cutting Edge Machine Pistol from 1973
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Nov 30, 2018
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The VP-70 was designed by Heckler & Koch cofounder Alex Seidel, and introduced in 1973. It was made with the idea of being a gun easily mass produced for arming a civilian resistance in case of Russian invasion of East Germany, but the West German government opted not to adopt it. In the original military form, the gun is semiautomatic as a pistol, with the option to use a 3-round burst firing mode when the shoulder stock is attached. The stock also doubles as a holster.

Mechanically, the VP-70 is simple blowback, and has several features which were quite cutting edge at the time. It is the first production service pistol to use a polymer frame, and it came with double-stack, double-feed 18-round magazines; the highest standard capacity of the day. It is striker fired, and the striker is at rest completely forward, unlike modern striker-fired pistol which use the cycling of the slide to partially cock the striker. This means that the VP70 is ac very safe action, but has a trigger pull best compared to a staple gun.

After the military rejection of the VP-70M, a civilian model was made, designated the VP-70Z. This model did not have any of the burst fire components, not the fittings to attach the buttstock. About 23,000 were made, including about 400 in 9x21mm for the Italian commercial market. This is far more than the approximately 3,500 VP-70M pistols made.

Thanks to H&K for providing access to bring you this VP-70M!
 

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H&K VP-70M on the Range: How Useful is the Burst Fire?
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Dec 1, 2018
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After looking at the history and mechanics of the VP-70 yesterday, we are heading out to the range to try it out (and thanks to Trijicon for generously offering use of their range!). I am curious to see just what that 2200 rpm rate of fire is like to shoot, and whether the awful trigger is as much of a hindrance to effective burst shooting as it is to simple semiauto. So, in addition to some shooting of the VP-70M, I will also be comparing it to an MP5...

Thanks to H&K for providing access to bring you this VP-70M!
 

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Rare 1907 US Military Trials Luger 45 ACP
Military Arms Channel


Published on Nov 30, 2018
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This is an incredible piece of American history. Before the 1911 there was a trial to decide which handgun the US military would adopt for its first ever autoloading sidearm. The 1907 .45 ACP Luger was in the running. Lugerman has made a faithful reproduction that we explore in this video
 

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The old Bushmaster M17S bullpup
Legally Armed America


Published on Dec 1, 2018
What a cool old gun I stumbled across. The M17S is a fun gun made by Bushmaster back when they were in Windham, ME.

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Pre-Production FG-42 (Type C)
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Dec 3, 2018
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Thanks to the generosity of a collector in the Association of Maltese Arms Collectors and Shooters, we have a chance today to take a look at a pre-production FG-42, serial number 015. This is one of the guns manufactured by Rheinmetall (the series production would be handed over to Krieghoff) in between the Type A and B prototypes and the Type D troops trials guns. Its provenance is well documented, being previously owned by noted Dutch collector Henk Visser, who received it as a gift form the Rheinmetall factory museum, where it had been since the end of the war.

The gun shows a few minor variations from the standard "first pattern" (aka Type E) FG-42, including a split pin to attach the trigger group and more notably, a completely different type of rear sight. It also, exhibits a modified French MAS-36 bayonet, proving the lineage in that design element (not that there was really any doubt...). In our video, we will discuss the early development of the FG42, and where this rifle is situated in that story!

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Favorite WWI stuff
Military Arms Channel


Published on Dec 4, 2018
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Here are some of my favorite firearms from WWI. We don't get into any great detail, but we do have some fun with a variety of my favorite shooters. This isn't all of them, but this is all I could squeeze into 30 minutes. Perhaps a video or two more will come out if you all like this one.
 

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Final Prices: Morphy's Fall 2018 Auction
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Dec 4, 2018
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As usual, I have a recap today of the final prices of the guns I filmed from the most recent Morphy's auction (Fall 2018). One of the things I noticed here is an opportunity for people interested in some of the big tripod-mounted early heavy machine guns. They aren't cheap my most standards, but compared to other NFA registered machine guns, they are a tremendous value for the money. Many of these guns - things like the Maxim, Vicker, Schwarloze, Hotchkiss - are magnificently engineered guns that were true queens of the battlefield in their day. But they are old, heavy, and cumbersome (not to mention typically not highlighted in movioes and video games), and not so popular these days. Definitely an opportunity for the machine gun connoisseur, in my opinion.
 

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South African Kommando: The "Rhuzi"
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Dec 5, 2018
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The Kommando was a semiauto SMG-type carbine designed by Alex du Plessis in Salisbury Rhodesia in the late 1970s. It was manufactured by a company called Lacoste Engineering, and financed by a man named Hubert Ponter - and those initials were the name of the initial production version of the gun; LDP. The gun is a quite simple design, a tube-receiver, open bolt gun with a fixed firing pin and an Uzi-type bolt which telescopes forward over the barrel. It uses unmodified Uzi magazines, and that along with it's Uzi-like construction and styling led to one of its nicknames, the Rhuzi (the others were alternate interpretations of the LDP initials; Land Defense Pistol and Lots of Dead People).

About one thousand LDP carbines were made in Rhodesia, and were also sold in neighboring South Africa. This led to an arrangement with a company called Maxim Parabellum to produce it in South Africa under the name Kommando. Eventually a total of about 10,000 were made between the two countries, making this one of the most common guns of its type made in that time and place. The South African government required the addition of an extra safety device to prevent runaway firing with underpowered ammunition, and a number of details evolved through production, most notably the stock locking system.
 

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Ammunition Evaluation: Ethiopian 7.92x57mm Mauser
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Dec 6, 2018
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Century International Arms has imported a quantity of Ethiopian ammunition, and asked me to do a video on it. So, I have a three-part evaluation here: appearance and packaging, live fire testing (including velocity and consistency), and teardown and bullet weight consistency. This ammunition was produced (as best I can tell) at the Emperor Haile Selassie Ammunition Factory, established with Czech technical aid in the late 1940s in Addis Ababa. This ammunition is all headstamped 1955, made for a variety of rifles and machine guns including the ZH-29, ZB-26, and FN BAR.

Velocity:

I tested velocity using a 7.92x57mm Yugoslav reworked K98k Mauser rifle (barrel length 23.6 inches). Measurements were taken at 10 feet from the muzzle, with a sample size of 15 rounds fired. I found an average velocity of 2460 fps, extreme spread of 81 fps (max 2505, min 2424), and standard deviation of 22.69 fps. At least half of the rounds fired exhibited a very brief hangfire, and two required a second primer strike to fire.

Bullets:

I tested the weight of 10 bullets using a calibrated Lyman electronic scale. I found an average weight of 197.4 grains, extreme spread of 1.6 grains (max 197.8 gr, min 196.2 gr), and standard deviation of 0.47 grains. Bullet construction is boat tail with an open base, lead core, and gilding metal over steel jacket (these bullets do attract a magnet). I found a seeming random mixture of silver and brass colored jackets in the boxes I opened.

Century advertises this ammunition as using corrosive primers, and I took them at their word and did not test for corrosivity.

Raw data:

Velocities (fps): 2465, 2475, 2440, 2464, 2468, 2433, 2460, 2484, 2424, 2437, 2429, 2474, 2472, 2465, 2505

Bullet weights (grains): 197.5, 197.7, 196.2, 197.1, 197.6, 197.6, 197.3, 197.7, 197.8, 197.4

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Stoner 63, 63A, & Mk23: History and Mechanics
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Dec 7, 2018
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The Stoner 63 is a firearm surrounded by a tremendous amount of mythology. It was Eugene Stoner's big project following on the AR-15, and it was a brilliant piece of engineering - a single modular receiver which could be assembled into a half dozen different configurations:

Carbine
Rifle
Automatic rifle ("Bren")
Light machine gun
Medium machine gun
Vehicular/coaxial machine gun

The ingenuity required to make all of these different variations work on a single receiver is momentous, and the fact that the resulting gun is heralded as one of the best machine gun designs ever made really cements Stoner's legacy as a brilliant firearms designer. In today's video, we are going to look at all the different configurations, and also examine the changes between the original Stoner 63 system and the 63A versions which would come after the USMC combat trials in Vietnam. We will also look at the third iteration, the Mk23 as adopted by the US Navy SEALs. I owe a tremendous thanks to Movie Armaments Group in Toronto for being given access to this virtually 100% complete Stoner kit!

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Is the Stoner 63 Really So Good? Shooting the Mk23, Bren, and 63A Carbine
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Dec 8, 2018
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Is the Stoner 63 really as good of a gun as everyone says? Today is my first opportunity to try one out on the range, and I'm going to look at it in three different configurations: the Mk23 SEAL light machine gun, the "Bren" style automatic rifle, and the carbine. Let's see how it handles!

I owe a tremendous thanks to Movie Armaments Group in Toronto for the opportunity to take the Stoner kit out to the range! Check them out on Instagram to see many of the guns in their extensive collection: https://instagram.com/moviearmamentsg...

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One Million Subscriber Special! The French 75 - Guns, Drinks, and Shirts!
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Dec 9, 2018
Holy cow, a million subscribers! When I started Forgotten Weapons, I never for a moment suspected it would end up this popular. Thank you to everyone who has subscribed! I think this required a celebratory cocktail...specifically, a French 75. So let's talk about the French 75 the gun - the Canon de 75 modèle 1897 - as well as the cocktail named after it.

In celebration of the milestone, we have a two-day sale on some of the merchandise at the Forgotten Weapons store - which you should check out:

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I would also like to mention that you can now find lots of Forgotten Weapons content on Amazon Prime, where videos have been compiled into 1-2 hour themed series:

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And last but certainly not least, a huge thanks to everyone who supports Forgotten Weapons on Patreon! Your support is what has made this possible, and what will keep it here for years to come.

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Mateba MTR-8
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Dec 10, 2018
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The MTR-8 was Emilio Ghisoni's first revolver design, predating the more popular and better known Mateba semiauto revolvers and the Chiappa Rhino. The MTR-8 was designed for competition shooting, and made in a variety of calibers and configurations, including long carbine versions, different barrel lengths, and calibers including .22LR, .32 S&W, .38 Special, and .357 Magnum. Ghisoni's design puts the recoil force in line with the shooter's arm as would all of his later designs, but it does this by moving the entire cylinder down and firing from the top chamber. This has the side effect of decoupling the cylinder from the lockwork and allowing a quite narrow and handy frame with a large cylinder. The .38 and .357 models hold 8 rounds, while the .32 caliber ones have 12-round cylinders and the .22 rimfire guns 14 rounds. The carbine types have even larger capacities. It should be noted that unlike his later Mateba revolver, the MTR series are tradition DA/SA guns, not semiautomatic or self-cocking. A total of only about 500 were made.

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Czech ZB30: The Best WWII Era Light Machine Gun?
TFB TV



Published on Dec 11, 2018
The Czech ZB30 was probably one of the better light machine gun designs that saw extensive use during the Second World War. Nations such as Japan and Britain copied aspects of it in the Bren and Japanese Type 99 LMG. It was also license-produced in some other countries as well. It was a top mounted magazine-fed, gas operated, light machine gun that incorporated a bolt hold open catch when rounds ran out. A variant of the ZB26, the light machine gun had a number of unique features that came to be standard on light machines of the time.

This video would not have been possible without the express help of Machine Gun Dad, aka Scott Howard, who generously lent us his time, hardware, and expertise in these episodes. See more at-

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Over the next several episodes we'll be looking at derivatives of the ZB26/ZB30 such as the Type 99 and the British Bren. But the ZB30 was definitely the best action of all three. The quality of machining and manufacturing that went into the design is blatan2tly obvious the first time a burst is fired from it. The parts just seem to slide over and with each other extremely efficiently, to the point where shooting it on fully automatic is just pure joy in so many ways.

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Final Prices: RIA December 2018 (#75)
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Dec 11, 2018
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(Reuploaded to fix a formatting goof - sorry!)

As usual, I have a recap today of the final prices of the guns I filmed from the most recent Rock Island auction (December 2018; #75). There were a few guns here that people got very nice deals on, but also a lot of guns that sold for more than I would have expected.
 

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German K43 in 8mm Mauser
Military Arms Channel


Published on Dec 11, 2018
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The K43 (or sometimes known as the G43) was Germany's self loading rifle of the second world war. Chambered in 8mm like their Mauser bolt action, the K43 was an interesting early self loading rifle deployed during the conflict.
 

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XM29 OICW Mockup
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Dec 12, 2018
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The OICW - Objective Individual Combat Weapon - was part of a program in the 1980s and 1990s to replace the whole lineup of uS small arms with a consolidated group of new high-tech ones. The M4, M16, and M203 would be replaced by the OICW, the M240, M2, and Mk 19 would be replaced by the Objective Crew Served Weapon, the M40 sniper rifle would be replaced by the Objective Sniper Weapon, and the M9 pistol would be replaced by the Objective Personal Weapon. The OICW was basically a mashup of a 5.56mm carbine with a semiautomatic 20mm grenade launchers. The weapon received a lot of attention because it sounded really impressive on paper - the grenades could be programmed with a laser rangefinder to detonate at any desired range. Just past walls, just inside windows, that sort of thing. The weapon had a big multi-function optical sight that would allow both day and night vision and a bunch of other features.

In reality, however, the XM29 (as it was designated) was a 15-pound clumsy and awkward boat anchor of a weapon. While the many capabilities may have looked good on paper, the XM29 was pretty awful for regular soldiering - heavy to carry and slow to use. The whole program would end in the mid 1990s. However, the carbine element of the OICW would go on to become the XM-8 family of rifles, which did make a serious bid at replacing the M4/M16 as American standard infantry weapons. We will look at the XM-8 family tomorrow...

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DeserTech 7.62mm MDR Teardown
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Dec 13, 2018
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The DeserTech MDR ("Micro Dynamic Rifle") has been in the works for several years now, after being initially announced at SHOT Show in 2014, if I recall correctly. While it was probably prematurely unveiled, the rifle as it stands today looks to be remarkably well designed. It is one thing to design a concept that sounds attractive (fully ambidextrous bullpup rifle convertible between 7.62x51mm and 5.56x45mm), but it is a whole other thing to actually develop a mechanical design that actually works. And it is yet more notable to make that system elegantly simple and to actually transition from handmade prototypes to successful production line manufacture. DesertTech appears to have cleared all those hurdles...

At the heart of the rifle is a rotating bolt locking system and a short stroke gas system. These are both very well understood systems - DesertTech has chosen to use proven ideas here instead of getting "innovative". The most interesting mechanical element is undoubtedly the ejection system, which can be swapped to eject from either side of the rifle but can actually be used from either shoulder regardless because it ejects cases directly forward. The system uses a pair of arms that push an empty case (or live round) laterally off the side of the bolt face and into a holding clip. A lug on the side of the bolt engages those arms on its rearward stroke, and a matching lug on the opposite side pushes the case forward and out of the rifle on the bolt's forward stroke. While this system sounds complex, the parts appear to my eye to have gone through a lot of testing and revision, as they look pretty simple and sturdy - a refined implementation of an unorthodox idea.

The controls are all ambidextrous, with non-reciprocating bolt handles, safety selector, and magazine release on both sides. A secondary magazine release is located on the front of the magazine well to allow a positive magazine removal, and this catch is stiff enough to not have problems with accidental release like some other bullpup designs. The weakest point of the rifle as I see it is the trigger, with is creepy and heavier than I would have expected. The trigger group is completely modular, however, and I would expect to see aftermarket replacement triggers appear on the secondary market before too long.

The barrel can be removed easily with a hex wrench, and DeserTech is producing a 5.56mm conversion kit. This will involve replacing the bolt, barrel, and ejection panel and installing a magazine well insert for the smaller magazine (the 5.56mm version will use AR pattern standard mags). The upper and lower receiver assemblies are completely interchangeable between calibers. For those wishing to use a suppressor, the gas system is adjustable, with 3 positions including one for suppressed use.

The rifle ships with a micro red dot optic mounted in lieu of iron sights. It is mounted to a single unit section of Picatinny rail integral to the gas block, meaning that it will retain zero when the barrel is removed. For those preferring other sights, the top of the receiver has a length of rail for attaching whatever you like. The handguard also has a top rail, but I would not consider it to be solidly fixed enough to retain zero on an optic. The handguard also has side and bottom MLok slots for bipods and other accessories. The handguard is not connected to the barrel, so bipods on it are effectively free floated.

I am excited to see how the rifle handles on the range! After filming this, Karl and I took the MDR out to the range for some first shooting impressions. Check out that video on InRangeTV here:

https://youtu.be/DabLcqavXJ0
 

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Czech vz.52/CZ52 in 9mm and 7.62x25
Military Arms Channel


Published on Dec 14, 2018
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First, the HK P9S is HAMMER FIRED. I keep calling it striker fired. The "striker" I point out is a cock indicator. I say stupid stuff all the time, but thankfully my contract allows for it. This video though is about the vz.52 (or CZ 52) in both 7.62x25 and 9mm.
 

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Almost Adopted: The H&K XM-8 Family
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Dec 14, 2018
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Today we are in H&K's Grey Room in Virginia, taking a look at the XM-8 program. The rifle evolved form the kinetic energy carbine portion of the doomed XM29/OICW program, and eventually became the G36 rifle. In between those two, however, it was the XM-8, and it came close to adoption by the US military.The XM-8 was designed to be a very modular system, with a variety of interchangeable stocks, handguards, optics and accessories. We will take a look at all of these different elements, as well as the disassembly and mechanical function of the design.

If you enjoy Forgotten Weapons, check out its sister channel, InRangeTV! http://www.youtube.com/InRangeTVShow
 

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Shooting the Full Auto XM-8 Carbine
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Dec 15, 2018
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Thanks to H&K and to Trijicon for range access, we are out today shooting an original and authentic XM-8 carbine! The XM-8 family are relatively bulky guns; moreso than one would expect from seeing photos of them. However, they are also very smooth and comfortable guns to shoot, with a relatively low rate of fire that makes controlled bursts very easy.

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Enfield No.4 Mk1/2 to 500yds: Practical Accuracy
9-Hole Reviews


Published on Dec 13, 2018
The Enfield No.4 Mk1/2 was the workhorse of the British Commonwealth... and also one of my favorite rifles to shoot. This one is even missing some rifling... how well does it shoot to 500yards?

Ammunition used: German MEN .303 British, these were loaded very close to British Radway Green Mark VII 174grain .303 cartridges.

Shopping with this link costs you nothing, but provides us with equipment: https://www.amazon.com/?tag=9holerevi...

Distance Conversions:
150y - 137m
200y - 182m
250y - 229m
300y - 274m
350y - 320m
400y - 366m
450y - 411m
500y - 457m


This video's editing by Agency Communications LLC
Music by Tyops (THANKS!!!)
 

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Confiscated Homemade Poachers' Guns from Zimbabwe
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Dec 17, 2018
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I had a chance to visit Hire Arms in Johannesburg - a movie arms supply company. Among many other things in their collection, they had an assortment of extremely crude handmade firearms confiscated from poachers in Zimbabwe. As something we don't see much of here in the US, I thought they were pretty interesting, even if just in a train wreck sort of way. So I pulled out a couple of the most unusual to put on camera.
 

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Ammunition Evaluation: Ethiopian .30-06
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Dec 18, 2018
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Century International Arms has imported a quantity of Ethiopian ammunition, and asked me to do a video on it. So, I have a three-part evaluation here: appearance and packaging, live fire testing (including velocity and consistency), and teardown and bullet weight consistency. This ammunition was produced (as best I can tell) at the Emperor Haile Selassie Ammunition Factory, established with Czech technical aid in the late 1940s in Addis Ababa. This ammunition is all headstamped 1977, made for a variety of American surplus rifles and machine guns acquired by Ethiopia including the M1 Garand, M1917 and M1919 machine guns, and M1918A2 BAR. I received this ammunition packaged in 15-round loose boxes as well as in M1 Garand en bloc clips and bandoliers.

Velocity:

I tested velocity using a .30-06 M1917 Enfield rifle (barrel length 26 inches). Measurements were taken at 10 feet from the muzzle, with a sample size of 15 rounds fired. I found an average velocity of 2998 fps, extreme spread of 90 fps (max 3031, min 2941), and standard deviation of 25.36 fps. None of the rounds exhibited any unusual behavior when fired, although the velocity I measured was substantially higher than the American M2 spec which I would have expected in a flat base 150 grain loading. Note: I tested ammunition from the 15 round boxes, and no form the Garand bandoliers. I did not test this in a Garand rifle, and cannot comment on the bolt velocity it produces therein.

Bullets:

I tested the weight of 10 bullets using a calibrated Lyman electronic scale. I found an average weight of 150.7 grains, extreme spread of 1.6 grains (max 151.6 gr, min 150.0 gr), and standard deviation of 0.52 grains. Bullet construction is flat base with an open base, lead core, and gilding metal over steel jacket (these bullets do attract a magnet).

Century advertises this ammunition as using corrosive primers, and I took them at their word and did not test for corrosivity.

Raw data:

Velocities (fps): 2955, 3015, 3028, 2993, 2992, 2976, 3009, 3017, 3020, 2995, 2941, 3001, 3031, 2994, 3007

Bullet weights (grains): 151.0, 150.7, 150.1, 150.5, 150.0, 151.6, 150.9, 150.7, 150.4, 151.4

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Winchester 1964 SPIW: Flechettes and a Blow-Forward Grenade Launcher
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Dec 19, 2018
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Today we are looking at the Winchester company's entry into the 1964 SPIW (Special Purpose Infantry Weapon) trials. The SPIW program was an attempt to increase small arms lethality by increasing hit probability with ideas like hyper-velocity flechette cartridges and burst fire trigger mechanisms. In addition, the weapons were required to incorporate area-effect elements - aka grenade launchers.

This design used a 60-round drum magazine firing a high velocity flechette as well as having a blow-forward semiautomatic 40mm grenade launcher attached to the muzzle. One of the biggest challenges in the development was the flechette cartridge itself - the sabot holding the dart in place had to be loose enough to cleanly detach at the muzzle, but also tight enough to pull the dart down the barrel.

Ultimately, none of the 1964 trials weapons were successful, and this Winchester design was particularly unsuccessful. In addition to terrible balance and handling, it was not particularly reliable in the firing trials.

Thanks to the Rock Island Arsenal Museum for allowing me access to film this very interesting rifle! If you are in the Quad Cities in Illinois or Iowa, the Museum is definitely worth a visit. They have a great number of small arms on display as well as an excellent history of the Rock Island Arsenal.

http://www.arsenalhistoricalsociety.o...
 

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Q&A 24: Pistols, Puppies, and Procurement
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Dec 20, 2018
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I think this is the longest Q&A to date...and as usual, I had far more questions submitted by you awesome Patrons than I could answer, so if yours didn't get in this time please submit it again next time.

0:00:37 - The Stoner 63 and value of modular platforms
0:03:37 - Forgotten Weapons on Instagram
0:05:13 - Was the Lebel adopted too hastily?
0:08:42 - Do I read comments on YouTube?
0:11:20 - Branching out to videos on ancillary gear
0:12:28 - Are bipods a benefit to infantry rifles?
0:16:46 - Best firearms museums in the US
0:18:09 - How do gun designers engineer guns?
0:22:33 - Where do I get my ammo?
0:25:48 - How long can Forgotten Weapons last?
0:29:10 - Use of Enfields and Mosins in Afghanistan
0:31:38 - Why no Vickers K on YouTube?
0:32:20 - What alcohol do I eschew?
0:33:28 - How do I plan video scheduling from trips?
0:37:48 - What French guns do I still need for my collection?
0:39:13 - Concerns about lead exposure
0:41:22 - Why did 9x19mm become so universal?
0:43:19 - Caseless ammunition for aircraft guns?
0:44:34 - What if the Mini-14 had competed against the AR-15?
0:45:42 - Focus of a hypothetic NFA collection?
0:47:36 - Home shop construction of a semiauto rifle
0:49:53 - SKS as a collectible and a modern gun
0:53:00 - Were there any WWII German small arms "wonder weapons?"
0:55:19 - Tenko MAC-10 rifle caliber upper
0:58:10 - Most overrated historical gun in pop culture
1:00:02 - Is trigger discipline a recent thing?
1:02:41 - What is my firearms background?
1:04:13 - Advice for aspiring authors
1:06:19 - Handguns in combat and M9 vs P320
1:07:37 - Did John Browning have ideas that flopped?
1:09:44 - Why not make last ditch guns in the first place?
1:12:29 - Railguns and coilguns
1:13:00 - Person pistols in combat, WW1 and WW2
1:15:37 - First smokeless powder pistols
1:16:47 - How I got Dharma, my dog
1:18:39 - Are there any transferrable Type 1 FG-42s in the US?
1:18:56 - Good book on semiauto pistol development?
1:20:35 - Charger clips vs stripper clips in Mausers
1:22:03 - Release triggers for precision shooting
 

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M1916 Fedorov: Russia's First Assault Rifle?
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Dec 21, 2018
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(I will fix the misspelling in the thumbnail shortly)

I have been trying to get my hands on Fedorov M1916 rifle for a while, and I finally had the opportunity at the NFC, part of the British Royal Armouries. The Fedorov was designed in the years just before World War One, and originally chambered for a proprietary 6.5mm cartridge (also designed by Fedorov) and using a fixed magazine. It was a development of the understanding of infantry firepower that came from the Russo-Japanese War, although Czar Nicholas II did not think it was a useful type of rifle. Once the Great War changed attitudes of many military figures, the Fedorov saw a comeback. Inspired by the tactical concept of the French Chauchat automatic rifle, Fedorov fitted the rifle with a 25-round detachable box magazine and rechambered it for the 6.5mm Arisaka cartridge (which Russia had supply of by way of the UK). In this new format, a small number were produced and issued before the Russian Revolution caused the nation to leave the war.

Fedorov and his team were established at the Kovrov Arsenal (originally built and equipped by the Danish Madsen firm to make light machine guns, but that plan never reached completion). There they perfected the production tooling for the guns, and produced them form 1921 until 1925, making about 3200 in total. They saw service during the Russian Civil War, and were apparently well liked despite a reputation for being a bit finicky and delicate. They were pulled out of service and warehoused in the late 1920s, although they would be reissued during the Winter War with Finland.

Overall, the Fedorov is a remarkably good rifle for its time period. Had further development been possible or encouraged, it could probably have been simplified substantially, although history has shown that there was no true future for recoil-operated military shoulder rifles. The tactical concept behind the design was excellent, and rather ahead of its time. The idea of equipping each man with effectively a portable machine gun would not see true successful implementation until the German Sturmgewehr, but Russia could have beaten them to the punch by some 25 years had the circumstances been a bit different.

Many thanks to the Royal Armouries for allowing me to film and disassemble this very rare rifle! The NFC collection there - perhaps the best military small arms collection in Western Europe - is available by appointment to researchers:

https://royalarmouries.org/research/n...
 

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HK-32 Prototype in 7.62x39mm
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Feb 20, 2019
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Among the large family of roller-delayed rifles produced by Heckler & Koch, one of the rarest and least known is the HK32. This was the select-fire shoulder rifle chambered in 7.62x39mm. These rifles appeared in H&K sales literature for a time, but were only made in very small numbers for one or two poor documented contracts. What we have here today is a very early prototype rifle in 7.62x39mm using a regular NATO caliber receiver with a magazine well block to fit a proprietary H&K magazine. The rifle retains many CETME features, including the muzzle brake, metal forehand with integral bipod, carry handle, stock design, and a unique 2-position rear notch sight.

Many thanks to the Royal Armouries for allowing me to film and disassemble this very rare rifle! The NFC collection there - perhaps the best military small arms collection in Western Europe - is available by appointment to researchers:

https://royalarmouries.org/research/n...

You can browse the various Armouries collections online here:

https://royalarmouries.org/collection/