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Older, Odd, Offbeat And Forgotten Guns & Ammo

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MG-34: The Universal Machine Gun Concept
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Oct 7, 2017
https://jamesdjulia.com/item/52619-67...

The MG34 was the first German implementation of the universal machine gun concept - and really the first such fielded by any army. The idea was to have a single weapon which could be used as a light machine gun, heavy machine gun, vehicle gun, fortification gun, and antiaircraft gun. The MG34 was designed to be light enough for use as an LMG, to have a high enough rate of fire to serve as an antiaircraft gun, to be compact and flexible enough for use in vehicles and fortifications, and to be mounted on a complex and advanced tripod for use as a heavy machine gun.

Mechanically, the MG34 is a recoil operated gun using a rotating bolt for locking. It is chambered for 8mm Mauser, and feeds from 50-round belt segments with a clever and unique quick-change barrel mechanism. The early versions were fitted with adjustable rate reducers in the grips allowing firing from 400 to 900 rounds per minute, and also had an option for a top cover which would fit a 75-round double drum magazine. Both of these features were rather quickly discarded, however,r in the interest of more efficient production. However, the gun fulfilled its universal role remarkably well.

The MG34 was considered a state secret when first developed, and despite entering production in 1936 it would not be formally adopted until 1939 - by which time 50,000 or so had already been manufactured. It would comprise about 47% of the machine guns in German service when the Wehrmacht invaded Poland, but would be fully standardized by March of 1941. It was replaced by the MG42 later in the war, as that weapon was both faster and cheaper to produce and also required substantially less of the high-grade steel alloys that Germany had limited supplies of. However, it would continue to be produced through the war, particularly for vehicle mounts.
 

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Astra 902: Because More Rounds is Better
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Oct 8, 2017
Semiauto Cased Astra 902: https://jamesdjulia.com/item/52700-31...
Select-fire Astra 902: https://jamesdjulia.com/item/52690-1-...

The Spanish Astra firm introduced its C96 Mauser lookalike, the Model 900, in 1927 to take advantage of the strong Chinese demand for that type of handgun. When Bestigui Hermanos introduced a select-fire machine pistol to the Chinese market, Astra quickly followed suit with their Model 910 and 902 in 1928. The 901 was really just a select-fire adaptation of the Model 900, while the 902 made an effort to compensate for the quite fast rate of fire (900 rounds/minute) by using a fixed 20-round magazine instead of the 901’s 10-round magazine.

A total of 7075 Model 902 Astra pistols were made, with the design followed in 1932 by the Model 903 and its detachable box magazines. In order to accommodate the extra-long magazine, the shoulder stocks of the 902s (all Astra 900-series guns were shipped with should stock holsters) had a deep opening cut out, which was then covered by a detachable leather boot to protect the magazine of the gun and close off dirt from the opening in the stock.

One very rare variant of the 902 is the semiautomatic-only type, of which only 50-75 were made (about half the number of 20-round Mauser C96 pistols). We have one of those to look at today, along with its intact original shipping box.
 

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The Keen-Walker Carbine - A Simple Confederate Breechloader
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Oct 9, 2017
https://jamesdjulia.com/item/51957-26...

Little is known about the Keen-Walker Gun Company, except for a few Confederate arsenal records that have survived. From those we know that the company delivered a total of 282 of these single-shot .54 caliber carbines to the Danville Arsenal in 1862, receiving $50 each for the first 101 and $40 each for the remainder. The company also subcontracted work from the Read & Watson company in Danville, converting Hall rifles.

The carbine made by Keen & Walker bears a substantial resemblance to the Maynard and Perry carbines, although it is not a copy of either one. It is a breechloading design, in which swinging down the trigger guard lever pivots the breechblock upwards for loading with ball and powder or a paper cartridge. A percussion cap is fitted to the nipple on the back of the breechblock for firing. There are no markings on the exterior of the guns save a single-letter proof mark applied when they were accepted by the Confederacy.
 

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Klienen Waffenwerkzeugatz - A German Armorer's Tool Kit
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Published on Oct 10, 2017
https://jamesdjulia.com/item/52168-6-...

This is a “Klienen Waffenwerkzeugatz” - a small armorer’s tool kit used by a German Waffenmeister. It is a really neat little set of handy and essential tools for working on small arms, which folds up and fits neatly into a standard German WWII ammunition can. The use of standard ammo cans for several other types of storage was common for the German military, as there were a bunch of vehicular mounts designed to fit ammo cans and it was a simple and universal type of storage. Anyway, this kit is in fantastic shape, and includes pliers, files, handles, calipers, wrenches, scrapers, and a portable vise for holding small parts. Everything you need to fix that shrapnel damage to your MG34!
 

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What You Didn't Know About the 1968 Machine Gun Amnesty
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Published on Oct 11, 2017
https://jamesdjulia.com/item/52520-11...

When the 1968 machine gun amnesty was announced in the US, it was treated with widespread suspicion among gun collectors. Some thought it would merely a pretense to find and arrest owners of unregistered machine guns. Others though it was just the first step in a prohibition and confiscation of machine guns. Both of these groups would prove to be wrong, however,r and the amnesty was in fact a true amnesty.

In fact, the amnesty was even more substantial than people recognize even today. It was not just an amnesty for possession of an unregistered machine gun, but also pretty much any crime associated with the gun. For example, it would legalize guns that had been stolen from military property rooms, and guns with defaced serial numbers. In fact, it even allowed felons to register machine guns, and retain the legal right to own them to this very day.
 

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Confederate Whitworth Sniper: Sub-MOA Hexagonal Bullets in 1860
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Published on Oct 12, 2017
https://jamesdjulia.com/item/51957-23...

Sir Joseph Whitworth is quite the famous name in engineering circles, credited with the development of such things as Whitworth threading (the first standardized thread pattern) and engineer’s blue. When he decided to make a rifle, he decided that he could make flat surfaces more precisely than round ones, and chose to design a rifle with a hexagonal bore and mechanically fitted bullets.

The Whitworth rifles proved to be magnificently accurate, with a British military test showing a group of 0.85 MOA at 500 yards, and under 8MOA even at 1800 yards. However, the rifles were equally expensive, and were not given further consideration for military use. Whitworth made a total of about 13,700, selling them to high level competitive marksmen and wealthy shooting enthusiasts. A small number were purchased by Confederate agents during the Civil War, and between 50 and 125 were able to evade the Union blockades to be delivered into Confederate hands. These rifles were equipped with Davidson 4-power telescopic sights, and they were put to extremely good effect by Confederate sharpshooting units. In particular, they were used to shoot at Union artillery crews, and Whitworth bullets have been found on a great many Civil War battlefields. They were not available in large numbers, but they were excellent rifles and put to use as much as possible.

Given the small number originally brought into the CSA, the number of known surviving examples is extremely low. This one, like many, was found without its scope and mount, and those parts have been replaced with period examples. As a true Confederate Whitworth, however, this is an extremely rare and historically relevant rifle!
 

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Solothurn S18-1000: The Pinnacle of Anti-Tank Rifles
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Published on Oct 13, 2017
https://jamesdjulia.com/item/52520-1-...

Among all the antitank rifles developed between the World Wars, the highest quality and most sophisticated was the Solothurn S18-1000. It fires the 20x138B cartridge which was also used in the Finnish Lahti L-39 and the German 20mm Flak guns, and it does so using a semiautomatic action and an 8-round box magazine. It is a short-recoil system, with a rotating bolt rather similar to that of the MG-34 machine gun.

The recoil-operated action of the Solothurn helps dampen its recoil more than the Lahti, and is definitely a more comfortable gun to shoot. The Solothurn is equipped with both iron sights and an optical sight (we used the irons in this shooting, because the rubber eye cup on the scope is fairly hard and brittle on this example). Remarkably for its 100+ pound weight, the gun definitely jumps back a few inches when fired unless one has firmly sunk the bipod feet into the earth. However, the recoil force is really more of a push than a sharp impact, and combined with the large surface area of the shoulder pad it is not at all a bad experience.

A number of different countries bought the S18-1000 (and many others bought the smaller S18-100), including the Italians and Hungarians. The only combat account I was able to find was from a Dutch antitank gun team that used one to successfully engage several German armored cars during the invasion of the Netherlands in 1940.
 

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M1918 BAR: America's Walking Fire Assault Rifle
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Published on Oct 14, 2017
https://jamesdjulia.com/item/52618-1-...

John Browning developed the Browning Automatic Rifle for use by American troops in World War One, taking inspiration from the other light automatic weapons in service including the Chauchat, Lewis, and MG08/15. Rather than being used as a light machine gun as we would understand it today, the BAR was an “automatic rifle”, intended to be used in much the same way as the Germans would use the Sturmgewehr in WWII. It would be fired in semiautomatic mode from the shoulder or hip while advancing on the enemy, using steady fire to keep them pinned down. Once troops broke into close contact, the gun could be switched to fully automatic to provide overwhelming firepower for the final assault on a position. While the walking fire from the hip was not particularly realistic in practice, the fully automatic firepower was a huge boon to the infantry. While it filled the game role as the Chauchat, the BAR was a much more refined weapon and much easier to use effectively.

The BAR was showed tot he US Ordnance Department in 1917, and the first order for them was placed with Colt in July of 1917. In short order further contracts would be placed with Winchester and Marlin-Rockwell, although it would take many months to fabricate the production tooling and perfect the design for mass production. A few hand-fitted guns were ready in February 1918 for a public demonstration, but significant quantities were not being built until July of 1918.

These guns would be shipped to France for use by the AEF, but not actually put into combat service until the Meuse-Argonne offensive in late September of 1918, due to General Pershing’s desire to keep them secret from the Germans until a large number could be used at once. As a result, the guns saw only very limited use before the war ended on November 11th. In total 102,173 BARs would be built, about half of them being finished into 1919, after the armistice. They would go on the be changed and updated for use in World War Two, but that is a discussion for another day. This particular gun is an excellent example of an M1918 BAR in correct World War One configuration, which is a rare find today.
 

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Kerr Revolvers: An English Source for Confederate Arms
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Published on Oct 15, 2017
https://jamesdjulia.com/item/51957-6-...

James Kerr formed the London Armoury Company in 1856, manufacturing Adams patent revolvers (Adams was one of the founding investors) and 1853 pattern Enfield rifles. The rifles were the better business and the company rather quickly decided to focus on them, which led Adams to leave with his patents. In order to keep a revolver in the LAC’s catalog, Kerr patented his own design, which proved to be a quite effective handgun.

When the US Civil War broke out, both the Union and the CSA sent procurement agents to Europe to purchase foreign arms, and the Confederate’s Captain Caleb Huse struck a substantial deal with the London Armoury Company. The Confederacy would ultimately purchase more than 70,000 Enfield pattern rifles from LAC, as well as Kerr’s patent sharpshooting rifles and 7,000-9,000 Kerr revolvers - the vast majority of LAC’s production during the war. So much of their production, that the LAC would actually fail and dissolver in 1866 when their best customer ceased to exist.

The revolver design was made in single and double action versions and in both .36 and .44 calibers, although the CSA purchased guns were all single action .44s. The action is basically a simple rifle style lockplate mounted on the grip and frame, isolated form the soot and fouling of the black powder very well. The cylinder is easily removed via an axis pin entering the rear of the frame, and the guns could be easily serviced by any competent gunsmith without need for any special knowledge or parts.

The two we have in today’s video are actually consecutive serial numbers (10,110 and 10,111) right at the very end of the Confederate acquisition period.
 

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Oversized 8-Barrel British Pepperbox Revolver
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Published on Oct 16, 2017
https://jamesdjulia.com/item/52289-2-...

The typical pepperbox revolver is a sleek and small .31 caliber double action pocket gun, like the Allen & Thurber standard type. This one, however, is anything but typical. This London-made gun is a far larger than normal, and sports 8 barrels, with a center square of four and an addition four outside of those. Those barrels are .36 caliber, and the firing mechanism is single action only. In addition, it is unusual in requiring manual indexing of the barrel cluster between shots - most pepperboxes index automatically when the trigger is pulled. I have no further information on the date or original of this piece beyond its “London” marking, and bring it to you as just one example of the wide variety of this sort of firearm that exists.
 

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The Vickers Heavy Machine Gun: Queen of the Battlefield
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Published on Oct 17, 2017
https://jamesdjulia.com/item/52526-1-...

For the record, I never have any financial interest in any of the guns that I film at auction houses - with the exception of this one. This is actually my Vickers HMG, being sold at the James D Julia auction house at the end of this month. It is a magnificent gun, but it is time for me to find it a new home so I can pursue some other projects instead. I hope you will indulge me for a moment today while I point out just how awesome it is!
 

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The St Etienne Mle 1907: France's Domestic Heavy Machine Gun
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Published on Oct 19, 2017
https://jamesdjulia.com/item/52517-1-...

When the French first began testing machine guns in the late 1890s, they were one of the few countries that did not purchase quantities of Maxim guns. One of the reasons was that in France’s North African colonies, transporting water for guns was considered an unnecessary liability. Instead, France purchased a number of air-cooled Hotchkiss machine guns for its colonial forces. For the French Metropolitan Army, it wanted a gun designed and produced by its own arsenal system. And so, the Puteaux Arsenal developed the Modele 1905 gun.

This was a gas trap style of action , pulling an operating forward with each shot. The gun was adopted and put into service, and as with every other military user of gas trap guns, the French quickly found the system to be seriously flawed. The St Etienne Arsenal set about improving it, and came up with the Modele 1907, which retained the forward-moving operating rod but used a gas piston instead of a gas trap. This would be the machine gun which France would enter World War One with, and more than 40,000 would be manufactured by 1917.

The Modele 1907 St Etienne gun is a magnificently Victorian machine gun, with a downright Swiss-like rack and pinion system running its action. It would have been truly at home on a Napoleonic battlefield - but not a World War One battlefield. The gun was not well suited to the muddy hell of trench warfare, despite its beautiful machining and quality. Looking for both a lot more guns and also a more field-reliable system, the French began buying a great many Modele 1914 Hotchkiss machine guns, and they would replace the Modele 1907 by the end of the war.

One cannot fault the French for this change, and yet it still seems sad to see such a gorgeous piece of metal fabrication be sidelined - complete with its hydraulically adjustable rate of fire, its fine toothed feed spool, its sights with the spring and lever system to accommodate heat-induced change of aim and its magnificently extravagant flash hider.
 

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Shooting the Madsen LMG - The First True LMG
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Published on Oct 20, 2017
https://jamesdjulia.com/item/52359-3-...

We have looked at a couple different Madsen light machine guns previously, but until today I have not had the chance to do any shooting with a fully automatic example of one. So I am taking this 1924 Bulgarian contract example out to the range wth some ammo!

The Madsen is a really interesting gun for several reasons, both historically and mechanically. It was the first light machine gun actually put into real combat use, seeing service in the Russo-Japanese War. It would go on to be used in World War One, World War Two, and too many smaller conflicts to count, right through to staying in service with Brazilian police units into the 1990s if not 2000s. A service life that long would be impressive for any machine gun, but particularly so for such an early an unusual design.

Mechanically, the Madsen is best described as a short recoil falling block action. It uses a top-mounted magazine which is offset to the left, and which has no feed lips (they are machined into the receiver instead). Cartridges are pushed laterally into the action by a rotary block below the magazine, and then rammed into the chamber by a long swinging arm (definitely take a look at my previous video on the Madsen disassembly to see how this works in detail). The breechblock pivots at the rear and drops down to lock behind the cartridge when firing. It does fire from an open bolt, although the semiautomatic conversions available in th eUS are converted to closed-bolt operation.

Firing the Madsen, it is clear that one is working with an early design. The grip is not nearly as comfortable and intuitive as later guns, and the trigger pull is rather heavy. It remains a durable and effective weapon, however, with its unique eccentricities standing in for the polish that would come with later guns like the ZB-26.
 

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Griswold & Gunnison: The Best Confederate Revolver Makers
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Published on Oct 21, 2017
Standard: https://jamesdjulia.com/item/52430-6-...
Presentation: https://jamesdjulia.com/item/51957-17...
Iron frame: https://jamesdjulia.com/item/51957-13...

Griswold and Gunnison were rather unique among Confederate revolver manufacturers for their ability to actually create a reliable and high quality product and produce it on a regular and predictable schedule. So many of the Confederate revolvers were made by starry-eyed novices, but Griswold & Gunnison ran a proper professional manufacturing operation, and as a result were able to produce as many guns as all other Confederate revolver makers combined.

The Griswold & Gunnison gun was basically a copy of the Colt 3rd model Dragoon, with a 7 1/2 inch .36 caliber barrel, 6-shot cylinder, and brass frame. They have a subtle but recognizable slight rear tilt to the grips, and are virtually all identical, or as close to it as can be expected for hand-fitted guns from the 1860s. In addition, the guns were made with twisted iron cylinders (instead of steel, which was too difficult to procure), and the trusted pattern of the material is often visible on the finished product. The one variation is that at about serial number 1500, the barrel shank changed from rounded to octagonal.

Arvin Gunnison was gunsmith who had been making Colt type revolver in New Orleans before the war, who partnered with Samuel Griswold for the endeavor. Griswold was a very successful entrepreneur who had built Griswoldville on 4,000 acres of land south of Macon, Georgia. There he had a wide variety of businesses, including grist and saw mills, a candle factory, a foundry, and a cotton gin factory. With the assistance of Gunnison, he converted the cotton gin factory into a revolver factory in 1862, and produced about 100 revolvers per month until November of 1864. On the 22nd of that month, Griswoldville was overrun by Union forces and destroyed.
 

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Leaders in Machine Pistols: the Beistigui Hermanos MM31
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Published on Oct 22, 2017
https://jamesdjulia.com/item/52520-8-...

Beistigui Hermanos is probably the least known of the Spanish machine pistol manufacturers, despite being the first to actually make such pistols. Beistigui was founded in 1910 in Eibar, and was one of the initial subcontractors chosen to make Ruby pistols for the French military during World War One. The discovered a substantial market for C96 Broomhandle type pistols in China during the 1920s, and introduced their own similar looking pistol in 1926 - the Model H.

This pistol was popular, but Beistigui realized that a fully automatic version would probably be much more desirable - and they were right. They introduced such a machine pistol in 1927 or 1928, and sold 22,000 of them in China by the end of 1929. These early pistol still used the same 10-round fixed magazine as the Mauser C96, however, and were seriously limited in practicality as a result.

In 1930, Beistigui introduced an improved version of the gun as the MM31 - the Modelo Military 1931. Despite being a C96 Mauser lookalike (and deliberately trying to make Chinese customers confuse it with actual Mausers), it was a legitimately very good gun, and included a number of improvements over the Mauser. A 20-round fixed magazine version was quickly introduced, followed by a detachable magazine version, to address the issues inherent to a gun with a 10-round magazine and a 900 round/minute rate of fire. Shortly after Beistigui introduced they detachable magazine gun, Mauser began to sell the Schnellfeuer. In an excellent marketing decision, Beistigui changed their guns to use copies of the Mauser magazine, allowing interchangeability with the most respected and desirable model of the pistol in China. The gun we are looking at today is one of these last pattern MM31 machine pistols, using Mauser magazines.

By the mid 1930s, the market for these guns had pretty much collapsed. In Spain, the abdication of the king in 1931 and growing civil unrest led to much increased government regulation of arms manufacture and the Japanese invasion of China limited the ability of Japanese traders to bring the guns to Chinese markets. Beistigui made one last unsuccessful effort to market a Broomhandle type gun (the MM34) to the Spanish Guardia Civil, and then transitioned to manufacturing bicycles instead of guns.
 

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Confederate Morse Carbine: Centerfire Cartridges Ahead of Their Time
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Published on Oct 23, 2017
https://jamesdjulia.com/item/52430-24...

George Morse of Baton Rouge patented a design for a remarkably modern centerfire cartridge and breechloading rifle action in 1856 and 1858, using a standard percussion cap as a primer. This was coupled with a gutta percha washer for sealing and a rolled brass cartridge body that was strong and robust - easily reloaded, if somewhat complex to manufacture.

After positive trials by the Army and Navy, Morse received a contract to make first complete guns and then a royalty contract for the conversion of existing muskets to his system. Work began at the Harper’s Ferry Arsenal, but money ran out with only 60 conversion completed. When the Civil War broke out, Morse chose to side with the Confederacy, and the tooling for his conversions was taken from the captured Armory to be put to use. He initially set up in Nashville, but the city fell to the Union in 1862, and he was forced to relocate to Atlanta and the Greenville South Carolina. It was in Greenville that Morse was finally able to manufacture guns in quantity, and he built approximately a thousand brass-framed single shot cartridge carbines for the South Carolina state militia.

Unfortunately for the Confederacy, the infrastructure to supply a modern type of cartridge ammunition really did not exist in the South, and this crippled any chance of Morse’s carbines becoming a significant factor in the war. The best technology in the world is still of no use if ammunition cannot be provided!

This Morse carbine is of the third type, using a sliding latch on the breechblock to hold the action closed when firing. Two previous versions used different and less secure systems, but this third type was introduced around serial number 350 and would comprise the remaining 2/3rds of the production run.
 

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Shawk & McLanahan - A Would-Be St Louis Revolver Company
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Published on Oct 24, 2017
Revolver: https://jamesdjulia.com/item/52428-2-...
Holster: https://jamesdjulia.com/item/52458-1-...

The Shawk & McLanahan revolvers are a lesser-known example of a very low production Civil War era revolver not made in the Confederacy. Abel Shawk was manufacturing entrepreneur in St Louis making fire engines when he decided to take up arms manufacturing instead. He partnered with J.K. McLanahan who acted as a financier for the project, and with a young German immigrant gunsmith named William (Anglicized from Wilhelm) Tegethoff.

Shawk apparently built his own rifling machine, and sourced many of his other tools form an acquaintance named Charles Rigdon. Ridgon would go on to move to the South and work on several revolver making enterprises for the Confederacy during the Civil War. This led to an assumption that the Shawk & McLanahan guns were also affiliated with the CSA, although they were actually not.

Only about 45 or 50 guns were made before the business venture fell apart, and the surviving examples are all slightly different, suggesting that a final production model was never perfected. The workmanship is quite good, though. The example we have today was actually plated and presented to a Confederate officer by his men, along with a very fancy metal holster.
 

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BM59: The Italian M14
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Published on Oct 25, 2017
https://jamesdjulia.com/item/52537-1-...

After World War Two, both the Beretta and Breda companies in Italy began manufacturing M1 Garand rifles. When Italy decided that they wanted a more modern selective-fire, magazine-fed rifle, they chose to adapt the M1 Garand to that end rather than develop a brand new rifle. Two Beretta engineers, Vittorio Valle and Domenico Salza, began work in 1957 on what would become the BM-59. Prototypes were ready in 1959, trials were run in 1960, and by 1962 the new weapon was in Italian military hands.

The BM59 is basically an M1 Garand action and fire control system, but modernized. The caliber was changed to 7.62mm NATO, and the barrel shortened to 19.3 inches. A simple but effective selective fire system was added to the fire control mechanism, and the en bloc clips replaced with a 20-round box magazine (and stripped clip loading guide to match). A folding integral bipod was added to allow the rifle to be used for supporting fire on full auto, and a long muzzle device was added along with a gas cutoff and grenade launching sight to allow the use of NATO standard 22mm rifle grenades.

In this form, the BM59 was a relative quickly developed and quite successful and well-liked rifle. In addition to the Italian military, it was purchased by Argentine, Algeria, Nigeria, and Indonesia. A semiautomatic version was made for the US commercial market and designated the BM62, and a small number of fully automatic BM-59 rifles - like the one in this video - were imported into the US before the 1968 Gun Control Act cut off importation of foreign machine guns.
 

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ZB26: The Best of the Light Machine Guns
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Published on Oct 26, 2017
https://jamesdjulia.com/item/52168-5-...

The ZB-26 stands as one of the best magazine-fed light machine guns developed during the 1920s and 30s - it was a very popular gun for small military forces and many countries which did not directly buy it were strongly influenced by it. The Japanese Nambu Type 96 and 99 were heavily based on the ZB, the the British Bren was a direct evolution licensed from Brno.

The design dates back to 1921, when the Czech government began searching for a modern light machine gun. They tested pretty much all the guns available on the market at the time, and also solicited guns from Czechoclovak designers. Brothers Vaclav and Emmanuel Holek submitted their I-23 light machine gun, which would become the ZB-26 (LK vizor 26 in Czech terminology) and become the official Czechoslovak light machine gun as well as a popular commercial export for the ZB factory. More than 120,000 were made in several different calibers and sold to 24 countries between 1926 and 1939.

When the Germans occupied Czechoslovakia, they seized a huge number of these guns both from the military and guns still in the factory. This particular one was part of a Spanish purchase contract, but was completed under the oversight of Heinrich Krieghoff and supplied to German forces.

Mechanically, the ZB-26 uses a tilting bolt and a long stroke gas piston, in a combination that would be copied in many later designs. It is robust, accurate, controllable, and handy - a truly excellent all-around light machine gun.
 

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Shooting the ZB-26: A Jewel of an Interwar Light Machine Gun
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Oct 27, 2017
https://jamesdjulia.com/item/52168-5-...

Today we have a chance to do some shooting with a ZB-26, a German-occupation 8mm light machine gun made at Brno in Czechoslovakia. The ZB-26 does not get nearly as much attention as LMGs made by the better known powers during the war, but it is an excellent weapon. In addition to being adopted by the Czech military, the gun was sold to about 2 dozen other countries and used in significant numbers by the Waffen SS.

As one would expect form its reputation, the ZB was smooth, reliable, and very controllable. For all the reasons discussed in yesterday’s history and disassembly video, it is a top notch firearm.

Today we have a chance to do some shooting with a ZB-26, a German-occupation 8mm light machine gun made at Brno in Czechoslovakia. The ZB-26 does not get nearly as much attention as LMGs made by the better known powers during the war, but it is an excellent weapon. In addition to being adopted by the Czech military, the gun was sold to about 2 dozen other countries and used in significant numbers by the Waffen SS.

As one would expect form its reputation, the ZB was smooth, reliable, and very controllable. For all the reasons discussed in yesterday’s history and disassembly video, it is a top notch firearm.
 

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Iconic and Unique: The UK Vz.59 General Purpose Machine Gun
TFB TV


Published on Oct 27, 2017
Very few service machine guns can compare in pure unique points to the Czech 7.62x54mmR UK vz 59 General Purpose Machine Gun, adopted in 1959 as the squad and platoon level belt fed machine gun of the Czech Infantry in the Warsaw Pact at the time. The weapon is still soldiering on today among the Czech and Slovak Infantry, although it is being slowly phased out by the FN Herstal M249 and Mk.48 machine guns.
 

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The MG-15: A Flexible Aircraft Machine Gun Pushed into Infantry Service
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Oct 29, 2017
https://jamesdjulia.com/item/52168-2-...

The MG-15 was the first standard flexible-mounted aircraft machine gun adopted by the Luftwaffe in the 1930s. Both it and the MG-17 are evolved from a Rheinmetall/Solothurn design which would also become the Austrian and Hungarian M30 infantry light machine guns. As used by the Luftwaffe, the MG15 fired at 900-1000 rounds per minute from a 75-round double drum magazine (the MG-17 was the belt-fed version). It is a very sleek and plain looking tubular gun, using a short recoil action and a rotary locking collar to secure the bolt and barrel during firing.

As World War Two progressed, aircraft armor became heavier than the 8x57mm Mauser cartridge became insufficient for aerial combat. It would be replaced by 13mm, 15mm, 20mm, and even 30mm machine guns and machine cannons. This left a substantial numbers of MG15 guns obsolete but still in inventory, and at the end of the war some numbers were converted to infantry guns. This was done by adding a simple buttstock, a bipod and bipod mounting shroud, and infantry type sights. It was not an ideal ground gun, but with German arms production in serious trouble anything was welcome.
 

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Correction: Whitworth Accuracy and Figure of Merit vs MOA
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Nov 2, 2017
Support Forgotten Weapons: http://www.patreon.com/ForgottenWeapons

In my recent video on the Whitworth rifle, I made a rather embarrassing mistake, interpreting "figure of merit" accuracy measurements as complete group sizes. This was incorrect, and caused me to seriously overestimate the accuracy of the Whitworth. It was indeed a outstandingly accurate rifle, but not to the levels I originally stated. In actual fact, the Whitworth was capable of about 3 MOA at 500 yards; not the sub-1 MOA I originally stated.

The numbers recorded at the 1857 test of Enfield vs Whitworth were figure of merit, aka mean radial dispersion. This is the average distance from the center of a group (20-shot group, per British standards) to the point of impact. While much more involved to calculate, this type of measurement provides a more useful measure of accuracy than simple overall group size.

Thanks to John Simpson, David Minshall, and Rob (BritishMuzzleLoaders) for spotting and correcting this mistake!

You can see David's article on this issue here: http://www.researchpress.co.uk/index....
Rob has a video on Figure of Merit, which is here: https://youtu.be/zAntq2M0o30
And John's book on sniping can be found here: http://amzn.to/2hNHt9d

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1891 Argentine Mauser at 600 Yards
Iraqveteran8888


Published on Nov 3, 2017
LIKE WHAT YOU SEE? CONSIDER PURCHASING A MAN CAN: https://goo.gl/TCXIU7
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ORIGINAL 1891 MAUSER VIDEO: https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&vide...

In this much requested video we take the 1891 Argentine Mauser chambered in 7.65×53mm Mauser out to the tower for some 600 yard work. These rifles have proven to shoot exceptionally well and hopefully we will be able to do it justice at extended range. Stay tuned, much more on the way.

CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE!
http://www.iraqveteran8888.com

Disclaimer: Our videos are for entertainment purposes only, imitation or the use of any instruction shown in the videos is solely AT YOUR OWN RISK. Iraqveteran8888 will not be held liable for any injury to yourself or damage to your firearms resulting from attempting anything shown in any our videos.

Copyright 2017, 88 Industries, LLC
 

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Czech vz61 Skorpion: History and Mechanics
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Nov 4, 2017
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The Czech vz.61 Skorpion is a rather unusual sort of firearm; a machine pistol designed from scratch instead of being converted from an existing handgun design, and chambered for the seemingly out of place .32ACP (7.65mm Browning) cartridge. It is a weapon which seems awkwardly small as a shoulder-fired submachine gun, and yet equally awkwardly large as a handgun. So what is it?

Well, it is a pretty classic example of a Personal Defense Weapon (PDW). It was originally designed for vehicle and artillery crews, for troops who needed more than a simple handgun, but could not practically tote around a full size rifle. The vz.61 is small enough to be worn in a belt holster, keeping it readily at hand but as unobtrusive as possible. With the stock extended, it is capable of much better accuracy than a handgun, and the combination of fully automatic fire with the light .32 caliber cartridge makes for a high volume of quite controllable fire.

The Skorpion is also a remarkably sophisticated mechanical design, with a very compact hammer fired mechanism and a rate reduced to keep the 20 round magazines from being expended *too* quickly.

Thanks to Marstar for letting me examine and shoot their Skorpion! Visit them at: http://marstar.ca
 

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Rifles of the World: The Argentine IMBEL FAL
Mike B


Published on Nov 4, 2017
 

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Flashback to 2015: Day at the Range with Friends. Mosin Nagant PU, Arisaka T99, Tannerite
Mike B


Published on Oct 30, 2017
A sweet day we had at the range a couple years ago. This is right after we got our steel targets set up, and we were enjoying a nice April day.
 

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Shooting the Czech vz61 Skorpion: Machine Pistol or PDW?
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Nov 5, 2017
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In the US, the commonly accessible version of the vz.61 Skorpion is the stock-less semiauto pistol - and in that configuration the gun is really nothing like the intentions of its designers. The Skorpion was designed to be a personal defense weapons, and in the small .32ACP caliber that really requires fully automatic fire.

The short and small stock does, in fact, provide a nice addition to help control the gun. It does not need to really brace against recoil (which is really minimal), but it does a useful job in providing a third point of contact to keep the gun in control and on target. That said, the Skorpion is actually quite controllable when fired offhand without a stock - much to my surprise.

Thanks to Marstar for letting me examine and shoot their Skorpion! Visit them at: http://marstar.ca

If you enjoy Forgotten Weapons, check out its sister channel, InRangeTV! http://www.youtube.com/InRangeTVShow
 

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Remington 788 in 22-250 "Vintage" guns, Checking Targets During An Afternoon Of Shooting
afleetcommand


Published on Nov 4, 2017
A friend came over to the farm and got me away from the Saw bench to go shoot some targets up on the hill. I have a couple of older guns that NO one would particularly care about.....SO I figured why not run them a little...in the spirit of the "Junk Pile" saw builds..

THIS video is all cut down to just focus on the results....putting copious shots in there is pointless.

Learned a few things over the course of an afternoon:

First my bud can SHOOT! And has an awesome collection of target rifles. Most "higher" end.

Second, how my rifles are "held" on the bags makes a definable difference in groups.

Third, have to re-learn an old lesson from time to time, its not what it looks like, its how it performs. Sometimes looks can be deceiving. Of course in the case of those Calhoon's, they perform as they look..:)
 

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Rifles of the World: Yugoslavian M48 Mauser Rifle
Mike B


Published on Nov 5, 2017
 

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America's WW1 Trench Rifle: The Cameron-Yaggi 1903
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Nov 6, 2017
https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

Virtually all nations in World War One had a periscope trench rifle of some sort, and the United States was no exception - although it was not formally adopted. The Cameron-Yaggi conversion was developed by James Cameron and Lawrence Yaggi of Cleveland Ohio, and submitted to the US Ordnance Department in late 1917. About 12 prototypes were made in total, all slightly different - and none was actually adopted before the war ended.

The Cameron-Yaggi conversion is notable for its rigidity and smooth operation, allowing sighting, firing, and bolt cycling from a concealed position. Most trench rifles are rather rickety devices, but not this one. Both 1x and 4x magnified periscope sights were experimented with, and a 25-round extended magazine was fitted in order to maximize the utility of being able to operate the bolt from the firing position. The device added about 6 pounds to the weight of the rifle, which certainly helped reduce recoil - and it did not require and significant modification to the host rifle!

This Cameron-Yaggi conversion is from the Bruce Canfield collection, previously in the Brophy collection.

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Valmet M62/S: The AK in Finland
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Nov 7, 2017
https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

After the Winter War and Continuation War, Finland settled a peace treaty with the Soviet Union, and started looking to modernize its infantry rifles - something semiautomatic was needed to replace the Mosin Nagants it was still using. A variety of rifles were tested, including the AR-10, Sig AM-55 (predecessor to the Stgw 57), and Madsen LAR. The Kalashnikov was really the clear choice, though, and the Finns received their first batch of Russian AKs in 1954. Sako and Valmet began working with AK designs in 1957, and by 1960 the Russian Type III milled receiver pattern was chosen as the basis for the new Finnish rifle.

That rifle would be formally adopted in 1962 as the Rk62, with full scale production beginning in 1965. It was mechanically a copy of the Kalashnikov, but with an assortment of external changes chosen by the Finns. Most significantly, the sights were dramatically improved. The front sight was given precise windage adjustment screws (as opposed to the Russian drift adjustments) and combined with the gas block. The rear sight was changed to an aperture type and moved to the rear of the receiver cover, which was also made with a much more precise fit than on Russian rifles.

The Finns also chose their own furniture style, including the distinctive tubular stock. While folding versions of this stock were sold commercially, the military pattern Rk62 used a fixed type, as does this M62/S semiautomatic version of the rifle. This example also has the early type of corrugated tubular pistol grip and “cheese grater” hand guard, both of which would be updated and improved after some time in Finnish military service.
 

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Rifles of the World: Swiss K31
Mike B


Published on Nov 6, 2017
 

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CALL OF DUTY WW2 : TOP 10 Allied Weapons I Wanted
jmantime


Published on Nov 3, 2017
TOP 10 Allied Weapons I Wish were in Call of Duty World War II .
https://www.patreon.com/jmantime
Call of Duty: WWII is a first-person shooter video game developed by Sledgehammer Games and published by Activision for Microsoft Windows, PlayStation 4 and Xbox One. It is the fourteenth primary installment in the Call of Duty series and the first one to be set primarily during World War II since Call of Duty: World at War in 2008. The game is set in European theatre of the war. The campaign is centered around a squad in the 1st Infantry Division, and follows their battles in the Western Front, while the multiplayer expands on different fronts not seen in the campaign.
 

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John Martz Custom Luger Pistols - Babies, Carbines, and .45 ACP Conversions
Forgotten Weapons


Published on Nov 9, 2017

DWM 1917 Baby Luger: https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...
American Eagle Baby Luger: https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...
P08 .45ACP Luger: https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...
Navy .45ACP Luger: https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...
Luger Carbine: https://www.rockislandauction.com/det...

John Martz was a WWII US Navy veteran who spent a career in metalworking before turning his gunsmithing hobby into a full time occupation in the 1960s. He is best known for his custom Luger pistols, and today we have a selection of them to take a look at. They fall into three main categories - carbines, baby Lugers, and caliber conversions. Most notable of the caliber conversions are his .45 ACP guns, made by cutting a Luger frame in two and widening it (plus extensive work to convert the upper assembly parts). With the extremely scarcity and value of original DWM .45ACP Lugers, Martz's conversions are quite sought after.

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