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Our homeschooling adventure.

Goldhedge

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What a great thread!
 

specsaregood

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What a great thread!
Agreed.

I wish I had time to do more hands-on stuff; but as it gets warmer I intend to.

One thing my kid really enjoyed was learning how to do an oil change. We discussed why it needs to be done, we discussed the steps involved, then I walked him through it as he did all the work. I posted this elsewhere; but this was the quiz I gave him afterwards:
7xIiQT7.gif
 

Goldhedge

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Best thing I ever did was learn to tear down an engine.

Go find an old VW engine. Pretty simple to work on. Not too heavy - like a PUP truck engine might be.

Books - for the Complete Idiot

I got pretty good at having it in pieces in about one hour. VW's are crap btw. Air cooled - another 'learning' experience.

What happens when oil gets hot? It leaves.... where it's supposed to be lubing.... CHUNG!
 

specsaregood

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Best thing I ever did was learn to tear down an engine.
Go find an old VW engine. Pretty simple to work on. Not too heavy - like a PUP truck engine might be.
Books - for the Complete Idiot
I got pretty good at having it in pieces in about one hour. VW's are crap btw. Air cooled - another 'learning' experience.
What happens when oil gets hot? It leaves.... where it's supposed to be lubing.... CHUNG!
yeah, he says he wants a pickup when he is old enough to drive. I'm noodling on the idea of getting him a beater pickup when he is 15 and telling him it is his when he gets his license as long as he fixes it up. I rebuilt a mustang when I was 14 with my dad and it was memorable.

Also was looking at go kart kits the other day as a project we could work on...
 

Goldhedge

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Also was looking at go kart kits the other day as a project we could work on...
Yeah, small engine repair would teach him the mechanical aspects....

I like 3d.
Truth be told, the best way to remove old oil stain from a driveway is kitty litter and a 2"x4"x6".

Scrub the litter into the spot and it just disappears.
 

the_shootist

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Yeah, small engine repair would teach him the mechanical aspects....


Truth be told, the best way to remove old oil stain from a driveway is kitty litter and a 2"x4"x6".

Scrub the litter into the spot and it just disappears.
What's the 2x4 for? Is it used as the 'scrubber'?
 

Goldhedge

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What's the 2x4 for? Is it used as the 'scrubber'?
Yes. I have a small bag of litter with a spraypaint can lid for a cup and the 2x4 lives in the bag.
 

specsaregood

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My kid showed interest in learning to play chess last year, and now with homeschool he has had time to work on it.
He has been learning here: https://www.chessmatec.com/
It goes through all the basic moves, terms, concepts, and tactics. He has self-taught himself where he is capable of playing a game now.
They have an impressive interface that is fun for kids. It is another thing he has been able to do self-directed and keeps his interest. I throw it in as a fun educational activity whenever one is needed.

*just thought to post this as he is currently working on "skewers" in it.
 

Goldhedge

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The best way I learned to play chess is to get a book of chess master games - usually found in paperback.

They go through the famous games step by step, move by move and you play both sides of the game on your board.

It taught me a lot of strategy.
 

Bigjon

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I always thought that this is the education I should have learned.
Logic seems to be a lost subject.
 

Goldhedge

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I always thought that this is the education I should have learned.
Logic seems to be a lost subject.
Know a family that used that.

Had a long wall in the basement with a history map across it.

3 levels of The Trivium. Each went in deeper as the years progressed reinforcing what was learned before.

3 times through aught to do it over that much time.
 

Goldbrix

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The best way I learned to play chess is to get a book of chess master games - usually found in paperback.

They go through the famous games step by step, move by move and you play both sides of the game on your board.

It taught me a lot of strategy.
I can set up a Chess Board and Castle.
Of course I was never in the game competitively. Just a rainy day killer.
My grandfather playing Draughts was amazing. Watching him beat my great uncle, his brother, and my uncles at holiday get togethers and the elders play euchre "WOW" talk about hard losers. Rookies need not take a seat. You were a minnow in with sharks.
 

Fiat Metaler

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For learning chess, once you know the basics, what you need to do is chess puzzles to learn strategy and tactics. There are several online apps that will drill you on these, many of which have an AI engine behind them so they drill you until you learn a concept; if you are not getting the concept they come back to it before moving on. I was talking to a h.s. chess coach at a national tournament - he told he he has a 30 minute commute to work everyday and his third grade son would do these drills during the commute and was already ranked 1200.
 

specsaregood

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For learning chess, once you know the basics, what you need to do is chess puzzles to learn strategy and tactics. There are several online apps that will drill you on these, many of which have an AI engine behind them so they drill you until you learn a concept; if you are not getting the concept they come back to it before moving on. I was talking to a h.s. chess coach at a national tournament - he told he he has a 30 minute commute to work everyday and his third grade son would do these drills during the commute and was already ranked 1200.
That's the general thought: tactics, tactics, tactics, but to each their own. While I have no doubt that is the quickest route to immediate success; I never enjoyed puzzles and drilling tactics. I like to imagine myself a positional player and enjoy the long range plan for position instead of finding future tactics. A great player once said, "Tactics flow from a superior position." But being a patzer myself; what I consider good long range positional planning probably seems retarded to an actual good player.

With that said, tactical puzzles are on the agenda, he is enjoying the games at the site I linked and they have a lot of training games teaching tactical concepts with limited pieces on the board.
 

Goldhedge

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What folks don't comprehend about chess is it ain't just a fun game of checkers.

You destroy your opponent mentally. It's brutal like that.


I can set up a Chess Board and Castle.
All one need to do then is play the games move by move and in no hurry.

Make the move. Think "Why there?" Flip the board around and play the opponent. Think.
Repeat. Play it again, and again. Repeat.

This will get you started:

 

Someone_else

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You destroy your opponent mentally. It's brutal like that.
I was never a good player, but I thought that winning was about playing well. Maybe that is why I was never better than "okay".

I am not a fan of zero-sum games, but a few years ago I was playing an ipad game "Dogs Playing Poker". It was fun, and I got better at the Texas-Hold-em variation of poker. What happened is that my play evolved beyond "playing well". To win, I found that I had to do better than "playing well", I had to CRUSH my opponents. I had to bully them. I had to bluff decisively. In short, I had to be a manipulative asshole. Even though I was playing against algorithms, I did not like what happened. So I deleted it forever.
 

Fiat Metaler

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Competitive chess is played with double-clocks where each side has 2 hours for all of their moves. After you make your move, you press the clock and your opponent's clock counts down. My son was playing matches that lasted 5 hours in teh 7th grade when he was rated under 800.

When you get to about 1200-1400 is when positional chess really opens up to you. He plays against the computer and "cheats" to see what the best move is. That's sorta his personality to look for a short cut. The odd thing is he has improved from about 1200 to 1400 this way. Positional chess is starting to open up for him instinctively. (For reference, a master is a rating of about 2000, and grand masters are people who have beaten other masters and have ratings of 2000 to 2400. A lot of chess teachers have a rating of around 1200.)

There are lots of ways to learn chess but the AI engines they have these days are letting kids get up the learning curve a lot faster than Bobby Fisher did.
 

specsaregood

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Math was the one thing early on that I decided I needed to purchase a curriculum. I looked at a bunch of them and it seemed that it was fairly unanimous that the best of the best for pure math skill and challenge is https://beastacademy.com/. It wasn't ranked as the best if you want to follow common core or plan to return to public schools; but the problem solving skills it trains are 2nd to none. Since, he never had any issues keeping up with the PS math program; I decided to give it a try. It is NOT something that my son can work through by himself however; working through the program takes up the plurality of our 1:1 time during most days. But once he masters the concepts, it is quite rewarding for us both.

Below is an example of a recent problem in a chapter he completed with a 100% test result. This is from their 3rd grade level.
s1Rls8z.jpg
 

Bigjon

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I think McCanney is a first class thinker and he has written a home school curriculum.


Professor James McCanney - Science Education for Christian Students & Parents
You have found the Best Homeschool Curriculum Online Homeschool Programs for Christian Homeschool Curriculum.
See details below. Get back to real science.


Quote from Professor McCanney
Modern education is designed to destroy your spirit. Most of all, at every turn, the Family is under attack . When you hear educators use the words "diversity" and "inclusive", it really means "teach all the kids to be the same" and "be ashamed of yourself". We have to teach our youth (starting at a very young age) that they have a spirit which makes them unique AND which tells them right from wrong ... that they as an individual are important. It is this spirit, acting with their physical body, that sets them apart from the animals who only live by reacting to their environment. This is what gives man his creativity and uniqueness as an individual. It is what make us children of God."
 

Fiat Metaler

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Another good resource are the Uncle Eric books. They are written a child's level as if he were having a conversation with his uncle.

Topics are limits on government, taxes, personal finance and responsibility, etc. They cost about $15 but well worth it. If you see them at a used curriculum sale, grab them.

 

specsaregood

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Today we sat down with grid paper and the homedepot site website and we designed our new raised bed, figured out size of the bed, and had him figure out all the lumber and fasteners we needed to order. He had to calculate how many pieces and what sizes we need, keeping in mind sawing, then screw length and type. He had to fill out the cart himself.

who has grid paper on hand you ask? Print it yourself: https://print-graph-paper.com/
 
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specsaregood

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Also, finally ticked off a big item on the todo list. There is a big media nook outside the kids room, that has been unuseable as it was packed with boxes and old clothes and whatnot since we moved in. The kid and I finally got it emptied, painted, and setup for him to start his career as a youtube gamer. At some point the wife came in and started helping while the kid was putting something away. She said, "you know if I just do this it will turn out better and we can get it done quicker." I had to explain, "that isn't the point, he needs to do it for practice and he will take pride in his own work." She acquiesced. I think it turned out nice. He taped and painted everything from his head to floor.

nzSvP1n.png
 

specsaregood

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Kid finished his easter story, printed out his homemade easter cards, addressed, stamped, and stuffed 9 envelopes to drop in the mail, yesterday.

Edit: he used our now usual method: sketch with pencil/tweak, trace with sharpie, erase pencil, color with crayons or pencils, scan, cleanup, color/effects/draw, print.

Found a youtube for this. You fold it so that the egg is whole and the rabbit doesn't show when it comes out off the envelope. Then you unfold it and the egg cracks/rabbit shows up. Popup-style.
h6Esdmc.jpg
 

Fiat Metaler

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She said, "you know if I just do this it will turn out better and we can get it done quicker." I had to explain, "that isn't the point, he needs to do it for practice and he will take pride in his own work." She acquiesced.

You are a very wise man.
 

Goldhedge

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Goldhedge

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Kid finished his easter story, printed out his homemade easter cards, addressed, stamped, and stuffed 9 envelopes to drop in the mail, yesterday.

Edit: he used our now usual method: sketch with pencil/tweak, trace with sharpie, erase pencil, color with crayons or pencils, scan, cleanup, color/effects/draw, print.

Found a youtube for this. You fold it so that the egg is whole and the rabbit doesn't show when it comes out off the envelope. Then you unfold it and the egg cracks/rabbit shows up. Popup-style.
h6Esdmc.jpg
Wow! That is so creative!!
 

specsaregood

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Wow! That is so creative!!
Well the card/folding/design wasn't our idea. But I agree it was nice. The kid picked it out after perusing a bunch of how to draw easter card videos.
 

specsaregood

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Every kid should learn how to cook and operate kitchen appliances.

I was cooking the majority of our family dinners by the end of 6th grade. And knowing how to prep and cook meals has always proved rewarding throughout my life. With that in mind, I seized the homeschool opportunity this year to get my kid capable.

He has had many baking experiences with his mommom, but never really had time or interest in learning how to cook dinners/meals. We took a week earlier this year and had him help with every meal every day. During that time he learned how to safely operate all the major kitchen appliances: toaster oven, stove, cooktop, slow cooker, bbq, chopper, coffee pot, garbage disposal. We never use the microwave, he just finally learned to operate that the other day when we had cause for popcorn.

He has learned how to make our usual family meals. He has learned chopping/knife skills, cleaning, etc. Now him prepping and helping with a family dinner happens at least once a week. I also have him plan the shopping for one meal/week.

He's got family in the restaurant supply business and has a standing offer/threat to work there part-time when he gets a few years older.
 

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Every kid should learn how to cook and operate kitchen appliances.

I was cooking the majority of our family dinners by the end of 6th grade. And knowing how to prep and cook meals has always proved rewarding throughout my life. With that in mind, I seized the homeschool opportunity this year to get my kid capable.

He has had many baking experiences with his mommom, but never really had time or interest in learning how to cook dinners/meals. We took a week earlier this year and had him help with every meal every day. During that time he learned how to safely operate all the major kitchen appliances: toaster oven, stove, cooktop, slow cooker, bbq, chopper, coffee pot, garbage disposal. We never use the microwave, he just finally learned to operate that the other day when we had cause for popcorn.

He has learned how to make our usual family meals. He has learned chopping/knife skills, cleaning, etc. Now him prepping and helping with a family dinner happens at least once a week. I also have him plan the shopping for one meal/week.

He's got family in the restaurant supply business and has a standing offer/threat to work there part-time when he gets a few years older.
Put his ass to work.
 

specsaregood

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Put his ass to work.
yeah, a lot of the stuff I am having a chance to teach him are entry level job skills. which i happily point out each time. i couldn't wait to get a paying job when I was a kid.

in the 90's, all the family, and neighborhood kids spent time working at the in-laws shop when they were 12-14. It is a tradition I will happily help continue.
 
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specsaregood

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Today we sat down with grid paper and the homedepot site website and we designed our new raised bed, figured out size of the bed, and had him figure out all the lumber and fasteners we needed to order. He had to calculate how many pieces and what sizes we need, keeping in mind sawing, then screw length and type. He had to fill out the cart himself.
Kid built our new raised bed yesterday that he designed over the weekend.

He did all the measuring and marking, a little bit of the cutting, half the hauling, half the screwing, and all the orienting (using a compass to determine which direction to point it), and all the cleanup. Was a good use of the measuring and geometry skills he has worked on. Today he'll be using the volume and area math skills to calculate how much soil and mulch we need to order to fill the bed and other parts of the yard.

w7K44at.png
 

Goldhedge

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Was a good use of the measuring and geometry skills he has worked on.
and that is precisely the problem with skooling... no practical relationship to the real world.

Now that he can safely operate a microwave - time to learn how the darn thing works!
 

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Watch the decimal points.

I remember a "slight" error I made when I was a younger man. In the days before home depot and the like, you had to order your sand from the local yard. I needed 3 cu.yd. of sand for a project. Well a slightly larger dump truck showed up then I thought would. I figured he had another delivery somewhere along the way. My 3 cu.yd. turned into 30 cu.yd. Right in the driveway, blocking the garage. It took quite a few wheelbarrows to move and a "few years!" to use up the sand.

I never forgot that error. As you see, I still bring it up when appropriate. :oops:
 

Fiat Metaler

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Kid built our new raised bed yesterday that he designed over the weekend.

He did all the measuring and marking, a little bit of the cutting, half the hauling, half the screwing, and all the orienting (using a compass to determine which direction to point it), and all the cleanup. Was a good use of the measuring and geometry skills he has worked on. Today he'll be using the volume and area math skills to calculate how much soil and mulch we need to order to fill the bed and other parts of the yard.
That is very impressive, particularly for a child that young.

I did something similar as an adult and learned that building raised beds so close to tall trees (as indicated by the shadows in your pictures) means that you will grow very little due to the limited sunlight.

I also learned that filling those raised beds is a back breaking job.

Its wonderful that he will learn these lessons much earlier than I did.
 

specsaregood

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I did something similar as an adult and learned that building raised beds so close to tall trees (as indicated by the shadows in your pictures) means that you will grow very little due to the limited sunlight.
Yeah, we have lots of trees. That photo was late in the day (sunsetting). We made note last year and took photos last summer where the sunny spot started and ended. The area where it is located is the one big patch of land where there is full sun for the majority of the day, especially from the south (no trees blocking that direction). He used a compass to orient the box so that the long side is facing due south.

I also learned that filling those raised beds is a back breaking job.
He is gonna learn that this weekend. :) And he thought hauling firewood this past fall was hard work...

Its wonderful that he will learn these lessons much earlier than I did.
I grew up a country kid and my dad built our house. He had us doing all this and more from about the same age. While I didn't grow up and go into any building trades, we always had access to tools and materials as a kid to build whatever we wanted; so as an adult I felt comfortable enough to attempt most things and had enough experience to know when I just want to hire somebody else to do the job.
 

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He is gonna learn that this weekend. :) And he thought hauling firewood this past fall was hard work...
Judicious use of a shovel and a wheel barrow... Just watch the toes when dumping it!
 

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A few weeks back I decided we needed an exercise for the kid's memorization skills. So now I find a new meaningful quote every week for the kid to log and memorize. We discuss the meaning of the quote and about the author.

eg: "It's not the size of the dog in the fight, it's the size of the fight in the dog."
-Mark Twain

If you all have any favorite quotes you think a young boy should know, feel free to share them.
 

Fiat Metaler

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A few weeks back I decided we needed an exercise for the kid's memorization skills. So now I find a new meaningful quote every week for the kid to log and memorize. We discuss the meaning of the quote and about the author.

eg: "It's not the size of the dog in the fight, it's the size of the fight in the dog."
-Mark Twain

If you all have any favorite quotes you think a young boy should know, feel free to share them.

Early to bed, early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy, and wise.

If it flies, floats, or ***, its better to rent.

Regarding memorization, when I was very young I was injured and lost all of my front teeth. When they came in, I had difficulty making S and TH sounds and had to see a speech therapist. It was actually pretty fun because we played memorization games like "I'm going on a trip and I'm bringing x, y, and z." You keep adding to the list and have to memorize the list as it gest longer. Also, card games like concentration to find pairs. (What I didn't realize as a youth was I was practicing my pronounciations). I think I benefited greatly and have an above average ability to memorize things for tests, etc.

Also, I wish I had had the multiplication tables up to 20 drilled into me. Being able to do mental math is a huge advantage in business.
 

MrLucky

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Not necessarily a meaningful quote, but one my father would tell me from time to time.

"When every day's a holiday, no day's a holiday."

As a younger boy, I'd look at him quizzically. His reply was "you'll figure it out". If you need help figuring it out, pm me.