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Pallet gardening

edsl48

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#2
Wood Pallet Garden – Harvesting Lettuce



With the rain and cooler temps this past week, our pallet gardens have been growing like crazy!

So far we have harvest 3 heads of endive lettuce.
It’s a little bitter {that’s normal} but it sure is pretty to grow. Kind of artsy if you ask me.

I think I’ll be replacing the endive beds with some Ruby Red Swiss chard once I get it all harvested.

The strawberries are coming along nicely too. We have strawberries growing in 4 places this year. In the greenhouse, along side the house, in a hanging basket and in a wood pallet. So far the strawberries in the greenhouse are doing the best.
Last year I planted strawberries in a vertical pallet and I had it standing up for awhile, but eventually placed it flat on the ground so it would be easier to manage.

The spinach is rockin’ too!

Lucy the lettuce dog taking her job seriously. Sampling is her primary duty.

Have you ever grown your own celery before? Homegrown celery has a totally different taste. We don’t use any chemicals on our vegetables, so I’m guessing that’s why they taste a little different than conventionally grown stuff you get in the stores.

And remember the red speckled lettuce and how I couldn’t figure out what variety it was? Well, it’s actually a romaine lettuce and the variety is called Freckles. If you ever find the seed packet at your local nursery center, grab one. It tastes just like regular Romaine only it’s prettier.

No matter how you do it, gardening is cool!
Have a great weekend everyone.
~Mavis

Want to learn more about wood pallet gardening and how I put mine together? Click on the pallets above and it will take you to my first pallet garden post of the year. You’ll also learn what to look for when choosing a pallet.

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newmisty

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#3
Cute.
 

newmisty

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#6
It might make more sense than my grand idea. I want to start growing a few things, including leaf lettuce, in a spare room with a grow light. Year after year of long winters are making me think of creative ideas.
I've seen some very ingenious "aquaponics" set-ups for simple things like lettuce and would like to do the same some day.

 

EricTheCat

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#7
I've seen some very ingenious "aquaponics" set-ups for simple things like lettuce and would like to do the same some day.

That is pretty interesting. This year I am going for high density in soil. This will be the first year I grow lettuce. Usually I grow onions, potatoes, peppers, tomatoes, celery and herbs.
 

kiffertom

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It might make more sense than my grand idea. I want to start growing a few things, including leaf lettuce, in a spare room with a grow light. Year after year of long winters are making me think of creative ideas.
check out this old mans garden.
 

Joe King

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#10
check out this old mans garden.
That's neat that he's able to grow citrus there, but I'm wondering how he's doin' this winter. Did that super cold polar vortex a few weeks ago make it to Alliance Nebraska? Or were they spared?
 

EricTheCat

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That's neat that he's able to grow citrus there, but I'm wondering how he's doin' this winter. Did that super cold polar vortex a few weeks ago make it to Alliance Nebraska? Or were they spared?
That is an interesting question. I like the idea of having a greenhouse of sorts and I like the way they run water under ground to heat it.

Before I watched the video I thought it was going to be about grafting. I know someone who has a peach tree, which normally would not survive here, but the tree is grafted to some other type of tree trunk that can handle the cold.
 

Pyramid

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#14
1550194197460.jpg


Not my picture, but this seems to be a really good idea for a hanging garden that's elevated just a couple feet above ground to keep the rabbits from eating the strawberries. Going to give it a try, as our strawberry patch isn't doing so well thanks to rabbits and other critters.
 

EricTheCat

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#15
I went ahead and rigged up an unused room with grow lights and planted some various leaf lettuces in a 4 gallon pot I had lying around. It will be interesting if my "closet lettuce" produces.

Also getting ready to start some onion seeds.

I see no pallets in my future. I am very interested in trying a small "aquaponics" setup like what newmisty shows in post #6.
 

kiffertom

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#16

kiffertom

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It might make more sense than my grand idea. I want to start growing a few things, including leaf lettuce, in a spare room with a grow light. Year after year of long winters are making me think of creative ideas.
my friend has a cold frame in which he raises lettuce all year round. if you dig a hole about 4 feet deep x about a foot or so across inside your cold frame. the ground temp will rise and keep your cold frame warm all winter. i saw this done on a farm below the cow watering station. the guy who showed it to me said the water wont freeze due to the rising heat.
 

EricTheCat

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#18
my friend has a cold frame in which he raises lettuce all year round. if you dig a hole about 4 feet deep x about a foot or so across inside your cold frame. the ground temp will rise and keep your cold frame warm all winter. i saw this done on a farm below the cow watering station. the guy who showed it to me said the water wont freeze due to the rising heat.
That is a great idea. I just might have to try something like that after the ground thaws.
 

newmisty

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edsl48

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Years ago in my neck of the woods people would put manure in cold frames to create heat. Never tried it myself though but I found something on it

How to Use Manure to Turn a Cold Frame into a Hotbed

By GrowOrganic.com on September 07, 2012


Manure heated hotbed diagram courtesy of Virginia Cooperative Extension.
Warm up your cold frame with help from your friendly neighborhood horse.
Horse manure will raise the temperature in a cold frame, and our automatic vent openers will keep the cold frame from over-heating.
Cold frames are heated by the sun. As soon as you add another heat source (via manure or electricity) the cold frame is called a hotbed.
In our video, Cold Frame and Hotbed Gardening, Tricia shows how to position a cold frame in your garden and how to turn it into an electrically heated hotbed. Electricity is the best source of even heat for a hotbed.
Instead of electricity, you can warm up your hotbed the old-fashioned way, with horse manure.

MANURE CAN MAKE YOUR COLD FRAME A HOTBED
Manure generates heat as it decomposes. If you place your cold frame on a foundation of manure you’ll raise the temperature of the air and soil inside the unit.
1) Build a cold frame from our kits or create one on your own.
2) Choose a south-facing site in your garden, with a windbreak.
3) Mark out a hole the size of your cold frame, and dig down about 2 feet.
4) Shovel in about 4 inches of gravel, for good drainage.
5) Fill the hole with horse manure. The ideal manure will come to you mixed with straw.
6) Press down the manure and wet it with a garden hose.
7) Top the manure with 4-6 inches of good soil (no weeds!—unless that’s what you want to grow over the winter).
8) Set the cold frame on top of the soil. And start calling it a hotbed.

GET THE HOTBED READY TO PLANT
1) Use a soil thermometer to see just how hot your hotbed is.
2) Install an automatic, heat-activated, vent opener to open and close the lid of the hotbed. Choose a vent opener that can handle the weight of your lid.
3) Check your seed packs for ideal germination temperature, and plant when the soil is at that point. Soil at 70-75°F is good for germinating most vegetables. Vegetable starts will thrive, too, at that temperature.
4) For fall and early spring planting you can’t go wrong with our Frost-Kissed Seed Collection (shown above) containing 10 Peaceful Valley seed packs of organic, cool-season, vegetables.
For more information about manure heating for hotbeds, check out the Virginia Cooperative Extension, the University of Missouri Extension, and Purdue University.
Many thanks to the Virginia Cooperative Extension for the use of their helpful diagram.
Take the chill off your cold frame, warm it up with manure, and enjoy the gardening flexibility of a hotbed all winter long.
 

Fatrat

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#25
Most pallets are recycled, people either take them back to places that buy pallets or use them as cheap firewood.
 

kiffertom

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#26
Most pallets are recycled, people either take them back to places that buy pallets or use them as cheap firewood.
i just cut up three of them for kindling. theyre so dry they burn real hot.