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Pics Of Days & Time Gone By

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#81
43 Magnificent Vintage Photos of America During the 1900s
Yesterday Today


Published on May 6, 2019
43 Magnificent Vintage Photos of America During the 1900s

Check out more great content on our webpage at www.yesterdaytoday.net
 

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#83
20 Haunting Photographs of the Hell of Serra Pelada Mines in the 1980s
May 10, 2019 1980s, Brazil, event & history, life & culture, people

Serra Pelada was a large gold mine in Brazil 430 kilometres (270 mi) south of the mouth of the Amazon River. The mine was made infamous by the still images taken by Alfredo Jaar and later by Sebastião Salgado and the first section of Godfrey Reggio’s 1988 documentary Powaqqatsi, showing an anthill of workers moving vast amounts of ore by hand. Because of the chaotic nature of the operation estimating the number of miners was difficult, but at least 100,000 people were thought to be present, making it one of the largest mines in the world.

In January 1979, farmer Genésio Ferreira da Silva hired a geologist to investigate whether gold he found on his property was part of a larger deposit. A local child swimming on the banks of a local river found a 6 grams (0.21 oz) nugget of gold. Soon word leaked out that da Silva was indeed sitting upon one of the largest deposits in the world. By the end of the week a gold rush had started with thousands of people descending upon the farm to mine. Five weeks later, there were 10,000 on Ferreira’s property and another 12,000 nearby. Huge nuggets were quickly discovered, the biggest weighing nearly 6.8 kilograms (15 lb), $108,000 at the 1980 market price (now $328,405 in 2019).

At first the only way to get to the remote site was by plane or foot. Miners would often pay exorbitant prices to have taxis drive them from the nearest town to the end of a dirt track; from there, they would walk the remaining distance—some 15 kilometres (9.3 mi)—to the site. The growing town, since it could only be made of material that was carried in by hand, was a collection of haphazard shacks and tents. Each miner had a 2 metres (6.6 ft) by 3 metres (9.8 ft) claim. By May 1980 there were 4,000 such claims.

When Brazilian photographer Sebastião Salgado visited the mine, he was stunned. “Every hair on my body stood on edge. The Pyramids, the history of mankind unfolded. I had traveled to the dawn of time,” he said. Below are some of the most powerful photos ever taken showing the sheer madness and chaos of the situation.






















(Photos by Sebastião Salgado)

https://www.vintag.es/2019/05/the-hell-of-serra-pelada.html
 

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#84
Hughes H-4 Hercules, The World’s Largest Flying Boat That Flew for Only 26 Seconds
May 09, 2019
1940s, aviation, event & history, inventions, science & technology

In 1942, the U.S. War Department needed to transport war materiel and personnel to Britain. Allied shipping in the Atlantic Ocean was suffering heavy losses to German U-boats, so a requirement was issued for an aircraft that could cross the Atlantic with a large payload. Wartime priorities meant the aircraft could not be made of strategic materials (e.g., aluminum).

The aircraft was the brainchild of Henry J. Kaiser, a leading Liberty ship builder and manufacturer. Kaiser teamed with aircraft designer Howard Hughes to create what would become the largest aircraft ever built at that time. The aircraft was designed to carry 150,000 pounds (68,000 kg), 750 fully equipped troops or two 30-ton M4 Sherman tanks. The original designation “HK-1” reflected the Hughes and Kaiser collaboration.

The HK-1 aircraft contract was issued in 1942 as a development contract and called for three aircraft to be constructed in two years for the war effort. Seven configurations were considered, including twin-hull and single-hull designs with combinations of four, six, and eight wing-mounted engines. The final design chosen was a behemoth, eclipsing any large transport then built. It would be built mostly of wood to conserve metal (its elevators and rudder were fabric-covered), and was nicknamed the Spruce Goose (a name Hughes disliked) or the Flying Lumberyard.

While Kaiser had originated the “flying cargo ship” concept, he did not have an aeronautical background and deferred to Hughes and his designer, Glenn Odekirk. Development dragged on, which frustrated Kaiser, who blamed delays partly on restrictions placed for the acquisition of strategic materials such as aluminum, and partly on Hughes’ insistence on “perfection.” Construction of the first HK-1 took place 16 months after the receipt of the development contract. Kaiser then withdrew from the project.

Hughes continued the program on his own under the designation H-4 Hercules, signing a new government contract that now limited production to one example. Work proceeded slowly, and the H-4 was not completed until well after the war was over. The plane was built by the Hughes Aircraft Company at Hughes Airport, location of present-day Playa Vista, Los Angeles, California, employing the plywood-and-resin “Duramold” process – a form of composite technology – for the laminated wood construction, which was considered a technological tour de force. The specialized wood veneer was made by Roddis Manufacturing in Marshfield, Wisconsin. Hamilton Roddis had teams of young women ironing the (unusually thin) strong birch wood veneer before shipping to California.

A house moving company transported the airplane on streets to Pier E in Long Beach, California. They moved it in three large sections: the fuselage, each wing—and a fourth, smaller shipment with tail assembly parts and other smaller assemblies. After Hughes Aircraft completed final assembly, they erected a hangar around the flying boat, with a ramp to launch the H-4 into the harbor.

Howard Hughes was called to testify before the Senate War Investigating Committee in 1947 over the use of government funds for the aircraft. During a Senate hearing on August 6, 1947 (the first of a series of appearances), Hughes said:

“The Hercules was a monumental undertaking. It is the largest aircraft ever built. It is over five stories tall with a wingspan longer than a football field. That's more than a city block. Now, I put the sweat of my life into this thing. I have my reputation all rolled up in it and I have stated several times that if it's a failure, I’ll probably leave this country and never come back. And I mean it.”​
In all, development cost for the plane reached $23 million (equivalent to more than $283 million in 2016.)

Hughes returned to California during a break in the Senate hearings to run taxi tests on the H-4. On November 2, 1947, the taxi tests began with Hughes at the controls. His crew included Dave Grant as copilot, two flight engineers, Don Smith and Joe Petrali, 16 mechanics, and two other flight crew. The H-4 also carried seven invited guests from the press corps and an additional seven industry representatives. Thirty-six were on board.

Four reporters left to file stories after the first two taxi runs while the remaining press stayed for the final test run of the day. After picking up speed on the channel facing Cabrillo Beach the Hercules lifted off, remaining airborne for 26 seconds at 70 ft (21 m) off the water at a speed of 135 miles per hour (217 km/h) for about one mile (1.6 km). At this altitude the aircraft still experienced ground effect. Nevertheless, the brief flight proved to detractors that Hughes’ (now unneeded) masterpiece was flight-worthy—thus vindicating the use of government funds. The Spruce Goose, however, never flew again. Its lifting capacity and ceiling were never tested. A full-time crew of 300 workers, all sworn to secrecy, maintained the aircraft in flying condition in a climate-controlled hangar. The company reduced the crew to 50 workers in 1962 and then disbanded it after Hughes’ death in 1976.

















Howard Hughes inside the “Spruce Goose”, 1947.


Howard Hughes inside the “Spruce Goose”, 1947.


Howard Hughes prepares to take the “Spruce Goose” out for tests. Nov. 1, 1947

(Photos: Getty Images)

https://www.vintag.es/2019/05/h-4-hercules.html
 

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#85
Hughes H-4 Hercules, The World’s Largest Flying Boat That Flew for Only 26 Seconds
May 09, 2019
1940s, aviation, event & history, inventions, science & technology

In 1942, the U.S. War Department needed to transport war materiel and personnel to Britain. Allied shipping in the Atlantic Ocean was suffering heavy losses to German U-boats, so a requirement was issued for an aircraft that could cross the Atlantic with a large payload. Wartime priorities meant the aircraft could not be made of strategic materials (e.g., aluminum).

The aircraft was the brainchild of Henry J. Kaiser, a leading Liberty ship builder and manufacturer. Kaiser teamed with aircraft designer Howard Hughes to create what would become the largest aircraft ever built at that time. The aircraft was designed to carry 150,000 pounds (68,000 kg), 750 fully equipped troops or two 30-ton M4 Sherman tanks. The original designation “HK-1” reflected the Hughes and Kaiser collaboration.

The HK-1 aircraft contract was issued in 1942 as a development contract and called for three aircraft to be constructed in two years for the war effort. Seven configurations were considered, including twin-hull and single-hull designs with combinations of four, six, and eight wing-mounted engines. The final design chosen was a behemoth, eclipsing any large transport then built. It would be built mostly of wood to conserve metal (its elevators and rudder were fabric-covered), and was nicknamed the Spruce Goose (a name Hughes disliked) or the Flying Lumberyard.

While Kaiser had originated the “flying cargo ship” concept, he did not have an aeronautical background and deferred to Hughes and his designer, Glenn Odekirk. Development dragged on, which frustrated Kaiser, who blamed delays partly on restrictions placed for the acquisition of strategic materials such as aluminum, and partly on Hughes’ insistence on “perfection.” Construction of the first HK-1 took place 16 months after the receipt of the development contract. Kaiser then withdrew from the project.

Hughes continued the program on his own under the designation H-4 Hercules, signing a new government contract that now limited production to one example. Work proceeded slowly, and the H-4 was not completed until well after the war was over. The plane was built by the Hughes Aircraft Company at Hughes Airport, location of present-day Playa Vista, Los Angeles, California, employing the plywood-and-resin “Duramold” process – a form of composite technology – for the laminated wood construction, which was considered a technological tour de force. The specialized wood veneer was made by Roddis Manufacturing in Marshfield, Wisconsin. Hamilton Roddis had teams of young women ironing the (unusually thin) strong birch wood veneer before shipping to California.

A house moving company transported the airplane on streets to Pier E in Long Beach, California. They moved it in three large sections: the fuselage, each wing—and a fourth, smaller shipment with tail assembly parts and other smaller assemblies. After Hughes Aircraft completed final assembly, they erected a hangar around the flying boat, with a ramp to launch the H-4 into the harbor.

Howard Hughes was called to testify before the Senate War Investigating Committee in 1947 over the use of government funds for the aircraft. During a Senate hearing on August 6, 1947 (the first of a series of appearances), Hughes said:

“The Hercules was a monumental undertaking. It is the largest aircraft ever built. It is over five stories tall with a wingspan longer than a football field. That's more than a city block. Now, I put the sweat of my life into this thing. I have my reputation all rolled up in it and I have stated several times that if it's a failure, I’ll probably leave this country and never come back. And I mean it.”​
In all, development cost for the plane reached $23 million (equivalent to more than $283 million in 2016.)

Hughes returned to California during a break in the Senate hearings to run taxi tests on the H-4. On November 2, 1947, the taxi tests began with Hughes at the controls. His crew included Dave Grant as copilot, two flight engineers, Don Smith and Joe Petrali, 16 mechanics, and two other flight crew. The H-4 also carried seven invited guests from the press corps and an additional seven industry representatives. Thirty-six were on board.

Four reporters left to file stories after the first two taxi runs while the remaining press stayed for the final test run of the day. After picking up speed on the channel facing Cabrillo Beach the Hercules lifted off, remaining airborne for 26 seconds at 70 ft (21 m) off the water at a speed of 135 miles per hour (217 km/h) for about one mile (1.6 km). At this altitude the aircraft still experienced ground effect. Nevertheless, the brief flight proved to detractors that Hughes’ (now unneeded) masterpiece was flight-worthy—thus vindicating the use of government funds. The Spruce Goose, however, never flew again. Its lifting capacity and ceiling were never tested. A full-time crew of 300 workers, all sworn to secrecy, maintained the aircraft in flying condition in a climate-controlled hangar. The company reduced the crew to 50 workers in 1962 and then disbanded it after Hughes’ death in 1976.

















Howard Hughes inside the “Spruce Goose”, 1947.


Howard Hughes inside the “Spruce Goose”, 1947.


Howard Hughes prepares to take the “Spruce Goose” out for tests. Nov. 1, 1947

(Photos: Getty Images)

https://www.vintag.es/2019/05/h-4-hercules.html
I bet a modern set of engines could lift that thing off...
 

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#86
back some good or bad memories

Fascinating Color Photos That Capture Street Scenes of Zagreb in 1953
May 11, 2019 1950s, Croatia, life & culture, street, Zagreb

Zagreb is the capital and the largest city of Croatia. It is located in the northwest of the country, along the Sava river, at the southern slopes of the Medvednica mountain. Zagreb lies at an elevation of approximately 122 m (400 ft) above sea level.

Zagreb is a city with a rich history dating from the Roman times to the present day. The oldest settlement located in the vicinity of the city was the Roman Andautonia, in today's Ščitarjevo.

The transport connections, concentration of industry, scientific, and research institutions and industrial tradition underlie its leading economic position in Croatia. Zagreb is the seat of the central government, administrative bodies, and almost all government ministries. Almost all of the largest Croatian companies, media, and scientific institutions have their headquarters in the city.

Zagreb is also the most important transport hub in Croatia where Central Europe, the Mediterranean and Southeast Europe meet, making the Zagreb area the centre of the road, rail and air networks of Croatia. It is a city known for its diverse economy, high quality of living, museums, sporting, and entertainment events. Its main branches of economy are high-tech industries and the service sector.

These fascinating color photos from Bo_Mar that captured street scenes of this beautiful city in 1953.




















https://www.vintag.es/2019/05/1950s-zagreb.html
 

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#87

USS Macon at Cleveland ,Ohio 1959
 

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#88

Navy Pier, Chicago 1961
 

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#89

RDM YARD 1950 Source - Beeldbank Rotterdam (copyright RDM, CC-BY-NC)
 

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#90

Toronto June 1959
 

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#91
back some good or bad memories

Fascinating Color Photos That Capture Street Scenes of Zagreb in 1953
May 11, 2019 1950s, Croatia, life & culture, street, Zagreb

Zagreb is the capital and the largest city of Croatia. It is located in the northwest of the country, along the Sava river, at the southern slopes of the Medvednica mountain. Zagreb lies at an elevation of approximately 122 m (400 ft) above sea level.

Zagreb is a city with a rich history dating from the Roman times to the present day. The oldest settlement located in the vicinity of the city was the Roman Andautonia, in today's Ščitarjevo.

The transport connections, concentration of industry, scientific, and research institutions and industrial tradition underlie its leading economic position in Croatia. Zagreb is the seat of the central government, administrative bodies, and almost all government ministries. Almost all of the largest Croatian companies, media, and scientific institutions have their headquarters in the city.

Zagreb is also the most important transport hub in Croatia where Central Europe, the Mediterranean and Southeast Europe meet, making the Zagreb area the centre of the road, rail and air networks of Croatia. It is a city known for its diverse economy, high quality of living, museums, sporting, and entertainment events. Its main branches of economy are high-tech industries and the service sector.

These fascinating color photos from Bo_Mar that captured street scenes of this beautiful city in 1953.




















https://www.vintag.es/2019/05/1950s-zagreb.html
So clean! People obviously cared about their city...unlike people today in America. Tossing baby diapers into the Wal Mart parking lot, throwing plastic drink bottles onto the sides of the road, etc.
 

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So clean! People obviously cared about their city...unlike people today in America. Tossing baby diapers into the Wal Mart parking lot, throwing plastic drink bottles onto the sides of the road, etc.
It's only a small minority that does that. Most people are pretty decent. At least that's been my experience.
 

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#93
45 Wonderful Vintage Photos of Actress Doris Day During the 1950s
Yesterday Today


Published on May 13, 2019
Actress Doris Day died on Monday, May 13, 2019. She was 97.
 

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#94
Vintage Trains and Trams in Belgium: A Look Back on the Belgian Traffic System in the 1970s
May 15, 2019 1970s, Belgium, life & culture, street, traffic & transport, vehicles

Belgium was among the first countries to build an extensive railway network. The country was heavily involved in the early development of railway transport. It was the second country in Europe, after Great Britain, to open a railway and produce locomotives. The first line, between the cities of Brussels and Mechelen opened in 1835.


Tram system of Belgium in the 1970s

In 1870, the total length was already exceeding 3100 km. In 1912 the length was increased till more than 5000 km. This will remain so till 1948.

Belgium was the first state in Europe to create a national railway network and the first to possess a nationalised railway system. The network expanded fast as Belgium industrialised, and by the early 20th century was increasingly under state-control. The nationalised railways, under the umbrella organisation National Railway Company of Belgium (NMBS/SNCB), retained their monopoly until liberalisation in the 2000s.

Currently, the length of the railway network is 3578 km of which 3000 km is electrified and less than 800 km is only single track.

These amazing photos were taken by Tim Boric that show what the tram system of Belgium looked like in the 1970s.


Antwerp. Franklin Rooseveltplaats, 1972


Antwerpen. A 1908 Vintage tram car on route 12 negotiating the curve from Van Wesenbekestraat to Gemeentestraa, 1973


Antwerpen. Groenplaats, 1973


Antwerpen. Koningin Astridplein, 1973


Antwerpen. Tram and car traffic under the "removable steel viaduct" that spoiled Rooseveltplaats for so many years, 1973


Brussels. A standard tram set at the terminus in Rue Henri Maus, next to the Bourse (Exchange), 1971


Brussels. At Bareel van Sint-Gillis and Barrière de Saint-Gilles. A star-shaped sort-of roundabout where six streets meet, 1971


Brussels. Place Emile Bockstael, 1971


Brussels. Tervurenlaan, 1977


Brussels. Triangles in Uccle, 1972


Chapelle-lez-Herlaimont. SNCV/NMVB-route 89 was in the 1970s a short-working of the 80 service from Charleroi, ending in Chapelle-lez-Herlaimont right in front of the local friture


Charleroi. Rue de l'Écluse, 1973


Charleroi. Rue des Preys with STIC tram on route 15, 1973


Charleroi. Tram terminus Charleroi Eden by night, circa 1975


Dampremy. A miner (or probably a steel worker) enjoys the winter sun as a vicinal tram passes his home in, 1973


Dampremy. Tram on street with the cokes factory in Marchienne-au-Pont in the background, 1973


Melle. Swinging the bow collector at the terminus of line 20 near Ghent, 1973


Roux. Under the watching eye of the tram driver, the conductor (still wearing the traditional dust coat) is setting the points to the right direction, 1975


Souvret. On a bleak and drizzly morning when the street lights stay on burning, circa 1975


Souvret. Rainy morning, circa 1975

https://www.vintag.es/2019/05/1970s-belgian-trams.html
 

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Paris Just Before WWII: 22 Stunning Photos Capture Daily Life of the French Capital in the 1930s
May 18, 2019 1930s, France, life & culture, Paris, people, street

After the First World War ended. The French economy boomed from 1921 until the Great Depression reached Paris in 1931. This period, called Les années folles or the "Crazy Years", saw Paris reestablished as a capital of art, music, literature and cinema.



Paris in the 1930s

The artistic ferment and low prices attracted writers and artists from around the world, including Pablo Picasso, Salvador Dali, Ernest Hemingway, James Joyce, and Josephine Baker.

The worldwide Great Depression hit Paris in 1931, bringing hardships and a more somber mood. The population declined slightly from its all-time peak of 2.9 million in 1921 to 2.8 million in 1936. The low birth rate of Parisians was made up by a wave of new immigration from Russia, Poland, Germany, eastern and central Europe, Italy, Portugal and Spain.

Besides, Paris also hosted major international expositions in 1937, and the Colonial Exposition of 1931, all of which left a mark on Paris architecture and culture.

These stunning and impressive photographs will give us a glimpse of Paris during the 1930s.


Café, Paris, 1930. (Photo by Alexander Artway)


Daisy Bar, Montmartre, Paris, 1930. (Photo by André Kertész)


Divers, Paris, 1930. (Photo by George Hoyningen-Huene)


Les Halles, Paris, 1930. (Photo by Alfred Eisenstaedt)


Notre Dame de Paris after Midnight, 1930. (Photo by Brassaï)


Paris metro, 1930


Montmartre, Paris, 1932


Papa’s airplane, Paris, 1934. (Photo by Robert Doisneau)


Rainy day in Paris, 1934. (Photo by Brassaï)


The embrace, Paris, 1934. (Photo by Fred Stein)


The two brothers, Paris, 1934. (Photograph by Robert Doisneau)


Fountain, Paris, 1935. (Photo by Fred Stein)


Paris evening, 1935. (Photo by Fred Stein)


Paris street, 1935. (Photo by Gilbert de Chambertrand)


Parisian bar, 1935. (Photo by Brassaï)


Children reading newspaper, Paris, 1936. (Photo by Fred Stein)


Les Escaliers de Montmartre, Paris, 1936. (Photo by George Brassai)


Paris, 1936. (Photo by Herbert List)


Paris, 1937. (Photo by Marianne Breslauer)


The squared circle, France, 1937. (Photo by Gaston Paris)


Paris, 1938. (Photo by Boris Lipnitzki)


Louvre, Paris, about 1939. (Photo by Nicolas Yantchevsky)

https://www.vintag.es/2019/05/1930s-paris.html
 

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#98
50 Amazing Vintage Photos from the 1960s Volume 12
Yesterday Today


Published on May 18, 2019
50 Amazing Vintage Photos from the 1960s Volume 12

Check out more great content on our webpage at www.yesterdaytoday.net

I've never been a fan of LIza Minelli's looks...but she was pretty cute before she chopped her hair off!

 

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Cool Pics That Capture a Beautiful Bikini Girl on the Beach in the 1980s
May 17, 2019 1980s, beach, fashion & clothing, female, portraits

During the '80s, women's independence was only growing. Bikinis became popular and even more risqué and fashion forward; with patterns and designs that were seriously on-trend.

We easily saw young women in various bikini styles on the beaches in this period. These cool pics were found by Steven Martin that captured an unknown girl in bikini in the 1980s.








https://www.vintag.es/2019/05/1980s-bikini-girl.html
 

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Painters on the Brooklyn Bridge, ca. 1910s
May 17, 2019 1910s, architecture & construction, event & history, male, New York, people, photography

Bridges have been around in the United States since the country’s inception, and even long before that. Up until the late 1800s did anybody see a bridge in the country with the magnitude of the Brooklyn Bridge, though. Construction on the Brooklyn Bridge started up back in 1869, using a hybrid of both suspension designs and cable-stayed that would make it stand out from the other bridges at the time.

The anchorages that held the bridge up were rented out as vaults to help pay for the bridge, which were mostly used to store wine. The bridge itself was the mastermind of John Augustus Roebling, who had been working on the Brooklyn Bridge plans for more than a decade. After his plan was put into place, it took around 14 years to finish, with the Brooklyn Bridge officially opening on May 24, 1883.

When the bridge first opened, there were nearly 2,000 vehicles and more than 150,000 people that made their way to and from Brooklyn and Manhattan. It wasn’t just a convenience for many New Yorkers, but also an attraction for those around the globe. As vehicles became more common and more people started to visit and move to New York City, the nearly 6,000 foot long bridge would need some work throughout the years.

As the official photographer for the New York Department of Bridges from 1906 to 1934 Eugene de Salignac captured New York as it was transforming from a city packed with horses to one of towering sky scrappers and street cars. While documenting work on the iconic Brooklyn Bridge on September 22, 1914 Salignac took a photo of workers painting the bridge cables. This may have been the inspiration to return a month later, on October 7, 1914, when he took this posed image of workers, arranged almost musically, on the cables of the Brooklyn Bridge — 31 years after it first opened.


Painters on the Brooklyn Bridge suspender cables, on October 7, 1914. (Photo: Eugene de Salignac/ NYC Municipal Archives)

Eugene de Salignac is a bit of a mystery to historians. Born in 1861 he was 42-years-old, in 1903, when he got a job as assistant to the photographer for the Department of Bridges, Joseph Palmer. When Palmer unexpectedly died three years later Salignac took over his job. For decades he took pictures documenting New York’s transformation from horse and buggy streets to the modern urban jungle we know now. Over the course of his career, he shot over 20,000 images. Yet for decades they sat in the city archives collecting dust.

No one knew of his work until 1999 when the senior curator at the New York City Municipal Archives, Michael Lorenzini, was spooling through the city’s huge collection of microfilm. Lorenzini started to notice that most of the images in the collection had the same style. This hunch led him to discover a series of numbers on the negatives that led to an epiphany, “It just kind of hit me: this is one guy; this is a great photographer.”


Painters on the Brooklyn Bridge, 1914.

The scale of Eugene de Salignac’s work is massive with more and more pictures discovered all the time. Working until his retirement in 1932 he took thousands of images. New York has uploaded many of Salignac’s pictures on its Department of Records website.

In 1943 he passed away, at 82-years-old, without anyone knowing the immensely important legacy he left behind in the city archives.


Brooklyn Bridge painters at work high above the city, on December 3, 1915. (Courtesy NYC Municipal Archives)

After he was “discovered” by Lorenzini in 1999 there have been a number of shows and in 2007 Aperture Publishers released a book called New York Rises: Photographs by Eugene de Salignac with essays by Michael Lorenzini and photography scholar Kevin Moore.


https://www.vintag.es/2019/05/painters-on-brooklyn-bridge-ca-1910s.html
 

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Painters on the Brooklyn Bridge, ca. 1910s
May 17, 2019
1910s, architecture & construction, event & history, male, New York, people, photography

Bridges have been around in the United States since the country’s inception, and even long before that. Up until the late 1800s did anybody see a bridge in the country with the magnitude of the Brooklyn Bridge, though. Construction on the Brooklyn Bridge started up back in 1869, using a hybrid of both suspension designs and cable-stayed that would make it stand out from the other bridges at the time.

The anchorages that held the bridge up were rented out as vaults to help pay for the bridge, which were mostly used to store wine. The bridge itself was the mastermind of John Augustus Roebling, who had been working on the Brooklyn Bridge plans for more than a decade. After his plan was put into place, it took around 14 years to finish, with the Brooklyn Bridge officially opening on May 24, 1883.

When the bridge first opened, there were nearly 2,000 vehicles and more than 150,000 people that made their way to and from Brooklyn and Manhattan. It wasn’t just a convenience for many New Yorkers, but also an attraction for those around the globe. As vehicles became more common and more people started to visit and move to New York City, the nearly 6,000 foot long bridge would need some work throughout the years.

As the official photographer for the New York Department of Bridges from 1906 to 1934 Eugene de Salignac captured New York as it was transforming from a city packed with horses to one of towering sky scrappers and street cars. While documenting work on the iconic Brooklyn Bridge on September 22, 1914 Salignac took a photo of workers painting the bridge cables. This may have been the inspiration to return a month later, on October 7, 1914, when he took this posed image of workers, arranged almost musically, on the cables of the Brooklyn Bridge — 31 years after it first opened.


Painters on the Brooklyn Bridge suspender cables, on October 7, 1914. (Photo: Eugene de Salignac/ NYC Municipal Archives)

Eugene de Salignac is a bit of a mystery to historians. Born in 1861 he was 42-years-old, in 1903, when he got a job as assistant to the photographer for the Department of Bridges, Joseph Palmer. When Palmer unexpectedly died three years later Salignac took over his job. For decades he took pictures documenting New York’s transformation from horse and buggy streets to the modern urban jungle we know now. Over the course of his career, he shot over 20,000 images. Yet for decades they sat in the city archives collecting dust.

No one knew of his work until 1999 when the senior curator at the New York City Municipal Archives, Michael Lorenzini, was spooling through the city’s huge collection of microfilm. Lorenzini started to notice that most of the images in the collection had the same style. This hunch led him to discover a series of numbers on the negatives that led to an epiphany, “It just kind of hit me: this is one guy; this is a great photographer.”


Painters on the Brooklyn Bridge, 1914.

The scale of Eugene de Salignac’s work is massive with more and more pictures discovered all the time. Working until his retirement in 1932 he took thousands of images. New York has uploaded many of Salignac’s pictures on its Department of Records website.

In 1943 he passed away, at 82-years-old, without anyone knowing the immensely important legacy he left behind in the city archives.


Brooklyn Bridge painters at work high above the city, on December 3, 1915. (Courtesy NYC Municipal Archives)

After he was “discovered” by Lorenzini in 1999 there have been a number of shows and in 2007 Aperture Publishers released a book called New York Rises: Photographs by Eugene de Salignac with essays by Michael Lorenzini and photography scholar Kevin Moore.


https://www.vintag.es/2019/05/painters-on-brooklyn-bridge-ca-1910s.html
Not many safety harnesses on those old boys!
 

Thecrensh

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Cool Pics That Capture a Beautiful Bikini Girl on the Beach in the 1980s
May 17, 2019
1980s, beach, fashion & clothing, female, portraits

During the '80s, women's independence was only growing. Bikinis became popular and even more risqué and fashion forward; with patterns and designs that were seriously on-trend.

We easily saw young women in various bikini styles on the beaches in this period. These cool pics were found by Steven Martin that captured an unknown girl in bikini in the 1980s.








https://www.vintag.es/2019/05/1980s-bikini-girl.html
Funny how things change....10 years ago, I would have been impressed by this girl. Now all I see is her crazy eyes and can't help but think how much a pain in the butt she would be.
 

searcher

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17 Photographs Captured Daily Life at US Marine Corps Boot Camp, Parris Island During Vietnam War

May 19, 2019 1970s, life & culture, military, South Carolina



United States Marine Corps Recruit Training (commonly known as “boot camp”) is a 13-week program of initial training that each recruit must successfully complete in order to serve in the United States Marine Corps.

All enlisted individuals entering the Marine Corps, regardless of eventual active or reserve duty status, will undergo recruit training at one of the two Marine Corps Recruit Depots (MCRD): Parris Island, South Carolina or San Diego, California. The training and standards are identical between the two bases, though the order of some training events differs from east coast to west coast.

United States Marine Corps Physical Fitness Test Physical Fitness Test that includes a run of 3 miles in less than 28 minutes, 70 or more crunches in 2 minutes, at least 7 pull-ups for males and flexed arm hang for more than 30 seconds for females (this is to achieve the minimum score). For a maximum score, male recruits must complete the run in 18 minutes, perform 115 crunches in 2 minutes and do 20 pull ups. All recruits must meet certain height and weight requirements. The Marine Corps utilizes a 500 yard rifle qualification, while the US Army utilizes a 300 yard qualification with a much smaller target.

During the Korean War, training was shortened from ten weeks to eight, but returned afterward to ten. The Ribbon Creek incident in 1956 led to considerable scrutiny and reform in recruit training, such as an additional layer of command oversight and the distinctive campaign cover. During the early 1960s, the training period was increased to 13 weeks, including three weeks of marksmanship training at the Rifle Range. The Vietnam War-era syllabus was shortened to nine weeks and again saw infantry recruits attend follow-on training at Lejeune and Pendleton.

These amazing photographs were taken by Thomas Hoepker in Parris Island, South Carolina from the series US Marine Corps Boot Camp, 1970.



















(Photos © Thomas Hoepker/Magnum Photos)

https://www.vintag.es/2019/05/us-marines-boot-camp-1970.html