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POLL: What are Your Favorite Historical US Coins?

What is Your Favorite US Coin?

  • Indian Cent

    Votes: 2 7.7%
  • Buffalo Nickel

    Votes: 3 11.5%
  • Mercury Dime

    Votes: 6 23.1%
  • Standing Liberty Quarter

    Votes: 2 7.7%
  • Walking Liberty Half Dollar

    Votes: 8 30.8%
  • Barber Dollar

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Incuse Indian $2.50 gold

    Votes: 2 7.7%
  • Liberty Eagle gold - various denominations

    Votes: 1 3.8%
  • St. Gaudens $20 gold

    Votes: 8 30.8%
  • Other: any other coins older or newer, please explain

    Votes: 10 38.5%

  • Total voters
    26

Pyramid

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#1
Vote for your favorite US coins and/or submit a favorite in the "Other" category. Poll is multiple choice and anonymous.

FWIW, my personal favorite is the Walking Liberty half dollar...a gorgeous depiction of Lady Liberty on the obverse that is the current SAE design, and an eagle on the reverse that's poised for takeoff and looking like its going to kick someones ass. I like them all, as well as many others not listed due to poll spacial limitations.
 
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EO 11110

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#2
not a coin, the norse is epic

favorite circulated coin is $10 indian

1610509144807.png
 
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Usc96

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#3
My very favorite has to be the 1915-S Octagonal $50 PanPac:

iu-2.jpeg


The Panama-Pacific Exposition was larger and more prestigious than any previous major fair held in America. The occasion of the event was the completion of the Panama Canal, and the exposition also served to celebrate the rebirth of San Francisco after a devastating earthquake and fire in 1906. Moreover, the series of commemorative coins issued for the Pan-Pac Exposition not only surpassed those of previous expositions in number but also in artistic merit and numismatic significance. Art was a central theme of the Pan-Pac Exposition, and great care was taken in selecting appropriate designs for the commemorative coins, which included four denominations in five different types. The authorizing legislation read in part:

"The words, devices, and designs upon said coins shall be determined and prescribed by the Secretary of the Treasury, and all provisions of law relative to the coinage and legal-tender value of all other gold and silver coins shall be applicable to the coins issued under and in accordance with the provisions of this Act; and one-half of the issue of $50 gold coins herein authorized shall be similar in shape to the octagonal $50 gold pieces issued in California in eighteen hundred and fifty-one; and the entire issue of said $50, $2.50, and $1 coins herein authorized shall be sold and delivered by the Secretary of the Treasury to the Panama-Pacific International Exposition Company at par, under rules and regulations and in amounts to be prescribed by him."

From the beginning, Robert Aitken's design for the fifty dollar gold piece was viewed with moderate enthusiasm by the Commission of Fine Arts, but Treasury Secretary William McAdoo was only satisfied with the work after Aitken made minor adjustments that included the removal of a spider web element in the design that McAdoo believed was "not accepted as a symbol of industry, if that was the artist's meaning, but the contrary." Aitken's use of Minerva, goddess of wisdom and agriculture, and her owl, a symbol of wisdom, along with a Roman numeral date, recalled the classic designs of ancient Greek coinage and art, which heavily influenced much of the art and architecture throughout the Exposition grounds.

As the Act of January 16, 1915, dictated, the fifty dollar gold piece was issued in two varieties -- one round, the other octagonal, being modeled after the "slugs" struck by the U.S. Assay Office in San Francisco during the California Gold Rush. Aitken prepared only one design for both varieties, a decision that is generally attributed to the swiftness with which the Mint sought to have the coins in production. However, on the octagonal version, in the angles created around the border by the unique planchet shape, Aitken placed swimming dolphins, which were described as representing the uninterrupted water route made possible by the Panama Canal.

Coinage of the fifty dollar gold pieces was limited to 1,500 examples of each variety, of which only 483 round and 645 octagonal pieces were distributed. The remaining coins were melted after the close of the Exposition. Surviving examples of either variety are highly sought-after today and represent the crowning acquisition of any classic commemorative coin collector.
 
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EO 11110

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#4
deleted - tupid
 

solarion

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#5
I like the Morgan buck.

1610510378366.png
 

solarion

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#7
Nice choice. Especially in pee colored metal.

1610510857447.png
 

newmisty

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newmisty

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newmisty

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#10
Phew! Thank you for the multiple options choice...too hard to pick 1 or two...or 3...
 

EO 11110

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#14
texas commem == remember the alamo

1610563754438.png


1610563852846.png
 

Irons

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#15
Liberty or V nickel. It's the first old coin I found metal detecting and I thought it was beautiful but I had no idea what it was. Had to look it up.
Same for the 3 cent nickel I found a couple years later.



.
 

solarion

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#16

jelly

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#22
I have a strong affinity for Franklin halves, like the Walking Liberties but really love the Franklin's. I see a few other folks share my thought on this based on the comments, would be interesting to see them listed as one fo the choices on the survey.
I love the Frankies as well. Really underappreciated coin, and a unique coin.
 

oldgaranddad

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#23
I always liked the two and three cent pieces. Non numismatic people are awed that they never knew they existed.
 

EO 11110

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#24
Check my avatar. The 1907 high relief Saint. What a masterpiece that coin is in hand! Super high relief. looks like a medal.
how many rolls of those do you have?
 

plata_oro

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#25
1. Walking Liberty Half
2. St. Gaudens $20 (I love the stamped edge)
3. Mercury Dime
4. Standing Liberty Quarter
5. Peace Dollar and Morgan Dollar
 

savvydon

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#26
how many rolls of those do you have?
Unfortunately I own none at the moment. Ties up too much cash. I have bought and sold at least a half dozen in the past though. The market is fairly reliable and I have made a little money turning them over. Plus got to really enjoy ownership, even if it was fairly short lived.
 

Buck

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#27
Unfortunately I own none at the moment. Ties up too much cash. I have bought and sold at least a half dozen in the past though. The market is fairly reliable and I have made a little money turning them over. Plus got to really enjoy ownership, even if it was fairly short lived.
eio was just yanking your chain, you know that...LOL

but, there are too many who like it for this thread to have no picture:

shiny bright:
1610631488445.png




toned:
1610631443052.png
 

MrLucky

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#28
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Rollie Free

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#31
Lots of good ones mentioned.

I'll chime in with the Buffalo Nickel and subsequent one ounce gold tribute, which is my favorite gold coin.
It's just something you'd see in the change when I was a kid. Not often, but sometimes. Much like Mercury Dimes. You'd get them in your change and notice then but didnt think anything special about them.
Gosh, if I'd only have known.
 

Ragnarok

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#32
I concur with Usc96, the octagonal 1915 Pan-Pacific $50 gold is my favorite coin too.
Picked up a 1oz. Silver replica of it just because.
The Morgan and Peace dollars are right behind it, would’ve loved to hear the sound of those hitting a bar top somewhere, but I was born too late..

R.
 
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