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Random Pictures thread !

<===Foolsgold

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M-31 andromeda galaxy - First time capturing this object. 582 second, single exposure. ISO 800, motorized mount, 5.5 inch refractor + focal reducer+canon 5DM4. Stars a little elongated but I was happy for my first attempt. No guide scope used.
 

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Peace, Love and Freedom – Pictures of Hippie Fashions from the late 1960s to 1970s

The late 1960s produced a style categorized of people who promoted sexual liberation and favored a type of politics reflecting "peace, love and freedom". Ponchos, moccasins, love beads, peace signs, medallion necklaces, chain belts, polka dot-printed fabrics, and long, puffed "bubble" sleeves were additional trends in the late 1960s.

Both men and women wore frayed bell-bottomed jeans, tie-dyed shirts, workshirts, Jesus sandals, and headbands. Women would often go barefoot, and some went braless. The idea of multiculturalism also became very popular; a lot of style inspiration was drawn from traditional clothing in Nepal, India, Bali, Morocco and African countries. Because inspiration was being drawn from all over the world, there was increasing separation of style; though clothing pieces often had similar elements and created similar silhouettes, there was no real "uniform".

Fringed buck-skin vests, flowing caftans, the "lounging" or "hostess" pajamas. These consisted of a tunic top over floor-length culottes, and were usually made of polyester or chiffon.

Long maxi coats, often belted and lined in sheepskin, appeared at the close of the decade. Animal prints were also popular for women in the autumn and winter of 1969. Women's shirts often had transparent sleeves. Psychedelic prints, hemp and the look of "Woodstock" came about in this generation.






















































 

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Early Automobiles – 26 Historic Vintage Photos Captured People Driving Their Cars before 1900

The early history of the automobile can be divided into a number of eras, based on the prevalent means of propulsion. Later periods were defined by trends in exterior styling, size, and utility preferences.

The first automobile ever was known around 1672, and the steam-powered self-propelled vehicles large enough to transport people and cargo were first devised in the late 18th century.

And during the 19th century, especially at the end of this period, automobiles has begun to be more widespread.

Here below are some historic vintage photos that captured people driving their cars in the late 19th century.




















































http://www.vintag.es/2016/10/early-automobiles-26-historic-vintage.html
 

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Amazing Pictures Capture Everyday Life in Soviet Villages During WWII Through a German Soldier-Photographer's Eyes

Asmus Remmer was a German photographer who specialized in portraiture, genre and landscape photography. From between 1940-45 he was an infantry soldier of Wehrmacht. In May 1945 he found himself in the American POW camp which he left in autumn of the same year.

Asmus wrote he was left at the railway station in Pavlinovo, Kaluga region of Russia. At the sunrise they could see the first Russian village. The houses were covered with snow. A Russian woman at the well and pink smoke of chimneys – he felt as if reading the Bible, and he exclaimed: “Is this the place where we wage war?” He felt sick at that moment and other soldiers brought him into the wooden house.

When he awoke, he saw A Russian girl standing on her knees in front of him and giving him a teaspoon with hot milk and honey. He told her: “I could kill your husband but you still worry about me.”

Soon he saw more Russian villages and understood that they had to make peace with Russians as soon as possible. It can be seen on his photos that Russians didn’t pay attention to his military uniform and were rather friendly. They overcame more than a thousand of kilometers deep into the Russian Empire and he kept thinking all the time in what condition this country would be when they leave.

All the pictures were taken in the Kaluga region in 1942-43.



















































http://www.vintag.es/2016/05/amazing-pictures-capture-everyday-life.html
 

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Before Cell Phone, These 14 Hilarious Vintage Posters Illustrate the Etiquette of Movie-Going in 1912

“Ladies, kindly remove your hats.” “Please don’t forget your umbrella or other parcels.”

These are some of the friendly reminders you would receive if attending your local movie theater in the year 1912. It’s a bit different from today’s requests to silence cell phones. These interesting posters show us some rules from the past that had been instilled into movie-goers at that time.

The images, which are available via the ever-surprising treasure trove that is the Library of Congress, capture a bygone era filled with profoundly polite theater patrons. While some still applies in our modern era—like keeping quiet and remaining seated during the movie—others can now come across as amusing, such as applauding only with your hands.


Please applaud with hands only


Ladies kindly remove your hats


If annoyed when here, please tell the management


Madam, how would you like to sit behind the hat you are wearing


Ladies and children are cordially invited to this theatre. No offensive pictures are ever shown here


Kindly remain seated


Advertise your business on this screen and get results. See the manager


3 minutes intermission while changing pictures


Intermission


Change of song to-morrow


Welcome


Good night


Don't forget your umbrella or other parcels


Loud talking or whistling not allowed

http://www.vintag.es/2015/03/14-humorous-vintage-movie-theatre.html
 

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Girls of Woodstock – The Best Beauty and Style Moments from 1969

The 1969 event was undoubtedly one of the most formative moments in music history, but as we've learned with most music festivals, they lend themselves to some pretty awesome style-spotting. Long before the concept of street style or even festival style existed, Woodstock showcased inspiring women wearing sweet bell bottoms, crop tops and knit dresses.

























































 

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War? What war? Afghan tribe so remote they didn't know about the Taliban or that the US had overthrown them is captured in stunning images
  • The Wakhan Corridor, between Tajikstan and Pakistan, is home to about 12,000 villagers who live simply
  • Many have no idea about the Taliban or the subsequent US invasion and war that raged across the land
  • Now the Afghan government wants to encourage tourists looking for adventue to visit the area


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3829425/War-war-Afghan-tribe-remote-didn-t-know-Taliban-overthrown-captured-stunning-images.html#ixzz4MbSwaWIW
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
 

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Burning man 2016. more to follow...

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bm16 JUNK PALACE.jpg


bm16 La Victrola.jpg


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bm16 PARTY.jpg


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Everything you see in these pics is gone now. Nothing but flat arid desert. Everything brought in must be carried out. A true testamony to human conception. Always leave what was originally there, and take out what you have brought in. Good concept. Burn it baby...
 
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17 Stunning Color Photos of 40's Fashion Taken by Toni Frissell

Antoinette Frissell Bacon was born in 1907 in Manhattan, NY, but took photos under the name Toni Frissell. At the beginning of her career, she worked briefly for Vogue, making captions and writing a bit for the magazine. She was fired because of her poor spelling, but was encouraged by Vogue’s fashion editor Carmel Snow to take up photography.

Frissell took up photography to cope with the illness of her mother, the death of her brother Varick Frissell, and the end of her engagement to Count Serge Orloff-Davidoff. She was known for her fashion photography, World War II photographs, and portraits of famous Americans and Europeans, children, and women from all walks of life.

She died of Alzheimer's disease on April 17, 1988, leaving hundreds of thousands of images. Here is a collection of stunning color photos that she shot fashion in the 1940s.



































http://www.vintag.es/2016/10/17-stunning-color-photos-of-40s-fashion.html
 

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Wonderful Color Photographs of Piccadilly Circus, London in the 1950s

Piccadilly Circus was built in 1819 with the aim of connecting Regent Street and Piccadilly Street, which was famous for its ample shopping opportunities.

The circus (.circus. meaning .circle.) is an open area situated at the junction of these streets. It is very popular, not only for the shopping, but also for the Shaftesbury Memorial and the impressive display of neon lights and video displays.

These wonderful color photographs captured Piccadilly Circus, London in the 1950s























http://www.vintag.es/2013/08/colour-photographs-of-piccadilly-circus.html
 

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Child Labor in America – 25 Amazing Vintage Photographs That Show Boys at Coal and Zinc Mines From a Century Ago

After the Civil War, the availability of natural resources, new inventions, and a receptive market combined to fuel an industrial boom. The demand for labor grew, and in the late 19th and early 20th centuries many children were drawn into the labor force. Factory wages were so low that children often had to work to help support their families. The number of children under the age of 15 who worked in industrial jobs for wages climbed from 1.5 million in 1890 to 2 million in 1910.

Businesses liked to hire children because they worked in unskilled jobs for lower wages than adults, and their small hands made them more adept at handling small parts and tools. Children were seen as part of the family economy. Immigrants and rural migrants often sent their children to work, or worked alongside them. However, child laborers barely experienced their youth. Going to school to prepare for a better future was an opportunity these underage workers rarely enjoyed. As children worked in industrial settings, they began to develop serious health problems. Many child laborers were underweight. Some suffered from stunted growth and curvature of the spine. They developed diseases related to their work environment, such as tuberculosis and bronchitis for those who worked in coal mines or cotton mills. They faced high accident rates due to physical and mental fatigue caused by hard work and long hours.

Lewis Hine, a New York City schoolteacher and photographer, believed that a picture could tell a powerful story. He felt so strongly about the abuse of children as workers that he quit his teaching job and became an investigative photographer for the National Child Labor Committee. Hine traveled around the country photographing the working conditions of children in all types of industries. He photographed children in coal mines, in meatpacking houses, in textile mills, and in canneries. He took pictures of children working in the streets as shoe shiners, newsboys, and hawkers. In many instances he tricked his way into factories to take the pictures that factory managers did not want the public to see. He was careful to document every photograph with precise facts and figures. To obtain captions for his pictures, he interviewed the children on some pretext and then scribbled his notes with his hand hidden inside his pocket. Because he used subterfuge to take his photographs, he believed that he had to be "double-sure that my photo data was 100% pure--no retouching or fakery of any kind." Hine defined a good photograph as "a reproduction of impressions made upon the photographer which he desires to repeat to others." Because he realized his photographs were subjective, he described his work as "photo-interpretation."


A trapper boy, one mile inside Turkey Knob Mine in Macdonald, West Virginia, 1908.


At the entrance to a West Virginia mine, 1908.


A young driver at Brown Mine in West Virginia, 1908.


A tipple boy at Turkey Knob Mine in Macdonald, West Virginia, 1908.


Frank, age 14. He had been working in a mine for three years and had been hospitalized for a year when his leg was crushed by a coal car, 1906.


A boy shovels loose rock in a mine in Red Star, West Virginia, 1908.


Shorpy Higginbotham, a worker at Bessie Mine in Alabama, 1910.


Dave, a pusher at Bessie Mine in Alabama, 1910.


Jim McNulty, 15, a leader inside a mine at Leadville Shaft in Pennsylvania, 1911.


Mine workers in Nanticoke, Pennsylvania, 1911.


Breaker boys employed by the Pennsylvania Coal Company, 1911.


Breaker boys employed by the Pennsylvania Coal Company, 1911.


Breaker boys employed by the Pennsylvania Coal Company, 1911.


Mine worker Angelo Ross, who claims to be 13, but is likely younger, 1911.


Breaker boys employed by the Pennsylvania Coal Company, 1911.


Breaker boys employed by the Pennsylvania Coal Company, 1911.


Breaker boys employed by the Pennsylvania Coal Company, 1911.


Harley Bruce, a worker at Indian Mountain Mine in Tennessee, 1910.


Arlie Fankins, 14, a shoveler in Barnesville Mine in West Virginia, 1908.


Basil Roberts and James Hopper, both 12, cull through waste from a zinc mine in Aurora, Missouri, 1910.


Willie Bryden, age 14, holds the door for a mule cart in a Pennsylvania mine, 1911.


Mine workers in Gary, West Virginia, 1908.


Breaker boys at work breaking coal. The process produces clouds of dust which coat the workers' lungs, 1911.


James O'Dell pushes a coal cart outside a mine in Coal Creek, Tennessee, 1910.


Workers wait for the cage to ascend to the surface at the end of the day, 1910.

(Images: Lewis Hine/Library of Congress, via Mashable/Retronaut)

http://www.vintag.es/2016/10/child-labor-in-america-25-amazing.html
 

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20 Incredible Photographs of France Taken by Robert Capa During World War II

Robert Capa (1913 – 1954) was a Hungarian war photographer, photo journalist and also the companion and professional partner of photographer Gerda Taró. At the start of World War II, Capa was in New York City, having moved there from Paris to look for work, and to escape Nazi persecution. During the war, Capa was sent to various parts of the European Theatre on photography assignments. He first photographed for Collier's Weekly, before switching to Life after he was fired by Collier's. He was the only "enemy alien" photographer for the Allies.


Capa is known for redefining wartime photojournalism. His work came from the trenches as opposed to the more arms-length perspective that was the precedent. He was famed for saying, "If your photographs aren't good enough, you're not close enough." Capa was killed in 1954 when he stepped on a landmine when covering the war in Indochina.


France, Paris. August 25th, 1944. Members of the French Resistance during the liberation of the city.


France, Chartres. August 18th, 1944. A mother (dark dress) and her daughter (white dress), accused of collaboration, have their hair shaved, as a sign of humiliation. The daughter is holding a baby conceived with a German soldier.


August, 1945. An American soldier selling a watch to a Russian soldier.


After the entry of the French 2nd Armored Division, numerous pockets of German snipers had to be rooted out in street fighting. Many French civilians and members of the Resistance helped the French troops in this fighting. This photograph shows a French civilian who was unable to contain his wrath against a German soldier who had surrendered. Paris. August 25th, 1944.


Soldiers of the U.S. 82nd Airborne Division. Saint-Sauveur-le-Vicomte, France, June 16, 1944.


Running for shelter during an air raid Bilbau, May 1937.


Just after the liberation of the town, a French woman who had had a baby with a German soldier was punished by having her head shaved. Chartres, Eure-et-Loir, France, 18 August 1944.


Tour de France bicycle race, France, July 1939.


Watching the Tour de France in front of the bicycle shop owned by Pierre Cloarec, one of the cyclists in the race, Pleyben, Brittany, France, July 1939.


France, Eure-et-loir. Chartres. August 18th, 1944. Shortly after the liberation of the city, a French woman who had a baby with a German soldier has her head shaved, as a sign of humiliation. Her mother (left) suffered the same treatment.


France, Eure-et-Loir. Chartres. August 18th, 1944. Shortly after the liberation of the city, a French woman who had collaborated with the Germans has her hair shaved at police headquarters as a sign of humiliation.


France, near Chartres. August, 1944. Resistance fighters take a German paratroop officer prisoner.


Paris, Les Champs ELysées. August 26th, 1944. Members of the French Resistance and soldiers of the French Army celebrating the liberation of the city.


France, Paris. August 26th, 1944. General Charles de Gaulle leading the parade down the Avenue des Champs-Elysées to celebrate the liberation of the city.


France. Paris. August 25th, 1944. French soldiers fighting against the Germans during the liberation of the city.


France. Paris. August 25th, 1944. Members of the French Resistance and soldiers of the French army.


Paris. 1944. 22-25th August.


France. Paris. August 25th, 1944. Members of the resistance crouching behind a truck during the Liberation.


France. Paris. French soldiers and civilians celebrating the liberation of the city on the Champs Elysees. August 26th, 1944.


Paris. 1944. Place of Concorde.

http://www.vintag.es/2015/04/20-incredible-photos-of-france-during.html
 

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Everyday Life in Nebraska During the 1960s Through Beautiful Color Photos

Nebraska's name is derived from transliteration of the archaic Otoe words Ñí Brásge, or the Omaha Ní Btháska, meaning "flat water", after the Platte River that flows through the state.

Nebraska is a state that lies in both the Great Plains and the Midwestern United States. Its state capital is Lincoln. Its largest city is Omaha, which is on the Missouri River. The state is crossed by many historic trails and was explored by the Lewis and Clark Expedition. The California Gold Rush brought the first large numbers of non-indigenous settlers to the area. Nebraska was admitted as the 37th state of the United States in 1867.

Check out these stunning color pictures below and see what life of Nebraska looked like in the 1960s.






















































http://www.vintag.es/2016/07/everyday-life-in-nebraska-in-1960s.html
 

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19 Incredible Black and White Photos That Capture Everyday Life in Marseille during the 1950s

Although it may not seem that way today, Marseilles is one of the oldest cities in France and began life in 600BC when it was founded by a group of seafaring Greeks.

Marseille ushered in a second boom with the birth of the French Republic. The city witnessed a huge growth in manufacturing and industry during the 19th century and was boosted again with the opening of the Suez Canal in 1869.

During WWII, Marseille had the dubious distinction of being bombed by both the German and Italian forces in 1940 and the Allies three years later.

Badly damaged, much of the city was rebuilt in the 1950s, a project funded mainly by reparations from Germany. There was a marked increase in immigration from the 1950s onwards as the so-called Pieds Noirs fled the fighting in Algeria, which has contributed in large part to the colorful reputation Marseille now enjoys.

Here is a small collection of 19 incredible black and white photos that shows the daily life in Marseille during the 1950s.






































http://www.vintag.es/2016/07/19-incredible-b-photos-capture-everyday.html
 

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Cycling Around Amsterdam in the 1970s

If you’ve ever visited the Netherlands, you can’t help but wonder why Dutch streets are so much more cycle-friendly.

Cycling is a ubiquitous mode of transport in the Netherlands, with 31.2% of the people listing the bike as their main mode of transport for daily activities. Cycling has a modal share of 27% of all trips (urban and rural) nationwide. In cities this is even higher, such as Amsterdam which has 38%. Check out these interesting vintage photographs below, which capture the cycling scenes in Amsterdam in the 1970s.





































http://www.vintag.es/2016/04/cycling-around-amsterdam-in-1970s.html
 

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Amazing Color Photographs Captured Berlin in the Summer of 1945, Right After the Fall

Berlin, the capital of Nazi Germany, was subject to 363 air raids during the Second World War. It was bombed by the RAF Bomber Command between 1940 and 1945, and by the USAAF Eighth Air Force between 1943 and 1945, as part of the Allied campaign of strategic bombing of Germany. It was also attacked by aircraft of the Red Air Force, especially in 1945 as Soviet forces closed on the city.

A number of monuments, such as French Luisenstadt Church, St. James Church, Jerusalem's Church, Luisenstadt Church, St. Michael's Church, St. Simeon Church, and the Protestant Consistory (today's entrance of Jewish Museum Berlin) as well as government and Nazi Party buildings were also hit, including the Reich Chancellery, the Party Chancellery, the Gestapo headquarters, and the People's Court.

Here are some of amazing color photographs of Berlin in the summer of 1945.
















http://www.vintag.es/2012/11/color-photographs-of-berlin-in-summer.html