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Random Pictures thread !

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Jean Marc Nattier Portrait of Manon Balletti
 

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Francis Davis Millet Between two Fires
 

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Warren W. Sheppard Tranquil Sunrise.
 

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John Fabian Carlson Snow Flurries
 

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Johann Gottfried Steffan Tree Study Near Tutzing
 

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Johann Rudolf Koller Der alte Hornbach am Zürichhorn
 

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Samuel van Hoogstraten The Annunciation of the Death of the Virgin
 

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William Quiller Orchardson Autumn
 

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Adrian Scott Stokes November In The Dolomites
 

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Pompeo Batoni Purity of the Heart
 

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Carl Friedrich Wilhelm Trautschold Snow Scene In The Black Forest
 

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Sergei Ivanovich Gribkov In the church
 

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I have no idea upload_2018-3-11_12-33-21.png upload_2018-3-11_12-33-21.png upload_2018-3-11_12-33-21.png upload_2018-3-11_12-33-21.png upload_2018-3-11_12-33-21.png upload_2018-3-11_12-33-21.png upload_2018-3-11_12-33-21.png upload_2018-3-11_12-33-21.png upload_2018-3-11_12-33-21.png upload_2018-3-11_12-33-21.png upload_2018-3-11_12-33-21.png upload_2018-3-11_12-33-21.png upload_2018-3-11_12-33-21.png upload_2018-3-11_12-33-21.png upload_2018-3-11_12-33-21.png upload_2018-3-11_12-33-21.png upload_2018-3-11_12-33-21.png who put this together, but it is wonderful!

upload_2018-3-11_12-33-21.png

Long ago and far away,
In a land that time forgot,

Before the days of Dylan,
Or the dawn of Camelot.

There lived a race of innocents,
And they were you and me,
upload_2018-3-11_12-33-21.png

For Ike was in the White House
In that land where we were born,

Where navels were for oranges,
And Peyton Place was porn.
upload_2018-3-11_12-33-21.png
upload_2018-3-11_12-33-21.png

We longed for love and romance,
And waited for our Prince,

Eddie Fisher married Liz,
And no one's seen him since.
upload_2018-3-11_12-33-21.png

We danced to 'Little Darlin',
And sang to 'Stagger Lee'

And cried for Buddy Holly
In the Land That Made Me, Me.
upload_2018-3-11_12-33-21.png
upload_2018-3-11_12-33-21.png
upload_2018-3-11_12-33-21.png

Only girls wore earrings then,
And 3 was one too many,

And only boys wore flat-top cuts,
Except for Jean McKinney.
upload_2018-3-11_12-33-21.png

And only in our wildest dreams
Did we expect to see

A boy named George with Lipstick,
In the Land That Made Me, Me.
upload_2018-3-11_12-33-21.png

We fell for Frankie Avalon,
Annette was oh, so nice,

And when they made a movie,
They never made it twice.
upload_2018-3-11_12-33-21.png

We didn't have a Star Trek Five,
Or Psycho Two and Three,

Or Rocky-Rambo Twenty
In the Land That Made Me, Me.
upload_2018-3-11_12-33-21.png

Miss Kitty had a heart of gold,
And Chester had a limp,

And Reagan was a Democrat
Whose co-star was a chimp.
upload_2018-3-11_12-33-21.png

We had a Mr. Wizard,
But not a Mr. T,

And Oprah couldn't talk yet,
In the Land That Made Me, Me.
upload_2018-3-11_12-33-21.png

We had our share of heroes,
We never thought they'd go,

At least not Bobby Darin,
Or Marilyn Monroe.

For youth was still eternal,
And life was yet to be,

And Elvis was forever
In the Land That Made Me, Me.
upload_2018-3-11_12-33-21.png

We'd never seen the rock band
That was Grateful to be Dead,

And Airplanes weren't named Jefferson,
And Zeppelins were not Led
upload_2018-3-11_12-33-21.png

And Beatles lived in gardens then,
And Monkees lived in trees,

Madonna was Mary
In the Land That Made Me, Me.
upload_2018-3-11_12-33-21.png

We'd never heard of microwaves,
Or telephones in cars,

And babies might be bottle-fed,
But they were not grown in jars.
upload_2018-3-11_12-33-21.png

And pumping iron got wrinkles out,
And 'gay' meant fancy-free,

And dorms were never co-Ed
In the Land That Made Me, Me.
upload_2018-3-11_12-33-21.png

We hadn't seen enough of jets
To talk about the lag,

And microchips were what was left
At the bottom of the bag.
upload_2018-3-11_12-33-22.png

And hardware was a box of nails,
And bytes came from a flea,

And rocket ships were fiction
In the Land That Made Me, Me.
upload_2018-3-11_12-33-22.png

T-Birds came with portholes,
And side shows came with freaks,

And bathing suits came big enough
To cover both your cheeks.
upload_2018-3-11_12-33-22.png

And Coke came just in bottles,
And skirts below the knee,

And Castro came to power
Near the Land That Made Me, Me.
upload_2018-3-11_12-33-22.png

We had no Crest with Fluoride,
We had no Hill Street Blues,

We had no patterned pantyhose
Or Lipton herbal tea

Or prime-time ads for those dysfunctions
In the Land That Made Me, Me.
upload_2018-3-11_12-33-22.png

There were no golden arches,
No Perrier to chill,

And fish were not called Wanda,
And cats were not called Bill.
upload_2018-3-11_12-33-22.png

And middle-aged was 35
And old was forty-three,

And ancient were our parents
In the Land That Made Me, Me.
upload_2018-3-11_12-33-22.png

But all things have a season,
Or so we've heard them say,

And now instead of Maybelline
We swear by Retin-A.

They send us invitations
To join AARP,

We've come a long way, baby,
From the Land That Made Me, Me.
upload_2018-3-11_12-33-22.png

So now we face a brave new world
In slightly larger jeans,

And wonder why they're using
Smaller print in magazines

And we tell our children's children
Of the way it used to be,

Long ago and far away
In the Land That Made Me, Me.


If you didn't grow up in the Fifty's, y ou missed the greatest time in history. Hope you enjoyed this read as much as I did.
 

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During World War II, Many Items Were Rationed in the United States, Including Shoes!


During the Second World War, you couldn't just walk into a shop and buy as much sugar or butter or meat as you wanted, nor could you fill up your car with gasoline whenever you liked. All these things were rationed, which meant you were only allowed to buy a small amount (even if you could afford more). The government introduced rationing because certain things were in short supply during the war, and rationing was the only way to make sure everyone got their fair share.

The Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor dramatically ended the debate over America's entrance into the war that raged around the world. As eager volunteers flooded local draft board offices ordinary citizens soon felt the impact of the war. Shoes were rationed because leather and rubber were in short supply. (Rubber especially, as Japan controlled Southeast Asia, where the bulk of the world's rubber was produced.)


Line for the Rationing Board on Gravier Street, New Orleans.


The Shoe Line: 1943 March. New Orleans, Louisiana. Line at rationing board.

Starting September 30, 1942, men's rubber boots and rubber work shoes were placed under rationing. To obtain a new pair, a man had to apply to the local ration board, prove he needed the shoes for essential industry—not for sport—and turn in the old pair. Galoshes and overshoes were not rationed because they used less crude rubber, but sportsmen couldn't get boots, and sneakers were no longer produced.

On February 7, 1943, the United States instituted rationing of leather shoes to begin on February 9. Each man, woman, and child could purchase up to three pairs of leather shoes a year, using designated stamps in War Ration Book One, and later in Books Three and Four. To simplify the system, only six shades of leather were produced. However, the supply of leather continued to decrease. On March 20, 1944, the ration was reduced to two pairs of leather shoes per year. Shoe rationing continued until October 30, 1945.





The strict rule that the ration stamp had to be torn from the book in the presence of the retailer was lifted for catalog purchases. If you wanted an extra pair of shoes, you had to fill out a long application at the ration board, listing every pair of footwear you owned, and explaining why another pair was essential for your occupation and why another pair was required to prevent serious hardship.





No exceptions were made for children and their rapidly growing feet. Families pooled their stamps, and adults made do with fewer shoes to provide for their children’s needs. However, pediatricians and podiatrists complained publicly that shoe rationing would produce a generation of “foot cripples.”

To make do with less, people took care of the footwear they already owned, keeping rubber boots clean, dry, and away from excess heat or cold, and repairing shoes and boots whenever possible. Shoes made of fabric, such as espadrilles, were not rationed and became fashionable. Women also turned to fabric purses and belts.


Scrap Rubber poster

Some people did not make do. Theft and black market profiteering were a continuing problem. For example, on May 3, 1944, a man was arrested in Pittsburg, California for stealing seven pairs of shoes from a shipment. The June 8, 1944 issue of the Antioch Ledger reported his sentence—six months or $500.

All told, shoe rationing lasted more than three years. When it concluded in late October 1945, more than a month after the war ended, OPA chief Chester Bowles called it “one of our most successful programs.” “By giving everyone a little less,” Bowles said, distilling the sense of shared sacrifice that defined the effort, the OPA ensured that there was enough “to go around.”


July 1942: Close-up of a man behind a counter handing over two boxes of Domino sugar to a man handing over a War Ration Book. In an effort to ration sugar, coupons from the War Ration Books assured a just distribution of the nation's sugar supply to all. (Photo by Anthony Potter Collection/Getty Images)


June 14, 1943: With the all important No. 17 coupon expiring Tuesday, New York shoe stores were jammed even on Sunday. These young ladies are trying on some white models at a store on Delancey St., on lower East Side, New York, 1943. (Photo by Weegee (Arthur Fellig)/International Center of Photography/Getty Images)


View of shoes with a sign that reads 'No Coupons Needed for Second Hand Shoes', New York, February 1943. Business doubled recently at a store on 92 Third Avenue that sells factory rejects and second hand shoes not affected by rationing. General sales of shoes increased on the first day of rationing; most are bought by working men. (Photo by Weegee(Arthur Fellig)/International Center of Photography/Getty Images)


Wartime rationing: Shopping for secondhand shoes in New York, 1943. (Photo by Weegee(Arthur Fellig)/International Center of Photography/Getty Images)


A number of people crowd into a shoe store on the last day for War Ration shoe coupon 17. Washington, DC, June 1943. (Historical/Corbis via Getty Images)


Three Models Showcasing Shoes made from Material that is not being Rationed during WWII, Chicago, Illinois, USA, 1944. (Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)

(via Sarah Sundin and Smithsonian)

http://www.vintag.es/2018/03/shoe-rationing-wwii.html
 

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Before 'Playboy', 'Modern Man' Was Really an Excellent Magazine For Men


Was there a girlie magazine more consistent than Modern Man with its covers? Where Playboy, Tiger, Rogue, Fling, etc. would get creative - Modern Man was steadfast in its faithfulness to the One Woman w/ Cleavage layout.

Never did it experiment with maybe adding two women. Never did it go heavy on the props and setting. Simplicity ruled on Modern Man: Just feature a chick with cleavage and be done with it.


Modern Man Magazine Covers in the 1950s

Modern Man came before Playboy (1951), but it didn't last as long. Wikipedia has it expiring in 1967; however, as the covers below attest - it was alive and well in the 1970s.

So, here's a giant stack of Modern Man covers, keepin' it simple. It's interesting to see, as we scroll through the years, the amount of skin gradually increases. Enjoy.


1951


November 1954


1955


September 1956


October 1956


1957


Spring 1958


Spring 1959


February 1961


May 1961


October 1961


December 1961


June 1962


September 1962


October 1962


January 1963


August 1963


September 1963


Winter 1963


April 1965


Summer 1965


January 1966


September 1967


Mid-Winter 1967


December 1967


Summer 1968


Winter 1969


November 1970


August 1971
 

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How to Dress Like Bananarama in the 1980s


Bananarama formed in the London in late 1981. Comprising three best friends Keren Woodward Sarah Dallin and Siobhan Farley, the latter whom they met at the London College of Fashion. Their success on both pop and dance charts has earned them a listing in the Guinness World Records as the all-female group with the most chart entries in the world.

Here's some ways to dress like Bananarama in the 1980s:

Early 80s Bananarama Look

For an early 80s Bananrama look, you don't need to look like you've tried too hard! Just get hold of a stripy jumper or top, a hat and some pedal pushers or cropped jeans. Hair must be wild and messed up, make up bold.







Mid 80s Bananarama Look

For this you need to look just a little more glamourous. (The release of True Confessions marked a noticeable change of image to Bananarama) You need a cropped jacket, maybe white like Siobhan's on the cover. Think in black and white terms, so stripy tights, white skirt, and off the shoulder black tops! Lots of belts! Hair should still be big, we are talking bout the '80s after all! Make up glamourous so not too over the top!







Late 80s Bananarama Look

This should be farly similar to the mid 80s look, just slightly more daring. Think tight stone washed jeans with off the shoulder tops. Lots of jewelery and a cropped jacket. Similar hair/make up to before!







http://www.vintag.es/2018/03/bananarama.html

 

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Unidentified Vietnamese Women and Children in My Lai Before Being Killed in the Massacre, 16 March 1968


On March 16, 1968, American soldiers of Charlie Company, were sent on what they were told was a mission to confront a crack outfit of their Vietcong enemies. They met no resistance, but over three to four hours killed between 347 and 504 unarmed Vietnamese civilians. Victims included men, women, children, and infants. Some of the women were gang-raped and their bodies mutilated. The massacre, which was later called "the most shocking episode of the Vietnam War", took place in two hamlets of Sơn My village in Quang Ngai Province. These hamlets were marked on the U.S. Army topographic maps as My Lai and My Khe.


Vietnamese women and children in My Lai before being killed in the massacre, 16 March 1968. According to court testimony, they were killed seconds after the photo was taken. The woman on the right is adjusting her blouse buttons following a sexual assault that happened before the massacre. (Ronald L. Haeberle/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images)

Ron Haeberle was a combat photographer in Vietnam when he and the Army unit he was riding with — Charlie Company, 1st Battalion, 20th Infantry Regiment — landed near the hamlet of My Lai on the morning of March 16, 1968. Villagers weren't alarmed; American GIs had visited the region near the central Vietnamese coast before, without incident. But within minutes, the troops opened fire. Over the course of the next few hours, they killed old men, women, and children. They raped and tortured.

When the photographs of the My Lai massacre were first published, many could not believe what they depicted. One reason was this: They did not show American soldiers in the act of killing.

For a long time, the man who shot the pictures, Ron Haeberle, said no such images existed. In 2009, Haeberle admitted that he destroyed a number of photographs he took during the My Lai massacre. Unlike the photographs of the dead bodies, the destroyed photographs depicted Americans in the actual process of murdering Vietnamese civilians.

Photos published by The Plain Dealer 50 years ago, and those Haeberle gave to the Army as part of its criminal inquiry, showed terrified victims in the moments before they were killed and their bodies after death. But there were no photos of soldiers actually shooting them.

In 1969, Haeberle told The Plain Dealer that he had made no effort to photograph actual killings. He evaded the issue during interviews with Army investigators.

But according to Cleveland.com, in 2009, in one of his only interviews with the U.S. media since the photos were published in 1969, he said something distinctly different. “I shot pictures of the shooting. But those photographs were destroyed.”

By the Army?

“By me.”

Haeberle was using two cameras that day, an Army camera and his own. “What happened was, I shot on a 36-exposure roll of film,” with his own camera. “I just went ahead and processed everything. I had actual photos of actual guys who were doing the shooting and stuff like that. I never showed those.”

When the Army questioned him about the photographs he had taken and what they showed, he says, “I answered them honestly. But I never said the words, ‘I destroyed them.’ ”

Over the years, occasionally people have asked him why he didn't try to stop the killing or if he was afraid he would be shot.

“I had no fear of that,” Haeberle said.

And he's been asked if he wishes he had done anything differently in My Lai.

“It's hard to say in the aftermath,” he said. “People say, ‘If I was there, I'd have done this.’ You don't know. Until you're in that reality. You never know.”


(Ronald L. Haeberle/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images)


Ronald L. Haeberle/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images)



(Ronald L. Haeberle/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images)


(Ronald L. Haeberle/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images)


(Ronald L. Haeberle/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images)


(Ronald L. Haeberle/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images)


(Ronald L. Haeberle/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images)


(Ronald L. Haeberle/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images)


(Ronald L. Haeberle/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images)


(Ronald L. Haeberle/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images)

For more images, visit FOTO.

http://www.vintag.es/2018/03/ron-haeberle-my-lai-photos.html
 

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Pictures Show What Traffic Jams Looked Like in the Past


Traffic jam has always been a problem so far, and hard to have a completely solution to solve. Take to look at these pictures to see what traffic jams looked like in the past.


Traffic on Regent Circus, now known as Oxford Circus, 1888


London Bridge, 1900


London buses, 1900


Piccadilly Circus, London, 1901


Rush hour in Chicago, 1909


Corner of 7th Street and Broadway, downtown Los Angeles, circa 1920s


Embankment, London, 1926


Buyers create a traffic jam at the Los Angeles wholesale produce market, 1927


Traffic jam, Berlin, 1927


Traffic on a bridge in Chicago, Illinois, 1927


Traffic jam in Detroit, 1928


Boston, 1929


Moscow’s traffic jam, 1931


Traffic jam on the Broadway Bridge over the Los Angeles River, 1937


Traffic jam on the Suzhou canal, China, December 1948


Los Angeles, 1950


Traffic jam on 6th Street in Downtown Los Angeles during transit strike, 1950


Los Angeles, 1952


Paris, 1954


Los Angeles, 1955


Pont de la Concorde, Paris, 1956


Allenby street, Lebanon, 1958


On the way to Woodstock, 1969


Budapest, Hungary in the early 1970s


Budapest, Hungary in the mid-1970s


Vancouver, British Columbia, 1973


The Brandenburg Gates traffic jam between East and West Germany on the first Saturday after the fall of the Berlin Wall, 1989

http://www.vintag.es/2018/03/traffic-jams-in-the-past.html
 

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Little Syria: Portraits of Syrian Immigrants in Lower Manhattan in the Early 20 Century


The Chinese have Chinatown. The Italians have Little Italy. And before the Brooklyn-Battery Tunnel pummeled its way into Manhattan, people from the Middle East also shared a slice of the city's history. Little Syria, as it was known, was the cultural hub of America’s first middle eastern immigrant community and it was located just south of where the current World Trade Center stands today.

For 60 years between 1880 until the 1940s, Arab-Americans poured into New York City from Greater Syria made up of present-day countries including Lebanon, Syria, Jordan and Israel to escape religious persecution and poverty. They found homes in crowded tenements on a six block stretch of Washington Street from Liberty Street to Battery Park, alongside Armenians, Greeks, and other communities from the Middle East and the Mediterranean.

According to an 1899 article from the New York Times about the Syrian Quarter and its 3,000 residents, the newly arrived immigrants made a home for themselves in this “tousled unwashed section of New York”.

“Turks, Armenians, Syrians, when they ship for America, do not leave all their quaint customs, garments, ways of thinking at home. Nor do they become ordinary American citizens directly after landing. Just enough of their traits, dress, ideas remain, no matter how long they have been here, to give the colonies they form spice and a touch of novelty.”

Many of the early Syrian-Americans began their new lives as street vendors before saving up to establish their own businesses. According to the New York Public Library, over 300 Syrian businesses were listed in the 1908 Syrian Business Directory of New York.












http://www.vintag.es/2018/03/little-syria-nyc.html
 

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Vintage Photos of People Wearing Masks During the 1918 Influenza Pandemic, One of the Deadliest Natural Disasters in Human History


At the close of WWI, an estimated 50 million people died from the Spanish flu. Masks were the uninfected’s main line of defense.

The Spanish flu pandemic of 1918, the deadliest in history, infected an estimated 500 million people worldwide—about one-third of the planet’s population—and killed an estimated 20 million to 50 million victims, including some 675,000 Americans.

The 1918 flu was first observed in Europe, the United States and parts of Asia before swiftly spreading around the world. At the time, there were no effective drugs or vaccines to treat this killer flu strain. Citizens were ordered to wear masks, schools, theaters and businesses were shuttered and bodies piled up in makeshift morgues before the virus ended its deadly global march.

Why “Spanish”? According to Mashable, to read the newspapers of 1918, Spain was hit particularly hard by the virus. On the contrary: 1918 was the last year of World War I and, in an attempt to maintain morale, the United States, Britain, France and Germany suppressed newspaper reports of the illness. Neutral Spain, with no war morale to maintain, did not censor its newspapers; so, to the rest of the world, the flu appeared particularly nasty there.


Two women speak through flu masks during the epidemic, c.1918.


An American policeman wears a 'flu mask' to protect himself from the Spanish flu outbreak that followed World War I, c.1918.


A U.S. Red Cross employee wears a face mask in an attempt to help decrease the spread of influenza, c.1918.


A nurse protects herself while fetching water, September 13 1918.


A typist works while wearing a mask, in New York City, October 16 1918.


A Seattle, Washington streetcar conductor refuses entry to a commuter who is not wearing a mask. Precautions taken in the city required passengers to wear masks on public transportation, December 1918.


A New York city street sweeper wears a mask to help check the spread of influenza, October 1918.


A patient wears a flu nozzle, 27th February 1919.


A patient wears a flu nozzle, 27th February 1919.


Unident baseball players, one batting and one catching, plus an umpire behind the plate, wear flu masks, 1918.


A man prepares 'anti-flu' spray for buses of the London General Omnibus Co. London, March 2, 1920.


A U.S. Red Cross employee wears a face mask in an attempt to help decrease the spread of influenza, 1918.


Seattle policemen wear protective gauze face masks during the influenza epidemic, 1918.
(Photos: Getty Images, via Mashable/Retronaut)

http://www.vintag.es/2018/03/spanish-flu-masks.html
 

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Amazing New York Street Style From the 1940s


Photographed by Alfred Eisenstaedt, famous for taking the picture of the sailor kissing the girl in Times Square, the following photos are from a street style series he did for LIFE magazine taken in 1944 called ‘Beautiful Girls’. They really do look so amazing and feminine. Such classic and put together looks!







(Photos by Alfred Eisenstaedt/ LIFE photo archive, via New York on My Mind)

http://www.vintag.es/2018/03/1940s-new-york-street-style.html
 

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I just learned that the faint line to the right of the left-most galaxy in the image I posted earlier is asteroid 600 Musa. Here is the same image with a different stacking technique to better show the trail of the asteroid. Nice accidental catch.
LeoTriplet-2018-03-17-AsteroidSSSS.jpg
 

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Amazing Black and White Photos Capture SoCal's Skate, Beach and Punk Scenes From Between the Late 1960s and Early 1980s


Spot is a man of many talents. Besides serving as the album producer and sound engineer for punk bands like the Misfits and Black Flag, the photographer, who goes only by Spot, also snapped a treasure trove of photos that perfectly captured SoCal beach and punk rock life during the late 1960s to the early 1980s.

He started taking photography seriously in 1969. Spot grew up with magazines like LIFE and was inspired by the black and white journalistic photos he saw, and when he got a Pentax, he was inseparable with his camera. He started writing music articles for a local newspaper, the Easy Reader, and began taking photos for the outlet as well.

In 1982, Spot lost access to the darkroom he had been using to develop his pictures, and along with being so busy recording at the time, he gave up photography.

“I started taking photos in 1969,” Spot told in an interview. “My first camera got stolen in ’72 and I didn’t get another one til ’76 when I was living in Hermosa and writing for the Easy Reader. Then it became photo-journalism. I lost my darkroom in 1981 when Media Art closed down. But all that damn musical punkin’, rockin’ and sockin’ had happened and I didn’t have time or facilities for photography anymore.”






























 

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Pleasing Your Man in 23 Old School Ways


While Cosmopolitan has always claimed feminist leanings, we know that really it’s always been about attracting the male of the species. Cosmo launched in 1972, and has been peddling the same strange mix of empowerment and insecurity ever since.

Although we doubt the magazine nowadays would include the word ‘anachronistic’ (Quentin Crisp, September 1981) or feature a sanitary towel ad that advises you to ‘hustle through your period’, the core aim of keeping and catching that man has always been a constant. Here, folks at the New Statesman take a look into the archives and make some cheap jokes about magazine content that was produced before we were even born.

1. Be a Cosmopolitan Girl


Ok, so you’re not obsessed with men, but that doesn’t mean that you don’t need to spend vast amounts of time and money to make yourself more interesting to them, while retaining the requisite amounts of insecurity (unlike those swanky Playboy guys) to keep you buying Cosmo every month.


2. Exercise in the Office


Take off your bra, ride your desk chair (ooh er!) and not only will you stay skinny, but if your boss catches you in the act, you could be in for a very sexy appraisal. Call us cynical, but this whole feature seems to be geared towards getting your boss to bang you.


3. Be the Perfect Wife


That means being able to eat and eat and still look sensational, btw. And being a first-class cook. And, according to Max (not pictured), possessing ‘a human quality of aliveness’ (we think that means y’know, breathing)


4. Say One of These in Bed


Lines include ‘Sleeping with you is like spending a week in Marrakesh’ (sweaty and expensive), ‘Where do I sent the cheque?’ (We think this means that the guy is so good at sex that he could be a gigolo, but tbh we’re really not sure) and ‘to think I once thought I was frigid.’ Yeah.


5. Be Sensual



A Cosmo quiz from January 1973 entitled ‘How Sensual Are You?’ includes the above hypothetical scenario, demonstrating how even the most life endangering of circumstances can provide pulling opportunities.




6. Do Some Naked Dancercise (but Only If You’re Sexy)


Flares optional. In the words of Cosmo, ‘don’t call them strip teasers, these girls are dancers who are beautiful enough to take their clothes off in public.’ Oh, what’s that? We’ll put our shirts back on, then.


7. Buy Him a Dachshund


He’ll be so happy that he’ll take his clothes off and straddle it.


8. Wear Windsong


Not an unpleasant symptom of undiagnosed IBS, it turns out, but an expensive perfume with a most unfortunate name.


9. Tape Your Hair to Your Head…


…while sucking a lollipop. It might look as though you’re recovering from a lobotomy but . . . Oh. You are recovering from a lobotomy.


10. Recreate Manet’s Le Déjeuner sur l’Herbe


No caption really needed. ‘Pick a secluded spot,’ advises Cosmo. Otherwise the flares and perm combos sported by your gentlemen companions may lead to arrest under the Sexual Offences Act.


11. Sit Like a Girl, Not Like a Man


Being a feminist is, admittedly, a rather sedentary endeavour (we’re sitting down now, FYI)


12. Read the Dictionary


Go on, it’s only a little one. Plus, as we all know men value women for their minds. He can’t even see the furry lingerie and seductive posture: he’s too busy thinking about your massive vocabulary.


13. Follow These Tips


Before you know it, you’ll be a purple chess maestro cum human prawn platter. That should do it.


14. Get Thin Enough for a Thong


Now you know whom to blame for that decade-long wedgie.


15. Multidate


How come Craig David gets to make love by Wednesday (and for the rest of the week) when we have to meet Peter at the theatre and spend a day at the coast with Steve? It hardly seems fair. Bob looks like a hoot, though. Come to Mama.


16. Smock Around the Clock


Reads: ‘you won’t have to fish for compliments – they’ll come naturally.’ Someone’s telling porkies.


17. Hate Your Body


The print equivalent of America’s Next Top Model, where gorgeous looking women are bullied into a state of permanent self-loathing. Nice.


18. Don’t Be a Slut


OK, so it doesn’t mean what we think it means, but Peter Lewis’ full page moan about how women are messy, slovenly and disorganised reeks of sexism, arbitrary gender norms, and, perhaps worst of all, observational humour (aren’t women silly) Shudder.


19. Wear Paper Panties


Nothing says romance like disposable knickers.


20. Live in This Flat


Where better to bring your beau back to than a living room that looks like it’s been vomited on by an eighties children’s television presenter with a penchant for millions sweets and then spunked on by a My Little Pony?


21. Be Nonchalant


Oh this old thing? I always sport hold ups and an orange kimono while taking tea with tradesmen.


22. Don’t Put on Weight


Genuinely disturbing, and perhaps even more so when you consider that the early eighties saw Cosmopolitan take a much more feminist slant. It’s sad that some genuinely groundbreaking journalism has been let down by ads such as this. Putting it alongside articles with titles such as ‘Sexist Chat to Avoid’ and features by Paula Yates about women’s lib just undermines the whole endeavour. This ad, worthy as it is of the 1950s, actually appeared in March of 1982. As for the poetry: we’ll let that speak for itself.


23. Don’t Laugh at His Failed Erection


We love how ‘masturbate slowly while looking into his eyes’ and ‘suggest toasted cheese and tomato sandwiches’ are put on an equal pegging as ways of handling erectile dysfunction. If you find yourself in this situation, the choice basically boils down to ‘blind him with your muff’ or ‘distract him with food.’

(This original article was published on the New Statesman)

http://www.vintag.es/2018/03/23-ways-please-your-man.html
 

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Vintage Polaroids of the Drunks and Weirdos in Amsterdam’s Red Light District Bars in the 1980s


Long before digital photography, the Polaroid SX-70 was the perfect way to get your portrait on the spot.

In spring 1979, American artists Bettie Ringma and Marc H. Miller moved from New York to Amsterdam. The two had already become known on New York’s downtown art scene, started taking portraits with the Polaroid SX-70 camera and selling them at 6 guilders a pop to make some extra cash.

“Every night we headed out for 4 or 5 hours seeking customers in Amsterdam's entertainment districts,” Marc Miller says. “Although at first we were not sure we would succeed, in retrospect I can see our success was virtually assured. Dutch art history is full of portraits done in bars and taverns, but apparently we were the first to update this tradition with instant photographs. Our Polaroid camera was a money machine fueled by alcohol; each photo sold for 6 guilders (approx. $3) and we usually took more than 50 pictures a night. We were soon a fixture of the city's nightlife with many regular customers eager to get new pictures whenever we happened to cross their path.”

In the process, they captured all the different faces and places that made up Amsterdam nightlife back then—from the Red Light District's rough sailor bars and Turkish cafes, to the trans club Madame Arthur and the Whiskey A Go-Go near the Leidseplein. Their pictures offer a unique glimpse into a time when mustaches were full, sex was a plenty, and rambunctious drunks cheerily flashed their bits in the pub.





















(Photos by Bettie Ringma and Marc H. Miller, via VICE)

http://www.vintag.es/2018/03/amsterdam-polaroids.html
 

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Historic Photos of Dublin After the 1916 Easter Rising
March 21, 2018 1910s, accident & disaster, architecture & construction, Dublin, event & history, Ireland, politics

On Easter Monday, 24 April 1916, roughly 1,200 members of local republican groups, including the Irish Volunteers and Irish Citizen Army, took over strongholds in Dublin city centre and made the General Post Office their headquarters.

The British Army were initially caught off guard by the assault with only 1,268 troops in the city at the time but soon rallied and by the end of the week had a force of 16,000 men.

The Glasnevin Trust have said around 485 people were killed and 2,600 were wounded during the week of fighting. Approximately half of those killed were civilians - either people caught in the crossfire or shot by the British Army after being mistaken for rebels. The youngest person reported dead was a 22-month-old child and the oldest was 82.

Most of central Dublin was destroyed in the chaos with an estimated 200 city centre buildings damaged - costing around £3m at the time.


Abbey Street and Sackville Street (O'Connell Street) shelled, rubble remains. The tram passing by was numbered 244. The ads on the tram are for Donnelly's Bacon, Hudson's Super Soap and the Metropolitan Laundry. An ad for Bovil can just be made out on another tram. In the foreground, the bearded man (very nautical vibe) is considering a huge slab on the ground.


Skeleton of the Metropole Hotel. All that remained of the Metropole Hotel, beside the GPO on Sackville Street (now O'Connell Street), after the Easter Rising, 1916.


The shell of the G.P.O. on Sackville Street (later O'Connell Street), Dublin in the aftermath of the 1916 Rising.


Linenhall Barracks, Dublin. Men surveying the wreckage of Linenhall Barracks in the aftermath of the Easter Rising in Dublin.


The remains of the Dublin Bread Company at 6-7 Lower Sackville Street (now O'Connell Street) after the Easter Rising in 1916.


Abbey Street corner, Hibernian Bank shelled. The Hibernian Bank facade on the corner of Abbey St. and O'Connell street stands in the midst of the destruction wrought during the Rising!

(Photos: National Library of Ireland)

http://www.vintag.es/2018/03/easter-rising-1916-aftermath.html
 

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John Michael Wright Portrait of a Lady, thought to be Ann Davis, Lady Lee
 

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Jean-Baptiste Greuze Young Girl with a Rose
 

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Jacob van Oost the Elder Head of a Young Girl
 

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Thorolf Holmboe Et skjær