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Rate your Air Powered Nailers

What brand do you prefer?

  • Stanley Bostich

    Votes: 3 20.0%
  • Paslode

    Votes: 2 13.3%
  • Hitachi

    Votes: 4 26.7%
  • Senco

    Votes: 4 26.7%
  • Other?

    Votes: 2 13.3%

  • Total voters
    15

Scorpio

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#1
How about air nailers?

Roofing
Shtg
Framing
Trim

Staplers,

etc.
 

Scorpio

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#2
I used a lot of Stanley, and had real good production and up time with them.

Others swear by Senco.

The paslodes always seemed horribly expensive to keep operating,
 

GOLD DUCK

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#3
How about air nailers?

Roofing
Shtg
Framing
Trim

Staplers,

etc.
QWAK,Scorpio,Which is best for NAILING bankers?:wink:

BTW:Is it best to tack the banker down THEN finish him off with a SCREW GUN?:s13::36_11_6::4_1_72:

the DUCK:s11:
 

Someone_else

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#4
I bought a Bostich framing nailer about nine years ago and it has been pretty good. I have not used any others (framing) though. One thing that annoyed me was that the 28 degree nails rarely went on sale, where the 31 (or 33?) degree nails had some competition between brands. It has a way to disable the safety sequence (trigger off, put on work, pull trigger), but I never saw the need for the speed advantage.
 

BeefJerky

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#5
Stanley Bostich used to be the SHIT along with Hitachi. However, in todays market Porter Cable has come on strong to take it, especially on the finish end of things.
 

ttazzman

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#6
as a contractor we always used paslode (framing).....never really had any issues with them.....if so we had a servicing dealer

seemed like all the pro finish guys were using a gas powered mini nailer....not sure the brand
 

techguy2

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#7
Definately LOL, but I have had just fine luck with my harbor freight nailers.

Have a HF framing gun I bought on sale with a coupon 10yrs ago, I think drive out was 69 bucks. I've done 4 or 5 major projects with it, and 7 or 8 minor ones. Now, I'm not framing houses every day, but for joe homeowner it works a treat.

Downside: Quite a bit heavier than the name brands... But heck it was 69 bucks.

I owned lots of Duo-Fast back in the day, when my paycheck depended on it.. good nailers, but that was back in the early 90's. They were a major player back then. Heck, I think I have 5 or 6 old school nailers still at my folk's home in the old tool stash.
 

BUILT TO LAST

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#8
I have owned three Passlode cordless guns for many years (Framer with hurricane tie nailer attachment, finish & brad) for the convenience since I don't do production work anymore. I keep the battery chargers hooked up to an inverter that I run while driving around. I rarely use them but when I need them they are there & ready to go with no need to roll out a compressor. When I used to do production framing work, the lightweight aluminum pneumatic Hitachi guns were the best. I have used an assortment of pneumatic finish nailers & staplers in shops over the years & honestly have forgotten which were the best. I remember quite a few Bostich.
 

Goldhedge

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#10
Screen Shot 2015-09-12 at 1.03.43 AM.jpg
 

edsl48

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#11
I bought one of the new DeWalt battery only framing nailers. I just love it. Haven't gone through the usual get the compressor out etc since.
(I know it said ir nailers but Passloads were mentioned so....)
 

gringott

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#12
I have Bostich and I love it. I first bought the "pancake" compressor and three guns. Then a couple of years later Lowe's had a deal on a Bostich compressor, a newer upright model they made a price mistake and had it for $28 and change, Sunday morning early. I ordered it for local pickup. They confirmed it that day, then Monday morning a series of emails cancelled the purchase. Months later I get a call from Lowe's service desk, they have the compressor I ordered. After some confusion, I was cagey and the lady said come get it now, I have it at the service desk. I went and picked it up, never paid anything for it. I love Lowe's.

As for Passlode, I know somebody who actually makes a living buying them, cleaning them up and fixing the issues [they have certain design flaws and weak parts], and reselling them. Believe it or not, he has sold many to the UK and Australia, they pay a fortune in shipping. For some reason contractors there want them and it is a good deal for them. It all started when a pin held in with a rubber retainer ring for the trigger fell out into deep mud and he lost it. The quest to find the tiny pin, and then to find a retainer for it started his business. Why the pin doesn't have a slot with a C clip retainer is beyond me. Designed to fail.
 

mayhem

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#14
Have a 1980' Senco framing nailer and a Porter gas (butane) 16ga and a PC brad nailer that I just hooked up to a 5 gallon portable air tank. We never had a lot of use for framing nailers here as steel was the material most used for interior walls, Very few exterior walls are wood.