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Rate your faucets?

Do you prefer a brand?

  • Moen

    Votes: 7 63.6%
  • Delta

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Peerless

    Votes: 1 9.1%
  • Kohler

    Votes: 1 9.1%
  • Other?

    Votes: 3 27.3%

  • Total voters
    11

BeefJerky

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#2
Delta went to hell in a handbasket during the lead law change overs. Moen did the right thing and every service plumber has access to parts, if not on the truck. many Kohler products are overengineered. Peerless is absolutely unappealing, Danze can't be beat for a value line. Had to vote other, I'm a Grohe fan. Just be prepared if a repair is needed.
 

CrufflerJJ

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#3
I've used Delta, Moen, and Peerless fittings here at home.

I voted Peerless since they gave me ZERO hassle with a leaky faucet. The disassembly setscrew would not come undone, so I was unable to fix it. They sent me a replacement faucet for free. Not bad at all.
 

D-FENZ

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#4
I didn't vote. There are too many variables- price, quality and particular use. "Other" would be too broad. But I do have some opinions and reasons for them.

The most important criteria for faucet selection is the availability of repair parts. A faucet can develop a leak for a variety of reasons at any time, new or old. Your expensive faucet will do you no good if it can't be repaired. You would generally want to stick to common brands for that reason. It used to be a regional issue with brand names but the big box stores have narrowed the market some to a few more common brands. But, just because Home Depot, Lowes or whoever sells a faucet doesn't mean they also sell (or are even able to obtain) repair parts. Also, feel the faucet movements on the display. Does it squeak or feel rough when you turn the faucet handle? What you want is smooth feel- even if the water isn't hooked up. Be EXTREMELY cautious of high end designer faucets advertised in "houte couture" architectural magazines. They may be very fasionable looking (and expensive) but the actual mechanics of them often looks like it was engineered by a 2 year old. Need repair parts? Probably, but yeah- forget about it.

In our plumbing business, Delta is the default, go-to faucet. It is what we bid for most new construction and what the service trucks carry for common replacements. Delta seems to have a good style, value, function and utility mix. Most plumbers carry the common repair parts on their service trucks. Some of their older faucets refuse to come apart for repairs but the faucets aren't really expensive to replace anyway. Their faucet line is a bit weak on the high end styles but the form, finish and value is good.

Moen is another brand that has a large service base. Too bad their style is almost completely uninspiring. But every plumbing service van and hardware store in every village has a repair cartridge. One of the neat things about most Moen faucets is the interchangability of the hot and cold water supply. If the plumber got the hot and cold side switched during construction it is quite easy to get the cold on the right again just by turning the cartridge stem half of a turn. It is one of the major reasons that plumbing companies spec. that faucet in the first place. On the down-side, with those cartridge type faucets, it's only about 1/2" of movement between off and full on so it is difficult to fine tune the water volume. Water-hammer in the piping is also very common because of the abrupt volume change when turning them off. Faucet "feel" is poor.

Kohler china (sinks, tubs, toilets) is of good quality and design but the brass (faucets), like BeefJerky already said is over engineered- laughably so- and absurdly overpriced. And that is for the high end brass. You can forget about the low end ones too because there is no quality. They do asinine things like use carbon steel in critical areas that quickly rusts away or freezes. Perversely, the faucet finishes in the low end faucets are in many cases better than the high end ones. As to service parts- chances are pretty good that a plumbing service vehicle will not have the right parts for a simple faucet repair. Interchangeable parts seems to be a foreign concept at Kohler. There is much better value elsewhere.

We have not installed many Grohe faucets over the years- maybe only a couple of hundred because of their higher price- but I can honestly say that, to my knowledge we have never had to take one apart to repair internal parts. We have had to replace things like the spray heads and pull-out hoses, but never internal parts. Without looking at a diagram, I wouldn't even know where to start to take one apart. That is saying a lot and is testament to their quality. It is also the faucet that I chose when I built my house.

Peerless is a low-end Delta (Masco) faucet with the same internals.

The most critical faucet generally is the tub/shower faucet. It is the one that is buried in the wall and generally very disruptive and expensive to replace. If you are looking to cut costs on a faucet, this is not the place. Get a good one. And while you are deciding, look for a shower head with protruding flexible, rubber spray tips. When they get limed up, they can be cleaned by simply running your fingers over them. It's the good stuff.
 

D-FENZ

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#6
Thanks historyrepete- I think.

Normally, I would view being seen as a thread killer a bad thing- stifling debate. But I will take your post as a compliment.

Thanks.
 

D-FENZ

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#7
One more thing I forgot to mention. When it comes to choosing a finish, I would highly recommend chrome. It is timeless, inexpensive and hands down the most durable. I've seen lots of finishes come and go, but next week or in 10 years, chrome will always be in style and they are all the same tint between manufacturers. If you've ever had to replace one of the faucets or the trim on a colored faucet, you know what I'm talking about. Good luck matching the odd "brushed platinum" finish of your tub/shower faucet with the drain/overflow.

Chrome even matches the mirrors. If you are looking to change a particular color scheme, it's a lot easier and cheaper to change the towels.
 

Scorpio

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#8
Hey D,

Can't disagree with anything you stated.

When spec'ing std service for resi stuff, the typical around here in use by the guys would be either Delta or Moen. Each guy had their preference of one or the other.

Myself, I had better luck with Moen.

Back in the day, mostly D and M were available off the shelf to people around here at home supplys, and now Peerless has been added to those choices it seems.

As you say, the real cheap stuff is just controlled obsolescence, made in chin land and just toss it when it goes bad.
 

ErrosionOfAccord

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#9
Price fister is junk IMHO. Installed one of the type with the faucet/hose inegrated. The gromet with the self fitting taper broke after two short years. The thing is serviceable, it just ticks me off that the end of the faucet is sloppy now. Plus it gives the wife a reason to talk about new kitchens
 

Fatboy

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#10
One more thing I forgot to mention. When it comes to choosing a finish, I would highly recommend chrome. It is timeless, inexpensive and hands down the most durable. I've seen lots of finishes come and go, but next week or in 10 years, chrome will always be in style and they are all the same tint between manufacturers. If you've ever had to replace one of the faucets or the trim on a colored faucet, you know what I'm talking about. Good luck matching the odd "brushed platinum" finish of your tub/shower faucet with the drain/overflow.

Chrome even matches the mirrors. If you are looking to change a particular color scheme, it's a lot easier and cheaper to change the towels.
Points well taken!

BUT.... It's not just the plumbing fixtures. One also has to consider the "matching" towel bars, door handsets, door hinges, light fixtures, etc. As mentioned, this adds considerable dollars when spread through the entire house.