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Repairing a small leak/crack in old lead drain pipe

viking

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#1
OK, searched online. Seems to be mostly plumbers responding by saying, "pay a plumber to have it done right" (ie. replace).

It is a maybe 2" lead pipe from a bathtub that joins into a cast iron drain pipe.

Looks like a small leak, maybe even a crack about an inch above the bell joint.

Should I try to solder it? Put a piece of rubber over it and clamp it. Etc? any ideas? It is not under pressure, so I think the leak should be easy to stop.
 

Scorpio

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#2
find this stuff in your local supply outfit,
it works on low pressure just fine,

you dip it in water to activate it, then wrap your piping with it,
cures fast

I have used it on underground steel heating pipes at curves.

??????????



Fernco 3" x 132" Pow-R Wrap Pipe Repair
Model Number: FPW-3132CS Menards® SKU: 6793453







$18.53 each


https://www.menards.com/main/plumbi...91-c-8529.htm?tid=-3751664909320244360&ipos=1
 

viking

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#4
find this stuff in your local supply outfit,
it works on low pressure just fine,

you dip it in water to activate it, then wrap your piping with it,
cures fast

I have used it on underground steel heating pipes at curves.

??????????



Fernco 3" x 132" Pow-R Wrap Pipe Repair
Model Number: FPW-3132CS Menards® SKU: 6793453







$18.53 each


https://www.menards.com/main/plumbi...91-c-8529.htm?tid=-3751664909320244360&ipos=1
Thanks. I'll try that if soldering doesn't work. Anyone have an opinion why I should try soldering first? Could could more problems?
 

D-FENZ

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#6
Plumber here. A picture would be awsome and might make a difference in the approach. If it's right out of a cast iron hub, there's probably a brass ferrule under the lead and it broke right off the end of that.

Unless you are very familiar with soldering I would not try it. You could end up with a hole in the lead big enough to shove a small kitten through. And it happens pretty fast. If you are going to try fixing it yourself, take a wire brush and rough up the area and patch it with a 2-part epoxy putty. And don't be afraid to put on a good sized patch- it's cheap- then tool/taper it with wet fingers. The stuff sets up within minutes even when wet. It's the good stuff. It even looks like lead.
 

hoarder

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#7
Should be pretty easy to fix with fiberglass cloth/tape and polyester or epoxy resin. If you have a roll of that drywall joint fiberglass tape I would wrap several layers of it around the leak and buy some polyester resin from Home Depot, mix two parts and paint it on.
 

gliddenralston

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#8
My god man...Flex Seal, as seen on tv, it can repair virtually anything, even under water!!:laughing:
 

BarnacleBob

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#9
Plumber here. A picture would be awsome and might make a difference in the approach. If it's right out of a cast iron hub, there's probably a brass ferrule under the lead and it broke right off the end of that.

Unless you are very familiar with soldering I would not try it. You could end up with a hole in the lead big enough to shove a small kitten through. And it happens pretty fast. If you are going to try fixing it yourself, take a wire brush and rough up the area and patch it with a 2-part epoxy putty. And don't be afraid to put on a good sized patch- it's cheap- then tool/taper it with wet fingers. The stuff sets up within minutes even when wet. It's the good stuff. It even looks like lead.
Try JB Weld epoxy putty.... the stuff us amazing.
 

viking

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#11
Plumber here. A picture would be awsome and might make a difference in the approach. If it's right out of a cast iron hub, there's probably a brass ferrule under the lead and it broke right off the end of that.

Unless you are very familiar with soldering I would not try it. You could end up with a hole in the lead big enough to shove a small kitten through. And it happens pretty fast. If you are going to try fixing it yourself, take a wire brush and rough up the area and patch it with a 2-part epoxy putty. And don't be afraid to put on a good sized patch- it's cheap- then tool/taper it with wet fingers. The stuff sets up within minutes even when wet. It's the good stuff. It even looks like lead.

OK, just put on the JB Weld, I let you know how it goes.
 

viking

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#12
If you are keeping it I would repipe. A leak is going to cost you more.
Just leaks onto a cement garage floor. And someday will sell this place anyway.
 

nickndfl

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#13
You won't pass inspection with the leak. Fix it now or it will cost you double later.
 

Zed

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#14
Thanks. I'll try that if soldering doesn't work. Anyone have an opinion why I should try soldering first? Could could more problems?
Toxic fumes... be careful!
 

Zed

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#15
find this stuff in your local supply outfit,
it works on low pressure just fine,

you dip it in water to activate it, then wrap your piping with it,
cures fast

I have used it on underground steel heating pipes at curves.

??????????



Fernco 3" x 132" Pow-R Wrap Pipe Repair
Model Number: FPW-3132CS Menards® SKU: 6793453







$18.53 each


https://www.menards.com/main/plumbi...91-c-8529.htm?tid=-3751664909320244360&ipos=1
Looks like water activated epoxy,

That will probably be stronger than the pipe.
 

Zed

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#16
OK, just put on the JB Weld, I let you know how it goes.
It shouldn't like sticking to a wet surface. Epoxy is good, but I think you need a specialist product. I have used polyurethane adhesive, like the black stuff they stick car screens in with. If you can get the surface dry that stuff sticks like 'poo to a blanket' and seals very well. Great on boats! Sika brand is good.