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Reviving Blue Collar Work: 4 Myths About The Skilled Trades

TAEZZAR

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#2
I believe real physical work is the backbone of society.
Farming, mining & manufacturing are the basis of an economy.
All other "jobs" are ancillary to them.

There is no shame in getting your hands dirty from honest work.
There is shame in getting your "hands dirty" from "white collar crime".
 

Ensoniq

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#4
A lot of wisdom in that article. Learning a skilled trade provides more economic security than the typical white collar worker has.

Alternatively, come up with an concept that you can monetize and build a small business around it. Grow it, sell to a larger competitor, then repeat.
 

Ensoniq

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I believe real physical work is the backbone of society.
Farming, mining & manufacturing are the basis of an economy.
All other "jobs" are ancillary to them.

There is no shame in getting your hands dirty from honest work.
There is shame in getting your "hands dirty" from "white collar crime".
Thx button missing
 

Sport

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#6
There is a lot of truth in that article. The shop that I am currently working in is struggling to find decent qualified machinists. I am finding that I have to mentor less than ideal candidates just to keep machines running. Most machinists in my area are looking at retirement. Welding on the other hand is not going as well. In our area oil is cutting back big time.

Manufacturing will make a comeback if we can embrace it and not look down on it.
 

Ensoniq

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There is a lot of truth in that article. The shop that I am currently working in is struggling to find decent qualified machinists. I am finding that I have to mentor less than ideal candidates just to keep machines running. Most machinists in my area are looking at retirement. Welding on the other hand is not going as well. In our area oil is cutting back big time.

Manufacturing will make a comeback if we can embrace it and not look down on it.
If we stopped robbing Peter to pay Paul, there'd be a whole lot of guys named Paul dying to learn how to machine
 
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TAEZZAR

LADY JUSTICE ISNT BLIND, SHES JUST AFRAID TO WATCH
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There is a lot of truth in that article. The shop that I am currently working in is struggling to find decent qualified machinists. I am finding that I have to mentor less than ideal candidates just to keep machines running. Most machinists in my area are looking at retirement. Welding on the other hand is not going as well. In our area oil is cutting back big time.

Manufacturing will make a comeback if we can embrace it and not look down on it.
I closed my CNC machine shop in 1992 because I couldn't find decent qualified machinists, for sure, it can't be any better today.
 

davycoppitt

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#9
Around here they cant get enough HVAC guys. In that they cant get enough commercial guys. And further they cant get any good Commercial Refrigeration guys. Did the whole college thing and couldn't find a decent paying job so I went to the trades. Within 5 years ill be making more than 99% of the kids my age. On top of that I can get more side jobs than I could handle. For me the trades were the way to go.
 

GOLDZILLA

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#10
If I didn't do mans work I would be a really fat sunsabitch. I can see the office version of me now breaking chairs and eating donuts all day and trying not to fall asleep.


 

Rusty Shackelford

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I love the idea that a modern electrician is a blue collar brute. Maybe if you are pulling wire. Half the problem companies have in finding electricians is that the tech changes way faster then most electricians can keep up with. Working with electricity and modern components require massive amounts of continuing ed not often found in other skilled trades. Electricians and guys that work on controls are in a field all by themselves.
 

Ensoniq

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I love the idea that a modern electrician is a blue collar brute. Maybe if you are pulling wire. Half the problem companies have in finding electricians is that the tech changes way faster then most electricians can keep up with. Working with electricity and modern components require massive amounts of continuing ed not often found in other skilled trades. Electricians and guys that work on controls are in a field all by themselves.
Well said. Back in the day a Master Electrician was the way to go. These days you have to have an electrical engineer
 

searcher

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#13
My Advice For New Welders & Tradesman Just Starting School Or Classes!
ChuckE2009


Published on Sep 24, 2017
 

hammerhead

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#17
paper.JPG


Was cleaning out a work shop of a deceased friend. Some shelves we're lined with newspaper. Not sure how clearly you'se all can read it but interesting commentary from March 3, 1967. Not much has changed since I was 3 years old
 

michael59

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#20
I was told by some family friend that IF I wanted to write my OWN ticket I would go into refrigeration. Me? I was thinking refrigerators like maytags and stuff. At the time I was into welding and dam if'n I was not good at it. So short story long as an old fart now I woke up and the girley friend had the U-Boob channel stuck on some glass blowing thing.

So I twisted it and typed in scientific glass.....oh man oh man oh shevits did I miss the mark. It occurred to me as I watched these guys and girls that this is a hands on trade. Think of it; mad scientist breaks glass apparatus but cannot build another so gets bud to do it for him. Now that is a symbiotic relationship and in such one can keep busy and supply a market.

and, now comes the "DOOOH!" If I only knew then what I surmise now/know now.

And, get this....you get to wear really cool old fashion eye-ball glasses; of course there are no horned-rims.
 

Uglytruth

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#21
1. Pay spread is not what it used to be for skilled trades.
2. Tools are very expensive.
3. Everything requires more and more training. Computers run everything these days.
4. Working under the "arrogant edumicated college degrees" that are F'ing clueless because they never did anything makes them think their shit don't stink & your just a lowly dirty hands guy. They ran off everyone with low wages, worn out machines, didn't keep up with technology, didn't discipline youngsters, made piss poor decisions, made unreasonable delivery schedules & put band aids on problems & BS'ed everyone while they got theirs & didn't care but they were to UNEDUCATED to see the writing on the wall with the ageing / retirement of their workforce on one end and no young coming in the other end. Now they gots no one, expect those left to work 60+ hrs & Sundays for time & a half not double time & cry like stupid little unskilled bitches they are "where are all the skilled people". What, your degree can't help you figure it out? FU! There are people out there but it's called supply & demand...... what's a good skilled trades person worth that shows up, treated fairly & can pas a drug test? They ain't figured it out yet. They even dismantled the vocational schools a few years back.

Sorry, but this one really gets me. We have a radio host that keeps saying welders are making 100K + a year & jobs go unfilled. Become a welder, electrician, plumber but it's not 1965 anymore. Just heard yesterday a guy was fired when he asked "who you have to blow to get this gravy job 3 days in a row"? Co Worker that is gay twisted it around & said "who's dick ya gotta suck to get this gravy job 3 days in a row" and he/she/it was offended. Guy's fired. Ya made your bed lie in it with your worthless degrees.
 

michael59

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#22
We always figured that the guy who kept f'n up and kept his job had certain kinds of pictures of the owner/s. Called leverage. See that part of leverage I understand I just don't understand how it transmits in the finical world.
 

Bottom Feeder

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#23
Has anyone ever tried to convince one of those twenty somethings to actually go for a trades profession? Especially one of those snowflakes that have already started (first couple a quarters) their pursuit of a 'college diploma'?
I could not believe the variety of whiny assed reasons I heard from a couple of them I know. "The work's too hard" being a predominate response. My friend has a 27 year old grandson living in his basement (gratis, of course) going to a community college chasing a degree in 'Accounting'. His total work week is 23 hours of attending classes and 145 hours of watching TV, hangin out with the guys, and sleeping. Why would he even want to go to a trade school which is usually an 8 hour a day class, five days a week for only three to six months or so? (Done with school — done with grandpa's free room & board)
In their mind; where's the benefit?

BF
 

Uglytruth

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#24
I was told a 4 year Journeymans card is not a degree. By a clueless woman that maker her living hiring nurses, electricians, tool makers and other skilled positions yet knows nothing about any of the skills required for the positions they are finding talent for.
If the computer says it checks all the boxes they call. No wonder industry has no one they build a firewall staffed by idiots between them and the skilled people. Then if you ask any questions like what is the pay range they give you the run around. Guess they are looking for someone with 4 phd's & 10 years experience in a new technology that's only been around for 5 years & is willing to with for a low wage. Of course no one is as skilled as they are. Like I said before FUCK'EM!
 

searcher

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#25
Thinking About Learning A Skilled Trade?
A Concord Carpenter / ToolBoxBuzz


Published on Feb 7, 2018
Thinking About Learning A Skilled Trade? - A message to our youth.

READ MORE:
http://www.aconcordcarpenter.com/enga...

In 2012 college graduates over age 25 earned 25% more than the median average wage worker according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).

Naturally as a father of three, I would use the logic that college means my child will make a decent living and not break their backs doing it, therefore that’s best for them, so I’ll do whatever is required to get them to a college or university.

But in the past TEN years, we’ve been reminded time and time again that college does not ensure employment, let alone a job that pays well. According to the BLS, 72.6% of recent college grads were employed and over a quarter-million Americans with a Bachelor degree or higher are working in jobs paying minimum wage.

The overwhelming cost of college has left our children with more debt then they are ready to handle. Since 1988 college tuition and fees have more than doubled in 2011, cited in a CNN money story highlighting inequality in America. And the college and university system has been criticized for their inability to prepare our children for a complicated and obstacle filled “real world.”

A Trade Education

Our perceptions of manual labor, blue-collar jobs, and trade schools have become toxic in our society. Why aren’t we engaging our youth in the trades?

The expectation that EVERYONE in each subsequent future generation should go to college is just silly.

Equally as silly is the idea that all laborers or blue collar workers are not intelligent or successful.

Two of my newest employees are college educated, obviously they were intelligent enough to complete the requirement for their degrees, and possibly could continue to pursue and obtain advanced degrees. Instead they choose to enter careers in the trades, where with their hard work and motivation they will no doubt be successful.