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Riots in Minneapolis, MN over George Floyd death.

tigerwillow1

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These FFs work all the time because too many people are stupid!
Carlin's statement shows he didn't learn high school math so he's probably in the stupid group. A statement from a stupid person about how many people are stupid. Me thinks Mr. Spock would raise his eyebrows and say "Interesting".
 

SongSungAU

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G200606.jpg
 

Goldhedge

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Someone_else

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So they are not soldiers...

They are temporary US Marshals. :)
 

Ensoniq

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Carlin's statement shows he didn't learn high school math so he's probably in the stupid group. A statement from a stupid person about how many people are stupid. Me thinks Mr. Spock would raise his eyebrows and say "Interesting".
you’ll have to explain it me as well. It makes perfect sense, where average = mean

i used to laugh at an old boss that used to say I want everyone that works in your department to be above average
 

the_shootist

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Carlin's statement shows he didn't learn high school math so he's probably in the stupid group. A statement from a stupid person about how many people are stupid. Me thinks Mr. Spock would raise his eyebrows and say "Interesting".
Well, I suppose George and I are equally stupid because I get exactly what he's saying. I graduated high school too and did quite well in math. I'm not sure what that has to do with the point the late Mr Carlin is making but it is what it is.
 

tigerwillow1

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Well, I suppose George and I are equally stupid because I get exactly what he's saying.
Then you're subconsciously auto-correcting him to median instead of average, since averages don't define a midpoint. With him acting like an expert he at least ought to know what he's talking about.
 

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specsaregood

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George Floyd's second grade teacher Waynel Sexton shares an essay and drawing of Floyd's she kept for 38 years about wanting to grow up and be a supreme court Judge
But instead he grew up to commit a home invasion and hold a pregnant woman at gunpoint. hurray for him.
My opinion is that he shouldn't been killed by that cop; but only because he should have died back when he committed the home invasion. AFAIC, he gave up his right to life the minute he did that.
 

SongSungAU

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What's Behind the Street Violence (5 min 44 sec):


Published on Jun 6, 2020 by PatrickCoffin.media​
 

GOLDBRIX

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But instead he grew up to commit a home invasion and hold a pregnant woman at gunpoint. hurray for him.
My opinion is that he shouldn't been killed by that cop; but only because he should have died back when he committed the home invasion. AFAIC, he gave up his right to life the minute he did that.
Well. He got the "Courts" part right.
 

newmisty

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Goldhedge

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Buck

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eyes are everywhere...now, where are the cops?
 

Goldhedge

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One more death to avenge...


Louisville man shot and killed during protests
  • BY CHRISTOPHER BRITO
JUNE 4, 2020 / 8:17 AM / CBS NEWS
Editor's note: This article has been updated with new information from the Louisville Metro Police Department. The headline has been changed.

Louisville police released new information Tuesday about the fatal shooting of a local business owner during a protest earlier this week, as friends and neighbors gathered to mourn. David McAtee, who was known as "the BBQ Man, was shot and killed early Monday. The Louisville Metro Police Department said Tuesday that surveillance video shows McAtee fired a weapon before he was killed, CBS affiliate WKLY-TV reports.

Acting Chief Rob Schroeder said the video does not make clear why McAtee opened fire, who he was aiming at or how close he was to officers at the time. When asked whether it was clear if McAtee fired the first shot, police officials said it appears so at this point, but the investigation is ongoing.

McAtee was serving food at an outdoor stand past the city-mandated curfew amid the protests over the police killings of Breonna Taylor and George Floyd. Jason Green, an eyewitness to the shooting and customer of McAtee's, told WKLY-TV that McAtee used to give police officers free food.

"He talks to them, they come and hold conversations... I've even see one time where one cop brought him food because his granny made it," Green said. "There's nothing bad to say about this man. He was a good man."


David McAtee, who ran Yaya's BBQ in Louisville, was shot and killed during protests early on June 1, 2020.WLKY-TV

Police officers and members of the National Guard had been enforcing the city's curfew. According to Kentucky Governor Andy Beshear, the shooting happened when officers and the National Guard tried to break up a large group of protesters. While working to disperse the crowd, they were fired upon and returned fire, killing McAtee, Beshear said.

Two of the officers involved in the shooting did not turn on their body cameras, which prompted the mayor to fire the police chief, Steve Conrad. Both officers have been put on administrative leave.

Kentucky State Police, the National Guard, the FBI and the U.S. Attorney's Office will all conduct investigations into the shooting of McAtee.

In February, McAtee told a local blog he'd been working for the last two years at the corner at 26th Street and Broadway — the spot of the shooting.

"This location is the one of the busiest locations in West Louisville. I always wanted to be in this spot, and when the opportunity came, I took it," McAtee said. He told the blog he looked forward to building his business. "Eventually, I'm going to buy this lot and build," he said. "I gotta start somewhere, and this is where I'm going to start. It might take another year or two to get to where I'm going, but I'm going to get there."

His family spoke out on Monday, saying he was known as a "community pillar" and "was a good person."

"All he did on that barbecue corner is try to make a dollar for himself and his family," McAtee's mother told the Courier-Journal. "And they come along and they killed my son."

Peter Martinez contributed to this report.
 

the_shootist

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That is a joke, right? Tell me, please.
The funny thing is...its not a joke , but so many sheep believe it! I really hate what much of America has become.

The founders would have shot this vermin by now
 

Ensoniq

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Then you're subconsciously auto-correcting him to median instead of average, since averages don't define a midpoint. With him acting like an expert he at least ought to know what he's talking about.
you might want to check the dictionary

median or midpoint is one of the definitions of average. You’re subconsciously assuming it only means mean

back to eighth grade with you
 

Ensoniq

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Varmint Hunter

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ABC123

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Martin Gugino is a 75-year-old professional agitator and Antifa provocateur who brags on his blog about the number of times he can get arrested and escape prosecution. Gugino’s Twitter Account is also filled with anti-cop sentiment [SEE HERE]. Last Thursday Gugino traveled from his home in Amherst, New York, to Buffalo to agitate a protest crowd.
During his effort Gugino was attempting to capture the radio communications signature of Buffalo police officers. CTH noted what he was attempting on Thursday night as soon as the now viral video was being used by media to sell a police brutality narrative. [Thread Here] Today, a more clear video has emerged that shows exactly what he was attempting.
In this slow motion video, you will see Gugino using a phone as a capture scanner. You might have heard the term “skimming”; it’s essentially the same. Watch him use his right hand to first scan the mic of officer one (top left of chest). Then Gugino moves his hand to the communications belt of the second officer.
The capture of communications signals [explained in detail here] is a method of police tracking used by Antifa to monitor the location of police. In some cases the more high tech capture software can even decipher communication encryption allowing the professional agitators to block (black-out), jam, or interfere with police communication.
Unfortunately in the modern era the professional agitators have become very sophisticated and use technology to help create chaos. Their activity is highly coordinated, and as James O’Keefe has revealed in his undercover operations these professionals even stage events to manipulate public opinion.

https://theconservativetreehouse.com/2020/06/06/buffalo-officials-duped-by-professional-antifa-provocateur-arrest-and-charge-two-police-officers-righteous-police-team-stand-together-and-walk-out/
 

spinalcracker

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^^^^^^that All may be true but still , that ain’t the way to treat a 75 yr old man...better training of the police would have prevented the entire thing
 

Uglytruth

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WTF would want to be a cop? Without them it will be chaos!
 

edsl48

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The Minneapolis rapid transit thugs...see what the cops have to deal with there.

 

<SLV>

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tigerwillow1

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"Average" can refer to, mean, median or mode.
I'm going to eat a bit of crow and admit that I was either taught, or only remember, that average means the mean. I pulled up the first dozen or so hits from a search engine and was schooled by the results of what "average" means:
2x - mean median or mode
7x - specifically the mean
6x - "typical"

And if the statement "The average, or mean, is not the only measure of central tendency, though it is one of the most common. The other common measures are the median and the mode. " is correct, there can be an unlimited number of definitions of average.

I still think Carlin's statement places him in the stupid half of the population, but have to entertain the possibility I'm in his lower half and can't comprehend that the upper half he talks about realizes he obviously means the median type of average. Under the wider definition of average, the same thing can be average, above average, and below average at the same time. Now I feel it's a meaningless term. Maybe that's why the press and politicians like to throw it at us so often to tell us what we think.
 

EO 11110

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I'm going to eat a bit of crow and admit that I was either taught, or only remember, that average means the mean. I pulled up the first dozen or so hits from a search engine and was schooled by the results of what "average" means:
2x - mean median or mode
7x - specifically the mean
6x - "typical"

And if the statement "The average, or mean, is not the only measure of central tendency, though it is one of the most common. The other common measures are the median and the mode. " is correct, there can be an unlimited number of definitions of average.

I still think Carlin's statement places him in the stupid half of the population, but have to entertain the possibility I'm in his lower half and can't comprehend that the upper half he talks about realizes he obviously means the median type of average. Under the wider definition of average, the same thing can be average, above average, and below average at the same time. Now I feel it's a meaningless term. Maybe that's why the press and politicians like to throw it at us so often to tell us what we think.
words of art used to change the meaning. junior and senior university level stat classes clearly identify average = mean

that mean is strengthened if the mode and median are in same neighborhood on the curve. if not, need more samples to bring them together
 

the_shootist

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Does anyone find it interesting that Minnesota, which has been bringing in Somalians by the thousands for years, is now one of the hottest spots for riots and destruction and the starting point for this insurrection?

Just a coincidence I'm sure (there are no coincidences!)
 
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Ensoniq

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Does anyone find it interesting that Minnesota, which has been bringing in Somalians by the thousands for years, is one of the hottest spots for riots and destruction during this insurrection?

Just a coincidence I'm sure
i wonder what they want to replace the police with. They won’t be discussing that probably until the cops are gone.

ill predict it starts with SHA and ends in RIA
 

the_shootist

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i wonder what they want to replace the police with. They won’t be discussing that probably until the cops are gone.

ill predict it starts with SHA and ends in RIA
If the remaining Americans don't fight to get their state back they'll deserve what they get. How bad is bad enough?

The same holds true for the rest of us!

Let me just say that again....

How bad is bad enough???
 

edsl48

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I wonder why this shooting of a citizen by a Minneapolis Cop didn't spark outrage?
/s

On July 15, 2017, Justine Damond (née Ruszczyk)[2][3] a 40-year-old Australian-American woman, was fatally shot by a 33-year-old Mohamed Noor, a Somali-American Minneapolis Police Department officer, after she had called 9-1-1 to report the possible assault of a woman in an alley behind her house. Occurring weeks after a high-profile manslaughter trial acquittal in the 2016 police shooting of Philando Castile, also in the Twin Cities metro area, the shooting exacerbated existing tensions and attracted national and international press.[4][5][6]

On March 20, 2018, Noor was charged with second-degree manslaughter and third-degree murder. Prosecutors later upgraded the charges against Noor to second-degree intentional murder. In April 2019, Noor was convicted of third-degree murder and manslaughter, but acquitted of intentional second-degree murder.[7] In June 2019, Noor was sentenced to 12.5 years in prison.[8] Damond's family brought a civil lawsuit against the City of Minneapolis alleging violation of Damond's civil rights, which the city settled for $US20 million,[9] one of the largest-ever settlements in a suit involving a police killing.[8]

Justine Damond[edit]

Justine Damond
Justine Maia Damond (April 4, 1977 – July 15, 2017) grew up in the Northern Beaches area of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia and attended Manly High School.[10] She graduated in 2002 from the University of Sydney as a veterinarian, then worked as a spiritual healer and meditation coach. She met Don Damond, a U.S. citizen, while attending a neuroscience workshop.[11] The couple became engaged on December 29, 2014,[12] and planned to marry in August 2017. Damond stopped using her surname Ruszczyk and took the Damond's family name ahead of their marriage.[13] Damond held dual Australia and United States citizenship, as her father, John Ruszczyk, holds US citizenship.[14]

Mohamed Noor[edit]
Mohamed Mohamed Noor[15] (born October 20, 1985),[16] was the officer who shot Damond. Noor's partner, Matthew Harrity (then 25 years old), was the driver of their squad car.[17] Noor had been lauded in the past by Minneapolis mayor Betsy Hodges and the local Somali community as one of the first Somali-American police officers in the area.[18] At the time of the shooting, Noor had been with the Minneapolis Police Department for 21 months; Harrity had been on the force for one year.[17]

In two years as a police officer, Noor had three formal complaints against him, two of which, as of September 2017, were pending resolution. In a separate case from May 2017, he was being sued for allegedly assaulting a woman while on duty.[19]

Following the deadly shooting, the Star Tribune reported Noor's police training had been "fast tracked", making reference to the seven-month immersive training program for cadets; some suburban police departments see the cadet programs as a way to add diversity to their police forces quickly.[20] Noor's police training had been part of the cadet program for the Minneapolis Police Department, an accelerated[20] seven-month program aimed at candidates who already have a college degree and wish to enter law enforcement. Former police chief Janeé Harteau stood by Noor's training:

We have a very robust training and hiring process ... This officer completed that training very well, just like every officer. He was very suited to be on the street ... I believe the actions in question go against who we are as a department, how we train, and the expectations we are as a department. These were the actions of one individual.[21]
On July 23, 2017, MPD and Council Member Elizabeth Glidden denied news reports of there being a "fast-track" seven-month MPD training program.[22][23] In September 2018, it was reported that in 2015, two psychiatrists and other training officers had raised concerns about Noor's fitness for police duty.[24] Two months before the shooting, Noor pointed a gun at the head of a driver he had pulled over for a minor traffic violation.[24]

Incident[edit]
On the night of the shooting, Damond called 9-1-1 at 11:27 p.m., and again eight minutes later, 11:35 p.m.[25] She reported that she thought she heard a woman either having sex or being raped.[26] Dispatchers categorized the call as "unknown trouble: female screaming"—a relatively low priority.[27] Officers responded to the area, the low-crime neighborhood of Fulton in southwestern Minneapolis,[27] and found no suspects or signs of the suspected rape that had prompted Damond's telephone calls to 9-1-1.[28]

Officers Noor and Harrity, after driving through an alley with the lights on their police Ford Explorer off, heard no signs of criminal activity.[27] As the two partners prepared to leave, Noor "entered 'Code Four' into the cruiser's computer, meaning the scene was safe."[27] Harrity would indicate "that he was startled by a loud sound near the squad," and immediately, then, Damond approached the police car's driver-side window.[29] Harrity drew his weapon, but, pointed it downward, did not fire.[30] Noor, however, fired once through the open window, fatally striking Damond in the chest.[27][29] Damond was unarmed and barefoot.[27] The officers attempted CPR to no avail; Damond died 20 minutes later.[31]

Harrity later told a supervisor, "We both got spooked."[27] At Noor's trial, Harrity testified of hearing "something hit the car and I also hear some sort of murmur," and that he feared an "ambush," but deemed it "premature" to use deadly force.[30] Noor testified that he did not see Damond's hand or any object in the hand, but nonetheless believed that his partner "feared for his life" and "there was a threat."[32] At Noor's trial, prosecutors presented evidence that Damond's fingerprints were not on the police car, suggesting she never made contact with it, and prosecutors called two expert witnesses on the police use of force, who testified that Noor's decision to shoot was unreasonable.[33]

Both officers had their body cameras switched off.[34] Minneapolis introduced police body cameras in 2016, but their activation was not mandatory in all situations.[35] No audio or video recordings captured the killing,[27] although a 16-year-old cyclist took cell-phone video of the scene after the shooting.[36]

Reactions[edit]
Attorney statements[edit]
Harrity's attorney, Fred Bruno, told the Star Tribune "it's certainly reasonable" to assume any officer would be concerned about an ambush. He referenced the recent death of a New York City officer killed in her squad car.[37]

Damond's family retained attorney Robert Bennett, the same lawyer who represented the family of Philando Castile. In a televised interview, he dismissed the claims of Harrity's attorney (that it was reasonable for the officers to fear ambush) as "disinformation".[38]

United States[edit]
The day after the killing, a vigil in Damond's honor was held at the site of her death in the alleyway entrance located on the north side of West 51st Street between Xerxes Avenue South and Washburn Avenue South in Minneapolis.[39] Several days after the killing, hundreds marched to Beard's Plaisance Park in Minneapolis, in honor of Damond.[40] A memorial service for Damond was held on 11 August 2017, on the shore of Lake Harriet in Minneapolis. The service was at the bandshell and there was a silent walk around the lake afterwards. It was attended by Damond's family and fiancé, and about 1000 mourners.[41][42]

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) issued a statement calling the disuse of body cameras "unacceptable". Blue Lives Matter countered, claiming officers making a simple area check have no reason to use them. The ACLU answered that police should at least start recording after a shooting occurs.[43]

On July 19, 2017, Republican Michele Bachmann, who had represented Minnesota's 6th congressional district in the U.S. Congress from January 2007 through January 2015, stated during a speech at the Eighth Annual Hog Roast and Republican gubernatorial forum in Waconia that Noor was an "affirmative-action hire". Speaking to World Net Daily, Bachmann stated, "Noor comes from the mandated cover-up women culture. That's why I'm wondering if they'll ask whether his cultural views led him to shoot her. That's something, if true, I can't imagine the progressives would allow to get out."[44]

Australia[edit]
Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull said the Australian government wanted answers:[45]

This is a shocking killing. It's inexplicable. How can a woman out in the street in her pajamas seeking assistance from the police be shot like that? We are demanding answers on behalf of her family. It's truly a tragic killing there in Minneapolis. Something clearly went tragically wrong. It seems inexplicable. It's a tragic loss.​
Damond's family and friends held a sunrise vigil for her at Freshwater Beach on July 19, 2017.[46] A further sunrise vigil was conducted at the same beach on July 15, 2018.[47]

Investigation and prosecution of Noor[edit]
Investigation[edit]
An application for a search warrant to search the alley where the shooting occurred, referring to the shooting incident, stated: "Upon police arrival, a female 'slaps' the back of the patrol squad. After that, it is unknown to BCA agents what exactly happened, but the female became deceased in the alley."[48] Among items collected were fingerprints from the rear cargo door window of the squad car.[49]

Hours after the shooting, Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension investigators controversially obtained a second search warrant and carried out a search of Damond's home for evidence, including 'bodily fluids, controlled substances, and writings'. They did not take anything from the property.[50] Noor refused to speak with investigators, invoking his right against self-incrimination.[51][52] Noor and Harrity were then on paid administrative leave.[53]

In February 2018, a grand jury was convened to investigate Damond's death.[54] On February 15, 2018, Harrity appeared before the grand jury.[55]

Trial and conviction[edit]
On March 20, 2018, a warrant was issued for third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter charges, and Noor turned himself in to police. He also resigned from the Minneapolis Police Department.[56] With the approval of the court, prosecutors later upgraded the charges against Noor to second-degree intentional murder.[57][58]

On April 30, 2019, Noor was convicted of third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter.[59] Under Minnesota law, third-degree murder is defined as "a person causing the death of another by perpetrating an act eminently dangerous to others and without regard for human life, but without intent to cause the death of any person"; second-degree manslaughter is defined as "whoever by culpable negligence, whereby he creates an unreasonable risk and consciously takes the chance of causing death or great bodily harm to another person, causes the death of another is guilty of manslaughter in the second degree".[60]

The Somali-American Police Association issued a statement after the verdict claiming that racial bias contributed to Noor's conviction.[61]

In May 2019, Noor's attorneys lodged a motion for acquittal on both charges, arguing that the evidence was insufficient.[62][63]

On June 7, 2019, Noor was sentenced to 12.5 years in prison.[8]

Aftermath[edit]
Minneapolis Chief of Police Janeé Harteau was on vacation at the time of Damond's killing, and continued her vacation for four days, rather than immediately returning to Minneapolis after the killing.[64] After returning to the city, Harteau said at a press conference, "Justine didn't have to die...The death of Justine should not have happened." Regarding Noor's refusal to speak to investigators, Harteau said "I would prefer Officer Noor would speak".[65] Less than a week after Damond's killing, Harteau was ousted, after Mayor Betsy Hodges said that she and the city had lost confidence in Harteau's ability to lead.[66][67] The police shootings were a contributing factor to Hodges losing her bid for reelection in 2017.[68]

Following the shooting, Minneapolis acting police chief Medaria Arradondo announced that police officers would be required to turn on body-worn cameras during all calls and traffic stops.[69] Bob Kroll, the president of the Minneapolis police officers' union, objected to having cameras recording while officers are on the way to a call, saying that officers' discussion of tactics "while responding to a call should not be publicly disseminated."[70]

A documentary on the life and death of Damond was shown on Australian Story in November 2017 on ABC TV.[71]