• "Spreading the ideas of freedom loving people on matters regarding high finance, politics, constructionist Constitution, and mental masturbation of all types"

ROCKS!

FFA

New Member
Joined
Sep 11, 2018
Messages
88
Likes
104
I also live in Ohio, not born here, NY born, I have found a few fossil rocks, howsoever, I usually look for points, (flint), anytime I'm around a tilled farm field, etc.

You might also be interested to know, if you don't already, that most of the creeks and rivers do have fine gold flakes. That's if, you know how to find it.
I've had some good luck with fossils here. I've even found a few trilobytes.
 

Bottom Feeder

Hypophthalmichthys molitrix
Midas Member
Midas Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
7,650
Likes
13,819
Location
Seattle
A few more added to my collection in the last few months.
This first photo is off the web but it shows what Galena is supposed to look like. Notice the square formed cubical structure.


The one I purchased is not your ordinary looking Galena specimen, though. It looks like someone has taken a blowtorch to it and softened all the sharp edges of the cubical form.


a closer view. notice the small quartz crystal in the lower left corner of the rock


more of that 'melted' look

Crystallized sulfur

closeup of the crystallization
Another piece of Selenite (Gypsum) this spear is about four inches long
This type is called 'picture selenite' or 'TV Rock' because of it's optical properties.
Oops, I misspoke here. Selenite crystals like this are not known as TV stone, that is actually a lay term for Ulexite, which has superior transmission ability.

That's it
BF
 
Last edited:

Unca Walt

Midas Member
Midas Member
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 15, 2011
Messages
9,431
Likes
13,704
Location
South Floriduh
Hey BF:

Selenite has several kewl (and spooky) light characteristics besides that neato one. I've got a coupla pieces of ten-inch selenite and did some experiments.

Hold the crystal horizontally against a white wall. Shine a laser into the middle of the crystal. (Like a torpedo track heading for an aircraft carrier) Fargin laser splits sideways. WTF??
 

Bottom Feeder

Hypophthalmichthys molitrix
Midas Member
Midas Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
7,650
Likes
13,819
Location
Seattle
lookin for a laser...
got a couple here somewhere
 

Unca Walt

Midas Member
Midas Member
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 15, 2011
Messages
9,431
Likes
13,704
Location
South Floriduh
:2 thumbs up:

You gots one of them focus-able little bitty screaming bright flashlights? Try it inna dark with that.
 

newmisty

Splodey-Headed
Midas Member
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
25,334
Likes
35,911
Location
Qmerica


Cool rock bro!
 

Bottom Feeder

Hypophthalmichthys molitrix
Midas Member
Midas Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
7,650
Likes
13,819
Location
Seattle
Thanks, misty. You would like this one, it weighs about two pounds, it's pretty dense. About 2X3X1 inches.

BF
 

Irons

Deep Sixed
Sr Site Supporter
Mother Lode
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
29,152
Likes
52,241
A Yooper discovers a new rock and rock hounds are going crazy for them.....

Behold 'Yooperlites,' newly-discovered glowing treasures in Michigan's Upper Peninsula
Updated Aug 31; Posted Aug 31

By Brandon Champion
bchampio@mlive.com



BRIMLEY, MI - You don't have to look very hard to find natural beauty in Michigan's Upper Peninsula, but if you know where to look, you may find a hidden treasure resting beneath your feet.

Behold "Yooperlites."

Brimley resident Erik Rintamaki has cornered the market on the fluorescent minerals found along the shores of Lake Superior. He named them. He collects them. He sells them. And, armed with a powerful UV light, he leads tours to show other rock hounds where to find them.
"I've been a rock hound all my life," he said. "It runs in the family. Once you start finding cool rocks on the beach, it gets addicting."

"Yooperlites," and other similar sodalites have likely been in Michigan for centuries, left behind by glaciers and rounded by the wave action on Lake Superior. But Rintamaki has been credited publicly with discovering this particular variation in Michigan, which includes a Hackmanite-like fluorescent quality.

Testing completed at Michigan Tech University confirmed the presence of sodium, aluminum, silicon, chlorine and oxygen, but no structural sulfur, which likely results in the fluorescent properties of the mineral, according to Kevin Cole, associate professor of geology at Grand Valley State University.

The rocks have a mesmerizing, out-of-this-world glow when hit with high-powered UV lights, something Rintamaki discovered when he first encountered the mineral in June of 2017.

"I left for the beach at 4 a.m. and arrived just in time to use my cheap 3 LED longwave UV flashlight," he recalled. "I found two very small Yooperlites about the size of a dime. I went four more times and only found a half dozen stones."

"Then I upgraded to a 100 LED UV torch and that's when the fun began. My largest find so far has been five pounds. Now I have upgraded even further to Convoy S2+ UV and a shortwave lamp. So I hope to open even more secrets of our Lake Superior beaches."

Armed with knowledge and equipment, Rintamaki has become known for his ability to find the glowing treasures. He routinely leads guided tours throughout Luce and Chippewa counties. Two such tours are scheduled to take place at Muskallonge State Park on Sept. 8 and Sept. 9.

The attention Rintamaki has brought to the presence of the fluorescent sodalite has led others to study the mineral. It is now believed to naturally occur in kilogram quantities along Lake Superior beaches, meaning it is readily available for collection.

Once you know where to look, that is.


https://www.mlive.com/news/index.ssf/2018/08/behold_yooperlites_the_glowing.html



 

newmisty

Splodey-Headed
Midas Member
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
25,334
Likes
35,911
Location
Qmerica
Neato! Gotta ad a UV light to the arsenal now Irons.
 

Bottom Feeder

Hypophthalmichthys molitrix
Midas Member
Midas Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
7,650
Likes
13,819
Location
Seattle
Be aware that there are two version of UV light; long and short wavelengths. They fluoresce minerals differently. Read up before you buy one.

BF

Oh, yeah, and don't forget eye safety — UV will hurt your eyesight.
 
Last edited:

Irons

Deep Sixed
Sr Site Supporter
Mother Lode
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
29,152
Likes
52,241
Be aware that there are two version of UV light; long and short wavelengths. They fluoresce minerals differently. Read up before you buy one.

BF

Oh, yeah, and don't forget eye safety — UV will hurt your eyesight.
Lots of rock hunters up here man. They are out on Lake Michigan beaches early in the morning when I'm there.
Petoskey stones are probably the most popular but I see folks with classifier pans and different screen sifters too.
They may be after garnets. When some beaches are eroded down to black sand, areas will shine red with tiny garnets.


.
 

Bottom Feeder

Hypophthalmichthys molitrix
Midas Member
Midas Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
7,650
Likes
13,819
Location
Seattle
I imagine they would be pretty hard to see them fluoresce in bright sunlight. They'd show up like deer eyes at night though.
 

FFA

New Member
Joined
Sep 11, 2018
Messages
88
Likes
104
A Yooper discovers a new rock and rock hounds are going crazy for them.....

Behold 'Yooperlites,' newly-discovered glowing treasures in Michigan's Upper Peninsula
Updated Aug 31; Posted Aug 31

By Brandon Champion
bchampio@mlive.com



BRIMLEY, MI - You don't have to look very hard to find natural beauty in Michigan's Upper Peninsula, but if you know where to look, you may find a hidden treasure resting beneath your feet.

Behold "Yooperlites."

Brimley resident Erik Rintamaki has cornered the market on the fluorescent minerals found along the shores of Lake Superior. He named them. He collects them. He sells them. And, armed with a powerful UV light, he leads tours to show other rock hounds where to find them.
"I've been a rock hound all my life," he said. "It runs in the family. Once you start finding cool rocks on the beach, it gets addicting."

"Yooperlites," and other similar sodalites have likely been in Michigan for centuries, left behind by glaciers and rounded by the wave action on Lake Superior. But Rintamaki has been credited publicly with discovering this particular variation in Michigan, which includes a Hackmanite-like fluorescent quality.

Testing completed at Michigan Tech University confirmed the presence of sodium, aluminum, silicon, chlorine and oxygen, but no structural sulfur, which likely results in the fluorescent properties of the mineral, according to Kevin Cole, associate professor of geology at Grand Valley State University.

The rocks have a mesmerizing, out-of-this-world glow when hit with high-powered UV lights, something Rintamaki discovered when he first encountered the mineral in June of 2017.

"I left for the beach at 4 a.m. and arrived just in time to use my cheap 3 LED longwave UV flashlight," he recalled. "I found two very small Yooperlites about the size of a dime. I went four more times and only found a half dozen stones."

"Then I upgraded to a 100 LED UV torch and that's when the fun began. My largest find so far has been five pounds. Now I have upgraded even further to Convoy S2+ UV and a shortwave lamp. So I hope to open even more secrets of our Lake Superior beaches."

Armed with knowledge and equipment, Rintamaki has become known for his ability to find the glowing treasures. He routinely leads guided tours throughout Luce and Chippewa counties. Two such tours are scheduled to take place at Muskallonge State Park on Sept. 8 and Sept. 9.

The attention Rintamaki has brought to the presence of the fluorescent sodalite has led others to study the mineral. It is now believed to naturally occur in kilogram quantities along Lake Superior beaches, meaning it is readily available for collection.

Once you know where to look, that is.


https://www.mlive.com/news/index.ssf/2018/08/behold_yooperlites_the_glowing.html



That looks like too much fun. I would love to try.
 

Unca Walt

Midas Member
Midas Member
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 15, 2011
Messages
9,431
Likes
13,704
Location
South Floriduh
Thanks, walter,the laser trick is cool alright. Laser focused down from my hand

HAH! Glad to see you could reproduce the phenomenon. Your second pic shows the part I din' mention that I don't understand either:

the laser doubles and triples inside (dunno how the hell it can) just like a double/triple rainbow). If yer laser is strong enough and your crystal long enough, you can make a column of step-function "re-laser" lines going parallel to the original.

Your photo shows the "squares" reduction/"squares" increase phenomenon clearly

The little crystal you have (not pickin' onnit) clearly shows three lines. I am purty sure you do not have enough length for the fourth line to show. The spaces between lines go: 1 -- 2 -- 4 -- (8?) <<== and I cannot make 8 (length prob) even with my long ones... and you can see the light reduction is reversed like 4x goes to 2x goes to 1x in brightness.

Just as a note: The rainbow comparison breaks down because multi-rainbows have the same distance between them.
 

Bottom Feeder

Hypophthalmichthys molitrix
Midas Member
Midas Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
7,650
Likes
13,819
Location
Seattle
I know yer not pickin on my rocks, walter. Display cabinets have limited space for a mineral collection and ya need to stay within the parameters of your available space. I do have a larger piece (Selenite) but it is not cut and polished like this example.

Now if I wanted (and if I had space for) a large crystal I could always go down to this cave in mechico and get one:

 

Irons

Deep Sixed
Sr Site Supporter
Mother Lode
Joined
Mar 30, 2010
Messages
29,152
Likes
52,241
Yooperlite craze is growing. This guy from a rockshop north of Frankfort found a 93 pounder over the weekend.

43559343_1896278570407993_7019334909495869440_n.jpg
 

Goldhedge

Moderator
Site Mgr
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 28, 2010
Messages
41,788
Likes
65,962
Location
Rocky Mountains
Just curious BF where do you store all these rocks? You have them on display in the man cave?
 

Bottom Feeder

Hypophthalmichthys molitrix
Midas Member
Midas Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
7,650
Likes
13,819
Location
Seattle
where do you store all these rocks?
Ah, yeah, that is the limiting factor (that and money). I have a 1½X2X7 foot display cabinet in my living room.

Cabinet.JPG

It's a little crowded, eh? The ugly rocks get displaced by the prettier rocks and the ugly ones go into the garage.

BF
 

pitw

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Jun 25, 2013
Messages
3,285
Likes
3,747
Location
Eastern Alberta.
Went into a rock shop for the first time this year[didn't know it was a rock shop as I went for a garage sale.LOL] and it was was very interesting. The thing that caught my eye the most was the maybe 100 old cigar box's he had rocks in.
 

pitw

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Jun 25, 2013
Messages
3,285
Likes
3,747
Location
Eastern Alberta.
Nope. He wouldn't part with them. He certainly opened my eyes up on how many types of rock's there are though. He has one that looks exactly like a slice of bacon and I think I got him to the point of almost selling it but not quite. Expensive damb things, eh.
 

EricTheCat

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Apr 2, 2010
Messages
1,251
Likes
2,845
Location
Southern MN
Ah, yeah, that is the limiting factor (that and money). I have a 1½X2X7 foot display cabinet in my living room.


It's a little crowded, eh? The ugly rocks get displaced by the prettier rocks and the ugly ones go into the garage.

BF
I could really use something like that. Maybe 4 of them. I have rock all over the place. With my next SD trip coming right up I still have not found a permanent place for the finds from last year's SD trip.
 

Bottom Feeder

Hypophthalmichthys molitrix
Midas Member
Midas Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
7,650
Likes
13,819
Location
Seattle
Expensive damb things, eh.
Yeah sometimes <sigh>

In my early twenties, in a off-the-hiway rock shop in back country Idaho, I saw a whole petrified tree stump for sale. $500.00
The thing was about four feet tall and about six or seven feet across.
The owner was an old rock hound, probably close to ninety. He had spent a lot of years running the place and he was selling the inventory off. He had a collection of rock spheres; six, eight, ten inch or so size. He had ground them himself, he said. He had tons of shit there; amethyst crystals, petrified wood by the bushel, fossils, cut and uncut slabs, and quartz. We talked for about two hours, I was the only visitor to the shop in all that time. I bought three of the crystal spheres for five bucks each. —dont ask me where they are now

Went back there years later and it was just another stretch of barren land alongside the road.

You don't need five cabinets, eric, ya just need to higrade your specimens.

BF
 

EricTheCat

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Apr 2, 2010
Messages
1,251
Likes
2,845
Location
Southern MN
You don't need five cabinets, eric, ya just need to higrade your specimens.
Are you suggesting I need to part with some of them? Because if you are, 'm be fighting words. ;)

Speaking of the expense of the stuff, I regret not taking advantage of a real good opportunity. We went to a rock shop in Duluth that was closing. They already had really decent prices and everything in the store was 50% off. I only bought a big cut in half agate (probably from Brazil) for $15 (marked $30). When we got back to my mom's place where I was visiting we were all kicking ourselves that we didn't get everything that we could fit in my car. Had we done that I would have even more rock to find space for. :)

Biggest regret there was not offering to buy their "gumball" machine that would dispense handfuls of small lake superior agates. I would have asked my friend if I could set it up in his computer repair shop. :)
 

Bottom Feeder

Hypophthalmichthys molitrix
Midas Member
Midas Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
7,650
Likes
13,819
Location
Seattle
Naw, I didn't mean to git rid of them; they're always good gifts for grandkids or such. You could have some rotation system, change em with the season or your mood or something.
Or you could hire stondey or one of the crew over there in Workin Man thread to build you a 'rock room'.

:Happy:
BF
 
Last edited:

EricTheCat

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Apr 2, 2010
Messages
1,251
Likes
2,845
Location
Southern MN
Naw, I didn't mean to git rid of them; they're always good gifts for grandkids or such. You could have some rotation system, change em with the season or your mood or something.
Or you could hire stondey or one of the crew over there in Workin Man thread to build you a 'rock room'.
Understood. We good then. :2 thumbs up: :winks2:

I do already have a 'rock room'. In it I have guitars, pedals, a mixer, drum kit, a microphone, piano, keyboard, etc.. Oh, I see what I did wrong. whistle:
 

Bottom Feeder

Hypophthalmichthys molitrix
Midas Member
Midas Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
7,650
Likes
13,819
Location
Seattle
Oh, you should get together with newmisty then. he's a musician and a building craftsman.
Make yer rock room rock!

BF
 

Unca Walt

Midas Member
Midas Member
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 15, 2011
Messages
9,431
Likes
13,704
Location
South Floriduh
Hola Kao!!

Comparison of two crazy old collectors of weird --

Bottom Feeder ---------------------------------------------------------versus







Unca Walt's Ditto Cabinet


display cabinet 002.jpg Second shelf from bottom: My megalodon tooth. Found it diving. The green thing is a busted Cassowary egg from Scooter's farm. The middle row is our Meissen stuff, puzzle balls, and the egg that lights up when you take a pic of it.
 

Bottom Feeder

Hypophthalmichthys molitrix
Midas Member
Midas Supporter
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
7,650
Likes
13,819
Location
Seattle
WHUP!! How 'bout that. Opposite corners of the country, even.

I got this one at Goodwill, broken glass and broken door hinge, for $20.00. I added shelf clips, replaced the shelves with ¼ polycarbonate and added air seals to the door (to keep out dust). I installed two strips of natural light spectrum LEDs on the inside of the front corners and basically cleaned it up. Your cabinet looks to be the same one as I have. (different shit, though :Happy:)

BF
 

EricTheCat

Gold Member
Gold Chaser
Sr Site Supporter
Joined
Apr 2, 2010
Messages
1,251
Likes
2,845
Location
Southern MN
Here are some finds from my recent trip to South Dakota. Hopefully I can get some better pics one of these days.

Various quartz, rose quartz, agate, chert and 2 pieces of selenite (just down from the quarter). These are river tumbled, from gravel deposits in an ancient dry river bed.
ChertAgateQuartzSelenite-Img_2625SS.jpg

These others were found in the junk pile of an old mine.

Blue apatite
BlueApatite-Img_2617SS.jpg

Some of the green tourmaline I found. Pretty thrilled to have found as much as I did. I have a lot more in matrix that I have yet to clean up.
GreenTourmaline-Img_2607SS.jpg

GreenTourmaline-Img_2608SS.jpg
 

newmisty

Splodey-Headed
Midas Member
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
25,334
Likes
35,911
Location
Qmerica
Hola Kao!!

Comparison of two crazy old collectors of weird --

Bottom Feeder ---------------------------------------------------------versus







Unca Walt's Ditto Cabinet


View attachment 113445 Second shelf from bottom: My megalodon tooth. Found it diving. The green thing is a busted Cassowary egg from Scooter's farm. The middle row is our Meissen stuff, puzzle balls, and the egg that lights up when you take a pic of it.
Cheese and fluffy rice! That megolodonian toof is fargin marsive! Would make a heck of a necklace. :p

What the giant nautilus lookin' think in the middle? I've seen similar but they were still embedded in rock.

That red/orange thing is striking,
 

Unca Walt

Midas Member
Midas Member
Site Supporter
Joined
Mar 15, 2011
Messages
9,431
Likes
13,704
Location
South Floriduh
Cheese and fluffy rice! That megolodonian toof is fargin marsive! Would make a heck of a necklace. :p

What the giant nautilus lookin' think in the middle? I've seen similar but they were still embedded in rock.

That red/orange thing is striking,
The nautilus thing is just what you thought it was. Polished the rock away from the fossil. It's an ammonite.

I am not sure by whatcha mean by the red/orange thing... but if you mean the thing right next to the ammonite, that's a slice of polished geode.

The blue shiny at the bottom is a Blue Morpho Butterfly. The sucker looks like it is fabricated from metal.

blue butterfly.jpg
 

newmisty

Splodey-Headed
Midas Member
Site Supporter ++
Joined
Mar 31, 2010
Messages
25,334
Likes
35,911
Location
Qmerica
Zambia emerald: A huge, 5,655-carat stone was found in Zambia
By Bukola Adebayo, CNN

7 hrs ago





© Gemfields Lion Emerald, 5,655-carat emerald found in Zambia
The world's largest producer of the green stones has unearthed a 5,655-carat emerald crystal at its mines in Zambia.

The stone, which weighs more than 1.1 kg (almost 2.5 lbs), was found at the Gemfield mines in Kangem, the company said in a statement Monday.
The emerald is being called "Inkalamu," which means "lion" in the local Zambia Bemba language. It will be cut into smaller pieces and auctioned in Singapore in November.

It has "remarkable clarity and a perfectly balanced golden green hue," the statement said.

© Gemfields The Lion Emerald, a 5,655-carat emerald found in Zambia

The stone was found in an open mine on October 2, by geologist Debapriya Rakshit and emerald miner Richard Kapeta.

Emeralds are rare and more valuable than diamonds, driving their demand in the market.

Most of the world's emeralds are mined in Zambia, Colombia, and Brazil.

Elena Basaglia, Gemfields' gemologist, said there's been increasing interest in Zambia's emeralds, particularly from dealers in Europe.

"We are experiencing strikingly increased demand for high-quality Zambian emeralds from the major brands, particularly in Europe, all of whom admire the rich color and unique transparency of our gems -- qualities that make them unique among emeralds," Basaglia said.

The gem is not the largest emerald stone to have been found in the company's mines. In 2010, miners at the Zambia-based operation found a 6,225-carat emerald they named the "elephant" due to its massive size.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/worl...-found-in-zambia/ar-BBP6rCP?OCID=ansmsnnews11