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Selling my off grid solar equipment

<SLV>

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#1
We are switching over to grid tie solar. I am selling the following equipment if anyone here is interested. Equipment is in western Wisconsin. Shipping is also a possibility.

Midnite Solar Classic 150 MPPT charge controller (with battery temp sensor)
Magnum Energy 4000W inverter (24v)
Magnum Energy AC/DC combiner box
Magnum Energy back panel for mounting both listed above
Magnum Energy battery monitor
Magnum Energy remote control center
Magnum Energy automatic generator start module

Basically everything except the panels and the batteries.

Let me know if you are interested in any or all.
 

<SLV>

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#2
Automatic generator start module sold.
 

TomD

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TomD

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Would you have the economic details handy?
 

TomD

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Curious to see if the investment +maintenance is worth the return.
 

tigerwillow1

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Curious to see if the investment +maintenance is worth the return.
It depends on what type of system you choose, the incentives in your state, and the metering agreement with your power company (often mandated by state regulations). My wild guess is that the breakeven point would be between 10 and 30 years. Without the incentives it might never break even.

There are 3 types of systems:
1. Off grid. No connection to the power grid. Most of your cost is in the battery.
2. Grid tied. The least expensive system. You have no battery storage and in essence use the grid as your battery. When your solar production exceeds your usage, you push the excess power into the grid and your meter "spins backwards", as people who don't know much about it like to say. When the grid goes down, your system shuts down and you have no power. (Some newer systems will provide a small amount of power when the grid is down and the sun is out).
3. Grid tied with battery backup. Acts like a grid tied system when the grid is up, and an off grid system when the grid is down. You'd typically have a smaller battery than an off grid system, so the cost is in-between off grid and grid tied. Efficiency of turning solar into power is less than a grid tied system, but the ability to have power when the grid is down is an asset that you have to value for yourself.

There's a federal incentive, state incentives, and often power company incentives. They've been trending lower over the years. In some cases the power company buys your excess power at the same rate you pay for it, and in other cases they pay less when you feed power into the grid. That's also been trending lower. When you sell power to the grid you are effectively forcing the non-solar customers to subsidize your use of the grid as a battery. Just like with the electric car subsidies, the politicians are beginning to realize there are unintended consequences to the behavior-influencing subsidies.

I have a grid tied batter backup system that's about 8 years old. I expect to break even in about 12 more years, and also expect to need a new battery then if not sooner. The convenience of a much-of-house uninterruptable power supply has been tremendous. We usually first learn that the power is out when a neighbor calls to ask.
 

Merlin

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You lucky devil; I'm jealous! I would love to have what you have, tigerwillow1. But I'm 74 years old and probably don't have 20 years to break even. Even more, since I'm living on my Social Security benefits and distributions from my IRA, I don't think I have the financial resources to pay cash up front. Do you have some kind of loan with reasonable monthly payments or did you do a cash purchase?
 

foolsgold

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My grid tied system cost $22,000+ but tax rebates from NYS and the federal govt. reduced my cost to $8,000. The ROI is 6 years. As stated earlier the grid acts as my battery and the meter turns backward on sunny days and forward at night. My bill consists of a $20 a month basic service charge, all my electric power is otherwise free. The power company "trues up" on a yearly basis and for a month or two my $20 monthly charge drops to $0.
Money well spent, people think I'm green, I'm not, I'm cheap. Each panel is 300 watts and the 18 panels generate 5400 watts. The local electrician that installed the system told me the panels will be good for 50 years, I believe him.
20181111_135302_small.jpg
 

TomD

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It's summer daytime energy that's most valuable to a power company and night energy is almost free. On a really hot day with energy demands spiking, energy producers have to fire up all the inefficient backup systems and/or buy power from the grid at ELEVATED prices.
 

tigerwillow1

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#12
Do you have some kind of loan with reasonable monthly payments or did you do a cash purchase?
I did a cash purchase. Some of the incentives come off immediately, and some are federal and/or state tax credits, so you have to make sure you have a big enough tax bill to reduce with the credits. This question gives me a good opportunity for a financial checkup. I actually have 2 separate systems, even though I admitted to only one.

System #1: Grid tie with battery backup. About 4kW, with 12 kWh storage. (uses AGM batteries, which are better for occasional discharges. For an off grid system, flooded lead acid batteries are a better choice). Installed 9 years ago. Cost $34.3k. Incentives $20.5k. Net cost $13.8k. To date has produced about $5k of electricity at $0.10/kWh. Projected financial breakeven in 16 more years for total of 25 years. (Does not consider lost interest, future value, etc.)

System #2. Grid tie only, also 4kW. Installed 6 years ago after incentives were significantly reduced. Cost $21.4k, incentives $6.4k, net cost $15k. To date has produced $3.6k worth of electricity. Projected financial breakeven in 19 more years, for 25 years total.

If I had gone with only system #2 at the time #1 was installed, the net cost would have been about $8k, with a ~13 year breakeven. The system in the post just prior must be in a higher kWh cost area to have its shorter breakeven time. My motivation was NOT to save money. It was for survival purposes first, and being green second. We can in theory live fairly comfortably during a long term grid outage, in conjunction with a propane tank larger than we need. If the grid were down long term, we'd be careful not to flaunt it with things like visible electric lights, to not attract human moths.
 

Merlin

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If the grid were down long term, we'd be careful not to flaunt it with things like visible electric lights, to not attract human moths.
I've often thought that I'd have to be very careful not to flaunt my food stores while all around me people were going hungry. In fact, I'd probably ought to go hungry and lose a little weight myself if others were suffering. My food stores would last longer, too :)